Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition

 
Scrap Book
November 25th 1895
to
December 21st 1896
 
606.73+
W 15s
in 8 vols v. 1
Business & Industrial Department
 
B+I Locked Case
PLEASE PRESENT THIS NOTICE WITH YOUR PAYMENT.
Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition
General Offices: PAXTON BUILDING, Sixth Floor, 16th and Farnam Sts.
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT No. 5. STOCK CERTIFICATE No. 1811

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this Corporation, held at the General Offices, on June 19th, 1897, it was ordered that in accordonce with Article IV of the Articles of Incorporation, and in accordance with the terms of all subscription contracts, that

An assessment of twenty (20) per cent. be made, on the subscriptions to and in aid of the Exposition, which assessment shall be due and payable on August 1st, 1897.

On your subscription there is, therefore, DUE AND PAYABLE AUG. 1, '97, 4.00
Make all Checks payable to H. KOUNTZE, Treasurer, and remit same to

To Miss Jeanne Wakefield
John A Wakefield SECRETARY
PROMPT PAYMENT OF ASSESSMENTS IS NECESSARY TO INSURE SUCCESS OF THE EXPOSITION.
Stock Certificates are not issued until fully paid. When issued are "Full Paid and Non-Assessable.'
TRANSMISSISSIPPI & INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION.
PAID
APR 18 1898
Secretary's Check
VOID UNLESS COUNTERSIGNED BY

John A Wakefield
CASHIER
TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION
JUNE 1ST TO NOVEMBER 1ST 1898.
OMAHA, NEB. [?] 1902
$20.006
PAY TO THE ORDER OF [?]
Two Hundred Sixty 0/100 DOLLARS
TO FIRST NATIONAL BANK OMAHA, NEB.

John A Wakefield SECRETARY
 
[(Signature?)?]
 
PLEASE PRESENT THIS NOTICE WITH YOUR PAYMENT.
Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition
General Offices: PAXTON BUILDING, Sixth Floor, 16th and Farnam Sts.
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT No. 5. STOCK CERTIFICATE No. 1811

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this Corporation, held at the General Offices, on June 19th, 1897, it was ordered that in accordonce with Article IV of the Articles of Incorporation, and in accordance with the terms of all subscription contracts, that

An assessment of twenty (20) per cent. be made, on the subscriptions to and in aid of the Exposition, which assessment shall be due and payable on August 1st, 1897.

On your subscription there is, therefore, DUE AND PAYABLE AUG. 1, '97, 4.00
Make all Checks payable to H. KOUNTZE, Treasurer, and remit same to

To Miss Jeanne Wakefield
John A Wakefield SECRETARY
PROMPT PAYMENT OF ASSESSMENTS IS NECESSARY TO INSURE SUCCESS OF THE EXPOSITION.
Stock Certificates are not issued until fully paid. When issued are "Full Paid and Non-Assessable.'
TRANSMISSISSIPPI & INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION.
PAID
APR 18 1898
 
PLEASE PRESENT THIS NOTICE WITH YOUR PAYMENT.
Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition
General Offices: PAXTON BUILDING, Sixth Floor, 16th and Farnam Sts.
NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT No. 5. STOCK CERTIFICATE No. 1811

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of this Corporation, held at the General Offices, on June 19th, 1897, it was ordered that in accordonce with Article IV of the Articles of Incorporation, and in accordance with the terms of all subscription contracts, that

An assessment of twenty (20) per cent. be made, on the subscriptions to and in aid of the Exposition, which assessment shall be due and payable on August 1st, 1897.

On your subscription there is, therefore, DUE AND PAYABLE AUG. 1, '97, 4.00
Make all Checks payable to H. KOUNTZE, Treasurer, and remit same to

To Miss Jeanne Wakefield
John A Wakefield SECRETARY
PROMPT PAYMENT OF ASSESSMENTS IS NECESSARY TO INSURE SUCCESS OF THE EXPOSITION.
Stock Certificates are not issued until fully paid. When issued are "Full Paid and Non-Assessable.'
TRANSMISSISSIPPI & INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION.
PAID
APR 18 1898
 

EVENING BEE.

OMAHA THE EXPOSITION CITY

NAMED BY THE TRANSMISSISSIPPI CONGRESS

Movement for a Great Western Exposition Takes on Shape and is Favored by All of the Members.

Today is the busy day of the Transmississippi congress. A vast amount of business still remains to be transacted, and although the time of the convention is more than half gone, scarcely a beginning has been made in discussing the various resolutions that have poured in since the first day's session. An effort is being made to finish most of the addresses today and with this end in view the congress was called to order an hour earlier than usual this morning. A number of free silver resolutions were read and referred; also a resolution calling upon the railroads to furnish delegates to the next congress a rate of not more than one fare for hte round trip. On motion of Mr. Whitmore the rules were suspended and the latter resolution was adopted, and then came the first real clash of arms of the congress.

Chairman Prince of the committee on resolutions reported favorably on a big bunch of resolutions, among which was the resolution declaring in favor of the free coinage of silver and which was submitted by W. J. Bryan yesterday. At this point John L. Webster of Omaha took the floor in behalf of a minority of the committee and presented the following:

FREE SILVER STRUCK A SNAG

Resolved, That we are in favor of true bimetallism, which consists in the largest possible use of both gold and silver as the standard money of the country compatible with the power of the nation to maintain the equal purchasing and debt-paying power of the two metals.

Resolved, That we are emphatically opposed to the free and unlimited coinage of silver a the ratio of 16 to 1, under present existing conditions; that such coinage would destroy the parity between the two metals; that the silver would drive the gold out of circulation, and thus destroy bimetallism and produce silver mono-metallism; therefore, be it further.

Resolved, That we believe this long continued agitation of the silver question has had much to do with the present financial depression, producing want of confidence, threatening the stability and permanency of price, and is a constant menace to he national credit, exciting apprehension abroad and uncertainty at home.

The discussion of the two reports was made an order of business later in the day.

RESOLVED FOR MANY THINGS

Resolutions were then adopted declaring in favor of a strict enforcement of the Monroe doctrine and the completion of the Nicaragua canal under the direct supervision and control of the government; demanding this recognition of the Cubans as belligerents; the admission of New Mexico as a state; the appropriation of $500,000 by the next national congress for the purpose of an irrigation survey of the arid and semi-arid regions of the west; declaring for the immediate foreclosure of government mortgages on the Pacific roads, or else a reorganization on such lines as would only allow the railroads a reasonable degree of profit. W. J. Carlson of California presented a minority report on the latter resolution, in which he pointed out the utility of the railroads in developing the west, and urged that a settlement be effected on the merits of the case. The resolution was championed by President Bryan, who had originally introduced it. HE declared that the Union Pacific railroad was the most iniquitous corporation in this country. It had robbed the people, and even attempted to intimidate the United States courts. There was no reason why a congress of western business men should not go on record in opposition to this gigantic burden on the people. Mr. Carlson spoke at length in favor of the minority report, and after some further discussion and a general ventilation of opinions, both reports were referred back to the committee to see if they could not agree on a compromise report.

BRYAN TALKS FOR OMAHA

Resolutions were also adopted in favor of a congressional appropriation for defending the harbor of San Diego by war vessels and fortifications, for the improvement of waterways and for a deep water harbor at San Pedro. A long resolution urging the various state governments to take legislative action relative to irrigation was submitted and referred.

The committee on ways and means recommended that the sum of $2 be assessed against each member of the congress for general expenses. Adopted.

At his point in the proceedings President Bryan asked unanimous consent to introduce the following memorial in behalf of the Nebraska delegation.

Whereas, We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the states west of the Mississippi river, made at some central gateway where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth-producing states, would be of great value, not only to the Transmississippi states, but to all the homeseekers in the world; therefor, be it

Resolved, That the United States congress be asked to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Transmississippi exposition in Omaha during the months of August, September and October in the year 1898, and that representatives of such states and territories in congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases to assist in carrying out this enterprise.

RECEIVED WITH ENTHUSIASM

In explanation of the motion Mr. Bryan spoke briefly on the advantages which such an expansion would create for the west. The people of the east had no conception of the resources of the west. When they visited Chicago they thought that that was as far west as civilization extended. Such an exposition as was projected would bring thousands of these people to view the actual possibilities of the Transmississippi states.

Colonel John Doniphan of St. Louis​ urged the adoption of the resolution. He said no more appropriate place than Omaha could be selected at which to give an exposition of the growth, the products and the weather of the western country. Omaha was in itself a realization of the fondest dreams of the early statesmen of this nation. He briefly related the history of Nebraska and the surrounding states of which Omaha was once of the grandest triumphs. He urged unanimous action by the congress in favor of the resolution. His eloquent tribute to the west was received with hearty applause.

H. R. Whitmore

St Louis
spoke of the manner in which Omaha had entertained the congress and said that the least the delegates could do was to unanimously pass the resolution.

Rev. S. Wright Butler explained that it had been a pleasure for the people of Omaha to prepare for the entertainment of the congress, and then proceeded to put the delegates in good humor by a few very pertinent witticisms, which stoked roars of laughter.

George Q. Cannon also seconded this proposition, and by this time a pronounced enthusiasm was manifested all over the hall.

THEY ALL VOTED FOR OMAHA

Mr. Cannon said that fifty years ago he had roamed over he hills here Omaha now stands. Then the Indians occupied the territory undisturbed, and now he marveled to see the structures that had grown on the then barbecue soil in this half century. He declared that the city hall and The Bee building had impressed him with the enterprise of Omaha, and the disposition of its citizens to build up a great city on the banks of the Missouri.

Other speakers expressed similar sentiments, and then the resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote, and amidst prolonged applause.

Mr. Bryan thanked the members of the congress for their enthusiastic support, and expressed the hope that they would never be compelled to regret their action.

It was nearly 12 o'clock when the regular order was reached. The first address was by Howell Jones of Topeka, Kan., who spoke on "The Advantage of Waterways to the Farmer." He took the ground that it was not more crops for the markets that the farmer needed, but more markets for the crops. The problem of shorter routes to the seaboard and to the Gulf of Mexico

 

FAVORING OMAHA'S EXPOSITION

Banquet at Council Bluffs Where the Enterprise Was Discussed

The magnificent banquet at the Grand hotel, Council Bluffs, under the auspices of the Merchants' and Manufacturers' association has awakened a deep and general interest in the Transmississippi exposition enterprise. Everywhere, among all classes of people, only favorable comment was heard yesterday. All may be counted upon to induce the legislature to recognize the scheme and make the necessary appropriation. The only appropriation to be asked for is a sum sufficient to erect a suitable building in which the Iowa exhibit can be made. Not a dollar will be asked to help the work in any other way. It is felt to be a sure thing that if the Iowa legislature takes the proper steps toward recognizing the exposition, all other states will follow and its success will be assured.

President Odell selected the committee of eleven authorized by the Grand hotel meeting. These men are to act in conjunction with the same number of men appointed by the Commercial club of Omaha, and the whole number of twenty-two will constitute the executive committee, which will have the management of the big exposition when it is held.

President Odell, in notifying the gentlemen selected, sent to each the following business-like letter:

"Dear Sir: At a meeting of the Merchants' and Manufacturers' association held in the Grand hotel on the 22d inst., a resolution was adopted instructing me to select a committee of eleven members to cooperate with a similar committee appointed in Omaha to arrange and carry forward the project of a Transmississippi exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898. The resolution was suggested by members of the Omaha committee who were present at the meeting, and who assured our association that such a committee was declared by the,. I was given twenty-four hours in which to make up this committee and report it to the association. I have made the selection from members whom I think best qualified to perform the various duties that will from time to time devolve upon them, and in the list you will find your name."

A. S. Hazelton, Thomas Bowman, George F. Wright, J. J. Steadman, W. J. M. Pusey, M. F. Rohrer, W. W. Loomis, T. C. Dawson, William Moore, E. W. Hart and Victor E. Bender.

PUSHING THE EXPOSITION

Meeting of the Directors with Council Bluffs Committee Last Night.

NUMBER OF PLANS ARE DISCUSSED

Bureau of Information to Be Established—Iowa Legislature Will Be Visited—National Aid Confidently Expected.

The board of directors of the Transmississippi and International exposition and A. S. Hazelton, M. F. Rohrer, Mayor Cleaver, T. C. Dawson, W. W. Loomis, William Moore, E. H. O'Dell, E. W. Hart and Victor Bender, members of the Council Bluffs committee, gathered about the banquet board in the Commercial club rooms last night. After discussing the menu, they gave the coming exposition a boost.

President Wattles of the Exposition company explained the object of the gathering by saying that while it was for the purpose of promoting and cementing the bonds of good fellowship between Omaha and Council Bluffs, it was also for the purpose of exchanging ideas concerning the best methods of preparing the preliminaries of the big show.

A. S. Hazelton of Council Bluffs stated that his city was ready to take hold of the matter and push it with influence, time and money. He said that he felt that anything that would help the great west would at he same time prove of lasting benefit to his city.

E. H. O'Dell urged that the time was ripe for action, and that steps should be taken at once to place the plans of holding the exposition before congress and the legislatures of Iowa and Utah. He felt that not only the state of Iowa would lend its assistance, but that every town and city would feel in duty bound to assist in making the exposition the greatest success of the age.

COUNCIL BLUFFS READY.

M. F. Rohrer said that Council Bluffs could be depended upon to do its share. He urged that all of the members of the Transmississippi congress which convened in this city last November should be made to feel that the proposed exposition was largely due to their efforts, as it was that organization which first inaugurated the scheme.

G. H. Payne favored the plan of sending excursions to the cities in Iowa and adjoining states for the purpose of interesting the people in the exposition. The plan was frowned upon, the sentiment prevailing that more good could be accomplished through the newspapers.

The resolution adopted by the Transmississippi congress when it was in session in this city was read and adopted by the board of directors and the committee.

Mayor leaver of Council Bluffs said that the holding of the exposition was a stupendous undertaking and an important affair. :We must keep in touch with every member of the Transmississippi congress,: he urges, "for it was through the efforts of that boyd that the scheme was first given birth. Those men brought it about, and I am sure that now they will stand by it to the end. If we can secure the combined efforts of the delegates to that congress, we can feel assured that the exposition will be a success. There is a vast amount of work to be done and to accomplish results, we must all work in harmony, and never allow the idea to prevail that this is a local affair. We mush not feel that the exposition is for Omaha, Council Bluffs, Nebraska, or Iowa, but instead, we must feel that it is the interest of every city west of the Mississippi river."

J. A. Wakefield spike in favor of united effort, and urged that the plans for the exposition be called to the attention of the Chamber of Commerce and the Board of Trade of Sioux City. He paid a tribute to the city at the mouth of Perry creek by declaring that the residents were always ready to take hold of a good thing, assisting with their money and their enterprise.

Dudley Smith said that he was heartily in favor of corresponding with the members of the Transmississippi congress and asking the members to put their shoulders to the wheel and give it a push. He thought that it would be a good plan to send a committee to Des Moines and call the attention of the Iowa legislature to the magnitude of the scheme. A resolution favoring the holding of the exposition , Mr. Smith thought, should be adopted by the legislature.

C. S. Montgomery urged that steps should be taken to get the matter properly before the Iowa legislature and in his judgement the thing to do was to have a committee appointed, not as lobbyists, but for the purpose of presenting the facts. "The exposition," said Mr. Montgomery, "should be supported by every state west of the Mississippi river.

"A bill looking to the securing of an appropriation of $50,000 has been introduced in congress by Senator Allen. Senator Thurston is ready and will do all in his power to push the matter along. The newly elected senators from Utah are with us. The $50,000 is only a start and before the end of reached we expect an appropriation of $150,000, $50,000 for the building and $100,000 for an exhibit. My judgement is that the senators from all of the states west of the Mississippi should meet and agree upon a line of action, and I understand that this will be done when the matter is properly called to their attention."

At this point Mr. Montgomery moved that a committee of three or five be appointed with the concurrence of the Council Bluffs Committee to go to Des Moines and interest the members of the Iowa legislature and the newspapers of the state.

Dan Farrell, jr., was of the opinion that the Council Bluffs committee could look after the Iowa plans.

Mr. Montgomery's motion was adopted and President Wattles announced that he would name the committee at some later date.

BUREAU OF INFORMATION

Mr. Montgomery then moved that a committee of three or five be appointed to furnish information for the press and the public concerning the exposition, the committee to correspond with governors of states and mayors of cities in the transmississippi states. The motion prevailed and the president announced that he would name the committees in due time.

World Herald-

WANT THE EXPOSITION

The south siders want to have the trans-Mississippi exposition held at Riverside park, claiming that is a better point for it then the fair grounds. The South Side Improvement Club will discuss, methods of accomplishing this at its next meeting Monday night.

This means Monday, Feb 3rd
OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY BUSINESS & INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT
 

NEITHER TRUE NOR NEIGHBORLY.

Beside trying to pry open the United States treasury in aid of a mid-continent exposition, Omaha has a delegation on hand at Des Moines attempting to break into the state treasury of Iowa by means of an appropriation by the legislature now in session. The indications are that it will not be an easy job to induce the legislature to any liberality of that kind. A large number of the leading newspapers in that state have taken alarm, and in terms that have only one meaning are warning the legislature of the consequences of any such extravagance in favor of a city in a neighboring state. The trouble at the bottom of this whole matter is that for the last twenty years, Nebraska and Nebraska cities have been largely built up at the expense of Iowa and Iowa cities. Iowa, in that period, has pursued an intensely illiberal course in regard to the liquor question, which as had a marked unfavorable influence upon immigration, while Nebraska has pursued a contrary course upon that question. It has engendered a resentment that shows itself upon all occasions like the present, when Iowa is asked to aid financially in the matter of a mid-continent exposition, to be held at Omaha, immediately across the river from one of Iowa's chief cities, which has suffered most from the illiberal act of the state on the whisky question. If Iowa stands aloof from the exposition it will be difficult, and, perhaps, an impossible task to make the mid-continent exposition materialize in 1898, as now contemplated—St. Paul Dispatch.

The leading newspapers of Iowa have not antagonized the transmississippi congress project. In fact Iowa, like most other western states interested, shows a disposition to join in the enterprise.

Omaha does not give this exposition, and is not therefore asking for help.

Omaha is merely the place selected by the late transmississippi congress as the place where western states would hold an exposition.

Being so selected Omaha must bear the larger share of the burdens of the enterprise in the hope of being reimbursed in whole or in part by the benefits, direct or indirect.

Atlanta lost money by her experience with the southern states exposition. Omaha takes her chances.

The part the western states play in the enterprise is that which any partner plays. Each state will have its building and its exhibit. It will make its appropriation, not to help Omaha, but o be represented and help itself. The federal exhibit which congress is asked to provide is not to help Omaha, but to help the west. It is to be educational—to show to the people of the west those things which are connected with the government and which cannot otherwise be seen without a visit to Washington.

The St. Paul Dispatch should show a more liberal spirit—a more fair minded nature. Its owner, Mr. Thompson, is a liberal man, public spirited and enterprising. He should remember also that Nebraska assisted by her votes in locating the republication national convention in Minneapolis four years ago.

[?] 75 W Jackson St Chicago, Ill.

OMAHA'S BIG FAIR TAKING SHAPE

Work Begins for the Trans-Mississippi Exposition of 1898.

Nebraska's Metropolis Promises to Get Up a Grand Exhibit.

OMAHA, Neb., Jan. 23—The trans-Mississippi congress, which met in Omaha Nov. 25 last, adopted resolutions unanimously concurred in by delegates present from the trans-Mississippi states, locating the proposed trans-Mississippi exposition in 1898 at Omaha.

From that day leading men in Omaha and the congressional delegation from Nebraska have been busily engaged in pushing preliminary work incident to a full organization

GORDON W. WATTLES, PRESIDENT
of working forces. The exposition will not be, strictly speaking, an Omaha enterprise. The articles which were adopted at an enthusiastic mass meeting of Omaha citizens recently contemplate an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the states and territories of the United Sates west of the Mississippi ricer, and also such exhibits as may be provided in the United States in any state of the union or any foreign country, for the purpose particularly of exhibiting to the world the products and capabilities of said states and territories. The articles provide that the exposition shall be opened in June and closed in November, 1898. The responsibility for the success of the enterprise must therefore devolve upon the vast empire embracing the western and Rocky mountain states.

The people of this city and state, however, are determined that the project shall be pushed to a successful issue. It was left to them to take the initiative and to put the machinery in motion. To this task the citizens of Omaha have addressed themselves with energy and enthusiasm. The corporation is organized with a capital stock of $1,000,000, with shares at $10, there being a provision that when $10,000 of the stock shall have been subscribed business shall be commenced.

JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, SECRETARY
At a recent meeting nearly $11,000 was subscribed by those present within a few minutes and strong committees named to secure further subscriptions. A board of eleven directors, as provided, was named, among them being the active and influential business men of the city. This board elected as their president G. W. Wattles, and as secretary John A. Wakefield.

The first work to be assumed is that of enlisting the support of state legislatures in the trans-Mississippi states. Influential men will in a day or two be named as a committee to wait upon the legislature now in session in Iowa, and that of Utah, to present the merits and objects of the Trans-Mississippi exposition in person, and to solicit moral and substantial support from these states. Next winter the legislatures of all the western states will be visited in like manner. The hope and purpose is to secure an appropriation from each of these states.

 
GURDON W. WATTLES, President. JACOB B. MARKEL., Vice-President. HERMAN KOUNTZE, Treasurer. JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, Secretary.
DIRECTORS: GURDON W. WATTLES, JACOB E MARKET, WM. R. BENNET, JOHN H. EVANS, DUDLEY SMITH, DAN. FARRELL, JR., GEORGE H. PAYNE, CHARLES METZ, ISAAC W. CARPENTER, HENRY A. THOMPSON, CARROLL S. MONTGOMERY.
TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION .. TO BE HELD AT OMAHA .. Beginning in June, and Ending in November in the year 1898
Omaha, Neb., Feb. 28th, 1896
Commercial Club, Pueblo Colo.
Gentlemen:--

Herewith please find letter advising you that it is proposed to hold a great Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha in 1898, and giving the action of the Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress as basis therefore, and asking your aid and influence with your representatives in Congress, toward securing adequate and generous appropriations for a National Building and a National Exhibit. Almost every section of our great country has been thus aided except this great Trans-Mississippi Territory, and the time seems opportune for the holding of an Exposition which shall particularly show to the world, the products and resources of this great section. Comprising, as it does, almost two thirds of the territory of the United States, and one-third of the whole population, it is desired to impress upon Congress the desire of our people for recognition and appreciation of this exposition, and to this end, we request that your body pass fitting Resolutions, setting forth your desires, and requesting Congress to pass the needful legislation in recognition and aid thereof.

We shall be obliged indeed if copy of the Resolutions be sent to your Representatives in Congress, and a copy sent, also, to this office.

Time is the essence of action and for good results, and we trust your action may be timely and commendatory.

Very respectfully,


John A Wakefield Sec'y
 
GURDON W. WATTLES, President. JACOB B. MARKEL., Vice-President. HERMAN KOUNTZE, Treasurer. JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, Secretary.
DIRECTORS: GURDON W. WATTLES, JACOB E MARKET, WM. R. BENNET, JOHN H. EVANS, DUDLEY SMITH, DAN. FARRELL, JR., GEORGE H. PAYNE, CHARLES METZ, ISAAC W. CARPENTER, HENRY A. THOMPSON, CARROLL S. MONTGOMERY.
TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION .. TO BE HELD AT OMAHA .. Beginning in June, and Ending in November in the year 1898
Omaha, Neb., Feb. 28th, 1896
Commercial Club, Pueblo Colo.
Dear Sir:—

At the last session of the Trans-Mississippi Congress, which was held in Omaha in the month of November, 1895, the following resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote:

"WHEREAS, We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the States west of the Mississippi River, made at some central gateway, where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth-producing States, would be of great value, not only to the Trans-Mississippi States, but to all the home-seekers of the world, therefore,

RESOLVED, That the United States Congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha during the months of August, September and October, in the year 1898, and that the representatives of such States and Territories in Congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases, to assist in carrying out his enterprise."

For the purpose of facilitating the work of the proposed exposition, a corporation has been organized under the style of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition. Articles of association have been adopted, a copy of which we herewith enclose. The amount of capital stock necessary to begin business has been more than subscribed. Officers and directors have been elected, as noted above, and we are now ready for active work.

A bill has been introduced in Congress, asking for recognition from the National Government , and an appropriation for a government building and a national exhibit. We earnestly invite your aid in securing legalization form Congress at its present session. We hope you will realize the importance of this matter and correspond at once with your senators and representatives, urging upon them the necessity of prompt and liberal action. The great Trans-Mississippi country, with its vast undeveloped resources should not hesitate to ask for liberal recognition for an exposition of this character. We invite your co-operation in securing it.

It is the desire of this organization that steps be taken in each of hte Trans-Mississippi Sates and Territories to recognize this enterprise, and to secure such legislation as may be necessary to properly exhibit the resources and products of the respective States and Territories. Organization is earnestly requested, and we invite correspondence and solicit your aid in making this exposition a complete success.

No such opportunity has ever before been offered the great west to advertise its resources and products to the world as this exposition will afford. Respectfully,

Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.


John A Wakefield Sec'y
 
GURDON W. WATTLES, President. JACOB B. MARKEL., Vice-President. HERMAN KOUNTZE, Treasurer. JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, Secretary.
DIRECTORS: GURDON W. WATTLES, JACOB E MARKET, WM. R. BENNET, JOHN H. EVANS, DUDLEY SMITH, DAN. FARRELL, JR., GEORGE H. PAYNE, CHARLES METZ, ISAAC W. CARPENTER, HENRY A. THOMPSON, CARROLL S. MONTGOMERY.
Omaha, Neb., Feb. 14th, 1896
Dear Sir:--

On reference to Article VII.-Directors and Officers,- of the Articles of Incorporation of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, enclosed herewith, you will notice that article provides for twenty-five vice-presidents. "One vice-president shall be constituted by the election of a vice-president for each state State and Territory west of the Mississippi River."

It has been decided by the Directors to request Governors of the Trans-Mississippi States and Territories to nominate parties for vice-president for such State or Territory upon being elected by this Board of Directors.

We shall withing the next few days write each of the Governors requesting that they make nominations for said vice-presidents, and we suggest to your that if you have any recommendations to make in the matter that you consider same carefully and send your recommendation to your Governor for his consideration and guidance as early as possible.

Respectfully yours,


John A Wakefield Sec'y.
 
GURDON W. WATTLES, President. JACOB B. MARKEL., Vice-President. HERMAN KOUNTZE, Treasurer. JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, Secretary.
DIRECTORS: GURDON W. WATTLES, JACOB E MARKET, WM. R. BENNET, JOHN H. EVANS, DUDLEY SMITH, DAN. FARRELL, JR., GEORGE H. PAYNE, CHARLES METZ, ISAAC W. CARPENTER, HENRY A. THOMPSON, CARROLL S. MONTGOMERY.
Omaha, Neb., Jan. 31, 1896
... letter affirmed at meeting- Jan 31st '96 to ... to Law makers and influential men in the Trans. Miss. states + territories.
Dear Sir:-

At the last session of the Trans-Mississippi Congress, which was held in Omaha in the month of November, 1895, the following resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote:

"WHEREAS, We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the States west of the Mississippi River, made at some central gateway, where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth-producing States, would be of great value, not only to the Trans-Mississippi States, but to all the home-seekers of the world, therefore,

RESOLVED, That the United States Congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha during the months of August, September and October, in the year 1898, and that the representatives of such States and Territories in Congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases, to assist in carrying out his enterprise."

For the purpose of facilitating the work of the proposed exposition, a corporation has been organized under the style of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition. Articles of association have been adopted, a copy of which we herewith enclose. The amount of capital stock necessary to begin business has been more than subscribed. Officers and directors have been elected, as noted above, and we are now ready for active work.

A bill has been introduced in Congress, asking for recognition from the National Government, and an appropriation for a government building and a national exhibit. We earnestly invite your aid in securing legalization form Congress at its present session. We hope you will realize the importance of this matter and correspond at once with your senators and representatives, urging upon them the necessity of prompt and liberal action. The great Trans-Mississippi country, with its vast undeveloped resources should not hesitate to ask for liberal recognition for an exposition of this character. We invite your co-operation in securing it.

 
GURDON W. WATTLES, President. JACOB B. MARKEL., Vice-President. HERMAN KOUNTZE, Treasurer. JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, Secretary.
DIRECTORS: GURDON W. WATTLES, JACOB E MARKET, WM. R. BENNET, JOHN H. EVANS, DUDLEY SMITH, DAN. FARRELL, JR., GEORGE H. PAYNE, CHARLES METZ, ISAAC W. CARPENTER, HENRY A. THOMPSON, CARROLL S. MONTGOMERY.
Omaha, Neb., _________ 1896

It is the desire of this organization that steps be taken in each of the Trans-Mississippi Sates and Territories to recognize this enterprise, and to secure such legislation as may be necessary to properly exhibit the resources and products of the respective States and Territories. Organization is earnestly requested, and we invite correspondence and solicit your aid in making this exposition a complete success. No such opportunity has ever before been offered the great west to advertise its resources and products to the world as this exposition will afford.

Respectfully,

 

See next page
 

Sunday World-Herald.

AN INDEPENDENT PAPER.

STAND UP FOR OMAHA.

The Trans-Mississippi Exposition.

(Chicago Tribune.)

A movement is on foot to hold a trans-Mississippi exposition at Omaha in 1898, to be open six months. The purpose is to make a grand display of the resources of the whole country, by especially of the twenty-four states and territories west of the Mississippi river. It is the intention to let the world see what a magnificent region west of Chicago there is still to be developed and made the home of many millions of happy, prosperous people. It is hoped to make the exhibit as a whole second only in splendor to the great World's fair which was held in this city in 1893, and no effort will be spared to make it take rank in history.

The population of the states and territories west of the Mississippi river increased from 5,665,683 in 1870 to 14,215,409 in 1890, the proportion for the extremes of the twenty-year period being about 100 to 250. The gain in wealth was far greater, and the increase since 1890 is a large one. Roughly speaking one may say the population is three times that of a quarter of a century ago, which was soon after the completion of the Pacific railroad connection between the east and the far west. The development of that vast area has not much more than begun. Not only the precious metals but other minerals are being taken from the ground in vast quantities, and the artificial irrigation of soil in the semi-arid regions is being pushed with a vigor that promises soon to bring under cultivation untold millions of acres that a few years ago were vaguely alluded to as constituting a part of the "Great American Desert," never to be made of use to man, Twenty-five years since Nebraska, on the eastern edge of which the exposition of 1898 will be held, was thinly settled, with little or nothing beyond the distance of 150 miles west from the Missouri river, and west of that was literally a wilderness. Nebraska, now contains more than 1,000,000 people, with 1,000,000 acres of land under irrigation, and barns and farm houses extend all the way from the Missouri to Cheyenne. The then territories now are states, though not all of them merit that distinction. The population of Nevada was less than 46,000 in 1890, and now does not much exceed that total.

The population of Chicago has increased at even a greater pace. The census total for 1870 was 296,977 and that for 1890 was 1,208,669, or more than four times greater. The 1,750,000 persons now estimated to reside within the limits of Chicago are nearly six times as many as those of 1870. This similarity of development is far from being merely accidental. Chicago has been and still is the principal market of the vast trans-Mississippi area, and there is no reason to think it will not continue to be so, though several minor centers have sprung up and others may arise while the population of the area west of this city is trebling and quadrupling as it must be expected to do in the course of the next few years. Undoubtedly this further filling up will be reflected into this city as its principal focus, though the similar cities of Omaha, Kansas City, Denver, Salt Lake City, Minneapolis and St. Paul, Des Moines and St, Louis also will share in the development. So Chicago is greatly interested in all that tends to foster the industrial activities of the area beyond the Mississippi, and its people, with those of other portions of Illinois, ought to take an active part in the exposition. A local company has been organized at Omaha for preliminary work, but each state will be asked to recognize and cooperate, and a bill offered by Senator Allen now is pending in congress, the object of which is to make the work of the organized directory more comprehensive and effective than it otherwise would be.

Senate Bill - 1306 Introduced Jan. 3rd 1896 By Senator Allan.
Sunday Bee- Feb 2nd 1896

OMAHA EXPOSITION BILL

Full Text of it as Introduced by Senator Allen.

SHARE THE GOVERNMENT MAY TAKE

Measure Provides for a Building and Exhibit by the United States—Local Movement is Active.

Members of the Transmississippi Exposition association are now beginning their work in earnest, looking to the holding of the exposition in this city in the summer and fall of 1898. The officers of the association have been elected, committees have been appointed and meetings to devise ways and means to push the project are being held almost daily. Encouragement is being received from many of the states of the transmississippi country, and the projectors of the big show feel assured that they will meet with success in their undertaking.

The bill providing for the holding of the Transmississippi exposition was introduced in the United States senate by Senator Allen January 3, read twice and referred to the select committee on international expositions, of which Senator Thurston is the chairman. The bill is:

A bill to authorize and encourage the holding of a Transmississippi exposition at the city of Omaha, in the state of Nebraska, in the year 1898, and make an appropriation therefor.

Whereas, It is desirable to encourage the holding of a Transmississippi exposition at the city of Omaha, in the state of Nebraska, in the year 1898, for the exhibition of the resources of the United States of America and the progress and civilization of the western hemisphere, and for a display of the arts, industries, manufacturers and products of the soil, mine and sea; and

Whereas, Encouragement should be given to an exhibit of the arts, industries, manufacturers and products, illustrative of the progress and development of that and other sections of the country: and

Whereas, Such exposition should be national as well as international in its character, in which the people of this country, of Mexico, the Central and South American governments, and other states of the world should participate, and should, therefore, have the sanction of the congress of the United States; and

Whereas, It is desirable and will be highly beneficial to bring together at such an exposition, to be held at a central position in the western part of the United States, the people of the United States and other states of this continent; and

Whereas, The Transmississippi Exposition association has undertaken to hold such exposition, beginning on the first day of August, 1898, and closing on the first day of October, 1898; therefore

Be it Enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress Assembled, That a Transmississippi exposition shall be held at the city of Omaha, in the state of Nebraska, in the year 1898, under the auspices of the Transmississippi Exposition association: Provided, That the United States shall not be liable for any of the expense attending or incident to such exposition, nor by reason of the same.

Sec. 2. That all articles which shall be imported from foreign countries for the sole purpose of exhibition at said exposition upon which there shall be a tariff or customs duty shall be admitted free of payment of duty, customs fees, or charges under such regulation as the secretary of the treasury shall prescribe; but it shall be lawful at any time during the exhibition to sell for delivery at the close thereof any goods or property imported for and actually on exhibition in the exposition building or on the grounds, subject to such regulation for the security of the revenue and for the collection of import duties as the secretary of the treasury shall prescribe: Provided. That all such articles when sold or withdrawn for consumption in the United States shall be subject to the duty, if any, imposed upon such article by the revenue laws in force at the ate of importation, and all penalties prescribed by law shall be applied and enforced against the persons who may be guilty of any illegal sale or withdrawal.

Sec. 3. That there shall be exhibited at said exposition by the government of the United States, from its executive departments, the Smithsonian Institution, the United States Fish commission and the National museum, such articles and material as illustrate the function and administrative faculty of the government in time of peace, and its resources as a war power, tending to demonstrate the nature of our institutions and their adaptations to the wants of the people; and to secure a complete and harmonious arrangement of such government exhibit a board shall be created, to be charged with the selection, preparation, arrangement, safe keeping and exhibition of such articles and materials as the heads of the several departments and the directors of the Smithsonian Institution and National museum nay respectively decide shall be embraced in said government exhibit. The president may also designate additional articles for exhibition. Such board shall be composed of one person, to be named by the head of each executive department and museum and by the president of the United States. The president shall name the chairman of said board, and the board itself shall select such other officers as it may deem necessary.

Sec 4. That the secretary of the treasury shall cause a suitable building or buildings to be erected on the site selected for the Transmississippi exposition for the government exhibits, and he is hereby authorized and directed to contract therfor, in the same manner and under the same regulations as for other public buildings of the United States; but the contract for said building or buildings, of the United States; but the contract for said building or buildings shall not exceed the sum of $50,000 and for the and for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896, there is hereby appropriated for said building or buildings, out of any money in the United Sates treasury not otherwise appropriated, the sum of $50,000. The secretary of the treasury is authorized and required to dispose of such building or buildings, or the material composing the same, at the close of the exposition, giving preference to the city of Omaha, or to the said Transmississippi Exposition association to purchase the same at an appraised value to be ascertained in such manner as my be determined by the secretary of the treasury.

Sec. 5 That for the purpose of paying the expense of transportation, care and custody of exhibits by the government and the maintenance of the building or buildings herein before provided for, and the safe return of articles belonging to the said government exhibit, and other contingent expenses, to be approved by the secretary of the treasury upon itemized accounts and vouchers, there is hereby appropriated for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1896, out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, the sum of $20,000 or so much thereof as may be necessary: Provided. That the United States shall not be liable on account of the erection of buildings, expenses of the commission account of any expenses incident to or growing out of said exposition for a sum exceeding in the aggregate * * * * hundred thousand dollars.

Sec. 6. That the commission appointed under the act shall not be entitled to any compensation for their services out of the treasury of hte United States, except their actual expenses for transportation and the sum of * * * dollars per day for subsistence for each day they are necessarily absent from home on the business of said commission. The officers of said commission shall receive such compensation as may be fixed by said commission, subject to the approval of the secretary of the treasury, which shall be paid out of the sums appropriated by congress in aid of such exposition.

Sec. 7. That medals, with appropriate devices, emblems and inscriptions commemorative of said Transmississippi exposition and of the awards to be made to the exhibitors thereat, shall be prepared at some mint of the United States, for the board of directors thereof, subject to the provisions, whether penal or, otherwise, of said coinage act against the counterfeiting or imitations of coins of the United States shall apply to the medals struck and issued under this act.

Sec. 8. That the United States shall not in any manner, nor under and circumstances, be liable for nay of the acts, doings, proceedings or representations of said Transmississippi Exposition association, its officers, agents, servants or employes, or any of them, or for the service, salaries, labor or wages of said officers, agents, servants or employes, or any of them , or for nay subscriptions to the capital stock, r for nay certificates of stock bonds, mortgages, or obligation of any kind issued by said corporation, or for nay debts, liabilities or expenses of any kind whatever attending such corporation or accruing by reason of the same.

That nothing in this act shall be so construed as to create any liability of hte United States, direct or indirect, for any debt or obligation incurred, nor for any claim for aid or pecuniary assistance from congress or the treasury of the United States in support or liquidation of any debts or obligations created by said commission in excess of appropriations made by congress therefor.

 
Form 470-5m
Circulation: Weekly, 156,000: Sunday, 25,000: Daily, 20,000.
Office of Managing Editor Clark Howell.
THE CONSTITUTION.
Atlanta, Ga. Jan. 31st, 1896.
Mr. G. H. Hitchcock, Pres. World Publishing Co., Omaha Neb.
Dear Sir:

Replying to yours of the 27th inst., I send you by this mail a copy of the Constitution containing the official report of the amount of receipts from all sources, for the Cotton States and International Exposition. This answers your first question.

Replying to your second question the total amount appropriated fro the exposition was as follows:- By the city $75,000; by the country, work from the county convicts in grading etc. to the value of $75,000 the county being Constitutionally inhibited in making a direct appropriation; from the state $17,500 and from the federal government, $200,000. Eight other states made appropriations for state displays; these appropriations ranging form $15,000 to $38,000.

Replying to your third question, the total amount of disbursements &c. cannot be exactly ascertained until the report of the finance committee is presented, which will be done in the course of a few days. The total amount of such disbursements, however, did not exceed the total receipts more than about $25,000-- that is, it will not when we have realized on the remaining assets now in hand. This difference will be made good by the directors and the exposition will make settlement for every dollar it owes.

As to my opinion on the profit derived by the city from the exposition, there is no possible doubt that the investment paid a hundred dollars for every one made by the city and by individual subscribers. In addition tot he subscriptions above mentioned, the personal cash subscription raised in the city amounted to $125,000. When the official report of the finance committee is submitted, I will see that you are provided with a copy of the same.

Very truly yours,
Clark Howell

RESOLVED, That we look with favor upon the plan to hold a Transmississippi Congress and International Exposition at Omaha, in 1898.

Passed unanimously by the Upper Des Moines Editorial Association at its meeting at Boone, Iowa, Feb. 7, 1896.

 

AT THE WIND UP

How the Exposition Came Out in Money Matters.

SOME FACTS AND FINANCE

The Attendance Not As Large As Expected.

FINANCIAL STORY OF THE FAIR

Detailed Account of All the Receipts Since First Day.

WHAT THE TOTAL RECEIPTS ARE

A Valuable List, Giving Each Day's Returns from All Sources—An Interesting Study

The Constitution gives today the financial story of the fair.

The receipts from every source for every day are given, and they make a study of absorbing interest.

Will the Cotton States and International exposition pay out?

When a member of the board of directors or any other exposition official is seen on the street this is the first question fired at him. Everywhere there is the keenest interest over the financial result of the fair.

"All we lacked," said Mr. Sam Inman yesterday morning, "was the attendance of 500,000 more people."

"When all our assets are counted in I think the gap will be covered up," said President Collier.

From the tone of the estimates given by the most prominent directors there is a sanguine spirit over the financial result, and while the attendance did not come up by many thousands to the original estimate, yet through the close economy and splendid management of the finance committee the affairs of the fair are not in such a dilapidated condition as they promised to be several months ago.

Taking in the reports from all departments the total receipts will amount to $487,621.85.

The figures yesterday in Chief Felder's office showed a total attendance during the fair of 1,286.863.

The attendance in detail was shown as follows:

1,287,863
Paid admissions, adults738,115
Paid admissions, children79,813
Passes434,935
Wagon gates35,000

This is up to the attendance of the last day and is approximately correct.

The Story of the Fair.

Here is the financial story of the fair. Here are the daily receipts coming to the exposition from all sources except subscriptions and other minor features. Here can be seen the rise and fall of attendance from day to day. Every financial feature of the fair, as far as the receipts are concerned, is given:

September Eighteenth.
Admissions$3,249.45
Concessions1,182.35
Total$ 4,431.80
September Nineteenth.
Admissions1,443.30
Concessions32.00
Miscellaneous60.00
Total1,535.30
September Twentieth.
Admissions1.302.25
Concessions531.48
Electricity407.50
Miscellaneous70.00
Total2,311.13
September Twenty-First.
Admissions2.232.50
Concessions311.67
Electricity320.90
Total2,865.07
September Twenty-Third.
Admissions1,483.25
Concessions184.25
Electricity17.90
Miscellaneous15.00
Total1,700.40
September Twenty-Fourth.
Admissions1,139.75
Concessions925.06
Total2,074.81
September Twenty-Fifth.
Admissions1,740.00
Concessions670.30
Electricity2.75
Miscellaneous250.00
Total2,663.05
September Twenty-Sixth.
Admissions1,023.75
Concessions489.04
Miscellaneous195.00
Electricity58.75
Total1,706.54
September Twenty-Seventh.
Admissions1,023.00
Concessions884.67
Miscellaneous60.00
Electricity288.17
Total2,225.84
September Twenty-Eighth.
Admissions2,694.25
Concessions410.50
Miscellaneous166.52
Electricity63.25
Total3,334.52
September Thirtieth.
Admissions1,203.75
Concessions1,215.53
Miscellaneous105.00
Electricity240.75
Total2,764.03
October First.
Admissions994.00
Concessions865.96
Miscellaneous15.00
Electricity7.50
Total1,882.46
October Second.
Admissions1,816.25
Concessions340.99
Miscellaneous362.25
Electricity381.92
Total2,901.41
October Third.
Admissions1,110.25
Concessions1,264.85
Miscellaneous59.25
Total2,434.35
October Fourth.
Admissions1,101.25
Concessions525.12
Miscellaneous41.60
Electricity76.25
Total1,744.22
October Fifth.
Admissions2,857.25
Concessions425.64
Miscellaneous67.00
Electricity50.00
Total2,399.89
1000 ✓
October Seventh.
Admissions1,372.75
Concessions658.24
Miscellaneous91.10
Electricity18.00
Total2,235.09
130 ✓
October Eighth.
Admissions1,446.00
Concessions730.23
Miscellaneous87.00
Electricity43.75
Total2,306.98
October Ninth.
Admissions7,468.30
Concessions426.51
Miscellaneous33.00
Electricity74.50
Total8,002.31
October Tenth.
Admissions1,645.00
Concessions772.89
Miscellaneous48.75
Electricity529.84
Total2,936,48
October Eleventh.
Admissions1738.00
Concessions1,245.03
Miscellaneous5.05
Electricity179.37
Total3,168.45
October Twelfth.
Admissions2,787.50
Concessions469.52
Miscellaneous78.00
Electricity109.00
Total3.444.02
October Fourteenth.
Admissions1,608.00
Concessions481.04
Miscellaneous93.35
Electricity42.25
Total2,224.64
October Fifteenth.
Admissions3,200.75
Concessions585.25
Miscellaneous351.00
Electricity447.50
Total4,584.50
October Seventeenth.
Admissions3,090.00
Concessions514.65
Miscellaneous463.70
Electricity118.00
Total4,186.35
October Eighteenth.
Admissions2,450.75
Concessions786.98
Miscellaneous115.56
Total3,353.29
October Nineteenth.
Concess.
895.46
Admissions3,588.00
Miscellaneous6.10
Electricity74.00
Total4,473.56
October Twenty-First.
Admissions3,919.80
Concessions631,48
Miscellaneous87.50
Electricity18.00
Total4,656.78
October Twenty-Second.
Admissions3,408.76
Concessions899.69
Miscellaneous103.00
Electricity173.75
Total4,585.19
October Twenty-Third.
Admissions10,315.50
Concessions590.39
Miscellaneous19.00
Electricity67.08
Total10,991.97
October Twenty-Fourth.
Admissions3,495.00
Concessions981.66
Miscellaneous670.61
Electricity723.75
Total5,871.02
October Twenty-Fifth.
Admissions3,194.50
Concessions2,055.58
Miscellaneous62.000
Electricity777.07
Total6,089.15
October Twenty-Sixth.
Admissions4,194.50
Concessions1,026.33
Miscellaneous1,345.00
Electricity42.00
Total6,610.58
October Twenty-Eighth.
Admissions3,523.00
Concessions25.75
Miscellaneous40.75
Electricity655.00
Total4,244.50
October Twenty-Ninth.
Admissions4,223.50
Concessions1,704.96
Miscellaneous521.00
Total6,449.46
October Thirtieth.
Admissions4,214.75
Concessions1,031.74
Miscellaneous170.90
Electricity26.00
Total5,443.39
October Thirty-First.
Admissions8.191.50
Concessions1,550.92
Miscellaneous126.00
Electricity23.00
Total9,891.42
November First.
Admissions2,668.55
Concessions1,067.58
Miscellaneous2.00
Total3,738.13
November Second.
Admissions3,944.05
Concessions1,543.13
Miscellaneous12.00
Electricity18.00
Total5,517.18
October Fourth.
Admissions2,644.05
Concessions449.40
Miscellaneous76.50
Electricity1,836.02
Total5,005.97
October Fifth.
Admissions3,730.75
Concessions1,431.81
Miscellaneous315.40
Electricity694.56
Total6,182.52
November Sixth.
Admissions6,525.30
Concessions934.05
Electricity497.25
Total7,956.60
November Seventh.
Admissions4,570.40
Concessions1,754.40
Miscellaneous2.00
Electricity556.92
Total6,833.72
November Eighth.
Admissions4,062.00
Concessions1,967.13
Miscellaneous15.00
Electricity77.85
Total6,121.98
November Ninth.
Admissions5,383.15
Concessions1,271.94
Miscellaneous165.25
Electricity684.90
Total7,505.24
November Eleventh.
Admissions3,304.65
Concessions1,280.89
Miscellaneous140.00
Electricity280.27
Total5,005.81
November Twelfth.
Admissions5,998.25
Concessions1,266.29
Miscellaneous293.75
Electricity204.60
Total7,762.89
November Thirteenth.
Admissions8,230.00
Concessions1,124.96
Miscellaneous213.00
Electricity292.30
Total9,860.26
November Fourteenth.
Admissions6,007.50
Concessions1,653.73
Miscellaneous259.50
Electricity415.83
Total8,336.56
November Fifteenth.
Admissions4,574.80
Concessions1,804.71
Miscellaneous132.00
Electricity48.50
Total6,560.01
November Sixteenth.
Admissions6,162.75
Concessions1,440.67
Miscellaneous588.15
Electricity52.00
Total8,243.57
November Eighteenth.
Admissions5,089.00
Concessions1,714.88
Miscellaneous338.50
Electricity75.75
Total7,218.13
November Nineteenth.
Admissions10,101.75
Concessions1,298.39
Miscellaneous196.50
Total11,596.64
November Twentieth
Admissions7,199.00
1,081.35
Concessions64.50
Miscellaneous125.00
Electricity4300.00
Total12,769.75
November Twenty-First.
Admissions5,894.75
Electricity608.27
Concessions1,716.30
Total8219.32
November Twenty-Second.
Admissions4,610.50
Concessions2,047.10
Miscellaneous50.00
Electricity88.50
Total6,796.10
November Twenty-Third.
Admissions5,836.80
Concessions1,769.64
Miscellaneous254.00
Electricity50.00
Total7,910.44
November Twenty-Fifth.
Admissions4,518.75
Concessions1,066.84
Electricity8.50
Miscellaneous38.75
Total5,632.84
November Twenty-Sixth.
Admissions4,479.00
Concessions1,334.85
Electricity35.00
Miscellaneous133.00
Total5,981.85
November Twenty-Seventh.
Admissions6,301.00
Concessions1,267.40
Electricity200.00
Miscellaneous32.00
Total7,800.40
November Twenty-Eighth.
Admissions23,550.25
Concessions741.83
Miscellaneous94.75
Total24,386.83
November Twenty-Ninth.
Admissions9,091.25
Concessions1,361.68
Electricity424.97
Miscellaneous79.00
Total10,956.90
November Thirtieth.
Admissions5,370.90
Concessions4,577.55
Miscellaneous537.00
Electricity267.00
Total10,752.45
December Second.
Admissions2,520.35
Concessions2,184.14
Miscellaneous100.00
Total4,704.49
December Fourth.
Admissions4,074.10
Concessions582.75
Miscellaneous85.75
Electricity657.50
Total5,350.00
December Third.
Admissions2,611.25
Concessions2,265.01
Miscellaneous171.00
Electricity398.40
Total5,445.66
December Fifth.
Admissions4,019.75
Concessions523.35
Miscellaneous103.10
Electricity855.58
Total5,501.78
December Sixth.
Admissions5,521.00
Concessions770.60
Miscellaneous41.50
Electricity120.48
Total6,452.58
December Seventh.
Admissions4,437.70
Concessions732.75
Miscellaneous296.75
Electricity30.25
Total4,497.45
1000
December Ninth.
Admissions2,201.75
Concessions688.57
Miscellaneous244.24
Total3,144.56
December Tenth.
Admissions2,472.50
Concessions918.89
Electricity418.25
Miscellaneous154.00
Total3,963.74
December Eleventh.
Admissions4,926.25
Concessions564.56
Miscellaneous170.00
Electricity149.15
Total5,807.96
December Twelfth.
Admissions5,007.25
Concessions514.32
Miscellaneous223.00
Electricity622.00
Total6,356.57
December Thirteenth.
[?]
December Fourteenth.
Admissions2,963.30
Concessions824.63
Miscellaneous104.00
Electricity350.50
Total4,241.93
December Sixteenth.
Admissions2,835.75
Concessions641.59
Miscellaneous238.25
Electricity1.44
Total2,686.83
103020
December Seventeenth.
Admissions3,298.50
Concessions691.64
Miscellaneous259.05
Total3,249.19
1000
December Eighteenth.
Admissions5,0013.40
Concessions1,008.49
Miscellaneous82.00
Electricity45.46
Total6,149.35
December Nineteenth.
Admissions3,436.00
Concessions892.58
Miscellaneous61.50
Electricity108.75
Total4,496.83
December Twentieth.
Admissions3,139.25
Concessions684.59
Miscellaneous15.74
Electricity114.50
Total3,954.05
December Twenty-First.
Admissions4,013.05
Concessions871.52
Miscellaneous93.00
Electricity148.25
Total5,125.82
December Twenty-Third.
Admissions5,161.75
Concessions351.57
Miscellaneous67.75
Electricity1,889.25
Total7,470.32
December Twenty-Fourth.
Admissions3,684.00
Concessions898.89
Miscellaneous382.50
Electricity727.95
Total5,693.34
December Twenty-Fifth.
Admissions4,663.75
Concessions711.64
Miscellaneous60.00
Electricity66.90
Total5,501.39
December Twenty-Sixth.
Admissions4,288.25
Concessions489.41
Miscellaneous388.87
Electricity388.20
Total5,449.73
December Twenty-Seventh.
Admissions5,391.75
Concessions666.09
Miscellaneous125.00
Electricity107.75
Total6,290.59
December Twenty-Eighth.
Admissions5,395.71
Concessions384.25
Miscellaneous64.00
Total5,843.96
December Thirtieth.
Admissions2,154.75
Concessions924.58
Miscellaneous116.50
Electricity72.00
Total3,267.83
December Thirty-First.
Admissions3,619.50
Concessions354.60
Miscellaneous142.75
Electricity19.50
Total4,136.45
Grand total$487,621.83

A DESERTED CITY.

Gloomy Scenes at the Exposition Grounds Yesterday.

EXHIBITORS RUSHING AWAY

Work of Packing Going on in All of the Buildings Rapidly.

WHAT OF THE MISSING DECISIONS

Foreign Exhibitors Solicitous Over the Delay of the Report of the International Jury.

There was an air of desolation everywhere yesterday on the exposition grounds in spite of the long procession of wagons that rumbled continually about the plank road. It was a deserted city and wore the appearance of a cemetery. Occasionally a stray wanderer would pass across the plaza and hurry on to get away from the dismal surroundings. The wonted music of the Midway was hushed. The Midway itself was vacant. A belated spieler jocosely addressed an imaginary was free of charge

Inside the buildings, however, there was a scene of lively activity. The exhibitors were rushing to get away their goods. In the agricultural hall many of the exhibits were dismantled in the forenoon. The commissioners from Arkansas, Louisiana, South Carolina and Florida were working with coats off.

In the fine arts building many of the pictures were taken down and cased for shipment. It will be some weeks before the foreign section in the manufactures and liberal arts hall is disturbed. A small crowd of shoppers still haunted the place yesterday and the wares were going at a great reduction.

In all of the other buildings the exhibitors were working like beavers. The quickest work was done in the government building. Yesterday afternoon this building presented an entirely different appearance. A large force of rained workmen have been employed and Uncle Sam will be among the first to get off his display.

Mr. Inman on the Scene.

In the offices in the administration building there was still work to be done. Mr. Sam Inman came out at 2 o'clock and held consultation over financial affairs. Captain James Wylie, who has proved one of the most able financiers and devoted his time incessantly to the affairs of the exposition, was there, too, directing in the different departments and advising. The duties of General Manager Smith were finished. His office was vacant and he was back again at his law practice down town. Secretary Lewis was engaged in writing out permits to exhibitors to remove their exhibits. Chief Tyler, of the transportation department, had his hands full again. Mr. Collier sat in his office—a lone sentinel. The executive work of the exposition has been vested entirely in him. He is now the head and front of the whole fair.

"I am glad," he said, "that the great strain of work is over. It seems a relief, but then we can't help feeling sorry that it has all passed and it seems a pity to wipe away such a beautiful place as this. But the exposition has accomplished a great deal. Socially it has been a great benefit to the people of Atlanta. We will know each other better hereafter. It has been a kind of mirror reflecting and bringing out the qualities of those connected with it. It has been a wonderful developer. I really regret to see it close. I feel like there is something missing. It almost seems that some close relative had died. In many respects I am sorry to see the end come."

A gloomy atmosphere overshadowed the whole park. The exposition is dead. In a few weeks there will be nothing but a row of vacant buildings left.

What of the Awards?

There is urgent inquiry and much solicitude among the exhibitors of the foreign section over the delay of the decision of the international jury of awards. The jury did its work a month [?] and many think that there is some [?]

Continued on Page 19

   

Continued from page 18

When the last report was [?] sent on to President Gilm[?] and it was expected that it would be turned in a few days, in time at [?] to make the announcement before [?] closing of the exposition The foreign exhibitors have been waiting in vain and there is much dissatisfaction among them over the delay. Secretary Lewis has telegraphed to President Gilman, but nothing definite has been ascertained yet. It is the opinion of President Collier that the delay is caused by the fact that before returning the report President Gilman forwarded it to Washington to be recorded as a part of the report of the original jury. This places the delay with the secretary of the first jury.

Off to Philadelphia

Dr. Gustavo Niederlein, the commissioner of Argentine Republic, will return to Philadelphia in a few days for the purpose of placing the exhibits secured at the Atlanta exposition in teh Philadelpha Commerical museum. He has in charge [?] collection of exhibits for that enterpr[?] and has been active in getting the mo[?] interesting display at the Atlanta fair.

A variety of objects from the Georgia exhibits will be taken off and every coun[?] will be more or less represented. He has secured contributions from each state building here and obtained in full the exhibits of the Georgia railroad and that [?] Venezuela.

All of these will be forwarded as so[?] as possible to Philadelphia and put [?] the Commercial Museum. This enterprise is one of the biggest of its kind ever attempted in the United States and promises great good.

A Vote of Thanks.

Commissioners A. Macchi and R. Saul[?] of the foreign section, were complimented yesterday by a vote of thanks of the foreign exhibitors. All of the representatives of the different countries called on each gentleman and presented them with a formal certificate of thanks. Mr. Macchi has accomplished much since his stay in Atlanta and has made many friends.

Mr. Saulay is a French journalist and a man of rare culture and strong intelle[?] There was no mercenary motive in [?] coming to Atlanta. His exhibit was interesting in all its departments and [?] known that he will secure the highest award when the belated decisions arrive.

MISS EDITH TUCKER DEAD.

She Died at He Mother's Home Hampton Street Yesterday.

Miss Edith S. Tucker, aged seventeen years, died at her mother's home on Hampton street late yesterday afternoon. Miss Tucker was stricken with typhoid fever about three weeks ago. She was to have been married Christmas day, had it ot been for her illness. She was a bright young girl, and her death will be deeply regretted by her acquaintances and mourned by her friends and relatives. Her father has been dead for some time.

The body will be shipped to Covington for burial today at 12 o'clock from the undertaking parlors of Barclay & Co. The funeral services will also be held at Covington.

   

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION

Committee of Council Bluffs and Omaha Gentleman Here to Place it Before the Assembly.

Hon. Alvin Sanders, the Chairman of the Committee, in an Interview, Talks of Objects of Exposition.

Will Show to the World What the Great States West of the Mississippi Can Do—Want Iowa's Help.

A committee of Council Bluffs and Omaha gentlemen reached the city last night and are stopping at the Savery. They are here to wait upon the legislature in the interest of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898. They say it is the intention to make it the greatest display of the resources of the western states and territories the world has ever seen.

The chairman of the delegation is the Hon. Alvin Saunders, the war governor of Nebraska and ex-United States senator of Iowa be voted for Grimes and Harlan. Mr. Saunders came to Iowa, when it was the territory of Wisconsin and assisted in framing the constitution under which it was admitted into the Union. He had the honor of being the youngest member of the constitutional convention. As the readers of The Register will be pleased to learn the object of his mission, he has kindly favored us with the following interview:

"Senator, when did you reach Des Moines?"

"This evening. Our committee, consisting of Mr. G. W. Wattles, president of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition Company; Judge Winfield S. Strawn, J. A Wakefield, S. T. Lindsay and myself, of Omaha, and E. H. Odell, president of the Merchants and Manufacturers' Association; C. R. Hannan, cashier Citizens' State Bank; Hon. I. M. Treynor, W. G. Moore and T. C. Dawson, is visiting Des Moines to interest the people of Iowa, through the legislature, and the citizens of Des Moines in providing for an exhibit of the resources and development of Iowa, at the exposition to be held at Omaha in the summer and fall of 1898."

"What is the purpose of the exposition?"

"It is to show to the world the riches of the magnificent country west of the Mississippi River and its wonderful development from the time all this vast region was under territorial government up to the present time. Few can realize the grandeur of its progress and prosperity since I located at Mount Pleasant in your state. Iowa was then the territory of Wisconsin. I was a member of the convention that framed the constitution admitting Iowa into the Union. I believe I was the youngest member of that body. At that time Iowa was a comparative wilderness, and west of the Missouri river the Indian and the buffalo held undisputed sway. Look at it now and see what "God hath wrought." It is the purpose of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition to make a display of the wonders wrought by these changes west of the great river on your eastern borders."

"How may states will be included in the exposition?"

"All who wish to make exhibits. The Trans-Mississippi region will be fully represented. This consists of twenty-four states and territories. But every state in the Union, as well as foreign nations, will be invited to make displays. A bill introduced by Senator Allen, of Nebraska, is now pending in congress covering all these points."

"Have any organized bodies and individuals given their endorsement of the exposition?"

"Yes. The Chicago Tribune had a fine editorial on the subject last Saturday week, urging the people of Illinois to do everything for its success, and showing the remarkable growth of Chicago and that state since 1800 by reason of the growth of the Trans-Mississippi region. The Nebraska State Press Association, the Nebraska beet sugar convention and other organizations in that state and in Iowa have given it unanimous endorsement. The Trans-Mississippi congress also endorsed it unanimously. It will have no connection with any financial or political movement. It is purely a commercial, industrial and agricultural enterprise."

"Will the management be local?"

"By no means. The present company is one merely to carry on the work until arrangements are completed . That will consist of a president, a resident vice president and twenty-four vice-presidents, one from each state and territory west of the Mississippi river. We hope to make the exposition second only in splendor to the Worlds' Fair and its permanent effect will be to still more rapidly develop and enrich the states reaching from the Mississippi to the Pacific Coast. And Iowa will be no means be one of the least of these. Your state is especially favored by Providence, and as I am more familiar with its western half, it is a marvel of fertility, health, natural beauty and abundance.

"What is the trans-Mississippi congress?"

"It is a body of representative business and public spirited men living in the states this side of the Mississippi who meet frequently in one city or another to discuss means and measures to promote the development of this section of the country. All creeds and opinions mingle and discuss, but in everything tending to promote the prosperity of the trans-Mississippi region they are a unit. This accounts for the great exposition of the western states. The congress realized its vital importance to the West, and single standard, double standard, high tariff and free trade men voted for our city."

"By the way, senator, have you any objection to giving us your preference and that of your state people on the presidential question?"

"Well, so far as that is concerned, our people are not positively fixed on any candidate. The withdrawal of ex-President Harrison from the race, or rather I should say his notice to the party that he will not be a candidate for the office, will, evidently, cause may changes in Nebraska, for the general has may warm friends there, who will now turn to others. Governor McKinley has a strong following there on account of his strong position on the tariff question, but I must think that many of the heretofore Harrison men will naturally look to Senator Allison as their next choice. Indeed, the senator is highly esteemed by all our people, and he is looked upon as absolutely sage. Then, again, it was Senator Allison's friends who came to Harrison's aid in 1888, at an opportune time, and our people have not forgotten it."

IOWA WILL BE THE FIRST IN

Legislature to Endorse the Transmississippi Exposition Plan Today.

OMAHA COMMITTEE WARMLY WELCOMED

Governor Saunders Given an Ovation in Both Houses and Assured of Earnest Support by Governor Drake.

DES MOINES, Feb. 11—(Special Telegram.)—An enthusiastic meeting was held this afternoon at the Savery house in the interest of the Transmississippi exposition at Omaha. The delegation from Omaha met members of the legislature, with Governor Drake and Lieutenant Governor Parrott were present. Governor Drake was made chairman. A resolution was presented, which will be offered as a joint resolution to eh legislature and will be adopted. Its adoption was moved by Speaker Byers of the house. It is as follows:

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states west of the Mississippi river, at the Transmississippi congress of 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition of the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories; and

Whereas, The said convention voted to hold said exposition at Omaha, Neb., in 1898; and

Whereas, The common interests of the states and territories constituting the great region will be promoted thereby, and the interests of the state of Iowa, lying at its gateway, will be especially benefited by such an exposition on its borders; therefore, be it

Resolved, By the general assembly of Iowa that the holding of the said Transmississippi exposition is heartily approved, and that the people of Iowa are urged to co-operate with the people of the other states of the transmississippi region, and with those of her neighbor, and take this opportunity of making a fitting display of their resources; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the senators and representatives from Iowa in the national congress with the request that they promote as far as possible the said exposition.

Speeches were made on the resolutions by Governor Saunders of Nebraska, Liutenant Governor Parrott, Judge Strawn, Speaker Byers, I. M. Treynor, J. A. Wakefield, Senator Oalmer, President Pro Tem A, B. Funk of the senate, and others.

Both houses of the legislature accorded a warm welcome to a committee form Omaha today. It came for the purpose of presenting the Transmississippi exposition to the Iowa legislature. Governor Saunders was escorted to the chair in both houses and was given an ovation. In the senate he was incited to address the body by Lieutenant Governor Parrott, and briefly set forth the plan and scope of the Transmississippi exposition. The resolution will pass without opposition.

 

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION.

Nebraska Delegation in the City in Its Behalf.

An enthusiastic meeting was held this afternoon at the Savery in the interest of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898. It was composed of a delegation from Omaha, Neb., and Council Bluffs, and members of the legislature. The representatives from Omaha were Ex-Governor Alvin Saunders, Judge W. S. Strawn, G. W. Wattles, L. T. Lindsey and J. A. Wakefield; from Council Bluffs, C. R. Hannan, E. H. Odell, I. M. Treynor, Wm. Moore, T. C. Dawson, E. F. Test and D. B. Dailey. The members of the legislature present were C. A. Carpenter, N. M. Pusey, D. J. Palmer, Funk, Hauger, Hinman, Crow, Crote, McDonald, Potter, Chapman, Frink, Gurley, Speaker Byers, Lieutenant Governor Matt. Parrott and Gov. F. M. Drake.

Governor Drake was made chairman and J. M. McLaughlin secretary of the meeting. The following joint resolution was presented relative to the Trans-Mississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha, Neb., in 1898:

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress of 1893, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition providing fro the holding of an exposition of the produce of the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories; and

Whereas, The said convention voted to hold the said exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898; and

Whereas, The common interest of the states and territories constituting this great region will be promoted thereby, and the interests of the state of Iowa, lying at its gateway, will be especially benefitted by such an exposition on her borders; be it therefore

Resolved, By the general assembly of the state of Iowa, that the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is heartily approved, and that the people of the other states of the trans-Mississippi region, and with those of her neighbor, and to take this opportunity of making a fitting display of their resources; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the senators and representatives from Iowa in the National congress by the secretary of state, with the request that they promote as far as possible the said exposition.

Mr. Byers moved its adoption, and that the chairman, Gov. Drake appoint one member form the senate and the speaker of the house as the committee. Speeches were made by ex-Governor Saunders, Matt. Parrott, Judge Strawn, Speaker Byers, I. N. Treynor, J. A. Wakefield, Senator Palmer, Col. Dailey and Representative Funk.

SURVIVING WAR GOVERNOR

In the morning Governor Saunders visited the senate and was invited to speak. Senators Pusey and Mitchell were appointed a committee to escort him to the platform. He was a member of the Iowa senate from 1854 to 1858 and was the youngest member of the convention which framed the constitution admitting Iowa into the Union. He left Iowa for Nebraska and shortly after became the war governor of that state. He is the only war governor alive.

HE said: "I was an early settler in Iowa, and at one time I knew every politician in the state. I was raised a farmer boy and had little bu ambition for politics. But I became greatly interested in making the boundaries of the state as they are now and was sent to the convention for that purpose. The part I took in making the present map of the state started me in politics. All that old war governors are gone save myself. For a while Curtin, of Pennsylvania, Governor Kirkwood, of this state and myself were the only ones left. They have both gone and U alone survive. I wish that the people of Iowa may always prosper, for no matter where I am, my heart is always warm towards your state."

CORRIDOR AND COMMITTEE

Enthusiastic Meeting in Favor of the Omaha Exposition--Work in Committees.

An enthusiastic meeting was held at the Savery at 2:30 yesterday afternoon, at which the delegation of Council Bluffs and Omaha people that is here in the interest of the Omaha exposition of 1898, met leading members of the legislature, and discussed the relations of Iowa and the coming exposition. At the conclusion a resolution was prepared and will be placed before the legislature today.

Those present from Omaha were: Ex-Govrenor Alvin Saunders, Judge W. S. Strawn, G. W. Wattles, L. T. Lindsey and J. A. Wakefield. From Council Bluffs, C. R. Hannan, E. H. Odell, I. M. Treynor, William Moore, T. C. Dawson, E. F. Test and D. B. Dailey. Members of the legislature: C. A. Carpenter, N. M. Pusey, D. J. Palmer, Funk, Hauger, Hinman, Crow, Crote, McDonald, Potter, Chapman, Frink, Gurley, Speaker Byers, Lieutenant Governor Matt. Parrott and Gov. F. M. Drake.

Governor Drake was made chairman and J. M. McLaughlin secretary of the meeting. A joint resolution was presented and read by the secretary, after which Mr. Byers moved the adoption of the same and that the chairman, Governor Drake appoint one member form teh senate and one from teh house to take charge of the resolution, and that they be instructed to introduce it tomorrow morning int eh legislature, which was unanimously carried. The chair appointed the president of the senate, Mr. Parrott, and the speaker of the hourse, Mr. Byers, as that comittee. Encouraging speeches were made by ex-Governor Saunders, Matt Parrott, Judge Strawn, Speaker Byers, I. M. Treynor, J. A. Wakefield, Senator Palmer, Colonel Daily and Representative Funk.

The resolution offered and which will be presented to the legislature tomorrow, is as follows:

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress of 1893, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition providing fro the holding of an exposition of the produce of the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories; and

Whereas, The said convention voted to hold the said exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898; and

Whereas, The common interest of the states and territories constituting this great region will be promoted thereby, and the interests of the state of Iowa, lying at its gateway, will be especially benefitted by such an exposition on her borders:

Be it therefore resolved, By the general assembly of the state of Iowa, that the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is heartily approved, and that the people of the other states of the trans-Mississippi region, and with those of her neighbor, and to take this opportunity of making a fitting display of their resources; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the senators and representatives from Iowa in the National congress by the secretary of state, with the request that they promote as far as possible the said exposition."

 
Iowa. Resolutions adopted at Des Moines Febr. 12th 1896.

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 10., RELATIVE TO THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION TO BE HELD AT OMAHA, NEBRASKA, IN THE YEAR 1898.

WHEREAS, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress of 1893, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition providing fro the holding of an exposition of the produce of the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories; and

WHEREAS, The said convention voted to hold the said exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898; and

WHEREAS, The common interest of the states and territories constituting this great region will be promoted thereby, and the interests of the state of Iowa, lying at its gateway, will be especially benefitted by such an exposition on her borders; be it therefore

Resolved, By the general assembly of the state of Iowa, that the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is heartily approved, and that the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Iowa are requested to co-operate with the Senators and Representatives from our sister sate, Nebraska, and the other trans-Mississippi states in procuring the passage at this session of Congress of a bill gibing national recognition to said exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a national exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be certified by the Secretary of State under the seal of the state and sent to the Senators and Representatives in Congress form Iowa.

 

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION.

(Des Moines Register.)

Ex-Governor Alvin Saunders of Nebraska is a man of full stature, mentally and physically. His striking personality and mental force promptly gained respectful consideration of the trans-Mississippi exposition presented to the Iowa legislature by the committee of Omaha and Council Bluffs gentlemen. Des Moines and all Iowa were honored by their presence here, as they will be at the trans-Mississippi exposition in Omaha in 1898.

Nebraska and Iowa people are practically one people in sentiment and environments, and they should labor energetically and unitedly to gain the mutual benefits to be derived from that exposition. New Orleans and Atlanta have had national recognition and aid for expositions, Nashville is to have proportionate recognition and assistance this year, and there is no reason why Nebraska and Iowa should not be equally well served int their trans-Mississippi exposition of 1898.

All Iowa people who had the pleasure of seeing and hearing ex-Governor Saunders and the other members of the committee were greatly pleased over the strength and character of the men who were sent here to interest the Iowa legislature and people in that important movement fro an exposition that will demonstrate the unequaled resources and productiveness of the most favored and prolific region of the world.

The committee returned well pleased with the results of their mission here, for they received undoubted proof of the earnest and active co-operation of the people of Iowa to make the trans-Mississippi exposition at least equal to any similar exposition in the history of the United States.

NEBRASKA SENDS GREETING TO IOWA.

Nebraska sends greeting to Iowa. The splendid treatment the trans-Mississippi exposition committee received from the legislature, the newspapers and the citizens of that great state was gratifying. As Omaha has been equally honored by the representatives of Iowa and the remaining western states and territories as the city in which the great exposition of the west is to be held, the cordiality and graceful attention tendered to the committee by Iowa's leading representative men comes with peculiar gratification to the people of this city, for which they are thankful, and which they profoundly appreciate.

The people of Nebraska ought not to lose any opportunity to reciprocate these friendly and cheering words unanimously spoken by the Iowa senate and house of representatives:

WHEREAS, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress of 1893, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition providing fro the holding of an exposition of the produce of the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories; and

WHEREAS, The said convention voted to hold the said exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898; and

WHEREAS, The common interest of the states and territories constituting this great region will be promoted thereby, and the interests of the state of Iowa, lying at its gateway, will be especially benefitted by such an exposition on her borders, therefore, be it

Resolved, By the general assembly of the state of Iowa, that the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is heartily approved, and that the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Iowa are requested to co-operate with the Senators and Representatives from our sister sate, Nebraska, and the other trans-Mississippi states in procuring the passage at this session of Congress of a bill gibing national recognition to said exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a national exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be certified by the Secretary of State under the seal of the state and sent to the Senators and Representatives in Congress form Iowa.

Iowa is a grand state. Many of its young men and women have settled in Nebraska, and in every locality they are honored and respected by our people. They have risen to eminence in many cases and everywhere they are prominent in our political, commercial, agricultural, industrial and religious life. One of Iowa's honored sons is the senior senator from this state, and another, who has just been received by the Iowa legislature with distinguished honor, has been governor, United States senator, and enjoys the distinction of being one of the founders of these two great commonwealths.

Nebraska cherishes the warmest regard for Iowa, both by ties of blood and mutual interests. As the Des Moines Register says, Nebraska and Iowa people are practically one people in sentiment and environments and they should labor energetically and unitedly for an exposition that will demonstrate the unequaled resources and productiveness of the most favored and prolific region of the world and make the trans-Mississippi exposition in the history of the United States. This will meet with ready response in every city and hamlet of Iowa and Nebraska.

On more than one occasion Senator Gear of Iowa has shown his warm friendship for Omaha, and but a few days since he exerted his powerful influence in favor of the exposition by the people of his state. Since Senator Allison has become a member of the United States congress he has voted for the admission of twelve trans-Mississippi states, and as chairman of the senate appropriations committee millions of public money have been set aside for improvements in the trans-Mississippi states and territories. In the national house of representatives all of the Iowa delegation are showing their friendliness to Omaha and Nebraska in expressing their favorable consideration for this city and state in their aspirations, and the success of the great exposition.

 

STRONG RESOLUTIONS PASS

Central Labor Union Favors a Trans-Mississippi Exposition for Omaha.

[?] and Request Adoption

The Resolutions Representing Wishes of Several Millions of People Will Then Be Sent to Congress.

(The secretaries of all labor unions in Omaha, South Omaha and Council Bluffs are requested to send weekly notices of their union meetings, names of officers elected, notes on increase or decrease of membership, socials, dances or entertainments and any and all items of interest to working men to the Labor Editor, World-Herald, before Thursday of each week. All such items will be published in this column.

Adopting the plan proposed in this column two weeks ago, the Central Labor union at its meeting last Wednesday night, unanimously adopted the following resolutions.

Whereas, The plan of co-operation is one of the most powerful means of disseminating knowledge and procuring advancement, and the most effectual for furthering the welfare of all classes, and that one thing necessary for bringing this about is for the people of one part of the country to make known to those in other parts the products of their enterprise and their natural resources; and

Whereas, A general exposition of what we have and are capable of producing would bring ta the knowledge of the world our merited standing, thereby placing us upon an equal footing with our competitors of the east and the marketa of the surrounding countries in which our commodities are now exchanged in great volume; and

Whereas, The interests of the great territory lying west of the banks of the Mississippi, comprising nearly 70 per cent of the area of the United States, demand that an exposition of this kind be held that our eastern neighbors and others who are wholly unaware of our capacity for producing, may become more familiar with our situation, and that general benefit may result to all; and

Whereas, The city of Omaha, by reason of its hotel facilities and railroad communications, would be of easy access and would accommodate great numbers of people, and its vast army of skilled workmen, who could in a short time place in readiness grounds and buildings for such an enterprise, would be one of the most suitable locations west of the Mississippi river for a display of the kind proposed, therefore, be it

Resolved, That we, the members of the Central Labor union of Omaha, representing every organized body of skilled and unskilled working men withing the limits of this metropolis, in regular meeting assembled, in view of the commercial, industrial and agricultural interests of this great and growing west, are in favor of the trans-Mississippi exposition of 1898 being held in the city of Omaha; and be it further

Resolved, That we give every reasonable encouragement and assistance in our power to all efforts made on the part of individuals and organized bodies in the trans-Mississippi country in the furtherance of this cause, and,

Resolved, That in view of the fact that we as workingmen will be greatly benefited by so laudable an enterprise, we will do our utmost to make it a success, that credit may be reflected alike upon our sister states, the commonwealth of Nebraska and the city of Omaha, and,

Resolved, That it is the sense of this meeting that the fraternity of workingmen of this city shall consider themselves highly favored by the adoption of resolutions in the meetings of other labor organizations throughout the central and western states, embodying the sentiments herein contained; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to all Central Labor union bodies west of the Mississippi river for their indorsement to hold said trans-Mississippi exposition in the said city of Omaha in the year 1898.

The preamble and resolutions were presented by Delegate D. W. Reid and were adopted amid a simultaneous shout of applause. Copies of the resolutions will be sent to all central labor bodies in the trans-Mississippi country, where they will no doubt receive attention and similar resolutions will be adopted, thus giving the expressed sentiment of several millions of people in favor of the establishment of the trans-Mississippi exposition at Omaha.

 

Whereas, At the last session of the Trans-Mississippi Congress, which was held in Omaha in the month of November 1895, the following resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote.

WHEREAS; We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the States west of the Mississippi River, made at some central gateway, where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities or these great wealth-producing States, would be of great value, not only to the Trans-Mississippi States, but to all the home-seekers of the world, therefore,

RESOLVED; That the United States Congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha during the months of August, September an October, int eh year 1898, and that the representatives of such States and Territories in Congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases, to assist in carrying out this enterprise.

Therefore, Resolved; That we the Retailers Association of Omaha, numbering nearly five hundred members, heartily and unanimously endorse the action of said Trans-Mississippi Congress, believing that the aid asked for would not only be a well justified expenditure of the National Congress, but a simple act of justice and a merited recognition of the great Trans-Mississippi section of our country.

RESOLVED; That we not only endorse by form the effect now being made to establish the Exposition mentioned, but pledge ourselves individually and as an Association, to give such our financial aid support, to the best of our ability and power, and to use all the influence we can command, individually and collectively, to make it a success.

RESOLVED; That copies of the action of this body be sent to our Senators and Representatives in Congress and to the Secretary of the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition and to the Daily Press.

The above resolution was unanimously adopted by the Omaha Retailers Association at their regular meeting held on Feb. 26th. 1896.

President.
Secretary.
I certify hereby, that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of Resolutions adopted by the Retailers Assoc of Omaha at its meeting on Febr. _ _ 1896.

Chas. D. Thompson
 
Feb. 10 1898. Com Club Rooms- Omaha-

WHEREAS, the corporation known as the Trans'Mississippi International Exposition purposes to hold an exposition within or near the city of Omaha beginning in the month of June and ending in the month of November in the year 1898, and

WHEREAS, the legislature of 24 states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river are asked to participate in the exposition and to contribute to its financial support by legislative and appropriation and,

WHEREAS, the state of Iowa, by reason of its proximity to the city of Nebraska and for the farther furthur reason that its legislature is in session, has been among the first to be asked to contribute to the project of the exposition, and

WHEREAS, by the request of the directors of the proposed exposition a committee of eleven of the citizens of Council Bluffs has been appointed to co-operate with said directors in promoting the interests of the exposition in this state, with special reference to the securing of an appropriation form this state, be it therefore

RESOLVED, that it is the sense of this committee of eleven representing as it does the city of Council Bluffs that the proposed exposition be located at a point in Omaha most advantageously suited for the holding of such an exposition and be it therefore,

RESOLVED, that it is the sense of this committee that the site known as East Omaha is the place most suitable, lying, as it does midway between and adjacent to the cities of Omaha and Council Bluffs and easily accessible from both points be it therefore,

RESOLVED, that all the efforts put forth by this auxiliary committee of eleven be with the definite understanding, that the exposition be held at that point, the boundaries of the site to be definitely determined and an agreement entered into between the   officers of the exposition company and the city of Council Bluffs to that end.

Present by Pub. Com of C. Bluffs Iowa at meeting of our Iowa Com. at Com. Club Rooms- 2/10/96- 130 PM. told them had to get the ex first in surely then get capital stock subscribing- then would take up matter of location, could not do so until that time.

[?]
 
GURDON W. WATTLES, President. JACOB B. MARKEL., Vice-President. HERMAN KOUNTZE, Treasurer. JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, Secretary.
DIRECTORS: GURDON W. WATTLES, JACOB E MARKET, WM. R. BENNET, JOHN H. EVANS, DUDLEY SMITH, DAN. FARRELL, JR., GEORGE H. PAYNE, CHARLES METZ, ISAAC W. CARPENTER, HENRY A. THOMPSON, CARROLL S. MONTGOMERY.
TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION .. TO BE HELD AT OMAHA .. Beginning in June, and Ending in November in the year 1898
Omaha, Neb., Feb. 19th, 1896
Dear Sir:-

You are earnestly requested to meet with the Directors of this organization and other citizens at the Commercial Club Rooms to-day, Wednesday at 4 o'clock p;m., to confer with Senator Jno. M. Thurston in relation to the desired Congressional aid, so necessary to the complete success of the proposed Exposition. Please keep this meeting in mind and favor us with your presence and expression of your views on the subject.

Yours very truly.
  • Chas. A. Weller, Richardson Drug Co.
  • G. M. Hitchcock,-World Herald.
  • Edward Rosewater,-Bee office
  • J. M. Kitchen,-Paxton Hotel.
  • H. W. Yates,-Neb. Nat, Bank.
  • W. A. Paxton,-Paxton Block.
  • Frank Murphy Merchants Nat Bk.
  • J. H. Millard,-Omaha Nat Bank.
  • A. U. Wyman-,Omaha Loan & Trust Co.
  • W. W. Marsh,-Union Nat. Bank.
  • C. W. Hamilton,-U.S. Nat. Bank.
  • Jno. S. Brady,-McCord & Brady.
  • Ed. A. Cudahy, -So. Omaha.
  • A. H. Noyes,-So. Omaha.
  • W. M. Foster,-So. Omaha.
  • F. P. Kirkendall, - 12th & Harney.
  • E. W. Nash,- Omaha Smelting Works.
  • G. C. Barton, -Omaha Smelting Works.
  • F. Colpetzer, -Chicago Lumber Co.
  • Geo. A. Hoagland,-9th & Douglas.
  • H. F. Cady,-5th & Douglas.
  • C. E. Yost, -18th & Douglas.
  • E. Dickenson,9th & Farnam.
  • S. H. H. Clark,-9th & Farnam.
  • G. W. Holdredge,-10th & Farnam.
  • H. G. Burt,-12th & Farnam.
  • C. W. Lyman,-Com. Nat. Bank.
  • R. S. Wilcox,-Browning, King & Co.
  • J. L. Brandeis & Sons.-Boston Store.
  • Wm. Hayden,-Hayden. Bros.
  • Alvin Saunders, 18th & Douglas.
  • A. L. Reed,-14th & Douglas.
  • E. L. Stone,-Dewey & Stone.
  • A. T. Rector,-Rector, Wilhelmy Co.
  • H. E. Palmer,-Ramge Bldg.
  • W. J. Broach, Mayor,-City Hall.
  • E. P. Peck,-Omaha Elevator Co.
  • W. V. Morse,-Morse, Coe Shoe Co.
  • G. L. Miller,-U.S. Custom House.
  • W. H. Roberson,- R. G. Dun & Co.
  • W. A. Wyatt,-Bradstreets.
  • E. M. Morseman, Pacific Exp. Co.
  • Thos. Kilpatrick,-15th & Douglas.
  • E. M. Bartlett,-New York Life Bld.
  • J. J. Brown-,Brown Block.
  • W. A. Saunders,- Merc. Nat. Bank.
  • Solon L. Wiley, 13th & Farnam.
  • A. J. Hanscom,-Karbach Block.
  • Hno. A. Harbach,-17th & Douglas.
  • Kelley, Stiger & Co. 15th & Farnam.
  • Hon. Euclid Martin, Omaha, Neb.
  • Jos. Barker, Nat. Bank of Commerce.
 

ALL FAVOR THE EXPOSITION

Council Bluffs Business Men Pass Resolutions on the Subject.

PREFER EAST OMAHA AS A LOCATION

Inclined to Make All Contributions from Iowa with This Condition Attached—Views of Various Individuals.

The men in Council Bluffs who are most enthusiastically engaged in promoting Iowa's interest in the Transmississippi exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898 are going to stick on the location of the big show at East Omaha. That has been their contention since the movement in favor of the exposition was started on the Iowa side of the river and it was made the subject of a meeting held at the court house last night and was embodied in a set of rather drastic resolutions that were adopted touching that point.

The meeting was under the auspices of the Merchants' and Manufacturers' association of Council Bluffs and was well attended Hon. George F. Wright was called to the chair and made a brief explanation of the objects of the meeting. He recounted the experience of the committee appointed to confer with the Omaha directory of the exposition. He said the committee had been unable to secure anything like a definite statement from the Omaha committee as to the probably location of the exposition or whether or not the Omaha people had any preference in the matter.

There was no longer any question, Mr. Wright explained, but that an exposition would be held and that it would be located in Omaha. HE had just returned from Washington and was thoroughly convinced that the Iowa and Nebraska delegations would be successful in getting the bill gibing governmental sanction to the enterprises passed at the present session of congress. He complimented the Iowa and Nebraska delegations in congress and said no delegations from any other states had more influence or could get more from congress.

AS TO IOWA'S SHARE

With the exposition a certainty, the question arose what was Iowas to get out of it. He said there were more people in the western half of Iowa than there were more people in the western half of Iowa than there were in all Nebraska, and that the exposition would be a wonderful help to the state and to Council Bluffs if it were located so that his city would have easy access to it. He thought there was no question that East Omaha was the most accessible site and said he had promised the Omaha committee that [?] the exposition was located in East Omaha Council Bluffs business men and citizens would guarantee a donation of $25,000 toward the expenses of the enterprise. He predicted that there would be at least 10,000,000 people visit the exposition and if the location were in East Omaha this city would derive an immense direct benefit from the exposition and could afford to contribute liberally to the creation of the enterprise.

E. H. Merriam was very emphatic in the question of location and said Iowa had only one interest in the exposition and that was to help it if it were located in East Omaha or to help kill it if it were located elsewhere/

M. F. Rohrer, V. E. Bender, Colonel Baker and W. F. Sapp added their endorsements of the East Omaha site, and Mr. Bender presented the following resolutions:

WHEREAS, the corporation known as the Transmississippi International Exposition purposes to hold an exposition within or near the city of Omaha beginning in the month of June and ending in the month of November in the year 1898, and

WHEREAS, the legislature of 24 states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river are asked to participate in the exposition and to contribute to its financial support by legislative and appropriation and,

WHEREAS, the state of Iowa, by reason of its proximity to the city of Nebraska and for the further reason that its legislature is in session, has been among the first to be asked to contribute to the project of the exposition, and

WHEREAS, by the request of the directors of the proposed exposition a committee of eleven of the citizens of Council Bluffs has been appointed to co-operate with said directors in promoting the interests of the exposition in this state, with special reference to the securing of an appropriation form this state, be it therefore

Resolved, That the Merchants and Manufacturers' association of Council Bluffs, meeting in conjunction with other citizens, heartily approve this proposed exposition, and that they render what help they can to the project, provided that any national, state or city aid shall be conditional upon an assurance to be int eh form of a joint pledge on the part of the directory of hte Exposition company and the East Omaha Land company and the East Omaha Land company. And be it further

Resolved, That we request our representatives at Washington and Des Moines to use their efforts to secure liberal appropriations for this project, provided that such appropriations are made subject to the foregoing condition, and to otherwise oppose any such appropriations sought.

THOUGHT IT SEVERE

Chairman Wright said he thought the resolutions a little severe, but the meeting wanted them adopted and they went through by a unanimous vote. The secretary was instructed to send a copy of the resolutions to each member of the Iowa legislature and a copy to each member of the Iowa and Nebraska representatives in congress.

The following resolution introduced by M. F. Rohrer was unanimously adopted:

Whereas, The articles of incorporation of the Transmississippi Exposition company provide that each of the states participating shall be represented in the organization by a vice president appointed by the governor; and

Whereas, It is the desire of the exposition company that the vice president from Iowa shall be a citizen of Council Bluffs; be it therefore

Resolved, That it is the unanimous wish of the citizens in mass meeting assembled that Hon. George F. Wright of this city be named as vice president, and that this wish be made known to the governor by the secretary of this meeting.

The committee of eleven heretofore appointed with A. S. Hazelton as chairman was continued in power and authorized and instructed to act in accordance with the sentiment of the meeting as expressed in the above resolutions.

 

WRITERS OF THOUGHT GEMS

Nebraska State Press Association in Session at the Lincoln Hotel.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Lincoln, Neb., Jan. 30.—The twenty-fourth annual meeting of the Nebraska State Press association was called to order promptly at 2 o'clock this afternoon in the parlors of the Lincoln hotel by President C. M. Hubner, who used for a gavel the first object which came to hand and this proved to be one of the big round silver dollars which "Tim" Sedgwick had just paid to Secretary W.E. Dayton on account of back dues. Two of the largest rooms on the parlor floor had been thrown together and both were filled with members. In answer to roll call by Secretary Dayton the following answered:

W. H. Ketchum, Crawford Tribune; F. H. Parks, Columbus Telegram; A. J. Walker, Platte Center Signal; C. J. Kenler, Wilsonville Review; J. A. Barrett, Lincoln; F. O. Edgecomb, Geneva Journal; Ed Whitcomb, Friend Telegraph; M. G. Perkins, Omaha; J. C. Seacrest, Journal, Lincoln; F. H. Porter, Holdredge Citizen; Brad Slaughter, Lincoln; M. H. Barker, Fullerton Journal; C. M. Hubner, Nebraska City; L. J. Simmons, Harrison; H. J. Ellis, Allianace; H. L. Merriman, Hyannis; S. J. Young, Herald, Hartington; P. A. Williams, Riverton Review; H. M. Crow, Bloomington Echo; G. W. Bemis, jr., York; D. H. Cronin, O'Neil Frontier; S. J. Potter, Omaha; C. H. Gue; F. H. Bickel, Juniata Herald; H. W. Hill, Telegraph, North Platte; E. E. Correll, Journal, Hebron; A. F. Mercer, News-Herald, Fairfield; W. H. Cross, Gazette, Fairbury; F. G. Simmons, Seward; A. B. Smith, Danbury News; T. N. Baker, Lincoln Newspaper union; T. E. Sedgwick; F. M. Kimmell, McCook; W. M. Gerdes and A. F. Buechler, Grand Island Independent; T. H. Chapman, Broken Bow Press; H. H. Campbel, Orleans Record; C. Littlefield, Litchfield Monitor; W. S. Raker, Gretna Reporter; W. N. Brecker, Ashland Gazette; Dan H. Carroll, Winside Tribune; H. L. Tostinson, Omaha; R. H. Jenness, Atkinson Graphic; W. C. Purcell, Broken Bow Chief; Norman Jackson, Crete Herald; H. C. Akin, Omaha; W. H. Stowell, Auburn Post; Ross Hammond; M. A. Brown, Hub, Kearney; W. E. Morgan.

WOMAN TO THE FRONT.

At the last annual meeting the Woman's auxiliary had been established as a place where the women workers might be at home. There was a good number of these present, bu they steadfastly refused to stay outside and attend any side show, but came right in and had front seats under the big tent. One of the old-timers, who has not become reconciled to the idea of the new woman, was ungracious enough to say, very privately, however, that the women were contending for "full equal rights and special privileges." The opposition of the women finally led tot he abandonment of the plan of a separate organization, and they ten came forward and registered as full members of the association. The following were the ladies present this afternoon:

Mrs. F. O. Edgecombe, Geneva; Miss Edith M. Pray, Gazette, Geneva; Mrs. [?]

EXPOSITION INDORSE[?]

After the program in the afternoon was completed a business meeting was held, at which I. W. Carpenter of Omaha was introduced for the purpose of presenting a resolution indorsing the trans-Mississippi exposition. The resolution, which was adopted is as follows:

Whereas, at the last session of the trans-Mississippi congress, which was held int eh month of November, 1895, the following resolution was unanimously adopted by a rising vote:

"Whereas, We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the states west of the Mississippi river, made in some central gateway where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth-producing states, would be of great value, not only to the trans-Mississippi states, but to all the home-seekers of the world; therefore,

"Resolved, That the United States congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a trans-Mississippi exposition at Omaha during the months of August, September and October in the year 1898, and that the representatives of such states and territories in congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases to assist in carrying out this enterprise."

And, whereas, for the purpose of facilitating the work of he proposed exposition a corporation has been organized under the style of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, articles of association have been adopted, the a mount of capital stock necessary to begin business has been subscribed and the organization has elected officers and is now ready for work; and

Whereas, A bill has been introduced in the congress of the United States asking for recognition from the national government, for an appropriation for a national building and for a national exhibit; and,

Whereas, Steps are being taken in each of the states comprising the trans-Mississippi region to secure the exhibit of the resources and products of [?] asking for state legislative assistance to enable them to do this; and,

Whereas, No such opportunity has ever before been offered the great west and this state to advertise its resources and products to the home-seekers of the world as this exposition will afford; therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Nebraska Press association, in convention assembled, pledges its hearty support to the indorsement of the plan of said exposition, and each member pledges his best endeavor toward bringing it to a triumphantly successful issue by putting its advantages before the people of our section through the press and by using our influence with our members in congress and the senate of the United States and urging them to procure the national assistance of the exposition, which national assistance of the great trans-Mississippi region.

Nebraska State Press Assc
 
COPY OF
Certified Copy of Resolutions Adopted by Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Nebraska, At the Twentieth Annual Encampment:
Omaha, Neb. Feb. 12th, 1896

WHEREAS, The Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress, a body composed of delegates form the States and Territories lying west of the Mississippi River, at its Eighth Annual meeting in November, 1895, adopted the following Preamble and Resolution:

WHEREAS, We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the States west of the Mississippi River, made at some central gateway where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth-producing States, would be of great value, not only tot he Trans0Mississippi States, bu to all the home-seekers of the world; therefore,

RESOLVED, That the United States Congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, during the month of August, September and October, 1898, and that the Representatives of such States and Territories in Congress to be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases, to assist in carrying out this enterprise.

NOW BE IT THEREFORE, RESOLVED: By the Nebraska State Meeting of the Grand Army of the Republic in 20th Annual Encampment assembled, that we heartily endorse and approve the holding of the said Exposition, and that we request our Representatives in Congress to approve and commend the same and aid the said exposition by voting and working to secure a liberal appropriation by Congress for a National Building and a Complete National Exhibit at said Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.

Seconded and unanimously carried.

 

I, James D. Gage, Assistant Adjutant General of the Department of Nebraska, Grand Army of the Republic,

HEREBY CERTIFY that the foregoing is a true and literal copy of the Resolution relative to the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, as it appears upon the records of the 20th Annual Encampment of this Department held at Omaha, Nebraska, February 12th and 13th, 1896.


James D. Gage. A. A. C.
SEAL
 

RESOLUTIONS.

The following resolutions were unanimously passed at a meeting of the Merchant's and Manufacturer's Association of Council Bluffs, Iowa, held at the Court House on the evening of February 24, 1896:

Whereas, the corporation known as the Trans-Mississippi International Exposition purposes to hold an exposition within or near the city of Omaha, beginning the month of June and ending in the month of November of the year 1898, and

Whereas, The legislatures of twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river are asked to participate in the exposition and to contribute to its financial support by legislative appropriations, and

Whereas, The state of Iowa, by reason of its proximity to the state of Nebraska, and for the further reason that its legislature is now in session, has been among the first to be asked to contribute to the project of the exposition, and

Whereas, By the request of the directors of the proposed exposition, a committee of eleven of the citizens of Council Bluffs has been appointed to co-operate with said directors in promoting the interests of the exposition, with especial reference to the securing of an appropriation from the state; be it, therefore

Resolved, That the Merchants' and Manufacturers' association of Council Bluffs, meeting in conjunction of other citizens, heartily approve this proposed exposition, and that they render what assistance they can to the project, provided that any national, state or city aid shall be conditional upon assurance that the exposition shall be located on a site within the boundaries of what is known as East Omaha, such assurance to be in the form of a joint pledge on the part of the directory of the exposition company and the East Omaha Land company, and be it further

Resolved, That we request our representatives at Washington and Des Moines to use their efforts to secure liberal appropriations for this project, provided that such appropriations are made subject to the forgoing condition and to otherwise oppose any such appropriations sought.

 

WILL BE A WINNER

[?]LITIES OF THE PROPOSED TRANS-MISSISSIPPI SHOW.

WILL BE OF GREAT MAGNITUDE

TWENTY-FOUR STATES AND TERRITORIES TO BE REPRESENTED.

EAST OMAHA THE FAVORED SPOT

ADVANTAGES OF THAT SITE OVER ALL OTHERS

COUNCIL BLUFFS MUST HUSTLE

THE MOST IMPORTANT PROJECT EVER PRESENTED TO THE PEOPLE OF THE WEST–A LOCATION MIDWAY BETWEEN THE TWO CITIES ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY TO THE SUCCESS OF THE EXPOSITION.

DIAGRAM SHOWING PROPOSED [?] OF THE GREAT TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION.

THE ABOVE DIAGRAM SERVES TO ILLUSTRATE HOW THE [?] GREAT INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT EAST OMAHA WOULD IN EVERY WAY MEET THE DEMANDS OF SUCH A SITE. ALL THE RAILROADS, EAST AND WEST, HAVE A NATURAL TER[?] NO GRADING WILL BE NECESSARY, AND WATER IN ABUNDANCE IS ON OR NEAR THE GROUNDS.

It is now generally known that a great exposition is to be held in this vicinity in 1898, between the months of June and November. It is to be an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the states west of the Mississippi river, to be made at some central gateway, where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of ht great wealth-producing states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river.

In the modern exposition is presented a wonderful volume of information. Its every page is crowded with practical knowledge, and illumined by the most attractive object lessons. Such living books have been opened in different parts of this country, and whether the volume was large or small its pages have been scanned with eagerness by thousands of those anxious to know more of the lives and deeds of their fellowmen. The suggestion to prepare such showing, narrating and illustrating the resources of that wonderful section of our country embraced in the Trans-Mississippi states, has rapidly developed into a preliminary plan, giving promise of a speedy ripening into an assured success. The realization of the magnitude of the enterprise and the advantages to arise form it, have not yet taken hold of the public mind. When these are in even measurable degree comprehended the enthusiasm of support will be only equaled by its unanimity. It is intended that the twenty-four states lying west of the Mississippi river shall be the chief participants in the presentation of this exposition, and that such presentation will be so extensive and meritorious as to draw to it visitors from every part of the world. These states have developed so wonderfully and rapidly as to give a seeming realization of the fanciful tales of Aladdin's lamp. The very people who are living where they daily see the marvelous results of this magic growth do not themselves realize how civilization has smiled upon the great American desert and caused it to blossom as the rose. The Trans-Mississippi country is an area larger than most of the leading nations of the globe. In resources it is more varied and richer than any, and these resources have but just been touched by development, and yet it has the material to form a display which would cause the whole world to open its eyes with a wonderment like that of the babe when first greeted by the brilliancy of the sun. The exposition will be a revelation to the people of the very section whose wealth of resource and wonder of development make it possible. They will be surprised by their own achievements and inspired by their own possibilities. The whole west will feel the throbbings of new life and ambition.

WHY IT SHOULD BE HELD.

In the sections east of the Mississippi there is an even greater ignorance of what he west is and what it may be. There is with this ignorance the natural tinge of prejudice. These two conditions make it difficult to induce the desired influx of capital and immigration, and with the passing away of the ignorance there will necessarily disappear all prejudice and feeling and timidity of investment. Just in proportion as the east realizes the actual present and probable future of the west, will there be an inflowing of those helps so necessary for the further and speedy development of these resources. The proposed exposition is one of the readiest and most satisfactory means of disseminating this needed information, east and west. The printed page is dull beside the living book. The world is not satisfied with being told. It wants to see.

IT is most befitting, therefore, that the national government should contribute to an enterprise of such national benefit. It has given its aid to other expositions of more restricted boundaries, and more local in their nature. Surely no only consistency warrants like aid for the Trans-Mississippi exposition, bu it should be the more liberal, as the plan is the broader and the section represented larger. IT is not only proposed but purposed to make this exposition second only to the world's fair. Nothing short of this will meet the expectations of the originators, nor fairly represent the possibilities of the great west. The $250,000 asked of congress is a bagatelle compared with the sum which the people will put into this enterprise, and a [?]erely nominal price for the benefits which the nation at large will receive in return.

AIDS TO THE PROJECT.

There is little need of enlarging on the general benefits to be gained. It [?] natural and right that local advan[?] should also be considered, for on the shoulders of the people of Iowa and Nebraska largely rests the burden of preparation and performance. It is only fair that these two states should share equally in the benefits, as they do in the labor. They will not be found shirking their duty, or allowing any just drafts on purse or power to go to protest. Iowa is the first state to give official recognition and endorsement to the project, and under certain conditions there will be no hesitancy in Iowa making such appropriations as are necessary, and giving such moral and substantial aid as is needed to win the success to which all are looking forward with such confidence. Nebraska will naturally strive for first place both in effort and enterprise, and the friendly rivalry of the two states, should the exposition be properly located, will cause its inspiring effect to throb to the outmost extremity of the far-reaching territory thus represented.

WHERE SHOULD THE SITE BE?

Naturally, too, the interest deepens as it centers on the twin cities, which come in closest and most continuous touch with the actuality of the exposition itself. Council Bluffs and Omaha should be alike interested. While Omaha has the marked advantage of the prestige arising form having its name linked with the location of the exposition, the Council Bluffs has no disposition to show petty envy or childish pouting. At the same time Council Bluffs justly feels that it's aid is essential to the success of the enterprise, and hence its local interests and wishes should not be ignored. Such interests and wishes will influence largely not merely the action of the city and the closely adjacent territory, but will govern to a great extent the action of the state legislature and tend strongly to determine the attitude which Iowa's influential representation in congress will assume in regard to national aid. Council Bluffs is recognized as the western gateway to Iowa, and as it is proposed to locate this exposition at this entrance, the keepers of the gate should naturally be inquired of as to what the outlook is. Will there come trooping through this gateway into Iowa, its equitable share of the benefit, in the securing of which Iowa is asked to give generous aid? Any attempt to thwart the incoming of these benefits, or to use the gateway as simply an outgo from Iowa, with not corresponding income, will cause Iowa's state and national representatives to cool in ardor, and to refuse aid to any enterprise failing to show proper recognition of the interests and privileges of this city and state. Nor is there any just motive to actuate any such disposition on the part of Omaha, for were that city to attempt such a course, the benefits of which Council Bluffs would be deprived, would not accrue to Omaha, but would not accrue to Omaha, but would be jeopardized. Omaha's voice has given and implied promise that the interests of Council Bluffs and Iowa will be as jealously guarded of those of Omaha and Nebraska, but in the very [?]ency of the planning there should [?]not only an inference but an [?]ance. Hope should not be based [?] whisper, but on avowal.

EAST OMAHA, THE PLACE.

One of the most important pre[?]naries to be determined is the loca[?] of the grounds, and in this Council Bluffs has a deep interest, for upon [?] depends largely the question as to wh[?] benefits will locally arise. It is [?] enough that the exposition should [?] held somewhere in Omaha. Omaha [?] a city of area and this elasticity of indefinite location might be stretched to embrace grounds so far to the west, or north, or south of the city, as to practically put the exposition as truly away from Council Bluffs as though it were located at Lincoln. For instance, one has but to recall the trying experiences of an attempt to get form Council Bluffs as though it were located at Lincoln. For instance, one has but to recall the trying experiences of an attempt to get form Council Bluffs to the state fair, located in the western part of Omaha, to realize that an exposition thus located might better be in Papillion, so far as this city is concerned. It could get neither pleasure or benefit should the exposition be located in such an out-of-the-way place. Omaha people themselves found it hardly less disadvantageous and inconvenient, but local reasons seemed to make that location advisable for that purpose. Such local reasons do not exist in regard to the exposition, for the exposition has not the elements of permanency, or is it intended for the accommodation of the people of one city or of one state. It is not only advisable, but absolutely necessary that a far different sort of a location should be selected for this enterprise, to secure local support or general success.

SELFISH MOTIVES MUST BE PUT ASIDE.

It is to be regretted that under the surface assurances of a fair consideration of the interests of Council Bluffs, there is a strong leaning among the Omaha leaders in the exposition project to locate it in some outlying suburban district which will practically take it out of the reach of this city and deprive this city of its just benefits. The masses in Omaha would protest against any such outlying location, not simply because it would be unfair to Council Bluffs, but because it would be inconvenient to themselves and a jeopardy to the success of the exposition.

It is believed that the citizens of Omaha and Nebraska will heartily endorse the proposal to locate the exposition in East Omaha, when they fairly understand the situation. It is believed that the citizens of Council Bluffs and of Iowa will, when likewise enlightened, not only endorse the selection of East Omaha, but will good-naturedly but firmly demand it as a condition to their giving the project the support and aid asked for. It is for the pur-[?]

[?]

convenience to visitors, either from the cities or from a distance, and it is in the offering of such conveniences of ingress and egress that the success of the project largely lies. It was the great problem of the World fair, and more stress was laid upon it by the projectors of that mammoth enterprise than upon any other single feature. While East Omaha presents great advantages to both cities, the advantages offered to those coming form a distance are very important. In East Omaha the problem solves itself.

These visitors, too, while here want to see both cities, and both cities want to be seen. Council Bluffs has a special interest in thus sharing with Omaha. The larger city naturally receives the most attention, but if the exposition is located far from Council Bluffs, all the visitors will see Omaha, and a few only will take a look at Council Bluffs. What this city wants, and what it has the right to demand, is that while all will want to look over Omaha, Council Bluffs should not be overlooked. It will not hurt Omaha, and it will help Council Bluffs.

WILL MEET THEM HALF WAY.

To furnish the needed conveniences for this easy reaching of the grounds and for visiting both cities the railways would not need to lay a foot of track. The terminal company would have to put in a little, but it will gladly do that, as well as make liberal arrangements in regard to traffic and the use of bridge and tracks. The terminal company and the East Omaha Land company are alike interested in making the exposition a grand success, and while they are naturally actuated by more or less consideration of their own interests, still these considerations are rather for future profit than for present greed. They generously offer the use of ht grounds free, proffer other advantages for practically nothing, so that he exposition can have its location there without any expenditure worth the mentioning. This is not necessarily due to the philanthropy of the companies interested in East Omaha, as much as to a combination of public spiritedness and self-interest. They can well afford to be generous, as East Omaha would be advertised and presented to the world under the most favorable conditions, and in the future, after the exposition had passed into history, they will doubtless reap their reward if they faint not. The public is now looking after the interests of the exposition, and not of East Omaha, and if the generosity of the companies in control willingly places these advantages at the disposal of the public, there should be no hesitancy in accepting the proffer.

WATER ADVANTAGES.

Another important feature of the East Omaha location is the advantage of water. Those who got filled with dust in trying to reach the state fair, and who after reaching it still found nothing but more dust and no water with which to even mix it, will readily appreciate the suggestion that East Omaha has a bountiful water supply. The city waterworks are extended already to the grounds and there is no need of heavy expenditures to secure all that is needed for drinking purposes. Then there is the lake, affording a charming opportunity for picturesque landscaping and boating pleasure. If there is and threatened lowering of the water the laying of a pipe to the north, tapping Florence lake and thus securing an unlimited supply from the Missouri river is a cheap and practical remedy. The lay of the grounds at the east of the lake is such as to be easily transformed into lagoons and a court so that with comparatively little expense there may be provided a miniature and beautiful reproduction of the World's fair, with Cut-Off lake to serve as a substitute for Lake Michigan, making the picture complete. Courtland beach would be improved and beautified by its owners, without doubt, adding to the attractiveness of the scene. Nor would this miniature reproduction of the water scenes of the World's fair b on a very diminutive scale. The launches and boats besides the trips about the lagoons could have a mile or so to stretch away on the lake. These possibilities are withing easy reach, too, of the probabilities of the financial resources of the project. Nowhere else withing easy reach of these two cities would such advantages be secured with so little outlay. Nature by the freaks of its great river has left the needed lake, and the ravines ready for the inpouring of the water, and all that is needed is a touch of the artist's hand to clothe them with beauty.

SITE EQUI-DISTANT FROM BOTH CITIES.

Another advantage of the East Omaha location does not appear on the above map, but it becomes very apparent from a glance at the published maps of the two cities. It is fully a mile nearer to the Omaha postoffice than the fair grounds are, so that it is nearer and more convenient for the majority of the people in Omaha. To Council Bluffs people it offers still greater advantages. The distance from the Council Bluffs postoffice to the fair grounds is about seven miles on a bee line, and more than eight miles by the usual travel. The East Omaha location is a little over three miles form the postoffice in Council Bluffs, so that while Omaha would gain a mile or more by having East Omaha chosen instead of the state fair grounds, Council Bluffs would save about five miles of travel.

Still another important consideration is the roominess of grounds. It is necessary to have plenty of opportunity not only for the placing of the buildings and the arranging of the display but there should be opportunity given for so arranging them as to provide for the attractiveness and convenience of the exposition. This cannot be accomplished if there is any crowding. Any proposition to temporarily enlarge the limited area of he state fair grounds by the use of public parks or private property would involve, as it has before, controversial questions of legality and willingness. In East Omaha no such vexatious questions can arise. The land is under a single control, or practically so, and there will be no difficulty in securing a free and absolute control of an almost unlimited area. Anywhere from 120 to 500 acres of land are placed at the disposal of the exposition enterprise, and thus this problem, which so vexed the managers of the world's fair, is disposed of in the very initiative of the movement.

DIRECT BENEFITS.

Now as to the more direct benefits that would flow form this great exposition. Months before the formal opening, both Omaha and Council Bluffs will be active with preparations for the show. The work is necessary in getting the grounds ready and the buildings erected, will give employment to labor and the demand for material of all kinds will bring business to the dealers. Transportation facilities must be provided, hotel and lodging houses will be opened. It is altogether probable that another hotel would be built in Council Bluffs. The exposition will remain open for a period of five months. At a very low estimate, the attendance will average 15,000 people per day. At the Atlanta exposition the crowds frequently exceeded 75,000, and the Trans-Mississippi Exposition will be on a much grander scale than was the one at Atlanta. It is reasonable to think that each of the 15,000 people will spend $2.00 per day in the two cities, making a daily expenditure of $30,000, and a total for five months amounting to several millions of dollars.

WHAT SHOULD BE DONE

On the whole, the exposition project offers to the people of Council Bluffs and Omaha an opportunity for gain and prestige, far beyond anything that has ever been suggested, and it is worth a prodigious effort on the part of the citizens of Council Bluffs to secure the location at East Omaha. To this end the Iowa delegation at Washington should be importuned to withhold their sanction and support of the measure now before congress asking for a government appropriation of $250,000, until the matter of the exposition site is definitely determined. The board of directors of the exposition site is definitely determined. The board of directors of the exposition claim that hey have no legal right to decide where the site is to be. If that is the case, the matter of a government appropriation may will be deferred until the next session of congress, or at least until the directory is so organized that it can fully and finally determine where the site shall be. The sentiment in Iowa is strongly in favor of a location mid-way between the two cities, and any appropriation which the state may make in aid of the exposition should be made wholly on condition that such a site will be chosen.

 

This Envelope contains a Diagram of the proposed site of the TRANS=MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION, and some facts which will be of personal interest to YOU

Jno A Wakefield Omaha Neb

Council Bluffs, Iowa, Feb 25
5PM
96

THE EXPOSITION BRIDGE.

The Omaha press has wisely concluded that it cannot longer ignore the just demand that the location of the Trans-Mississippi exposition should be among the first things to be decided upon in order to win success. The expressed wishes of Council Bluffs were at first treated with silence which has a tinge of contempt strangely inconsistent with the appeal for this city to give its aid to the project, and to use its influence in gaining the support of Iowa's state and national representatives. The growing sentiment in Omaha that the East Omaha location is the most feasible and desirable for all except the few who have some conflicting local interests of their own has helped, too, in causing the press of that city to at least break the suspicious silence. The utterances, however, have thus far been of a very cautious nature, and have been characterized for the most part by an apparent desire to quiet Council Bluffs with a lullaby.

"Sleep little Bluffs, sleep,
While Omaha watches the sheep."

The Bee says: "The board of managers of the Trans-Mississippi exposition have very wisely decided not to cross the location bridge until it gets to it."

This is rather in variance with previous sedative expressions that the board of managers had no power to decide the question of location. Now that it is admitted that hey have the authority, and that they have exercised it by deciding not to cross the bridge until they get to it, it is fair to infer that they will cross said bridge when they do get to it. The fact is they have got to it new, and it is known as the East Omaha bridge. Will they cross it? Come, be honest and play fair.

The Omaha Excelsior has set a more manly example and has given space to a reproduction of The Nonparell map showing the advantages of the East Omaha site and has evinced a willingness to have the matter discussed openly and fairly. It closes an editorial with: "The Trans-Mississippi commission do not believe that they have the right to establish the location. If they haven't, who has? We cannot wait on congress."

The Omaha papers should get together and agree a to whether the managers have the right to decide a location or not. If they have no such right then they ought to first get a management which has the right. If they have the right then they should first exercise it and decide on a lot before they ask folks to give them money to help build the house.

An Omaha paper shouts "Utilize the East Omaha Bridge." If it really means it why not start right in and prepare to utilize it by making East Omaha the site of the exposition.

The press of the city over the river is shouting "Stand Up For Omaha." If it stands up high enough to get a fair view of the situation it will see that East Omaha is just the site for the exposition.

The gabble about contesting Judge [?]

[?]

before they get [?]its they had better decide where to put them. This bit of experience should be a warning to the directors that they are liable too have an exposition on their hands before they get any place to put that. Wouldn't it be a good idea for them to fix on a location right away before they find themselves in a like embarrassing condition as to that?

The directors of the Trans-Mississippi exposition meet today to decide upon the duties of the vice presidents, one of whom is to be chosen from each state. A few have already been chosen, and the directors find themselves in the em-[?]

Omaha has located Manderson all right even before he has any show, and it ought not to hesitate about locating the exposition, for that does[?] have a show.

 
Council Bluffs Manefesto on matter of Location for Exposition
 

[?]he Trans-Mississippi Exposition delegation has returned from its successful western trip. They found no location which would compare with East Omaha, but they still decline to [?]press themselves in its favor.

Omaha through its press and by private correspondence is urging that Council Bluffs keep still about the question of locating the exposition. Council Bluffs keep still about eh question of locating the exposition. Council Bluffs has in times past listened to lullabies only to wake up and find that some great opportunity had slipped by during its lull. Experience ought to have taught it to get in its work first and take its lullaby afterwards. When the agitation of the location first started the managers of the exposition project declared they had no authority to decide upon a location. Now they admit that hey have the authority, but don't want to exercise it yet. They ought to first find out where they are at, and where the location is to be "at" and then let the orchestra start up. All will join in, quick time, and lots of harmony.

Gov. Drake's appointment of Hon. George F. Wright, of this city, as the vice president for Iowa of the Trans-Mississippi exposition, is in full accord with the wishes of Council Bluffs, and will meet with the hearty approval of all interested in the success of the great enterprise. The Omaha press express their satisfaction of the appointment, and pay graceful compliments to Mr. Wright's worthiness. It is to be hoped that this era of good feeling for him, and to respect for his ability and wisdom of judgment will manifest itself also when the occasion arises for him to show his well-known loyalty to Council Bluffs and Iowa by insisting on having the exposition located where it can be of some advantage to the city and state which he represents.

An Omaha paper says it is useless to talk just now about locating the Trans-Mississippi exposition, for there is nothing to locate. If that is so why ask for any appropriations if there is nothing to receive the appropriation? If there is nothing to locate, the board of managers had better hustle around and get something. council Bluffs has found a good place to put it, and the sooner something is got the better. The quickest way to get it is to frankly tell where it is to be put.

The prediction is made that the Paris exposition of 1900 will be a whopper because twenty-four different governments have signified their intentions to participate. Come to think of it that's just the number of states which will participate in the Trans-Mississippi exposition to be held in East Omaha in 1898, and there isn't one of these twenty-four states but what is bigger and better than the ordinary nation. If the Paris exposition is to be a whopper the Trans-Mississippi one will be a whopper.

DEMAND EAST OMAHA.

Merchants and Manufacturers Radical on the Exposition Location.

In the superior court room in the country court house last evening a meeting of the Merchants and Manufacturers' association with other citizens of Council Bluffs was held for the purpose of an expression regarding the site which ought to be chosen for the Trans-Mississippi exposition. Considerable feeling has been stirred up in this city over the question, but the extremists who are responsible for the most radical utterances seem to be limited in number. Many of the things said last evening in the heat of oratorical effort were deprecated by the cooler headed of those present after the meeting was over. That the action to be taken was to a certain extent cut and dried was evident from the fact that a representative of a local sheet appeared with "proofs" of a large part of the resolutions which were to b presented and which were passed, the matter having already been put in type before its presentation before the meeting.

The gathering was addressed by George F. Wright first. He gave a brief history of the efforts which representatives of this city have made to secure a definite location of the exposition ground in East Omaha and made a statement of the present status of the matter. He was followed by E. H. Merriam, who declared that if the exposition was not located in East Omaha on the site selected by the local republican oracle he thought Council Bluffs out to work against the exposition in all possible ways. M. F. Rohrer, Victor Bender and Colonel W. F. Baker followed in speeches similar in tenor, but more mild in expression, and the following resolutions were passed:

Whereas, The articles of incorporation of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition company provide that each of the states participating shall be represented in the organization by a vice president appointed by the governor, and

Whereas, It is the desire of the exposition company that he vice president from Iowa shall be a citizen of Council Bluffs, be it therefore

Resolved, That it is the unanimous wish of the citizens in mass meeting assembled that Hon. George F. Wright of this city be named as vice president, and that this wish be made known to the governor by the secretary of this meeting.

Whereas, The corporation known as the Trans-Mississippi International Exposition purposes to hold an exposition within or near the city of Omaha, beginning in the month of June and ending in the month of November, 1898, and

Whereas, The legislatures of twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river are asked to participate in the exposition and to contribute to its financial support by legislative appropriations, and

Whereas, The state of Iowa, by reason of its proximity to the state of Nebraska, and for the further reason that its legislature is now in session, has been among the first to be asked to contribute to the project of the exposition, and

Whereas, By the request of the directors of the proposed exposition, a committee of eleven of the citizens of Council Bluffs has been appointed to co-operate with said directors in promoting the interests of the exposition, with special reference to the securing of an appropriation from the state; be it therefore

Resolved, That the Merchants and Manufacturers association of Council Bluffs, meeting in conjunction with other citizens, heartily approve this proposed exposition, and that hey render what help they can to the national or city aid shall be conditioned upon an assurance that he exposition shall be located on a site within the boundaries of what is known as East Omaha, such assurance to be in the form of a joint pledge on the part of the directory of the exposition company and the East Omaha Land company; and be it further

Resolved, That we request our representatives at Washington and Des Moines to use their efforts to secure liberal appropriations for this project, provided that such appropriations are made subject to the foregoing condition, and to otherwise oppose any such appropriations sought.

   

WHEREAS, The Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress at its Eighth Annual session in November last, adopted unanimously by a rising vote, the following:

"WHEREAS, We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the States west of the Mississippi River, made at some central gateway where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth-producing states, would be of great value, not only to the Trans-Mississippi states, but to all the home-seekers of the world; therefore,

RESOLVED, That the United States Congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha, during the months of August, September and October, in the year 1898, and that the representatives of such states and territories in Congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases to assist in carrying out this enterprise."

WHEREAS, For the purpose of facilitating the work of the proposed exposition, a corporation has been organized under the style of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, whose purpose is to so conduct and arrange the affairs and proceedings in connection with and relating to the proposed exposition in order that the broadest and most beneficial results may be obtained; and,

WHEREAS, To secure the largest success to the enterprise, entire harmony of feeling and effort should exist, to the entire exclusion of personal and corporate interests; and,

WHEREAS, It is deemed unwise and impracticable to endeavor to hold said exposition without the recognition of Congress, and National encouragement through appropriations providing for National Buildings and National Exhibits; and,

WHEREAS, An attempt is now being made to force upon this organization the matter of the location of said exposition, and coerce it into deciding upon a certain site, and threatening to kill the enterprise if said desired location is not now agreed upon; therefore be it

Resolved, By this Board of Directors, that for the purpose of carrying   out the purposes of the proposed exposition, it is indispensably necessary,

First; That an act of Congress be passes, Recognizing and endorsing the exposition, and providing an adequate appropriation for National Buildings and National Exhibits.

Second; The securing of subscriptions to the capital stock of this Corporation to an amount sufficient to guarantee the successful promotion and conducting of the enterprise to a complete and honorable conclusion; and

RESOLVED, That until the foregoing pre-requisite aids are secured, we deem it impolitic, inopportune and unwise to discuss or to seriously consider the matter of the location, for until said necessary aids are secured, we cannot assume that ere is an exposition to locate; and,

RESOLVED, That any attempt to force the location at this time can only result in arousing local prejudices, and cause clashing of local interests, thereby working great, if not fatal, injury to the proposed enterprise; and be it further,

RESOLVED, That we deem it due to the friends of this enterprise to, at all this times, state that it is the purpose and intention of this Board, when the aforementioned pre-requisite aids have been secured, to have the merits and advantages of the various sites, carefully and fairly considered, and will favor the location of the exposition upon the site offering the greatest advantages, and that will be best calculated to insure the most complete success of the exposition, the result most to be sought for.

Resolutions prepared by J. A. Wakefield, and submitted to Directors meeting, Feb. 28. 1896 They were formed but found too long, and in accordance with said thought- two short mes were prepared and adopted— on said date see following this posting-

[?]

Resolved, That we deem it inexpedient and unwise to discuss and undertake to settle the question of locating a site for the exposition at this time.

Resolved, That at the proper time a fair and impartial hearing will be given to all parties interested in the numerous sites proposed, and that a site will be selected with due consideration to the interests of all concerned.

   
THIS LETTER SHOULD BE RED.

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION,

STRONG WORDS FROM NEW JERSEY.

STATE GAZETTE. Trenton, N. J. Feb. 26.
Editor of the World-Herald:

It seems to me that the proposition to hold an exposition of the Trans-Mississippi states at Omaha in 1898 is a most excellent one. Such a fair would be a most valuable educator of the people, especially those living in the East, who have no fair conception of the vast and varied resources of the Middle West and Sunset States, Unreasonable as it may seem to the main of travel and broad experience, the opinion prevails in the East that the West produces more real estate boomers and outlaws than anything else. The relations of the two sections have, become closer as their interests have become more common and they will be materially strengthened by any enterprise that faithfully expresses and reveals the importance of the agricultural, mineral and lumber districts of the West.

In my opinion no more favorable point could have been selected for the proposed exposition than Omaha, because of its central location and the ease with which it may be reached form all the populous sections of the North, East, South and West. The scheme, if carried forward, will undoubtedly be successful and the results must be of great benefit to the whole country. I have for it good and sincere wishes.

THOMAS HOLMES Editor of the State Gazette.

TO BE HELD AT OMAHA, JUNE TO NOVEMBER, 1898.

Portals 500-
Slips 500- 3/3/96
North East Nebr Press. Randolph, Febr [?] '96

WHEREAS; The Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress, a body composed of delegates from the twenty-four States and Territories West of the Mississippi River. at its eigth annual meeting in November, 1895, unanimously recommended the holding of a Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898; and,

WHEREAS: The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition has been duly organized and proposes to hold such exposition for the purpose of showing the wonderful capabilities of these wealth-producing states but to all the home seekers of the world; and

Whereas A bill has been introduced in congress asking for recognition of this enterprise form the national government , and an appropriation for a government building and a national exhibit; therefore be it

RESOLVED, By the Northeastern Nebraska Press Association in semi-annual meeting assembled, at Randolph Nebraska;

That the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition is hereby heartily commended and approved, and that the senators and representatives in congress from Nebraska are requested to assist in securing national recognition of said exposition, and appropriation for a national exhibit and proper buildings to contain the same; and

RESOLVED; That the secretary be and is hereby instructed to send copy of foregoing to teh senators and representatives in congress from Nebraska; and further

RESOLVED. That secretary be instructed to send an attested copy of these resolutions to the secretary of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.

M. C. O'HARA, U.E. FOSTER, D. H. CRONIN, W. A. NEEDHAM, E. CUNNINGHAM.
26
   
World-Herald- Sat. March 7th 1896

GOVERNOR WELLS' WISE WORDS

Salt Lake City, UTAH, March 2.—To the Editor of the World-Herald: In response to your invitation, I have pleasure in saying, in reference to the proposition to hold at Omaha, in 1898, an exposition of the products, resources, manufactures, arts and industries of the Transmississippi states, that the same has my unequivocal indorsement. For many years I have been a thorough convert to the efficacy of fair-holding as a means of promoting the industrial advancement of a community, a commonwealth, or a nation. The states in question, although the youngest in years, certainly have the resources to make them the greatest wealth producers of any portion of the United States.

A fitting and accurate display of these resources will be extremely beneficial to the states in question for very many reasons, chief among which is that their greatness of the eastern states, and the exposition, if properly patronized, would not only challenge this recognition but would also be the means of procuring capital to a much greater extent than hitherto, for the development of the resources of this great region. So far as Utah is concerned, the question of holding a semi-centennial inter-mountain exposition at Salt Lake City in 1897, commemorative of the advent of the Mormon pioneers in 1847, is begin agitated by the state legislature now in session. If this is decided upon, of course, it would detract from the support which Utah might otherwise give the Omaha exposition. It is possible, too, that considering the extra burdens to be borne by our recent admission to statehood, and the fact that our public finances are not in the favorable condition that we would wish, the state legislature may decide to entertain neither of the propositions for economical reasons, I am advised of yet another contemplated exposition, to be held at Dallas, Tex., in 18997, in celebration of the semi-centennial existence of Texas, and acquisition by the United States of all those sister states and territories added to the American union by the treaty of Guadulupe Hidalgo. It would seem to me, if there could be a concentration of energy by the western states, that it would be productive of better results, and one affair could be given that would be immensely creditable, while a diffusion of strength, like scattered shot, might prove inefficient and impotent. I have the honor to be, very truly yours,

HEBER M. WELLS, Governor of Utah.

Governor Wells' frank letter deserves the serious and prompt consideration of the promoters of the proposed exposition. He expresses his own great interest in the proposition, by he points out the serious danger that the great success of the exposition at Omaha may be threatened by a variety of other propositions.

As Governor Wells says: "Concentration of energy by the western states would be productive of better results, and one affair could be given that would be immensely creditable, while a diffusion of strength, like scattered shot, might prove inefficient and impotent."

The attention of the promoters of the proposed exposition must now be devoted to the transmississippi states. The concentration suggested by Governor Wells must be effected, and that as speedily as possible.

The citizens of Omaha must take a deep interest in this project and place their best energy and their means behind the proposition.

 

THE AMERICAN EXPORT MONITOR.

EXPOSITIONS.

Mexico's World's Fair.

A Mexican national exposition of industries and fine arts, with an international department, will be opened in the City of Mexico, September 15th, to continue for at least six months. England, Germany, France and the United States, it is expected, will be worthily represented by exhibits of manufactures. Four main buildings will be provided for the housing and display products from the United States: for manufactures, mechanical arts, agriculture and food products.

Canada's Exposition

In addition to the applications received from all over the world, the executive committee of the Montreal Exposition has provided for many special attractions of a novel and interesting character, such as : The Avenue of All Nations, Old London Bridge and Street, The Rock of Gibraltrar, with H. M. S. "Victory;" The Venetian Canals, with gondolas adn gondoliers; The Electric Railway and the Alps Scenery, The Haunted Swing, Children's Fairly Land, The Colorado Gold Mine, The Mirror Maze, The Burmese Snake Cahrmers and Jugglers, East India's Wonderland, The Moorish Palace (in it Eden Musee), The Microscope and Gyroscope Top, An Ostrich Farm, Chinese Village and Pagoda, with theatre; Japanese Park, with hooden and tea garden; Streets of Cairo, Two Great Panoramas. The grounds will be artistically and beautifully laid out, and everything will be done to add to the convenience and comfort of the visitors. There will be flowing fountains and green lawns, and prizes will be offered for the best designs in laying out the grounds. Many of the leading bands of music in the world have been engaged to furnish music during the exposition. Electric illuminations and fountains, as also a grand display of fireworks, will enhance the beauties of the grounds at night.

For the convenience of intending American exhibitors an office has been opened in the Postal Telegraph Building, New York.

An Exposition at Vienna.

The United States has been invited to participate in an international exhibition of agricultural machinery to be held in Vienna, Austria, form the 9th to the 14th of May, 1896. Exhibits sent from the United States will be readmitted duty free.

Austrian Exposition.

The Austrian Exposition (International) of Physical Education, hygiene and Sport will be held in Innsbruck (Tyrol) from May to October this year. Committee for the United States: August Belmont, Frederic R. Coudert, Julien T. Davies, Lyman J. Gage, Chauncey M. Depew, Theodore A. Havemeyer, General Thomas L. James, Percival Kuhne, Herman Oelrichs, General Horace Porter and Charles Stewart Smith. General Commissioner: A. B. De Guerville.

Southern States Exhibition in Chicago.

The Chicago Southern States Delegation adopted resolutions on February 20th declaring it feasible and desirable to hold a Southern States Exposition in Chicago in 1896, provided that the Southern States pledge themselves to furnish exhibits and to deliver them free of charge at the exposition building to be provided by Chicago; that Chicago shall furnish a suitable building, with such space as may be needed up to 100,000 square feet of surface, and to pay the expenses of maintaining the exhibition for not more than three months.

Another resolution provided for the appointment of an advisory committee of one member from each Southern State to act with the Chicago managers in al exposition matters.

Brussels International Exhibition of 1897.

There will be an International Exhibition in Belgium in 1897. The Exhibition will comprise 14 sections: —1. Fine Arts. 2. Social Economy. 3. Hygiene. 4. Life Saving. 5. Industrial and Decorative Arts. 6. Lightening and Heating. 7. Electricity—Traction. 8. Military Art. 9. Industrial Manufactures—Materials, Methods and Products. 10. Sporting Material. 11. Exercises—Popular Games. 12. Temporary competitions in Agriculture and Horticulture. 13. Practical Teaching and the Industries and Handiwork of Women. 14. Trade. Colonies.

Paris Exposition, 1900.

Although questions have been raised of late as to the advisability of holding an Exposition in Paris in 1900, we are informed that all financial problems have been solved satisfactorily. The invitations sent out to the different Governments will not be recalled.

From time to time we will chronicle the progress of this gigantic enterprise.

 

Exposition Advice

One Enthusiastic Omaha Man Suggests a Press Bureau.

"The Trans-Mississippi exposition is getting up steam rather slowly, I'll admit," said a gentleman the other day, "but nevertheless surely. It needs a little more life and a little more money. Our senators and congressmen are doing nobly, but they need more public sentiment form the twenty-four great states directly interested. The press of these states has not yet been aroused. The committee in charge of this enterprise should take steps to interest the press of the country. The newspapers of all this central west can be immediately enlisted on our side by a very little judicious direct effort by some newspaper man with time and ability. It would pay the exposition committee to create a press bureau and provide it with the means for immediate usefulness. Another thing out to be done, and for $10,000 or less money can be done. The governors of the several states should be invited to send commissioners to an exposition meeting to be held in Omaha, early in May. The vice presidents should be included. The exposition committee, as soon as it is advised of the appointments, should send the commissioners tickets to Omaha and return and advise them their expenses for the trip would all be met by the citizens of this city. When they come, a grand banquet should be tendered to them; the plans of the exposition board should be created. Every man would thus become a local advocate of the enterprise, with an official connection which would enable him and associates to be selected while the commissioners are here, if possible, to organize local boards in all the states to be included. The way to get the exposition, and to make it an unqualified success, is to go after it in generous western style. You can never arouse enthusiasm enough to kindle a general interest by sitting in a little back room dictating letters to stenographers and printing circulars for the mails. A personal effort and a friendly press in every state are the essentials, a long, long time before the surveyors stake out any boundaries for the buildings."

VOICES FROM THE WEST.

WYOMING PEOPLE ENTHUSIASTIC.

THE BOOMERANG. Laramie, Wyo., March 2.
Editor of the World-Herald:

Replying to your recent favor will say that no state in the great western empire beyond the Mississippi will hail with greater delight the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition than Wyoming. So far as I have heard expressions everybody favors holding the proposed exposition. It would be an opportunity never before accorded western energy, not excepting the great Columbian exposition. The great development that Wyoming has made in agriculture, not to speak of the wonderful riches of her mines, which are just now becoming known, would be sufficient incentive for your people to furnish ocular testimony of our greatness. No state is better prepared to begin the work than Wyoming. Every city in the state, scattered as they may be, has boards of trade or mining exchanges. Every country in the state also has an immigration board. All these organizations could be united in the work for the state and the exposition.

I heartily join the large numbers already heard from through the World-Herald in favor of the exposition.

P. E. LOW.

A GOOD MOVE.

THE CHRONICLE. San Francisco, Cal., Feb. 28.
Editor of the World-Herald:

Mr. de Young is absent in Europe and therefore unable to express the opinion desired. Speaking for him I think I can say that he regards every public movement calculated to bind together the trans-Mississippi states as a good one.

JOHN P. YOUNG, Managing Editor.

CERTAINLY WELL TIMED.

THE ILLINOIS STAATS-ZEITUNG. Chicago, Ill., Feb. 28.

The proposition to hold an exposition of the trans-Mississippi states in Omaha in 1898 is certainly well-timed, would be of great interest and of greater benefit to that part of the country. That vast territory west of the Mississippi has so many interests in common—commercial, financial, agricultural and mining interests—that one great exposition at which all these could be exhibited would do much to show the United States the great resources of that part of the country. Yours,

WASHINGTON HESING, Managing Editor.

GOVERNOR WELLS OF UTAH.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, STATE OF UTAH. Salt Lake City, Utah, March 3.
Editor of the World-Herald:

In response to your invitation, I have pleasure in saying, in reference to the proposition to hold at Omaha, in 1898, and exposition of the products, resources, manufactures, arts and industries of the trans-Mississippi states, that the same has my unequivocal indorsement. For many years I have been a thorough convert to the efficacy of fair-holding as a means of promoting the industrial advancement of a community, a commonwealth, or a nation. The states in question, although the youngest in years, certainly have the resources to make them the greatest wealth producers of any portion of the United States.

A fitting and accurate display of these resources will be extremely beneficial to the states in question for very many reasons, chief among which is that their greatness is not sufficiently recognized by the people of the eastern states, and the exposition, if properly patronized, would not only challenge this recognition, but would also be the means of procuring capital to a much greater extent than hitherto for the development of the resources of this great region. So far as Utah is concerned, the question of holding a semi-centennial inter-mountain exposition at Salt Lake City in 1897, commemorative of the event of the Mormon pioneers in 1847, is begin agitated by the state legislature now in session. If this is decided upon, of course, it would detract form the support which Utah might otherwise give the Omaha exposition. It is possible, too, that considering the extra burdens to be borne by our recent admission to statehood, and the fact that our public finances are not in the favorable condition that we would wish, the state legislature may decide to entertain neither of the propositions for economical reasons. I am advised of yet another contemplated exposition, to be held at Dallas, Tex., in 1897, in celebration of the semi-centennial existence of Texas, and acquisition by the United States of all those sister states and territories added to the American union by the treaty of Guadulupe Hidalgo. It would seem to me, if there could be a concentration of energy by the western states, that it would be productive of better results, and one affair could be given that would be immensely creditable, while a diffusion of strength, like scattered shot, might prove inefficient and impotent. I have the honor to be, very truly yours,

HEBER M. WELLS, Governor of Utah.

GOVERNOR RICHARDS OF WYOMING.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. Cheyenne, Wyo., March 4.
Editor of the World-Herald:

It is my belief that the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898 will prove to be the most popular and the most successful of anything of the kind ever seen in this country, always excepting the peerless World's fair at Chicago. As an exposition of the development of the western portion of the United States it will excel even our World's fair.

The western states that will be fully represented in this exposition have not done justice to themselves at any of the others on account of their location and the great expense of transportation. An exhibition of the development and improvement of the United States cannot be properly made if the western states are not fully represented.

The great development of this country during the last quarter of a century has been made west of the Mississippi river. The people have seen something of this in other expositions, they have read much of it and in a general way know that we have been doing pretty well. The country contiguous and tributary to a certain trade center will naturally be best represented in a fair or exposition held at that place.

Let us have an exposition at Omaha, with government aid, and all the usual concomitants, and we will show the world that the booms of the western country have a solid foundation to support them and that "westward the star of the empire takes its course."

Nebraska can rely on Wyoming for all the aid within her power to make the exposition entirely successful.

WILLIAM A. RICHARDS, Governor.

GOVERNOR HOLCOMB OF NEBRASKA.

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER. Lincoln, Neb., March 3.
Editor of the World-Herald:

Acknowledging receipt of your favor requesting an expression of opinion concerning the proposition to hold an exposition of the trans-Mississippi states at Omaha in 1898, I beg to express my deep interest in the project. I can [?] or no enterprise which would result in greater good, not only to Omaha and the country contiguous—not only to the great west, bu to the entire country. This exposition, the success of which is in a large measure now assured, will serve to a better acquaint the people with the vast and varied resources and unequaled productiveness of the trans-Mississippi country. Such an exposition will not only disclose the marvelous development during the last fifty years of this empire of over 2,000,000 square miles of territory, with a present population of 20,000,000 people, but it will develop the fact that its future possibilities are almost without limit and that its resources may be made capable of sustaining in comfort many millions more.

Our sister states of the east will come and get better acquainted with the wealth of resources of the great two thirds of our nation, lying west of hte Mississippi river and containing less than one-third of the country's population. The business interests of the great centers of commerce in the eastern and central states will meet at Omaha the different agencies which made these cities possible.

The [?] Nebraska by reason of bringing so many thousands of people into the state at a season of the year when the fields will show the wealth of her soil and the energy of her people cannot be overestimated. The reputation acquired by the public-spirited citizens of Omaha for successfully managing all enterprises undertaken by them was doubtless one of the principal considerations, together with its admirable location, entering into the choice of Nebraska's metropolis as the place of holding this important exposition of the west. Every Nebraskan appreciates the honor and stands ready to lend a helping hand to make this exposition second only to the World's fair at Chicago and equaling it in the display of the wealth and products of the richest stretch of the country on earth. Yours very truly,

SILAS A. HOLCOMB, Governor

SOUTH DAKOTA DEEPLY INTERESTED

Editor of the World-Herald

I have been requested to give my opinion upon the propriety of holding an exposition for the trans-Mississippi states at Omaha in 1898. It would seem that there can be but one opinion upon such a question. Every such exposition within the history of the world has been of inestimable benefit to the country, people and industries concerned therein. Every such event has always been followed by an era of invention and improvement in the means of production and exchange, as well as in the arts and sciences.

Had I time and space I believe I could show how every community within the trans-Mississippi states would be benefited by such an exposition, but I propose to speak particularly of this wonderful show how we would be benefited by the Omaha exposition.

Truly did Marvin Hughitt declare the Black Hills to be "the richest hundred miles square on the face of the earth." Almost every natural resource within the knowledge of man is found here in abundance. An impression seems to obtain throughout the country that gold is our only resource. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Almost every metal known to chemistry is found here. Gold, silver, copper, tin, lead, and iron, as well as mica, asbestos and the finest sandstone and marble, are some of the resources of this region. All the agricultural productions of the temperate zone flourish and are produced and grow luxuriantly in our rich soil.

True, gold is our great resource, and so intent have our people been in mining this metal that other industries have fallen into the background. The annual output of gold has already attained $10,000,000 and this can easily be doubled withing two years if we can induce capital to develop our mines and build reduction works. The Bald mountain region doubtless contains the greatest mass of gold ore on the face of the earth. This ore actually comes out at the grass roots. As yet no deep mining has been done in that region, but the ore is taken out from tunnels and drifts. Notwithstanding that region has been only scratched, the quantity of ore in sight is practically inexhaustible. It consists of what is known as refractory ore, which must be treated either chemically or smelted. Both these processes are now in successful operation here. The Deadwood & Delaware Smelting company has a gigantic plant, treating 200 tons per day, and it is preparing to double its capacity. The Golden Reward chlorination works has about the same capacity as the smelter, and the great Kildonan mill, all running day and night, and can reduce but a small portion of the ore mined. Tens of thousands of tons of rich ore are lying upon the dump, awaiting reduction. In no country upon the face of the earth is there such inducements to capital as those now offered in reduction words at Deadwood.

These are the facts and figures which Black Hills people wish to get before the world, and in no way can they do it so successfully as at a great exposition like that to held at Omaha. I undertake to guarantee that the mining interests of the Black Hills will build at Omaha a thing which was never seen before, namely, "a gold palace." I don't mean a palace built of gold, but a great building in which every feature of this mighty gold-producing country will be exhibited. There we can exhibit ore form the Holy Terror, assaying $25,000 per ton, as well as ore picked up from the grade of the Elkhorn road in Bald mountain, assaying $80 per ton. We can probably induce the Homestake company to place on exhibition one of its bold bricks, of which they produce six every fifteen days, averaging in value $165,0000. There we can exhibit ores from a thousand mines, every one of which will yield large returns to capital. There we can exhibit coal form Hay creek, almost equal to the anthracite of Pennsylvania. There we can exhibit our fine building stone and marble, as well as our No. 1 hard wheat, weighing sixty-five pounds to the bushel.

Mr. Editor, these are some of the reasons why the people of the Black Hills will welcome a Trans-Mississippi exposition at Omaha. To elaborate these would be to impose upon your good nature, but our people can elaborate them at their leisure. I know our people are looking forward to this great fair with much hope and anticipation. We must have capital to develop this country, and we can make the necessary showing at that fair to obtain it. We do not ask capital to take any chances. All we ask is an investigation, knowing that no other field in the world offers such inducements.

FREEMAN KNOWLES.
   

RESOLUTIONS passed by The COLORADO SPRINGS BOARD OF TRADE and MINING EXCHANGE, March 5th, 1896.

WHEREAS, A Corporation has been organized at the City of Omaha, Nebraska, under the title and name of "The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition," for the purpose of holding an exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, during the year 1898, for the purpose of exhibiting to the world the products, industries and civilization of the States and Territories of the United States west of the Mississippi River; and,

WHEREAS, The Colorado Springs Board of Trade & Mining Exchange recognizes the importance of such an exposition, for the purpose of informing the people of the world of the products and capabilities of this Trans-Mississippi country, and especially the State of Colorado with her great Agricultural, Horticultural and Mineral resources, in the possession of the greatest Gold, Silver and Copper mines of the world; therefore be it

RESOLVED, That we as a Mining Exchange extend to the said Corporation our best wishes for their success, and we in their behalf ask the Honorable Representatives from this State in the United States Congress, to use their influence in securing the necessary aid to insure the success of said enterprise.

 

Resolutions endorsing and approving the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, to be held June to November, 1898.

WHEREAS, The Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress, a body composed of Delegates from the Twenty-four States and Territories lying West of the Mississippi River at its Eighth annual meeting in November 1895, unanimously recommended the holding of a Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898; and

WHEREAS, The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition has been duly organized and proposes to hold such exposition for the purpose of showing the wonderful capabilities of these wealth-producing States, not only to the Trans-Mississippi States but to all the home-seekers of the world; and

WHEREAS a Bill has been introduced in Congress -H.R. 6193- asking for recognition of this enterprise from the National Government and an appropriation for a Government building and a National Exhibit; therefore be it

RESOLVED BY The O M A H A R E A L E S T A T E E X C H ANGE in regular Meeting assembled, in the City of O m a h a and State of Nebraska Exposition is hereby heartily approved and commended, and that the Senators and Representatives in Congress form Nebraska are requested to assist in securing National recognition of said Exposition and appropriation for a National Exhibit and proper buildings to contain the same, as provided for in said Bill H.R. 6193; and,

RESOLVED, That the Secretary be adn is hereby instructed to send copy of foregoing to the Senators and Representatives in Congress from

Nebr.

RESOLVED, That Secretary be also instructed to send an attested copy of the Resolutions to the Secretary of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, and a copy also to the Press of the State for publication.

Dated.

March 9th
1896.


[?]

I hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of Resolutions adopted by the Omaha Real Estate Exchange at a meeting held this day, at which a full representation was present.


[?] Sec'y.
 

WHEREAS, at the meeting of the Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress held in Omaha, Nebr., November 1895, it was recommended that an Exposition be held in Omaha during the months of August, September and October 1898.

AND WHEREAS, a company has been incorporated in Omaha for the purpose of forwarding this enterprise,

AND WHEREAS, we believe that an Exposition of the kind contemplated would be of incalculable benefit to the State of Nebraska,

BE IT RESOLVED, that the above mentioned Exposition has the hearty endorsement and approval of the mayor and council of the City of Hastings, and that the mayor be requested to forward copy of these resolutions to the member of congress from the 5th Congressional District of Nebraska, with his urgent request on behalf of the City that he give the matter his special attention and do all in his power to obtain the necessary legislation in recognition and aid of the aboved mentioned enterprise.

 
[?], Clerk. [?]W. HOUSEMAN, Sewer Com'r and Chief Fire Dept. WILL L. YETTER, Treasurer. A. H. Bowen, Attorney. C. H. WANZER, Chief Police.
CITY OF HASTINGS, NEBRASKA.
OFFICE OF CITY CLERK.
Hastings, Nebr., March 10 1896
[?] John A. Wakefield
Omaha Neb

Dear Sir

Enclosed please find copy of resolutions passed by our council last evening in regular session which we have this day forwarded to [?] from the big 5th

Very Deeply Yours

D. M. M. McElhinney Mayor
 
OFFICE OF CLERK OF THE CITY OF KEARNEY
C. A. PRESCOTT, CLERK.
Kearney, Neb. March 10, 1896
John A. Wakefield, Esq. Escty. Trans-Miss. and Int. Ex. Omaha, Neb.
Dear Sir:--

In accordance with yours of the 29th ult. the matter referred to was submitted to the city council of this city at its last session, and the following resolutions adopted.

"WHEREAS, We believe that an Exposition of all the products, industries and civilizations of the states west of the Mississippi river made at some central point where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth producing western states would be of great value, not only to the Tran-Mississippi states but to all the home seekers of the world, Therefore

RESOLVED, That the United States Congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha during the months of August, September and October in the year 1898, and that the representatives of Nebraska in Congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases, to assist in carrying out this enterprise, and that the Clerk be instructed to forward a copy of these Resolutions to Hon. John. M. Thurston, David H. Mercer and O. M. Kem, at Washington, D.C. and John A. Wakefield, Secretary of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha, Nebraska."

Trusting this will meet with your approval, I am

Yours truly,

C A Prescott
City Clerk

HOT SPRINGS STAR.

V. Prest for So. D

Thomas H. Wells of this city has been appointed vice president for South Dakota of the Trans Mississippi and International exposition to be held in Omaha in August, September and October, 1898. Mr. Wells' appointment will give general satisfaction throughout the state. He is an energetic and progressive young man and has already sent out numerous communications to leading influential citizens and newspapers throughout the state, calling attention to the importance of the project and urging the entire west to unite in its interest and thereby insure its complete success. Congressman Mercer of the Omaha district has asked congress to appropriate $500,000 in aid of the exposition. It is desired that all political conventions and other public gatherings pass suitable resolutions endorsing the exposition. This enterprise, if carried out as contemplated, will be of incalculable benefit to the entire west and should be encouraged in every possible way.

 
C. H. Spencer, President. Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary.
MERCHANTS EXCHANGE OF ST. LOUIS
St. Louis, March 9, 1896.
Mr. John A. Wakefield, Sec'ty Trans-Miss. and International Exposition, Omaha, Nebraska.
Dear Sir:-

Your Favor of the 29th ult. was duly received, and presented to the board of Directors of this Exchange at a meeting held this day. The board passed the following resolutions, copies of which I will send to our Senators and Representatives in Congress.

WHEREAS: It is proposed to hold a Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition in the City of Omaha, Nebraska, in 1898 for the purpose of showing to the world the vast resources and products of the farther West, and

WHEREAS: It has been the policy of the United States Government in the past to recognize such undertakings by a National exhibit, therefore

RESOLVED: That the Board of Directors of hte Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis are of the opinion that the proposed exposition will be of interest and profit to the whole country and especially to the Trans-Mississippi States, and therefore respectfully requests the honorable Senators and Representatives for Missouri to favor an appropriation by Congress for a National building and a National exhibit.

Yours truly,

Geo H Morgan
Secretary.
 

Copy of Resolutions introduced and unanimously adopted at The Northwestern Irrigation Convention, held at Sturgis, So. Dakota, March 5th, 1896:

R E S O L V E D, That it is the sense of this convention that we are heartily in favor of the holding of a Trans-Mississippi Exposition in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1898, as proposed by the Trans-Mississippi Congress, and we request our Senators and representatives in Congress to aid in the passage of a Bill for the appropriate recognition of this enterprise and for a suitable appropriation to assist in the same."

(J. M. Woods, President. (S. E. Wilson, Vice President. ( C. V. Gardner, Secretary.

AN IMMENSE AFFAIR

THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL.

Exposition Will be Held in the City of Omaha from Hune to November 1898—Its Scope—Exhibits Will be Brought from All Parts of the World—The Company is Already Incorporated With a Capital Stock of $100,000—Col. John Doniphan One of the Vice Presidents.

Col. John Doniphan of this city, was recently appointed by Gov. Stone, vice president for the state of Missouri, of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, to be held in the city of Omaha, beginning in June, and ending in November, 1898.

This project had its origin in the Trans-Mississippi congress held in Omaha last summer. The plan is now assuming definite shape. It will be under the control of a board of directors residing in Omaha. It is a stock company, incorporated under the laws of Nebraska. The capital stock is fixed at [?]00,000, enough of which has been sub-[?] to begin operations.

The president and secretary, designated in the articles of incorporation, are to be residents of Omaha. Each state and territory west of the Mississippi river will be officially represented by a vice-president appointed by the governor. There are twenty-four in all. It is called the Trans-Mississippi and International Exhibition, because it will be under the control of the states west of the Mississippi, although it is to be national and international in the scope of its exhibits.

The immediate object of the enterprise will be an exhibition of the great staples of the trans-Mississippi region, together with exhibits of the arts, industries, manufactures, illustrative of the progress, development and natural resources of that and other sections of this country as well as from Mexico, the Central and South American governments and other nations of the world.

The general scope and character of the exhibition will be similar to the exhibitions of Philadelphia, in 1876, Chicago in 1893, and the recent Atlanta exhibition. Each state within the region designated is invited to take part in the management of the exhibition, through its vice president, and all the states and important cities are invited to lend their commendations and endorsement, through their Associations, Conventions, Commercial Clubs, Boards of Trade, City Councils, etc.

A bill is now pending in congress, locating the exhibition in Omaha, providing for the admission of exhibits free of duty, and appropriating $200,000 for the erection of suitable buildings for a national exhibit, but limiting the government's liability to expenditures for the purpose expressed in the bill.

Col. Doniphan is much pleased with his appointment and is very enthusiastic over the prospects of what promises to be a successful exhibition.

From- V.P for Mo- Col. Jno. Doniphan
 

THE EXPOSITION AT OMAHA

All the Trans-Mississippi States Are Interested.

NATIONAL ASSISTANCE IS INVOKED.

Importance of the Nicaraguan Canal and the Necessity of North and South Trunk Line Roads.

Galveston, Texas, March 7.–The following letter fully explains its object:

Mr. Tom Richardson, Secretary Deep Water Utilization Committee, Galveston, Texas:

Omaha, Neb., March 5.–My Dear Sir: Referring to your recent favor relative to the advantages to be derived from holding the exposition of the Trans-Mississippi States and Territories at Omaha in 1898, with reference to encouraging business with the South, Mexico, Central America and the West Indies, and also the exporting and importing of Western products through the gulf ports, permit me, before taking up these points, to touch upon the origin of the exposition of the products, resources and development of the twenty-four States and Territory lying est of the Mississippi river, from Manitoba and British Columbia on the North to Mexico and the Gulf of Mexico on the south, and from the great river on the east to the Pacific ocean on the west, and the Trans-Mississippi congress which has unanimously indorsed it, selecting Omaha as the most central and convenient point where the people living in this vast region can easily congregate.

The Trans-Mississippi congress is composed of leading men of all classes, pursuits and professionals living west of the Mississippi river, who come together at stated periods to discuss methods and measures to promote the development and prosperity of these Western States and Territories, recommending such of them as its best judgement dictates, to the National congress, the States and the people for adoption. It knows neither creed, class nor politics, nor any special system of finance, but men of all opinions freely co-mingle and fraternize, with the sole purpose of serving their consistency to the best advantage. In this they act in unison, although the largest liberty of discussion is permitted.

The eighth annual session of this congress was held in this city in November last. It had a most notable and successful session. It was composed of high tariff men of all shades of opinion. It was in every sense a representative body of the people of the western half of the Union, form the gulf to the British possessions. In the discussions the fact became apparent that the States lying east of the Mississippi had been favored with great expositions of their resources and development, beginning with the Centennial in 1876 at Philadelphia, and continuing through the New Orleans Exposition, the World's Fair at Chicago and the Cotton States' Exposition at Atlanta, while the Pacific coast was favored by the Midwinter Fair at San Francisco.

While no exposition of the growth and prosperity of the Trans-Mississippi States and Territories, as the East, South, West and Pacific coast had such exhibits, the suggestion was made to have one for the States and Territories west of the Mississippi at some central point, which should be second only to the Columbian Exposition at Chicago in 1893. This met with instant favor, and the following resolution was offered and unanimously adopted by the congress on a rising vote:

Whereas, we believe than an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the States and Territories west of the Mississippi river, made at some central gateway, where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth-producing States, would be of great value, not only to the Trans-Mississippi States, but to all the home-seekers of the world; therefore

Resolved, That the United States congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi exposition at Omaha during the months of August, September and October, in the year 1898, and that the representatives of such states and Territories in congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases, to assist in carrying out this enterprise.

Such is the account of the Trans-Mississippi congress and the inception of the great exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898.

Please observe that it is not a local enterprise. On the contrary, it is to be general in every sense of the word, Omaha to be merely the point selected by the Trans-Mississippi congress and the general government where the exposition is to be held.

Our citizens realizing the honor placed upon them and perceiving the necessity of immediately beginning the work of preparation, have formed an organization under the style of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, in which provision is made for each State and Territory to have an equal representation in the management, through a vice president appointed by the governor of each State and Territory thereof west of the Mississippi river.

A matter of pressing importance upin our people was the necessity of securing action on the part of the States of Iowa and Utah, whose legislatures are now in session and will not be again for two years; also the action of congress in the present session. The State of Iowa officially recognized the exposition in the unanimous passage of a joint resolution by the legislature, instructing he congressional delegation of that State to favor National recognition and aid to the exposition. It is needless to say that great commonwealth is enthusiastic in favor of the exposition. Its prominent men and newspapers are outspoken in support of it and to these are added the leading newspapers of Chicago. Thus far the exposition is receiving unanimous support of all organizations to whom it has been presented, notably among the working men and labor organizations throughout the country. The press associations are also favoring it in the most unanimous manner. Utah will act favorably in a few days, and next winter when the remaining legislatures are in session all of the interested States and Territories will take the action necessary, as the exposition appears to be meeting with universal favor.

The States east of the Mississippi and foreign nations will be invited to make exhibits, and there is no doubt the exposition will be unexcelled in splendor over anything ever seen in the Trans-Mississippi region.

As to the advantages to be derived from holding the exposition with reference to encouraging business with the South, Mexico, Central American, at the West Indies and South America, as well as Europe and Asia, by reason of one of the principal objects of the exposition. In one of the discussions in the Trans-Mississippi congress leading up to the resolution favoring the exposition, a memorial was offered by a delegate from California asking the present National congress for such legislation as to insure prompt completion of the Nicaragua canal, under the control of the United States government, to insure to American commerce and other nations low tolls and freedom from discrimination of any kind. At the same session Hon. Howel Jones, president of the deep water harbors on the Gulf of Mexico to Western agriculture, showed that on this latitude and longitude (Omaha) the distance to Galveston was 585 miles less than the distance to New York. This being the central point, the difference will vary more or less according to locality. he said the great body of our exports are derived from the far,, (about 74 per cent or $627,216,656 in 1890) and that all of the coffee and seven-eighths of the sugar is imported (or $194,721,363 and $78,547,021 of wines in 1890) and most of the coffee consumed in the territory commercially tributary to Galveston is imported form Southern countries, and the sugar is imported from Cuba. Therefore, by virtue of hte shorter route via Galveston, as soon as this new trade is established, the people of the Northwest can import all the coffee and sugar we consume, and save money now paid to the longer route (of say 585 miles) via New York.

As to the exports, I am using the figures of the last census because they are official. The value of the cotton and cotton seed oil exported in 1890 amounted to $236,259,970, and the exports of breadstuffs $154,259,970. Of the latter the exports of corn amounted in round numbers to $43,555,000, wheat $45, 275,000 and flour of all kinds $57,980,000. In the same year the value of flour manufactured in the five Northwestern States was: Minnesota $60,158,088, Missouri $34,486,795, Nebraska $6,365,492, Kansas $17,420,475, Iowa $11,833,737, or a total of $130,264,587. I mention the item of flour because you will see that much of it is drawn from Minnesota and Missouri, the two largest Western flour manufacturing States fro export to South American ports via New York, which can be handled to greater advantage at Galveston with a through trunk railroad line, and the completion of the Nicaragua canal, making Galveston or New Orleans the nearest seaport to the Pacific South American states, as well as Europe, Brazil, Mexico and other points on the east.

Speaking of the importance of the Nicaragua canal, the Hon. Warner Miller in a recent address to the manufacturers in New York said we furnished $14,000,000 exports to Mexico, or 45 per cent, and took 76 per cent of her imports in 1893. The Central American States imported $21,000,000 of products, of which we furnished 24 1-2 per cent; they exported $30,000,000, of which we took 32 1-2 per cent. The South American States imported $400,000,000, of which we furnished 8 1-4 per cent; they exported $456,000,000, or which we took 45.6 per cent; Cuba exported $87,000,000 , of which we took 81 per cent, and imported $55,000,000 of which we furnished nearly 34 per cent. He said: "There is but one proper way of securing the United States its proper proportion of the vast trade of the Pacific, and that is by the construction of the Nicaragua canal."

Owing to its deep water facilities and the possession of a trunk railroad line (the Illinois Central) from Chicago, New Orleans is experiencing an expansion of trade and exports such as that city has never known before. Its exports of corn to Europe in January of the present year show an increase of 2,619,705 bushels, and the Illinois Central is making arrangements for it to attain to much larger proportions.

?

Before closing this communication I desire to call your attention to the vast wealth and resources of the Trans-Mississippi States, exclusive of the Territories, as compiled in the last census. Comprising two-thirds of the area of the United States, they contained a population of 16,545,506, an increase of nearly 46 per cent in ten years. They had 271,730,999 acres in farm lands, an increase of 49 per cent over 1880. Of these farm lands 158,166,581 acres were improved, an increase of 65 per cent in ten years. The value of farm lands, fences and buildings was $4,651,767,082, an increase of 112 per cent over 1880. The value of live stock on farms was $1,000,297,247, an increase of 81 per cent in ten years. These Trans-Mississippi States had 8,335,484 head of horses and mules, an increase of 75 per cent; 28,180,467 head of cattle, an increase of 84 per cent; 27,995,132 hogs, an increase of 46 per cent, and 16,222,927 sheep, an increase of 28 per cent over 1880.

Of dairy products they produced 336,502,311 pounds of butter in 1890, an increase of 87 per cent, and of eggs they produced 299,746,697 dozen an increase of 138 per cent in ten years.

The corn crop of 1890 amounted to 1,144,247,152 bushels, an increase of 56 per cent, and the yield of wheat was 242,482,378 bushels, an increase of 42 per cent. In cotton they raised 2,838,684 bales, an increase of 40 per cent, and they raised 297,606,080 pounds of cane sugar, and increase of 40 per cent over 1880. They harvested 29,,918,639 tons of hay in 1890, an increase of 173 per cent. The value of their factory product was $1,381,384,380, an increase of 239 per cent over 18880. This is but a partial account of their productions.

Of the aggregate wealth of the States in 1890 it amounted to the enormous sum of $19,661,387,036, an increase of 118 per cent; and that of the Territories was $628,392,459, an increase of 598 per cent, both representing a grand total of $20,289,778,495.

As to the advantages to be derived from holding the Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha, with reference to encouraging business with the South and other places, the figures are before you. If not convincing, look at the nine or more transcontinental railroad lines as a result of the demand for the completion of the Union and Central Pacific railroads, and the prodigious development of the country since. The Centennial of 1876 was followed by another remarkable internal development, in spite of the panic of 1878. Since the exposition at New Orleans, note the progress of that city and the Southwest. The World's Fair has been the worldwide in its benefits; and since the Atlanta Exposition the Cotton States are alive with people seeking homes, singly and in colonies.

The result of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition will be that it will bring the people of the South, Southwest and West into closer terms, leading to an increase of population of wealth, the formation of powerful North and South trunk railroad lines west of the Mississippi, where there are no navigable streams to Southern scaports, and the deepening and other improvements of the harbors on the Gulf, enabling you to handle your proportionate share of the trade, which you do not now, of the millions of people living in the central regions of this Republic.

To my mind, the beneficial results that will accrue to each of the States and Territories comprising the great Trans-Mississippi country from the holding of the exposition, will be so great that to neglect to foster and encourage it, bout by words of cheer and acts of appropriation providing fro State buildings and exhibits, will be to the very material disadvantage and loss of the State failing to so act, and I do not aim to take an optimistic view of the enterprise.

We desire the active aid and influence of your own and adjoining States, and trust that same may be exerted at this time in encouraging the passage of an act of congress, recognizing the enterprise and making a liberal appropriation for National buildings and National exhibits, and later on, that yours and adjoining States may take active steps looking to State buildings and State exhibits. The exposition would not be complete without a good representation form your section, and we hope to have it. Yours very truly,

John A. Wakefield, Secretary.
 

Resolution endorsing and approving the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition , passed by the Board of Trade, Laramie, Wyoming, at meeting held on March 12th, 1896.

RESOLVED,-that it is the sense of this Board that every possible encouragement and aid should be given to the promotion of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898; that we respectfully recommend that the Senators and Representatives from Wyoming in Congress support such movement for a liberal appropriation for a Government exhibit at said Exposition, and that we urge upon the Legislature and citizens of Wyoming early and vigorous preparation for presenting the industries and resources of Wyoming at such exposition.

 
State of Missouri
County of Buchanan
March 16th 1896.
St. Joseph, Mo.

Whereas the late Trans Mississippi Congress, composed of delegates from twenty-four ststes states and territories, lying west of the Mississippi river, adopted a resolution providing for holding an exposition to display the products, manufacturies and industries of t these ststes states and territories at Omaha Nebraska in the year of 1898. And whereas the holding of such exposition must greatly benifit the state of Missouri and especially Saint Joseph and other cities and town adjacent thereto.

Therefore be it resolved by the Commercial Club of Saint Joseph That the holding of the said Trans Mississippi exposition at Omaha is hereby approved and that our representatives and Senators in Comgress Congress be requested to co-operate with the Senators and Representatives form Nebraska in procuring the passage at the present session of Congress a bill giving national recognition of said exposition and providing for an appropriation for national exhibits and the necessary buildings to contain the same.

And that a copy of the foregoinh foregoing be furnished the Senators from Missouri and Hon. George C. Crowthers.

MR. CARPENTER OF OMAHA.

Yesterday The Herald received a pleasant call from Mr. Isaac W. Carpenter, one of Omaha's leading business men en route for the Pacific coast. Mr. Carpenter, in addition to being connected with business interests in Omaha, is also closely identified with the enterprise known as the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898; and incidentally Mr. Carpenter, in his journey to the coast, is creating public opinion favorable to the said exposition. He warns us that he is bu the forerunner of many that are to follow in the interest of this enterprise, for Omaha's businessmen have determined upon making the exposition a success. The call to join the movement comes at rather an inopportune time for Utah, since we have the burdens of statehood just thrown upon us, and in addition tot hat we are contemplating a great semi-centennial Inter-Mountain Exposition for the state of Utah during the summer of 1897, to commemorate the advent of the Utah pioneers into Salt Lake valley; and just how far this may exhaust our ability to indulge in the exposition business we cannot say; If, after a full consideration of the question by an interchange of thought, the states this side the Mississippi conclude that it will be a good thing to hold the proposed Trans-Mississippi Exposition. Utah will be in it with her neighbors, as her public spirit and love of enterprise will not permit her in such an affair to be conspicuous by her absence. And when it comes to a show-down of products, Utah is in it, both as to variety and abundance, and our interests no less than our pride would demand that we make known our resources that a just share of the home makers coming to the west may be induced to settle in the peaceful and mountain-shadowed valleys of Utah.

The Herald wishes you well, Mr. Carpenter, and may the Lord be good to you.

MICHAEL NEY.
 
Mayor's Office
Omaha Mch. 3, 1896.
W. J. Broatch, Mayor.
Hon
Mayor of the City of Atchinson, Kas.,
Dear Sir:

At the last session of the Trans-Mississippi Congress, which was held in this city in November, 1895, resolutions were adopted providing for the holding of an exposition for the Trans-Mississippi states and territories at Omaha from May until November, 1898. A bill is now pending before both houses of Congress asking national recognition and an appropriation for a government exhibit. A corporation has been organized in this city under the name of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition for the purpose of facilitating the work. Numerous commercial bodies and municipal corporations throughout the West have endorsed by formal resolution the plan of holding an exposition, which will advertise to the world the resources of the great West. The legislature of the state of Iowa recently passed a joint resolution by unanimous vote of both houses favoring the exposition.

I enclose herewith such information as I have at hand regarding the scope and objects of the exposition.

Believing that it will materially benefit the entire Trans-Mississippi territory, I respectfully ask that your bring the matter before your City Council, and, if it meets their approval, have resolutions endorsing the project passed and mail a copy of same to me and to your senators and representatives in Congress. By so doing you will conger a favor which I shall be glad to reciprocate.

Please request your newspapers to publish and send a marked copy to my address.

Very respectfully yours,

W.J. Broatch Mayor.
 

WHEREAS, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi River, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress held in this city in 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an Exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories, and

WHEREAS, Said convention voted unanimously to hold the said Exposition at the city of Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898, and

WHEREAS, The common interest of all the states and territories constituting this great region, as well as the country at large, will be greatly promoted thereby, and the material interests of this City will be especially benefited by such an exposition; therefore,

Be it Resolved, By the City Council of Omaha, the Mayor of the City concurring,

That the holding of said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is hereby heartily approved, and that the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Nebraska and the other Trans-Mississippi States are requested to use their best efforts in procuring the passage, at this session of Congress, of a bill giving National recognition to said Exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a National Exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same.

Be it Further Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be sent under seal of the City of Omaha, to the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Nebraska.

Passed March 3, 1896.

Approved March 5th, 1896.
W. J. BROATCH, Mayor.
BEECHER HIGBY, City Clerk.
W. A. SAUNDERS, President City Council.
 

WORKING FOR THE BIG SHOW

AT SALT LAKE CITY. (Salt Lake Tribune.)

The representatives of Omaha pluck and enterprise reached the city yesterday in a special car, attached to the afternoon Union Pacific train. The specific object of this visit it to work up interest in the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition =, that will be held in the Gate City from June to November of 1898.

In the party are Guerdon W. Wattles, vice president of the Union National Bank, who is president of the exposition; Secretary John A. Wakefield, an extensive wholesale lumber dealer; W. R. Bennett, who is at the head of the W. R. Bennett company, the largest department house in Omaha; John H. Evans, president of the Bank of Commerce; Charles Metz, general manager of Metz Bros. Brewing company; Henry A. Thompson, senior member of Thompson, Belden & Co.; G. M. Hitchcock, proprietor of the World-Herald; Z. T. Lindsey, who is at the head of a large rubber goods house; Captain H. E. Palmer, member of the fire and police commission, and City Attorney A. S. Hazelton of Council Bluffs.

They will remain in the city several days, during which they hope to meet as many as possible of the leading business and professional men of Salt Lake and Utah. There will be incidental sight-seeing in connection with the visit, though probably this feature will remain very decidedly in the background, as nearly if not quite all of the gentlemen have visited Utah before, and also because of the object of the pilgrimage westward has to do with a project that has already grown very dear to the Omaha heart, and one that already seems placed upon the plane of certitude and success.

Recently the moral support of Utah was given the project by a joint resolution, adopted by both branches of the legislature.

The city council and board of trade of St. Louis have agreed by resolution to aid the enterprise. Kansas City and other cities have followed with similar promises of support, so that the Omaha men who assumed the burden laid upon them by the Trans-Mississippi congress feel confident of justifying the trust imposed in them.

CAME WITH GENERAL CONNOR.

Captain Palmer will probably find more to interest him during the sojourn in Zion than any other member of the party, for the reason that his consists in the revivifying of old friendships and a renewal of bygone memories. Captain Palmer came to the Salt Lake valley with General Connor and was his chief of staff in 1865. In the latter part of that year he left the army for the busy life of a mining camp, and 1867 found him in charge of the Salmon River (Idaho) News. Captain Palmer has been in nearly every mining camp of the west, being like the remainder of the party, a thorough westerner.

About a year before General Connor's death Captain Palmer visited Salt Lake and upon calling upon General Connor found that he had just received permission from the war department to be buried in the cemetery at Fort Douglas. Together they went to the post and selected a sunny spot on the hillside, where the general later was laid to rest, Then they staked the corners and departed.

THE ONLY SURVIVOR.

Captain Palmer is the only surviving member of General Connor's staff. He says that when the command started eastward everyone believed that its destination was the scene of hostilities in the far east. President Lincoln, the commander of the department of the Pacific, and General Connor were the only one who knew that its destination was Salt Lake City, [?] until the command was halted at the [?]ent site of Fort Douglas did it [?] known what were the intentions of the government. "Many stories have been told of General Connor's first coming to Salt Lake City," said Captain Palmer, "But the truth has usually been missed. General Connor left his command about 100 miles from the city and, disguised as a cowboy, came to Salt Lake City and remained two days, during which he selected for his camp and plateau east of town, where Fort Douglas is now situated. During his visit to town only one man knew of his presence, and he was a trusted friend with whom he stayed."

THE TIES THAT BIND. (Salt Lake Herald.)

We had a pleasant call last evening from G. W. Wattles, esq., president of the Trans-Mississippi exposition; Captain H. E. Palmer and Editor G. M. Hitchcock of the Omaha World-Herald, all of Omaha. These gentlemen are here in the interest of the Trans-Mississippi exposition. They will find the sentiment of the people of Utah heartily in favor of the exposition, and that the people will do what they can to make it a success. From the cold, unsentimental business point of view they will do this, and they will also do it from the sentimental point of view. The ties that bind Utah to Omaha are the memories of the past, when Omaha was the outfitting point for emigrants to the west. It was from there that the handcart companies and the bull-team trains started for Utah. The gentlemen who have come form Omaha in the interest of the exposition will be welcomed by the people of Utah, who will give this great enterprise all the aid in their power.

WELL RECEIVED. (Salt Lake Herald.)

Guerdon W. Wattles, president; John A. Wakefield, secretary; W. R. Bennett, Charles Metz and Henry A. Thompson, directors of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition company of Omaha, together with G. M. Hitchcock, H. E. Palmer, A. S. Hazelton and Z. T. Lindsey, constitute the party of gentlemen which arrived in this city yesterday over the Union Pacific in the interest of the exposition which will be held at Omaha in 1898.

Mr. Wattles is the vice president of the Union National bank of Omaha; Mr. Wakefield is the leading lumber merchant of the Gate City; Mr. Bennett company, one of the largest in Omaha; Mr. Metz is the general manager of the Metz Bros. Brewing company; Mr. Thompson, Belden & Co., Mr. Hitchcock is the owner of the World-Herald, the leading paper of the city; Captain Palmer is a member of the fire and police commission and is well known in this region because of his connection at one time as adjutant on the staff of General Connor; Mr. Hazelton is the city attorney of Council Bluffs, Ia., while Mr. Lindsey is the head of one of the largest wholesale rubber goods firms in the west. The party is a representative one in every respect.

As stated, the gentlemen are her for the purpose of conferring with the leading men of the state, the governor and other officials, on the matter of having Utah co-operate in the holding of the exhibit in Omaha two years from next June. When informed by a Herald man that the state legislature had already passed a resolution indorsing the scheme the party was greatly pleased, as they had not been so informed and were prepared to make an earnest effort in that direction.

However, the fact that this resolution has been passed will not deter them from calling on the governor and other state officers, as well as the prominent men of the city, and urging that this state take an active part in the affair.

Mr. Wattles, the president, said last evening that the exposition project was meeting with a great deal of encouragement at the hands of the western states. They were in Cheyenne Saturday, and were received by the governor of Wyoming who, with other representative men, pledged the hearty support of the state. On their return they will stop of at Denver and will talk the matter over with the Colorado officials.

The states in the region between the Mississippi and the Eastern Colorado line have already done much toward the exposition. Iowa's legislature has appropriated $50,000 and expects to appropriate twice that amount in addition. Kansas, Missouri and other adjacent states will be heard from at the sessions of hteir legislatures this coming winter, and from appearances it would appear as though the display will be a great success, and one which Utah cannot keep away from, if she wanted to.

However, it is not the purpose of these gentlemen to rush into the legislature and ask that the doors of the state vaults be opened to allow them to go in and help themselves. On the contrary, the city of Omaha has agreed to raise a round half million for the support of the exposition and it is for the purpose of ascertaining whether the surrounding commonwealths are going to take a part that the citizens send this delegation on a trip to "feel the public pulse."

They will today call upon Hon. George Q. Cannon, Hon. Heber J. Grant, Hon. Thomas G. Webber of the Co-op., Hon. Joseph R. Smith, Hon. John Henry Smith, Hon. George M. Cannon, Abram H. Cannon, Governor Wells, Secretary Hammond and other state officers, Hon. John E. Dooley, Hon. R. C. Chambers, May Glendenning, Colonel N. Treweek, Richard Mackintosh, Hon. George M. Scott and other leading citizens, with a view of sounding them for opinions. It is expected that public sentiment can be ascertained in the brief space of one day, so thorough will be the character of the work, but if the ground cannot be all covered, the party will remain over one day longer.

Before the members leave they will take a trip to Mercur. They have a Pullman car, which was placed at their disposal by the Pullman company, and Colonel Clayton of the Salt Lake & Los Angeles will have them taken down to Mercur with a special engine.

The greater portion of the party have been in Salt Lake years ago, and are loud in their praises of the improvements which have taken place since their first visits here. The fame of Mercur has extended down eastward and the members of the delegation say they must see the place ere they leave.

The party spent yesterday in looking over the city, a visit to Fort Douglas being among the pleasures.

 

WYOMING WILL HELP

Governor and State Officers Are Enthusiastic Over the Big Exposition.

Promise to Do All Within Their Power to Help Make It a Grand Success.

Citizens of Cheyenne Turn Out to Give the Excursionists a Most Hearty Welcome.

Unasked, They Had Already Taken Steps to Secure State and National Appropriations.

Omaha Men Royally Entertained and Their Mission Meets With Indorsement—All Friendly Toward Nebraska.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Cheyenne, Wyo., March 21.—The delegation of Omaha citizens representing the Trans-Mississippi exposition had a busy day in this city. The members of the party arrived here at 8 o'clock this morning and soon after their arrival were called upon by a number of representative citizens. At 11 o'clock the visitors were provided with carriages and, under the guidance of Mayor Merritt, Hon. E. A. Slack of the Sun-Leader, Judge C. F. Miller, Hon. Louis Kirk and others, were driven to Fort Russell and other points of interest about the city. At 2 o'clock the party, by appointment, called upon Governor Richards at the state capitol to discuss the exposition prospect. With the governor at the conference were State Engineer Mead, Chief Justice Groesbeck, Justice Conaway, Attorney General Fowler, State Superintendent Miss Reel, representatives from the state treasurer's and secretary of state's office and all the members of the state board of land commissioners.

EXPLAINS THE OBJECTS.

President Wattles of the delegation explained in a comprehensive statement the objects and expectations of the movement for the Omaha exposition, and asked that the representatives of the state of Wyoming join with Nebraska and the other trans-Mississippi states in urging favorable congressional action on the bill now pending in congress to appropriate funds for a national building and exhibit and to the recognition of the exposition as an international affair.

Mr. Hitchcock was called upon and he very clearly pointed out the advantages which would accrue to Wyoming and all of the western states if the exposition could be made a success. Immigration, he said, comes in periodical waves. For some time the tendency had been against the west, but he now believed we were on the threshold of an advancing wave of eastern and foreign immigration, and the west, by advertising its resources and home-making capabilities, should be prepared to divert to itself a share of this immigration. The Atlanta exposition had been of almost untold benefit to the south and, with energy and work for which the west is noted, the Omaha exposition could be made of wonderful aid to the west.

GOVERNOR IS ENTHUSIASTIC.

Governor Richards was called upon, and in a very pleasing speech he guaranteed the delegation his personal aid in the promotion of the success of the exposition, and was sure that the entire state would be with him in the matter. He had at various times been asked to appoint delegations and extend state aid to expositions in Mexico and in the far east. He had not been very enthusiastic in his responses. But when the Omaha proposition was brought to his attention he was from the outset willing and anxious to lend it a willing hand. He had already written to Senators Warren and Clark and Congressman Mondell asking them to support and aid in the passing of the bill appropriating funds for a national building and exhibit. He had no hesitation in promising to urge the Wyoming legislature, which meets January next, to make an appropriation so that Wyoming may be creditably represented at the Omaha exposition.

State Engineer Mead was called upon and said he would give the project his most cordial support. Many of the interests of the states of Nebraska and Wyoming were identical, and the welfare of one was bound up in that of the other. Nearly all of the great lines of railway in Wyoming center in Nebraska's greatest city.

WILL DO ALL THEY CAN.

Nebraska, he said, is the market place for Wyoming's coal oil and its live stock products. Omaha capitalists had done more than any other to aid in developing a number of resources, and Wyoming will be glad of an opportunity to reciprocate by doing all she possibly can to aid in making the exposition a grand success.

Features of the exposition and its effect upon the west, if successfully carried through, were then made by Captain Palmer, Mr. Bennett, Mr. Hazelton and Mr. Wakefield. Attorney General Fowler ans Judges Groesbeck and Conaway, in short addresses, told the visitors of some of the resources of Wyoming and explained how beneficial their development would be to Nebraska and Omaha. Miss Estelle Reel, state superintendent of public instruction, was called upon to speak for the women of the state, and in a very clever talk promised the support of the ladies of Wyoming for the exposition. After the conference a large number of business men called upon the visitors and arrangements were made for a public meeting during the evening.

CITIZENS PLEDGE SUPPORT.

The public meeting at the city hall was largely attended and was a complete success. Addresses were made by Mayor Samuel Merrill, ex-Mayor T. F. Stahle, Hon. A. D. Kelly, E. A. Slack, proprietor of the Sun-Leader, and other prominent citizens, and resolutions were adopted pledging the co-operation and support of the citizens of Cheyenne to the work of making the exposition a success.

The visitors left at 10 o'clock for Salt Lake City, well pleased with their reception in Cheyenne.

UTAH IS IN THE PROCESSION

The Citizens of the Young State Realize the Importance of the Exposition.

Joint Resolution Passed in the Legislature Giving Approval and Promising Aid.

Omaha Delegation Enthusiastically Received by Officers and People—Inter-Mountain Show Abandoned.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Salt Lake City, Utah, March 23.—The delegation from Omaha has been enthusiastically received by the state officers of Utah and the dignitaries of the Mormon church. Today the delegation met the presidents of the churches by appointment and received assurances of each president that the exposition would be promoted in every way possible.

Governor Wells sent a special message to the legislature notifying the members that the Omaha delegation was in the city and desired a conference. The speaker of the house and the president of the senate appointed committees on conference and they met the Omaha delegation in the office of Governor Wells, where speeches were made by Messrs. Wattles, Hitchcock and Lindsey of Omaha and Hazelton of Council Bluffs. Governor Wells responded and was followed by the members of the legislature. Every member favored the exposition and promised Utah's co-operation. The legislature of Utah has adopted the following joint resolution without a dissenting vote:

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river at the trans-Mississippi congress of 1895 adopted a resolution for the holding of an exposition of the products, manufactures, arts and industries of those states and territories, and,

Whereas, The said convention decided to hold the said exposition at Omaha, in the year 1898, and,

Whereas, The common interest of the states and territories constituting this great region will be promoted thereby, and the interests of the state of Utah will be especially benefited by such an exposition, be it therefore

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the senators and representatives from Utah in the national congress by the secretary of state, with the request that they promote as far as possible the said exposition.

Many former residents of Omaha have called on the delegation and greatly helped to forward the exposition idea. Colonel Clayton took the delegates in a special car to see the splendid new pavilion on Salt lake. The pavilion cost $250,000, is Moorish in style and has a dancing floor for 1,000 couples. Tomorrow part of the delegation goes to visit the great mining town of Mercur and the other part goes to Ogden to hold a meeting. The delegation reaches Denver Wednesday evening or Thursday morning and has the assurance of a good reception.

In order not to interfere with the Trans-Mississippi exposition at Omaha Utah has decided to abandon her proposed Inter-Mountain exposition at Salt Lake in 1897.

The Omaha delegation is delighted with the interest and enthusiasm manifested in Utah and Wyoming and expects to reach home Friday or Saturday.

 

OGDEN IS ENTHUSIASTIC.

People Promise to Help Boom Exposition.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Ogden, Utah, March 24.—The Omaha exposition delegation reached Ogden this afternoon and left on the evening train for Denver, where it will remain over Thursday.

A committee of prominent citizens met the delegates at the depot and escorted them to the Reed hotel, where an informal reception was held and a dinner served.

The people of Ogden are greatly interested in the exposition plans. They are also feeling very enthusiastic over the approaching completion of the great water power project on which several hundred men are now being employed. This power is to furnish electricity for manufacturing and also to operate the electric line now half constructed between Salt Lake City and Ogden.

 

OMAHA ABROAD.

IN DENVER.

(Denver Times.)

On Wednesday and Thursday of the present week Denver will entertain ten representatives of the business interests of Omaha—well known men of that city who are in the west with the idea of awakening interests in the Trans-Mississippi exposition which it is proposed to hold in Omaha in 1898. It will be the effort of the delegation to get an indorsement from Colorado for the exposition. At the head of the party is G. W. Wattles, president of the exposition, and he is accompanied by Mr. Wakefield, the secretary; J. R. Dody, G. M. Hitchcock and others.

The party left Omaha last week in a special car and arrived in Cheyenne on Saturday. There they conferred with the governor and other state officials and were given considerable encouragement. Today they are in Rawlins, and from there go directly to Salt Lake City to meet the members of the state legislature, citizens and state officials. A letter from Mr. Hitchcock states that they will be in Denver on Wednesday.

Mr. Hitchcock seems especially anxious to secure the co-operation of Denver and Colorado, especially as this city last year had plans of its own for an exposition. It is promised that the Omaha affair will by no means be local in its scope, and it is desired to have the entire trans-Mississippi country represented. During its visit to Denver the delegation will meet prominent citizens and will call on the governor. At the points where the representatives have been stopping it has been the custom to appoint committees to meet them, and it has been suggested that the chamber of commerce or some other body take the matter up here and see that the visitors are properly entertained.

The Omaha proposition is a big one, and it is said that the citizens of that place have taken it up with enthusiasm. There is already a bill before congress for a government appropriation.

IT WILL WIN.

(Hot Springs (S. D.) Star.)

The Trans-Mississippi and International exposition to be held at Omaha, beginning in June and ending in November, 1898, now has a complete organization, with a local incorporated company, with vice presidents from the various states. They are already getting down to effective work and have sent to businness​ men's associations, mayors and city councils in each town of the trans-Mississippi territory having a population of 1,000 or more requests for the adoption of resolutions indorsing their enterprise. Our city council will probably consider such a resolution at its next meeting, and there is no question but it will pass unanimously. A bill has been introduced in congress making an appropriation for the exposition, and the indications are that it will pass. Various states are also expecting to make appropriations, and this exposition will beyond question be one of the grandest of its kind ever held in the United States. These western states are very enthusiastic for this exposition, and they may well afford to be. Thomas H. Wells of this city, who is South Dakota's vice president, is working up sentiment in the state in its favor.

IN CHEYENNE.

(Special to the Salt Lake Tribune.)

Cheyenne, Wyo., March 21.—Ten of the leading business men of Omaha, representing the Trans-Mississippi exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898, reached here this morning by special train and spent the day in the city working up favorable sentiment for the Omaha project. The party were met by a number of Cheyenne business men and taken in carriages to Fort Russell and other interesting points about the city. This afternoon the delegation held a conference with Governor Richards and other state officials at the capitol. The purposes and benefits of the proposed exposition were set forth by President Hitchcock of the Omaha World-Herald and other members of the delegation. Governor Richards, in reply, said that he fully indorsed the plans of the Omaha people and had already secured the promise of all of Wyoming's representatives in congress for their support of the bill appropriating funds for a national exhibit and building. He promised to recommend to the next Wyoming legislature that an apropriation​ be made large enough for a creditable exhibit from Wyoming.

Addressing indorsing the exposition project were also made by Judges Groesbeck and Conaway of the state supreme court, State Engineer Mead, State Superintendent of Schools Miss Reel, Attorney General Fowler and others.

This evening a well-attended public meeting was held in the city hall, where a number of speeches were made favorable to the exposition.

The visitors left for the west at 10 o'clock and will reach Salt Lake City tomorrow afternoon.

WELL ENTERTAINED.

(Special to the Salt Lake Herald.)

Cheyenne, Wyo., March 21.—A party of leading Omaha business men reached here this morning by special train en route to Salt Lake, Ogden, Denver and other western points, at each of which they will work up interest in the Trans-Mississippi International exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898.

In the party are Guerdon W. Wattles, vice president of the Union National bank; John H. Evans, president of the National Bank of Commerce; Charles Metz, general manager of Metz Bros.' Brewing company; Henry A. Thompson of Thompson, Belden & Co.; G. M. Hitchcock, proprietor of the Omaha World-Herald; A. S. Hazelton, city attorney of Council Bluffs; Z. T. Lindsey of the Lindsely wholesale establishment; H. E. Palmer, insurance, and John A. Wakefield, wholesale lumber dealer.

While in Cheyenne the party was taken in carriages to Fort Russell and other points of interest about the city and held a very satisfactory conference with Governor Richards and other state officials as to Wyoming's attitude toward the exposition. Substantial aid was promised the exposition from Wyoming and every effort will be made here to aid in the success of the undertaking of the Omaha people. The visitors left for the west this evening and will reach Salt Lake tomorrow afternoon. Ogden and Denver will be visited on the return trip.

EXPOSITION A GOOD THING.

G. F. Swift of Swift Packing Company Gives His Opinion.

G. F. Swift of the Swift Packing company is at the Paxton today, returning tonight to Chicago. He has been out to San Francisco for the past two weeks, looking after business interests there. It was his opinion that San Francisco had suffered less from the financial stringency than most eastern cities, and expressed himself as being very well pleased with the business of the company there.

He anticipates that the packing house in South Omaha will soon have a decided increase in business. Although since last spring there have been fewer cattle to kill, yet everything has gone well, considering. And there being "oodles" of corn in the cribs, there will be plenty to do in the future. He thought the cattle loan company projected by P. D. Armour and local capitalists to give cattle men money to operate with, as described in the World-Herald some time ago, was a good thing, although he was not actively interested in it. He thought that what would benefit the cattle growers would be a good thing for the packing houses.

Speaking of expositions, Mr. Swift said he was not informed upon the subject of the Trans-Mississippi exposition. "Expositions, as a rule, are a good thing for a country," he added; "the world's exposition did Chicago lots of good, and I have no doubt benefited the country at large. I visited the Atlanta exposition, and considered it a success, except in one respect. It was held too late in the season, and the weather became disagreeable and cold. The Trans-Mississippi exposition ought to be a good thing for Omaha, and for the west."

Mr. Swift will probably visit the packing house in South Omaha today, and leave for Chicago tonight.

ENCOURAGEMENT.

WELCOME IN DENVER.

(Denver Post.)

A party of Omaha business men have invaded [?]est to arouse interest in the coming Trans-Mississippi exposition to be given [?] Nebraska metropolis. They will t[?] Denver on their way home and should [?]ven hearty encouragement. Any n[?]t which tends to build up the western section of the country should be accorded hearty support in Colorado.

WERE WELL RECEIVED.

(Salt Lake Herald.)

The distinguished party, composed of some of the officers and directors of the proposed Trans-Mississippi and International exposition at Omaha in 1898, which arrived in this city last Sunday spent yesterday in reviewing Zion and consulting with some of its leading business men. To say they were not greatly impressed with the city and its people would be stating an untruth. Not only were the distinguished gentlemen representing the nucleus of Nebraska and Iowa business enterprise, favorably impressed with the boundless resources of this young state, which they confessed the eastern people know so little about, but the scenes on all sides revealing the result of the pluck and energy of a hardy people was, according to their own statements, beyond expectations.

The prime object of their visit here is to interest the people in the proposed exposition to be held at Omaha. At the close of the day they expressed themselves as entirely satisfied with their mission, and will depart with the assurance from leading business men and legislative members that when the time comes Utah will do her share, realizing as her people do the value of making a display of her resources, as it might be called, at home.

CALLED UPON PRESIDENT CANNON.

During the day the party called upon President George Q. Cannon, upon whose suggestion, more than anyone else, the idea of a Trans-Mississippi exposition was conceived. Mr. Cannon, as president of the trans-Mississippi congress, and on several occasions a delegate from Utah, has made for himself a name among the Mississippi states. The party was graciously received by him and every assurance given that Utah would lend her influence to make the enterprise a great success.

CONFERENCE WITH GOV. WELLS.

In the late afternoon the distinguished party were conducted to the private office of Governor Wells, where also Secretary of State Hammond and a legislative committee from each of the two branches were present.

After introductions all around President Gurdon W. Wattles of the exposition company briefly outlined the objects of their mission. He expressed his gratitude at meeting the state's executive and at the latter's consideration in arranging for a meeting. They came not, he said, as a party versed in oratory, but simply as representative business men, interested in the advertising and consequently the upbuilding of the great west.

HOW IT ORIGINATED.

Taking up the object of their visit to Utah, Mr. Wattles said the exposition was the result of the recommendations of the trans-Mississippi congress. At the last meeting, held at Omaha, a resolution was passed indorsing such a project. Since then Omaha's business men took the matter in hand, incorporated a company, elected officers and directors whose business ability was representative, and now only ask that adjoining states that would naturally be benefited by the enterprise lend their influence in securing national recognition. Omaha itself expects to subscribe $500,000, at least, toward the enterprise and Iowa had done much in the way of assistance. Mr. Wattles said that the people of his city had not connected themselves with the undertaking unmindful of the hard times and the burden it would mean to the city in a business way. Omaha had been selected because of its central location and excellent transportation facilities.

It was the opportune time, he thought, to advertise when times are hard. The Atlanta exposition did much to advertise the resources of the south, and the cotton states are already beginning to reap the harvest. By arranging a great exposition in the west the home seeker and those seeking to multiply their capital would again be turned toward the setting sun. The advantage to be derived would be great, and although the men at the head of the undertaking did not come to ask anything at the hands of Utah's people, they felt that the exposition would be incomplete without participation by this state.

Hon. G. M. Hitchcock, owner of the Omaha World-Herald, was next called upon. He said the people of his town realized at the outset that the co-operation and support of all the adjoining states would be necessary in order to make the enterprise excusable or successful. An exposition which is calculated to demonstrate to the east and outer world that the great west has abundant resources awaiting the arrival of investing capital would be a failure or fall far short of its object unless for such aid from the surrounding states. Therefore all western states should stand together. Mr. Hitchcock said the promoters realized now more than ever the need of assistance from this state. Here was represented the pluck and energy of the west; the sights on all hands testified to the great future of the state, and now he believed its resources should be advertised abroad. The same spirit which is forging Utah to the front rank of western states was needed, he said, to make their exposition a success.

Hon. A. S. Hazelton, city attorney of Council Bluffs, was next introduced and spoke in the same vein as those who preceded him. "We come for two purposes," he said. "First, on an educational mission. We wanted to inform you of the object of this enterprise. We are pleasantly surprised, however, to find that you have already performed one of the objects of our trip—to secure the passage of a memorial to congress asking for an appropriation. Then we want your state to be represented, and we come to arouse your enthusiasm in this respect."

So far as asking congress for an appropriation, Mr. Hazelton said they were simply asking for something that was their right. The east and the south had secured national aid and now the rights of the west should be recognized.

THE GOVERNOR RESPONDS.

Responding, Governor Wells stated having received a letter from the secretary of the exposition company some time ago. He at once transmitted it to the legislature, and the result was a joint memorial indorsing the undertaking and directing Utah's representatives in congress to use their influence to make it a success.

The governor then stated that owing to the peculiar condition that Utah finds itself owing to lately securing statehood he could not pledge any support in a financial way, especially at this session. Owing to the fact that he did not know just what the revenue will aggregate he would not be willing to ask any appropriation from the present session would take some action in having the state represented as it properly should be. He also called the attention of the gentlemen to the proposed Pioneer celebration that much of the spare cash would be used in making this celebration a success.

Following the governor, Senators Booth, Miller and Candland, representing the senate, and Representatives Taylor, Smoot, Clark and Harris assured the visitors of their hearty support, but coincided with the view of the governor that it would not be advisable to ask an appropriation from the president session.

SECRETARY HAMMOND.

Secretary Hammond thought Utah would be found on the ground when the proper time comes, and would be a formidable competitor for honors.

Z. T. Lindsey, a wholesale rubber merchant and member of the party, thought the benefits to this state resulting from a good display could not well be overestimated.

Concluding President Wattles thanked the governor and the legislative members for their assurance of hearty support, which met with the expectations of the entire party.

 
39

ENTHUSIASM EVERYWHERE.

(Salt Lake Tribune.)

Governor Wells arranged a meeting yesterday for the Omaha visitors and a committee of the legislature for 5 o'clock in his office. At that hour the small room which does temporary duty as an executive office was crowded as it has never been before. Private Secretary Case brought in a lot of additional chairs, and when the meeting was ready for business there was hardly room enough for freedom of action.

Governor Wells, Secretary of State Hammond and the following members of the committees on manufactures and commerce of the two houses of the legislature were present: Senators Booth, Glen Miller and Candland; Rrepresentatives​ Taylor, Smoot, Clark, Maughan and Harris.

The Omaha delegation, ten in number, were ushered in by D. C. Evans, who introduced the visitors to the governor, the latter presenting in turn the legislative committeemen. The Omaha men were Gurdon W. Wattles, John A. Wakefield, W. R. Bennett, John H. Evans, Charles Metz, Henry A. Thompson, G. M. Hitchcock, Z. T. Lindsey, Captain H. E. Palmer, also A. S. Hazelton of Council Bluffs.

MISSION OF THE OMAHAS.

When the introductions were over Governor Wells expressed pleasure at meeting the visitors and requested them to state their errand.

Mr. Wattles, the chairman of the delegation, responded as follows: "We are not orators, but a delegation of business men from Omaha, come to state a business men from Omaha, come to state a business proposition, in which we think you are interested in a business way. The trans-Mississippi congress met in Omaha last November, when the question of holding a Trans-Mississippi exposition was discussed. A resolution was passed favoring the exposition and Omaha was selected as the place. Since then the people of Omaha have taken hold of the matter. A corporation has been formed and the people of Omaha and the state will raise about $500,000. A bill is pending in congress appropriating $250,000. We realize that the exposition comes at a time when we all feel poor, but we are doing our best to make it a great success. We have met with great encouragement throughout the west. Iowa will make an appropriation of $50,000 for a building. We have been cordially greeted by your governor and other prominent citizens, notably George Q. Cannon. We hear with pleasure that your legislature has taken cognizance of the exposition. We believe it will be a wise move for Utah to be represented, for while your resources are great they are not known to many people even in the trans-Mississippi country. The south has had a great impetus by reason of advertising its resources at the Atlanta exposition and has demonstrated the value of such a display. There is a great tide of immigration coming, and Utah should prepare to get her share of it. We ask nothing at your hands now further than your good will."

G. M. Hitchcock of the World-Herald said: "At the outset of the enterprise we realized that it would be necessary to secure the active co-operation of the states of the entire west in order to make the exposition excusable, if not successful. An exposition that would fall short of showing all the resources of this great section of the country would be a failure, and hence we ask the assistance of your state and the others of the great west. I have it on the authority of the editor of the Atlanta Constitution that the beneficial results of the exposition there to the city and the nine co-operating southern states were more than a hundred fold. Utah's ardent support we must have. Nowhere else is there such an example of human pluck and human enterprise as we have seen in Utah. It has fairly made us ashamed of what we have done in Nebraska when we see what you have accomplished in this former desert. The men who made Utah and the spirit that has made her great we want represented at the Omaha exposition."

TELLS HOW IOWA FEELS.

City Attorney Hazelton of Council Bluffs, Ia., said: "I came along with the Omaha men to tell you how we Iowans feel about this exposition. At the trans-Mississippi congress there was a sentiment that something was wrong with this western section of the union, and an exposition was decided on to apply the remedy. Your enterprising fellow citizen, George Q. Cannon, lent valuable aid to the project, and I might say did more for it than any one else. People in other parts of the country are ignorant of the resources of the west, and the exposition was decided on to acquaint the people of other states with what we have to offer. When Omaha and Nebraska assumed the obligation of the exposition, Iowa joined heartily in the project and will do all in her power to make the exposition a success. We want your help in getting the proper legislature through congress, and this you can do through congress, and this you can do through your delegation, who, we are glad to say, are favorable to the enterprise. If you have any influence with other delegations we ask you to use that to the same end."

GOVERNOR WELLS REPLY.

Governor Wells said: "It is already known to you what Utah has done to encourage the exposition in the passage of a resolution. I don't know what further we can say to you at this time. I am in hearty accord with you and believe that Utah should be represented. I know your exposition will be much more successful if Utah is represented than if she is not. It is my mind, and I think it is the sentiment of the legislature, to have an exhibit at Omaha, but the appropriations for that purpose had better be deferred until the next session, which meets a year from now. In 1897 we will be 50 years old. Next July a year it will be a half century since two tired travelers first gazed on Salt Lake valley. It is possible we shall want some appropriations for a celebration of that event, which is of great importance to us. Whether that will take the form of an exposition remains to be seen, but you can safely leave the matter to the legislature of next year, which will, in my opinion, do what is right in the premises."

VIEWS OF LEGISLATORS.

Senator Booth said it was a great pleasure to meet the visitors. He knew the great benefits to be gained by the exposition, and thought all the states of the west should aid each other. He did not think it wise to make any appropriation at this session, owing to the fact that the revenues of the state are still an unknown quantity. With statehood came increased burdens. The first state tax had not yet been levied, but he thought the revenues would be ample to meet current expenses and possibly make an appropriation, so that Utah will be represented at Omaha. He believed the exposition would be a great success.

Senator Glen Miller said he had lived near Nebraska and knew very well the pluck and enterprise of the people of Omaha and the indomitable spirit which made the town. At present Utah has to prepare for housekeeping as a state. Next year these unusual expenses will not be a burden upon the state. He believed thoroughly in advertising, and thought the west had been backward in advertising itself. It had been like Ireland in trying to help others, but subjecting itself. The Omaha exposition would give the west an opportunity that it should take advantages of to make known its resources.

Representative Taylor said he had always admired the enterprise of the people of Omaha and was heartily in sympathy with the spirit of the exposition. The legislature had passed the resolution with unanimity, and if the revenues would justify it he felt sure the next legislature would make an appropriation to provide for Utah's representation.

ALL SPOKE ONE WAY.

Representative Smoot spoke in a similar vein. He said the people of Utah were conservative, and he hoped the visitors would not be discouraged at not getting positive assurances at this time. Utah always came to the front at the proper time, and when another legislature assemled​ he did not doubt but that the state would do as all her citizens ever do—her full duty.

Senator Candland said he was born a Ute, but had visited Omaha and admired the city. he believed in the exposition, believed it should receive national aid, and believed that Utah should be represented.

Secretary of State Hammond added a few words in the same strain.

Representative Clark also spoke briefly in favor of the exposition.

Z. T. Lindsey, the wholesale rubber man of Omaha, said he could say something about Utah which not everybody knew. Utah has a rubber mine. He had been interested in it for four years and thought it was a great thing. It was a peculiar deposit that made the best kind of varnish, and that ought to be exhibited at Omaha. Mr. Lindsey promised that if Utah appropriated $100,000 she would gain 100,000 people.

Mr. Wattles closed the meeting by expressing the thanks of the delegation for their reception and for the promises of aid in the future.

WITH THE FIRST PRESIDENCY.

The party waited upon the first presidency in the morning and were received by Presidents Woodruff, Cannon and Smith. President Wattles of the exposition made an outline of what was proposed to be done, and the methods of achieving the desired results. His argument was convincing that the exposition would accomplish much for Utah, and the members of the first presidency promised their co-operation and assistance in making it a success. President George Q. Cannon was in the trans-Mississippi congress at the time the exposition was decided upon and then, as now, believed that by such means Utah's manifold resources, latent or partially developed, might be made profitable by turning to them the eyes of the capital.

Then the meeting put off its business and took on a social character and an enjoyable hour was spent in pleasing reminiscences.

DENVER AND COLORADO, TOO

Officials of Each Promise to Do All Possible for the Exposition.

Omaha Delegation Warmly Received and Pledges of Practical Assistance Given.

Great Benefits to Be Derived by All Western States Appreciated—Mining Exchange Votes Indorsement.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Denver, Colo., March 26.—The party of business men from Omaha, representing the proposed Trans-Mississippi exposition to be held in that city in the summer of 1898, arrived in the city last evening in a special car from Utah. There were ten in the party, including Gurdon Wattles, the president of the exposition company; John A. Wakefield, secretary of the company; G. M. Hitchcock, editor and proprietor of the Omaha World-Herald; John H. Evans, Charles Metz, Henry A. Thompson, Zachary T. Lindsey, H. E. Palmer and A. S. Hazelton.

It was explained that the purpose of the visit is to arouse public interest in the trans-Mississippi states in the proposed exposition, and to start all the influence that can be brought to bear to rush through congress at Washington a bill now pending which provides for the erection of a government building at the exposition and thereby give national recognition to the undertaking.

The promoters of the exposition represent that it is the first request of the kind from the west, as the west, and hereby becomes of unusual importance.

CITY IS ENTHUSIASTIC.

At 10 o'clock this morning the party visited Mayor McMurray and was received by his honor and most of the city officials, including the city council. Mayor McMurray had already been communicated with from Omaha by the officers of the exposition and had transmitted the communication to the city council for action. Lieutenant Governor Bush happened to be calling upon the mayor at the time of the party's arrival, and he assured the party of Colorado's good will toward Omaha and readiness to assist in the promotion of the exposition. Some moments of chat preceded the formalties​ of the visit, and during these moments it was revealed that nearly every one present, who did not live in Omaha had at some time or other had his home there, and that all the Omaha people in the party had at one time or another lived in Colorado. Among the Omahans, Captain Palmer, now police and fire commissioner of that city, was a Colorado pioneer from the fact that he had been here as an officer of the army in 1861.

President Wattles of the Exposition company opened the formalities by telling the mayor that he and his party had come to Colorado to enlist Colorado's support in the proposed enterprise and especially in the important preliminary step of securing national recognition. He said he thought the time had come for the trans-Mississippi country to be recognized and to begin to force itself forward to the eminence it deserved as comprising nearly two-thirds of the entire territory of the United States.

ITS BENEFITS EXPLAINED.

The Omaha exposition, he thought, would do much toward filling up the vacant spots in the vast stretch of land from the Mississippi to the coast. And he knew of no portion of the west more able to contribute enterprise and push to the exposition than Colorado. Editor Hitchcock joined President Wattles in paying a tribute to Colorado's "push, will and pluck." He thought that the partnership of Colorado and Nebraska would be an eminently fitting one, which should be made more complete and thorough. The one state, he said, is the mineral treasury of the country, if not of the world; the other can be, and is going to be the granary of the world.

Mayor McMurray extended a welcome to the visitors "as neighbors" and then assured them that the city would [?]tend its hearty co-operation. He got a sly bid for Colorado by saying that an invitation from Omaha meant a chance for Colorado to exhibit her own glory. What Colorado might promise to do in this instance would be merely lending to Omaha what the state would expect to receive back with interest in 1[?] when Colorado proposes to make a monster celebration of the anniversary of the Louisiana purchase.

WILL WORK AT WASHINGTON.

Lieutenant Governor Brush assured the visitors that the state at large would be ready with all the influence it could bring to bear at Washington or el[?] where in the interests of the exposition. He remarked incidentally that he was glad to learn that Nebraska was beginning to see the value of irrigation.

Secretary Wakefield of the Omaha party stated the practical aid which was now desired from Denver. It was as stated above, the use of Denver municipal and Denver and Colorado state aid and influence in the pushing of the bill now in congress.

Mayor McMurray closed the conference with further assurance and a request that the Omaha officials keep the Denver and Colorado people informed from time to time as to the state of assistance they would need.

At 12 o'clock the party withdrew to visit the mining exchange. Business was suspended for twenty minutes. President Wattles was there introduced on the floor by President Root of the exchange, and made a brief speech setting forth much the same matter that had been presented at the meeting with the mayor. Later in the day the mining exchange unanimously passed a resolution indorsing the exposition and asking congress for favorable action.

STATE OFFICERS PLEDGED.

At 2 o'clock the Omaha party called upon Governor McIntyre, by appointment, at the capitol. Other state officials were also present. Speech were made by President Wattles, Secretary Wakefield and Mr. Lindsey of Omaha and Mr. Hazelton of Council Bluffs. Response was made by Governor McIntyre, who warmly indorsed the exposition and pledged to it the hearty support of Colorado.

In the evening the Omaha delegates met the directors of the chamber of commerce by special invitation. Speeches were made by several of the Omaha delegates, including Captain Palmer. Responses were made by President Steele, Mr. Evans of the street car company, Earl B. Coe of the Denver Times and others. The directors pledged the support of the city of Denver to the enterprise and evinced great enthusiasm. Several of them also took occasion to say that Colorado felt such hearty friendship for the Omaha World-Herald on account of its great fight [?] silver that on that account along if no other, anything that the World-Herald asked for would find strong support in Colorado.

The Omaha delegation has now finished the labor of its trip and will return to Omaha Saturday afternoon after paying a flying trip to Cripple Creek. The success of the expedition has been beyond all expectations and the members are enthusiastic.

ELEVEN VOTES PROMISED.

Mercer Confident of a Favorable Report on the Exposition Bill.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23 Post Building,
Washington, D. C., March 26.

Mr. Mercer will appear before the meeting tomorrow of the committee on ways and means to discuss his bill for the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, to be held at Omaha in 1898. Of the eighteen members of the committee eleven have pledged themselves to Mr. Mercer to support the bill. Mr. Mercer will try to get it reported tomorrow.

The sundry civil bill, reported to the house today, contains the following provision:

[?]

 

Daily Sun-Leader

OUR OMAHA VISITORS.
1

The delegation of Omaha gentlemen who visited Cheyenne today in the interest of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition made the most favorable impression possible. They carried with them their own credential in their gentlemanly demeanor and intelligent discourse Their was an entire absence of assumption or boasting at same time the visitors evinced a firm confidence in the future of Nebraska and the great west.

Wyoming should have a kindly feeling toward Omaha and her capitalists have shown their confidence in the resources of this state by liberal investments in our oil and coal lands, in our lands, cattle and other classes of property. As to the exposition it promises to be a good thing for the entire west, and if properly utilized by our people will do much to advertise Wyoming and bring settlers to our irrigated lands.

We should like to see a liberal attendance at the city hall this evening when the plans and purposes of the exposition will be explained by President Wattles and his associates. The advantages to be gained by this enterprise will then be apparent to our citizens . The party will leave for Salt Lake at 10 o'clock this evening, and we trust will bear with them a pleasant recollection of their brief stay in this city.

Daily Sun-Leader.

Largest City and State Circulation.

AN OMAHA DELEGATION

IN THE CITY IN THE INTEREST OF THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION.

A Distinguished Party of Prominent Citizens and Business Men—Conferences With the Governor, Mayor and Leading Business Men—Hospitalities Extended—Meeting Tonight at the City Hall.

2

A delegation of ten leading business men of Omaha, representing the Trans-Mississippi International Exposition of Omaha, arrived in the city this morning, in a special car on the Union Pacific line.

The personnel of the party is as follows: G. W. Wattles, president of the company and vice president of the Union National bank of Omaha; John A. Wakefield, secretary of the exposition, a wholesale lumber merchant; John H. Evans, president of the National Bank of Commerce; Charles Metz, of Metz Brothers, brewers; R. A. Thompson, dry goods merchant; G. M. Hitchcock, publisher of the World-Herald; Z. T. Lindsey, wholesafe​ rubber; W. R. Bennett, leading general merchandise store; A. S. Hazelton, the city attorney of Council Bluffs, and H. E. Palmer, insurance.

The purpose of these gentlemen is to confer with our citizens, city and state officials, with reference to the international exposition to be held in Omaha, beginning in June and ending in November, 1898, and as far as possible to arrange for the proper representation of our state in that great exhibition.

On arriving here the party took quarters at the Inter Ocean and during the early morning hours were called upon by the mayor, city officials, members of the press and prominent business men and the plans of the committee were discussed with much enthusiasm.

At 11 o'clock the party was taken out for a drive around the city and to Fort Russell and were greatly pleased with the points of interest seen in their carriage trip.

They were accompanied by Mayor Merrill, E. A. Slack, Louis Kirk, C. F. Miller, C. D. Kelley, Robert Morris and others of our citizens. They were particularly delighted with the bright skies, pure atmosphere and delicious winter climate of our beautiful capital city.

At 2 o'clock the party had a very pleasant conference with Governor Richards and other state officials.

During the day arrangements were made for a meeting at the city hall this evening, when the plans and the purposes of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition will be fully and ably explained by gentlemen of the Omaha delegation to our citizens who are invited to come out and attend the meeting. The meeting will begin at 7 o'clock, as the party are to leave the city at 10 p. m. for Salt Lake.

Their itinerary from here takes in Salt Lake, Ogden, Denver and return to Omaha. It is hoped our people will generally attend as we are sure they will be interested in the bright and brezy​ talks of our Omaha friends.

It should be born in mind that the interests of Wyoming are largely connected with Omaha commercially and in our mining development. Omaha capital is largely invested in the central Wyoming oil fields and various irrigation enterprises as well as in mining. Her business men are already moving to build a railroad line and an oil pipe line in this state and if we do our part they will work with us cordially and earnestly to develop the grand resources of Wyoming.

ENCOURAGEMENT FOR OMAHA.

Western States and Cities to Help the Coming Exposition.

A dispatch from Omaha says that acting under instructions of the city council, Mayor Broach is sending letters to 500 mayors of the cities in the Trans-Mississippi valley asking them to present the letters to the councils of their respective cities, urging the adoption of resolutions favoring the exposition that is to be held in Omaha during the summer and fall of the year 1898.

The resolutions after being adopted will be sent to Secretary Wakefield and by him forwarded to the senators and sepresentatives​ in congress. When Secretary Wakefield opened his mail this morning he found a large number of letters from prominent business men, residents of western states, and in each instance they were in favor of the exposition, the writers promising to do all in their power to aid in the pushing of the preliminaries of the big show.

THEY WILL BE HERE TODAY

Leading Omaha Business Men Are En Route to Salt Lake.

THEIR MISSION AS GIVEN

Trans-Mississippi International Exposition.

Party Includes Many Men of Prominence in Various Walks of Life, Including W. H. Hitchcock, Proprietor of the Omaha World-Herald—Courtesies Shown the Gentlemen at Cheyenne—Ogden and Denver to Be Visited on the Return Trip.

(Special to the Herald.)

CHEYENNE, Wyo., March 21.—A party of leading Omaha business men reached here this morning by special train en route to Salt Lake, Ogden, Denver and other western points, at each of which they will work up interest in the Trans-Mississippi International exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898.

In the party are Guerdon W. Wattles, vice president of the Union National bank; John H. Evan, president of the National Bank of Commerce; Charles Metz, general manager of Metz Bros.' Brewing Co.; Henry A. Thompson of Thompson, Belden & Co.; W. H. Hitchcock, proprietor of the Omaha World-Herald; A. S. Hazelton, city attorney of Council Bluffs; Z. T. Lindsey of the Lindsey wholesale establishment; H. E. Palmer, insurance, and John A. Wakefield, wholesale lumber dealer.

While in Cheyenne the party was taken in carriages to Fort Russell and other points of interest about the city and held a very satisfactory conference with Governor Richardson and other state officials as to Wyoming's attitude toward the exposition. Substantial aid was promised the exposition from Wyoming and every effort will be made here to aid in the success of the undertaking of the Omaha people. The visitors left for the west this evening and will reach Salt Lake tomorrow afternoon. Ogden and Denver will be visited on the return trip.

COMING TO UTAH.

REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS FROM OMAHA HERE TODAY.

Hon. G. M. Hitchcock, Editor of the World-Herald, and a Party Visit Salt Lake in the Interest of the Omaha Exposition.

Hon. G. M. Hitchcock, editor and publisher of the Omaha World-Herald, accompanied by a delegation of leading citizens of the Gate City, will arrive in the city this morning on the Union-Pacific. The [?] is to confer with prominent [?] this state concerning the international exposition which will be held in Omaha in 1898. The party will doubtless remain here for several days, communing with the citizens who want to see Utah make the best exhibit at the exposition, as she will, if the people become interested.

Mr. Hitchcock is known as one of the leading men in Omaha, is very wealthy and is liberal in his support of anything which will redound to the credit of his city. He is a son of the late United States Senator Hitchcock of Nebraska.

The other members of the delegation are representative men and will doubtless indulge in great conversations over the prospects of the coming show in the metropolis of the Missouri Valley.

 
41

OMAHA DELEGATION ARRIVES

3

Booming the Trans-Mississippi Exposition.

WILL REMAIN SEVERAL DAYS.

Will Enlist the Co-Operation of Utah People—An Exhibit of the Varied Resources of the State Desired—Designed to be a Great Benefit to the West—Success of the Enterprise is Assured.

Ten representatives of Omaha pluck and enterprise reached the city yesterday in a special car, attached to the afternoon Union Pacific train. The specific object of this visit is to work up interest in the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, that will be held in the Gate city from June to November of 1898.

In the party are Gurdon W. Wattles, vice-president of the Union National bank, who is president of the exposition; Secretary John A. Wakefield, an extensive wholesale lumber dealer; W. R. Bennett, who is at the head of the W. R. Bennett company, the largest department house in Omaha; John H. Evans, president of the Bank of Commerce; Charles Metz, general manager of Metz Bros. Brewing company; Henry A. Thompson, senior member of Thompson, Belden & Co.; G. M. Hitchcock, proprietor of the World-Herald; Z. T. Lindsey, who is at the head of a large rubber goods house; Capt. H. E. Palmer, member of the fire and police commission; and City Attorney A. S. Hazleton of Council Bluffs.

They will remain in the city several days, during which they hope to meet as many as possible of the leading business and professional men of Salt Lake and Utah. There will be incidental sight-seeing in connection with the visit, though probably this feature will remain very decidedly in the background, as nearly if not quite all of the gentlemen have visited Utah before, and also because the object of the pilgrimage westward has to do with a project that has already grown very dear to the Omaha heart, and one that already seems placed upon the plane of certitude and success. Mercur's gold-veined hills, however, will engage the travelers one day, as a visit to the camp has already been decided upon.

ORIGIN OF THE ENTERPRISE.

It was at the Trans-Mississippi Congress in November of last year that the much-mooted, long-desired Western exposition was decided upon, with the unanimous adoption of this resolution:

Whereas, We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the States west of the Mississippi river, made at some central gateway, where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these wealth-producing States, would be of great value, not only to the trans-Mississippi States, but to all the home-seekers of the world; therefore,

Resolved, That the United States Congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha during the months of August, September and October, in the year 1898, and that the representatives of such States and Territories in Congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases, to assist in carrying out this enterprise.

Because of its central location, its railroad facilities, its wealth, population, progressiveness and many other advantages, Omaha was selected as the scene of the proposed exposition.

The idea that dominated the convention was that the possibilities of the great West were still practically unknown. In the twenty-four States and Territories lying west of the Mississippi river are sections which, according to reliable estimates, are capable of supporting 70,000,000 people without crowding and still leaving a vast domain for the homeseeker. The unbounded mineral resources of the mountain States, which had as yet been scarcely scratched by the miner's pick, also are known only in a general way, and it was to advertise all of these to the world that the exposition was decided upon.

WHAT HAS BEEN DONE.

In order to facilitate the work of the proposed exposition, a corporation has been formed of prominent Omaha men with a capital stock of $1,000,000, nearly half of which has already been subscribed for. Bills carrying an appropriation of $250,000 have been introduced in both branches of Congress, by Senator Thurston in the Senate and by Congressman Mercer in the lower house. The Senate bill has been reported favorably by the committee and is expected to pass.

The management will not be local. Each State and Territory in the Trans-Mississippi region will have a share in it, through the appointment of a vice-president by the Governor, so that the full force and authority of the Federal Government and the government of each one of the interested States and Territories will be fully enlisted in the great enterprise, which will outrival in splendor anything that has been witnessed between the Mississippi river and the Pacific ocean.

Iowa has officially recognized the exposition by a joint resolution unanimously passed by both houses of the Legislature, requesting its delegation in the two branches of Congress to favor the bill now before it. An appropriation of $50,000 for a State building was also made.

Recently the moral support of Utah was given the project by a joint resolution, adopted by both branches of the Legislature.

The City Council and Board of Trade of St. Louis have agreed by resolution to aid the enterprise. Kansas City and other cities have followed with similar promises of support, so that the Omaha men who assumed the burden laid upon them by the Trans-Mississippi Congress feel confident of justifying the trust imposed in them.

At Cheyenne a most cordial reception was given the party and earnest promises of co-operation made by the most prominent citizens of Wyoming. Denver will be visited on the return trip.

CAME WITH GEN. CONNOR.

Capt. Palmer will probably find more to interest him during his sojourn in Zion than any other member of the party, for the reason that his consist in the revivifying of old friendships and a renewal of bygone memories. Capt. Palmer came to the Salt Lake valley with Gen. Connor and was his chief of staff in 1865. In the latter part of that year he left the army for the busy life of a mining camp, and 1867 found him in charge of the Salmon River (Ida.) News. Capt. Palmer has been in nearly every mining camp of the West, being, like the remainder of the party, a thorough Westerner.

About a year before Gen. Connor's death, Capt. Palmer visited Salt Lake and upon calling on Gen. Connor found that he had just received permission from the War department to be buried in the cemetery at Fort Douglas. Together they went to the post and selected a sunny spot on the hillside, where the General later was laid to rest. Then they staked the corners and departed.

THE ONLY SURVIVOR.

Capt. Palmer is the only surviving member of Gen. Connor's staff. He says that when the command started eastward everyone believed that its destination was the scene of hostilities in [?]

OMAHA MEN IN TOWN

Inter-State Delegation Looking Over the City.

Salt Lake Herald

REMAIN HERE THREE DAYS

4

WILL VISIT THE GREAT CAMP OF MERCUR.

Party of Representative Gentlemen Who Want to Interest Local People in the Exposition of 1898—Pleased to Learn That the Legislature Has Passed a Resolution of Encouragement Already—Will Consult with Prominent People of This City Today.

Gurdon W. Wattles, president; John A. Wakefield, secretary; W. R. Bennett, Charlie Metz and Henry A. Thompson, directors of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition company of Omaha, together with Hon. G. M. Hitchcock, H. E. Palmer, A. S. Hazleton and Z. T. Lindsay, constitute the party of gentlemen which arrived in this city yesterday over the Union Pacific in the interest of the exposition which will be held at Omaha in 1898.

Mr. Wattles is the vice-president of the Union National bank of Omaha; Mr. Wakefield is the leading lumber merchant of the Gate City; Mr. Bennett is president of the W. R. Bennett company, one of the largest in Omaha; Mr. Metz is the general manager of the Metz Bros. Brewing company; Mr. Thompson is the head of the firm of Thompson, Belden & Co.; Mr. Hitchcock is the owner of the World-Herald, the leading paper of the city; Captain Palmer is a member of the fire and police commission and is well known in this region because of his connection at one time as adjutant on the staff of the late General Connor; Mr. Hazleton is the city attorney of Council Bluffs, Ia., while Mr. Lindsay is the head of one of the largest wholesale dry goods firms in the west. The party is a representative one in every respect.

As stated, the gentlemen are here for the purpose of conferring with the leading men of the state, the governor and other officials, on the matter of having Utah co-operate in the holding of the exhibit in Omaha two years from next June. When informed by a Herald man that the state legislature had already passed a resolution indorsing the scheme, the party was greatly pleased, as they had not been so informed and were prepared to make an earnest effort in that direction.

However, the fact that this resolution has been passed will not deter them from calling on the governor and other state officers, as well as the prominent men of the city and urging that this state take an active part in the affair.

Mr. Wattles, the president, said last evening that the exposition project was meeting with a great deal of encouragement at the hands of the western states. They were in Cheyenne Saturday, and were received by the governor of Wyoming who, with other representative men, pledged the hearty support of the state. On their return they will stop off at Denver and will talk the matter over with the Colorado officials.

The states in the region between the Mississippi and the eastern Colorado line have already done much toward the exposition. Iowa's legislature has appropriated $50,000 and expects to appropriate twice that amount in addition. Kansas, Missouri and other adjacent states will be heard from at the sessions of their legislatures this coming winter, and from appearances it would appear as though the display will be a great success, and one which Utah cannot keep away from, if she wanted to.

However, it is not the purpose of these gentlemen to rush into the legislature and ask that the doors of the state vaults be opened to allow them to go in and help themselves. On the contrary, the city of Omaha has agreed to raise a round half million for the support of the exposition and it is for the purpose of ascertaining whether the surrounding commonwealths are going to take a part that the citizens send this delegation on a trip to "feel the public pulse."

They will today call upon Hon. George Q. Cannon, Hon. Heber J. Grant, Hon. Thomas G. Webber, of the Co-op., Hon. Joseph F. Smith, Hon. John Henry Smith, Hon. George M. Cannon, Abram H. Cannon, Governor Wells, Secretary of State Hammond and other state officers, Hon. John E. Dooly, Hon. R. C. Chambers, Mayor Glendinning, Colonel N. Treweek, Richard Mackintosh, Hon. George M. Scott and other leading citizens, with a view of sounding them for opinions. It is expected that the public sentiment can be ascertained in the brief space of one day, so thorough will be the character of the work, but if the ground cannot be all covered, the party will remain over one day longer.

Before the members leave they will take a trip to Mercur. They have a Pullman car, which was placed at their disposal by the Pullman company, and Colonel Clayton, of the Salt Lake & Los Angeles,will have them taken down to Mercur with a special engine.

The greater portion of the party have been in Salt Lake years ago, and are loud in their praises of the improvements which have taken place since their first visits here. The fame of Mercur has extended down eastward and the members of the delegation say they must see the place ere they leave.

The party spent yesterday in looking over the city, a visit to Fort Douglas being among the pleasures.

[?]district. He rep[?] choice among those mentioned for the place up to this time, but as a resident of the Seventh ward he rather preferred Mr. Chaffee. As to General Cowin, he thought that gentleman had no claims on the republican party. He had been in the city for fourteen years, and had not been known to take any active interest in republican politics, but this seemed to be the only objection raised.

McKINLEY IS WITH THE ORDER.

Mr. Thompson said he had received letters from the A. P. A. organization in Ohio heartily indorsing McKinley, and since then his paper had laid down in its fight against the Ohio man. The officials of the order in the Buckeye state had investigated the career of the protectionist and had pronounced him all right—which certificate of character had been accepted by the friends of the order in this state. It was for this reason that the order felt satisfied that any delegation to be selected from this state in the interest of McKinley would be satisfactory to the A. P. A., hence it would not risk complicating the matters by making a contest.

WILL TRY TO DISCIPLINE MERCER.

When told that many republicans say that Congressman Mercer cannot be defeated for renomination, Mr. Thompson said such expressions only showed the ignorance of those making them as to the feeling of the republicans generally in this city. He said the A. P. A. votes in this district had elected Dave twice, once in face of the opposition of a certain element in the city, and once when that element had given him a milk-and-water support, and that instead of appreciat-[?]

 

[?]sept limit $70,000. The estimate of the department was for $125,000. For the court house, postoffice and custom house at Sioux City, $60,000 as per estimate.

Leave of absence for two months, with permission to apply for an extension of two months, is granted Major Curtis E. Price, surgeon.

M. E. Hansen has been appointed postmaster of Sterling, Jackson county, Ia., vice A. C. Ferguson, resigned.

S. D. Cox has been appointed postmaster of Minatre, Scotts Bluff county, Neb., vice T. A. Twiss, resigned.

S. R. Maddox has been appointed postmaster, vice M. L. Judson, resigned, of Pringle, Custer county, S. D.

J. D. Wilkes has been appointed postmaster of Thayne, Uinta county, Wyo., vice A. F. Bracken, resigned.

Representative Mondell of Wyoming today introduced a bill granting right of way over public domain for pipe lines. The measure applies to the public lands and reservations of the United States in Wyoming, outside the boudary lines of Yellowstone park and in the state of Colorado. Any pipe line organization under this act must, within twelve months after the location of ten miles of pipe line, file with the register of the land office for the district where the land is located, map of its line, and on approval by the secretary of the interior the same shall be noted on the plats at said office and thereafter all such lands, over which such right of way shall pass, shall be disposed of subject to such right of way. The bill also provides for safeguarding the forfeited rights of the government.


FRED F. SCHRADER.
 

POW-WOW WITH THE OMAHAS

Exposition Promoters Get Encouragement.

CONFER WITH LEGISLATORS.

Visitors Meet Gov. Wells and Members of the State Senate and House—Object of Their Mission to Get Utah's Friendly Support and Representation in the Trans-Mississippi Exposition.

5

Gov. Wells arranged a meeting yesterday for the Omaha visitors and a committee of the Legislature for 5 o'clock in his office. At that hour the small room which does temporary duty as an executive office was crowded as it has never been before. Private Secretary Case brought in a lot of additional chairs, and when the meeting was ready for business there was hardly room enough for freedom of action.

Gov. Wells, Secretary of State Hammond and the following members of the Committees on Manufactures and Commerce of the two houses of the Legislature were present: Senator Booth, Glen Miller and Candland; Representatives Taylor, Smoot, Clark, Maughan and Harris.

The Omaha delegation, ten in number, were ushered in by D. C. Evans, who introduced the visitors to the Governor, the latter presenting in turn the Legislative committeemen. The Omaha men were Gurdon W. Wattles, John A. Wakefield, W. R. Bennett, John H. Evans, Charles Metz, Henry A. Thompson, G. M. Hitchcock, Z. T. Lindsey, Capt. H. E. Palmer, also A. S. Hazelton of Council Bluffs.

MISSION OF THE OMAHAS.

When the introductions were over, Gov. Wells expressed pleasure at meeting the visitors, and requested them to state their errand.

Mr. Wattles, the chairman of the delegation, responded as follows: "We are not orators, but a delegation of business men from Omaha came to state a business proposition, in which we think you are interested in a business way. The trans-Mississippi congress met in Omaha last November, when the question of holding a trans-Mississippi exposition was discussed. A resolution was passed favoring the exposition, and Omaha was selected as the place. Since then the people of Omaha have taken hold of the matter. A corporation has been formed, and the people of Omaha and the State will raise about a half million dollars. We realize that the exposition comes at a time when we all feel poor, but we are doing our best to make it a success. We have met with great encouragement throughout the West. Iowa will make an appropriation of $50,000 for a building. We have been cordially greeted by your Governor and other prominent citizens, notably George Q. Cannon. We hear with pleasure that your Legislature has taken cognizance of the exposition. We believe it will be a wise move for Utah to be represented, for while your resources are great they are not known to many people even in the trans-Mississippi country. The South has had a great impetus by reason of advertising its resources at the Atlanta exposition, and has demonstrated the value of such a display. There is a great tide of immigration coming, and Utah should prepare to get her share of it. We ask nothing at your hands now, further than your good will."

G. M. Hitchcock, editor of the World-Herald, said: "At the outset of the enterprise we realized that it would be necessary to secure the active co-operation of the States of the entire West in order to make the exposition excusable, if not successful. An exposition that would be well short of showing all the resources of this great section of the country would be a failure, and hence we request the assistance of your State the [?] the great West. I have it on the authority of the editor of the Atl[?]ution that he beneficial res[?]position there to the city[?] nine co-operating Southern States were more than a hundred-fold. Utah's ardent support we must have. Nowhere else is there such an example of human pluck and human enterprise as we have seen in Utah. It has fairly made us ashamed of what we have done in Nebraska when we see what you have accomplished in this former desert. The men who made Utah and the spirit that has made her great we want represented at the Omaha exposition."

TELLS HOW IOWA FEELS.

City Attorney Hazelton of Council Bluffs, Ia., said: "I came along with the Omaha men to tell you how we Iowans feel about this exposition. At the trans-Mississippi congress there was a sentiment that something was wrong with this Western section of the Union, and an exposition was decided on to apply the remedy. Your enterprising fellow citizen, George Q. Cannon, lent valuable aid to the project, and I might say did more for it than any one else. People in other parts of the country are ignorant of the resources of the West, and the exposition was decided on to acquaint the people of other State with what we have to offer. When Omaha and Nebraska assumed the obligation of the exposition, Iowa joined heartily in the project and will do all in her power to make the exposition a success. We want your help in getting the proper legislation through Congress, and this you can do through your delegation, who, we are glad to say, are favorable to the enterprise. If you have any influence with other delegations, we ask you to use that to the same end."

GOV. WELLS'S TALK.

Gov. Wells said: "It is already known to you what Utah has done to encourage the exposition in the passage of a resolution. I don't know what further we can say to you at this time. I am in hearty accord with you and believe that Utah should be represented. I know your exposition will be much more successful if Utah is represented than if she is not. It is my mind, and I think it is the sentiment of the Legislature, to have an exhibit at Omaha, but the appropriations for that purpose had better be deferred until the next session, which meets a year from now. In 1897 we will be 50 years old. Next July a year it will be a half century since two tired travelers first gazed on Salt Lake valley. It is possible we shall want some appropriations for a celebration of that event, which is of great importance to us. Whether that will take the form of an exposition remains to be seen, but you can safely leave the matter to the Legislature of next year, which will, in my opinion, do what is right in the premises."

VIEWS OF LEGISLATORS.

Senator Booth said it was a great pleasure to meet the visitors. He knew the great benefits to be gained by the exposition, and thought all the States of the West should aid each other. He did not think it wise to make any appropriation at this session, owing to the fact that the revenues of the State are still an unknown quantity. With Statehood came increased burdens. The first State tax had not yet been levied, but he thought the revenues would be ample to meet current expenses and possibly make an appropriation for the exposition. But next year the exact amount of revenue would be known, and the next Legislature would, no doubt, if possible, make an appropriation so that Utah will be represented at Omaha. He believed the exposition would be a great success.

Senator Glen Miller said he had lived near Nebraska and knew very well the pluck and enterprise of the people of Omaha and the indomitable spirit which made the town. At present Utah has to prepare for housekeeping as a State. Next year these unusual expenses will not be a burden upon the State. He believed thoroughly in advertising, and thought the West had been backward in advertising itself. The Omaha exposition would give the West an opportunity that it should take advantage of to make known its resources.

Representative Taylor said he had always admired the enterprise of the people of Omaha and was heartily in sympathy with the spirit of the exposition. The Legislature had passed the resolution with unanimity, and if the revenues would justify it he felt sure the next Legislature would make an appropriation to provide for Utah's representation.

ALL SPOKE ONE WAY.

Representative Smoot spoke in a similar vein. He said the people of Utah were conservative, and he hoped the visitors would not be discouraged at not getting positive assurances at this time. Utah always came to the front at the proper time, and when another Legislature assembled he did not doubt but the State would do as all her citi-[?]

Senator Candland said he was born a Ute, but had visited Omaha and admired the city. He believed in the exposition, believed it should receive National aid, and believed that Utah should be represented.

Secretary of State Hammond added a few words in the same strain.

Representative Clark also spoke briefly in favor of the exposition.

Representative Harris closed the greetings of the home people, expressing confidence that Utah would fall in line next year.

Z. T. Lindsey, the wholesale rubber man of Omaha, said he could say something about Utah which not everybody knew. Utah has a rubber mine. He had been interested in it for four years and thought it was a great thing. It was a peculiar deposit that made the best kind of varnish, and that ought to be exhibited at Omaha. Mr. Lindsey promised that if Utah appropriated $100,000 she would gain 100,000 people.

Mr. Wattles closed the meeting by expressing the thanks of the delegation for their reception and for the promises of aid in the future.

WITH THE FIRST PRESIDENCY.

The party waited upon the First Presidency in the morning and were received by Presidents Woodruff, Cannon and Smith. President Wattles of the exposition made an outline of what was proposed to be done, and the methods of achieving the desired results. His argument was convincing that the exposition would accomplish much for Utah, and the members of the First Presidency promised their co-operation and assistance in making it a success. President George Q. Cannon was in the trans-Mississippi congress at the time the exposition was decided upon and then, as now, believed that by such means Utah's manifold resources, latent or partially developed, might be made profitable by turning to them the eyes of the capital.

Then the meeting put off its business and took on a social character and an enjoyable hour was spent in pleasing reminiscences.

At 2 o'clock the visitors boarded a special train and proceeded to Saltair, the guests of Col. N. W. Clayton, president of the Great Salt Lake & Los Angeles railroad. A very pleasant afternoon was spent, and the party returned with additional appreciation of the beauties and resources of Utah's capital.

THE OMAHA EXPOSITION

Delegates Satisfied with Their Work in Salt Lake.

UTAH WILL DO HER SHARE.

CONFERENCE IN THE AFTERNOON WITH GOVERNOR WELLS.

President Wattles, Editor Hitchcock, Attorney Hazleton Outline the Project—Governor Wells Replies—A General Discussion.

6

The distinguished party composed of some of the officers and directors of the proposed Trans-Mississippi and International exposition at Omaha in 1898, which arrived in this city last Sunday, spent yesterday in reviewing Zion and consulting with some of its leading business men. To say they were not generally impressed with the city and its people, would be stating an untruth. Not only were the distinguished gentlemen representing the nucleus of Nebraska and Iowa business enterprize​, favorably impressed with the boundless resources of this young state, which they confessed the eastern people know so little about, but the scenes on all sides revealing the result of the pluck and energy of a hardy people was, according to their own statements, beyond expectations.

The prime object of their visit here is to interest the people in the proposed exposition to be held at Omaha. At the close of the day they expressed themselves as entirely satisfied with their mission, and will depart with the assurance from leading business men and legislative members that when the  

43
this comes, Utah will do her share, realizing as her people do the value of making a display of her resources, as it might be called, at home.

CALLED UPON PRESIDENT CANNON.

During the day the party called upon President George Q. Cannon, upon whose suggestion, more than anyone else, the idea of a trans-Mississippi exposition was conceived. Mr. Cannon, as president of the Trans-Mississippi congress, and on several occasions a delegate from Utah, has made for himself a name among the Mississippi states. The party was graciously received by him and every assurance given that Utah would lend her influence to make the enterprise a great success.

CONFERENCE WITH GOVERNOR WELLS.

In the late afternoon the distinguished party were conducted to the private office of Governor Wells, where also Secretary of State Hammond and a legislative committee from each of the two branches were present.

After introductions all around, President Gurdon W. Wattles of the exposition company briefly outlined the object of their mission. He expressed his gratitude at meeting the state's executive and at the latter's consideration in arranging for a meeting. They came not, he said, as a party versed in oratory, but simply as representative business men, interested in the advertising and consequently the up-building of the great west.

HOW IT ORIGINATED.

Taking up the object of their visit to Utah, Mr. Wattles said the exposition was the result of the recommendations of the Trans-Mississippi congress. At the last meeting, held at Omaha, a resolution was passed endorsing such a project. Since then Omaha's business men took the matter in hand, incorporated a company, elected officers and directors whose business ability was representative, and now only ask that adjoining states that would naturally be benefited by the enterprise, lend their influence in securing national recognition. Omaha itself expects to subscribe half a million, at least, toward the enterprise and Iowa had done much in the way of assistance. Mr. Wattles said that the people of his city had not connected themselves with the undertaking unmindful of the hard times and the burden it would mean to the city in a business way. Omaha had been selected because of its central location and excellent transportation facilities.

It was the opportune time, he thought to advertise when times are hard. The Atlanta exposition did much to advertise the resources of the south, and the cotton states are already beginning to reap the harvest. By arranging a great exposition in the west the home-seeker and those seeking to multiply their capital would again be turned toward the setting sun. The advantage to be derived would be great, and although the men at the head of the undertaking did not come to ask anything at the hands of Utah's people, they felt that the exposition would be incomplete without participation by this state.

EDITOR HITCHCOCK.

Hon. G. M. Hitchcock, owner of the Omaha World-Herald, was next called upon. He said the people of his town realized at the outset that the co-operation and support of all the adjoining states would be necessary in order to make the enterprise excusable or successful. An exposition which is calculated to demonstrate to the east and outer world that the great west has abundant resources awaiting the arrival of investing capital would be a failure or fall far short of its object unless for such aid from the surrounding states. Therefore all western states should stand together. Mr. Hitchcock said the promoters realized now more than ever the need of assistance from this state. Here was represented the pluck and energy of the west; the sights on all hands testified to the great future of the state, and now he believed its resources should be advertised abroad. The same spirit which is forging Utah to the front rank of western states was needed, he said, to make their exposition a success.

ATTORNEY HAZELTON.

Hon. A. S. Hazelton, city attorney of Council Bluffs, was next introduced, and spoke in the same vein as those who preceded him. "We come for two purposes," he said. "First, on an educational mission. We wanted to inform you of the object of this enterprise. We are pleasantly surprised, however, to find that you have already performed one of the objects of our trip—to secure the passage of a memorial to congress asking for an appropriation. Then we want your state to be represented, and we come to arouse your enthusiasm in this respect."

So far as asking congress for an appropriation, Mr. Hazelton said they were simply asking for something that was their right. The cast and the south had secured national aid and now the rights of the west should be recognized.

THE GOVERNOR RESPONDS.

Responding, Governor Wells stated having received a letter from the secretary of the exposition company some time ago. He at once transmitted it to the legislature, and the result was a joint memorial endorsing the undertaking and directing Utah's representatives in congress to use their influence to make it a success.

The governor then stated that owing to the peculiar condition that Utah finds itself owing to lately securing statehood, he could not pledge any support in a financial way, especialy​ at this session. Owing to the fact that we do not know just what the revenue will aggregate, he would not be willing to ask any appropriation from the present session, but had reason to hope that the next session would take some action in having the state represented as it properly should be. He also called the attention of the gentlemen to the proposed Pioneer celebration here next year, and thought it probable that much of the spare cash would be used in making this celebration a success.

Following the governor, Senators Booth, Miller and Candland, representing the senate, and Representatives Taylor, Smoot, Clark and Harris assured the visitors of their hearty support, but coincided with the view of the governor that it would not be advisable to ask an appropriation from the present session.

SECRETARY HAMMOND.

Secretary Hammond thought Utah would be found on the ground when the proper time comes, and would be a formidable competitor for honors.

Z. T. Lindsay, a wholesale rubber merchant and member of the party, thought the benefits to this state resulting from a good display could not well be overestimated.

Concluding President Wattles thanked the governor and the legislative members for their assurrance​ of hearty support, which met with the expectations of the entire party.

VISITED SALTAIR.

The visitors were yesterday taken to Saltair in a special car, the guests of Colonel Clayton. They were simply delighted with the waters of the great lake and the magnificent summer resort. Today the party will continue to see some of the leading business men, and before going east will visit Mercur.

A NOTABLE VISIT.

The Omaha Delegation Were Here Last Night.

Ten of Her Most Enterprising Business Men Visit Ogden in the Interest of Their Great Exposition—Interesting Interviews.

Yesterday afternoon at about 4 o'clock Mayor Spencer and Senator Allison telephoned Auditor Beardsley to notify the business men that the Omaha representatives of the proposed Omaha, Transmississippi and International exposition would arrive in Odgen at 5 o'clock and to have as many business men as possible down at the train to meet them. The information was circulated as rapidly as possible and a goodly delegation of Ogden's business men met them and escorted them to the Reed hotel where an informal reception was held. Those who had been unable to go to the train met the gentlemen at the Reed. Carriages had been provided and the program was to go up the canyon and see the work of construction on the great power plant, but as their time was limited and they desired to meet as many citizens as possible, this part of the program was omitted.

A STANDARD representative was among those who met the party at the at the train. F. J. Hendershot kindly introduced him to the members of the party whose names and occupations are as follows: George W. Wattles, president of the proposed exposition and vice president of the Omaha National Bank; J. A. Wakefield, secretary of the exposition and a wholesale lumberman of Omaha; G. M. Hitchcock, editor of the World-Herald of Omaha and a staunch and aggressive fighter for free coinage of silver; L. T. Lindsay, wholesale rubber goods merchant; Hon. H. E. Palmer, business man and member of the fire and police board of Omaha; A. S. Hazelton, city attorney of Council Bluffs, Ia.; H. A. Thompson, president of Thompson, Belden & Co., Omaha; Charles Metz, general manager of the Metz Brewing Co.; J. A. Evans, prest. of the National Bank of Commerce and W. R. Bennett, president of the W. R. Bennett Co. All of these gentlemen are directors of the proposed exposition.

They were a very bright, energetic appearing body of men, very sociable and agreeable to all. Mr. Wattles, the leader of the party as well as other members of the party expressed themselves in a very enthusiastic manner with reference to the encouragement received. Mr. Wattles said the exposition was a gigantic undertaking, but would attract the attention of the world to the west as nothing else would and would do for the west what the late Atlanta exposition has done for the south. Speaking of Utah he said: "You have a wonderful state, a magnificent state. From what I have seen I feel convinced that Utah is destined to be one of the greatest states in the Union. You can build a wall around Utah and live within its confines and need for nothing." The whole party expressed themselves as simply delighted with the climate and products of Utah.

The party left here at 8:20 p. m. direct for Denver via the Union Pacific. They are visiting only three states on this tour, viz., Wyoming, Utah and Colorado.

They are very sanguine of having an exposition in 1898 that will nearly, if not quite, equal the great Columbian fair at Chicago in 1893, and the purpose of the exposition is to advertise to the world the wonderful resources awaiting development in the west.

 

UTAH TO COLORADO

7

Nebraska Delegation Making Its Swing Around the Circle.

SCHEME ENDORSED BY MORMONS AND GENTILES.

Mr. Hitchcock and Associates Will Reach Denver Tonight.

CENTENNIAL STATE WILL EXTEND A HEARTY WELCOME.

And Tomorrow the State Officials Will Learn of the Transmississippi Exposition.

Omaha sends a delegation to Denver to enlist the co-operation of the people of Colorado in the Transmississippi exposition, to be held in the Nebraska city in 1898. The delegation, which consists of ten representative men from Omaha, will arrive from Salt Lake City today, having had a most successful visit in the new state. In the party are the following gentlemen: Gurdon W. Wattles, John A. Wakefield, W. R. Bennett, John H. Evans, Charles Metz, Henry A. Thompson, G. M. Hitchcock, Z. T. Lindsey, Captain H. E. Palmer, also A. S. Hazelton of Council Bluffs.

The exposition was first thought of last November, when the Transmississippi congress met in Omaha. The idea found instant favor with the citizens of Nebraska, who have since then been earnestly working for the realization of a project that promises much benefit to all the interests of the West. A corporation has been formed, and the people of Nebraska promise to raise at least half a million dollars, while a bill for the appropriation of $250,000 is pending in congress. Iowa has set aside $50,000 for a building and will help in many ways.

Success in Utah.

A telegram received by The Times today announces that the mission to Utah has been more successful than the most enthusiastic dared to hope. The delegation was received Monday by the governor and committees from both houses of the legislature. In a most cordial speech, Governor Wells declared that doubtless Utah would send an exhibit, although an exposition to celebrate the half century of her history had been talked of.

Leading Denver citizens will welcome the Omaha delegation at the Brown Palace hotel this evening, and a meeting with the governor, the president of the mining exchange, the president of the chamber of commerce, and representatives of the city's various public enterprises will be arranged for to-morrow.

Gurdon W. Wattles is chairman of this visiting delegation. He is a prominent business man of Omaha, and has been chosen for this important task of arousing interest in the exposition project on account of his executive ability and indomitable energy. A. S. Hazleton, who is Iowa's envoy, is city attorney of Council Bluffs, Omaha's neighbor, which takes almost a proprietary interest in the successful culmination of the enterprise.

World-Herald Proprietor.

Colorado will feel a special interest in Gilbert M. Hitchcock, the owner and editor of the World-Herald, the silver champion in Nebraska journalism. Mr. Hitchcock is the son of the late Senator Hitchcock, who made a brilliant record in the Republican ranks of the United States senators. After being graduated from Ann Arbor he was admitted to the bar and practiced law in Omaha. His natural inclination being toward journalism he left his profession to establish the Omaha World, an evening paper that soon met with remarkable success, and was designated by Max O'Rell as one of the three American newspapers that bore the distinction of publishing really witty paragraphs. About eight years ago Mr. Hitchcock purchased the Herald, a morning paper, consolidating it with the World, and it has since occupied a wide western field.

An ardent advocate of silver, the paper has fought most valiantly for bimetallism and has gained a tremendous following in Nebraska. Mr. Hitchcock supported W. J. Bryan in his first candidacy for congress and has always been the silver orator's most consistent friend. Since his retirement to private life Mr. Bryan has been a constant contributor to the editorial columns of the World-Herald. Colorado and the West owe a great debt to the efforts of the Nebraska newspaper and the Nebraska statesman, and doubtless the silver state will show its appreciation by sending a magnificent exhibit to the Transmississippi exposition.

FOR OMAHA'S EXPOSITION

A Delegation of Business Men Has Arrived in Denver.

THEY'RE STIRRING UP THE WEST

Aid Has Been Promised Them in Wyoming and Utah, Where They Have Just Been on a Flying Tour—Colorado People to Be Invited and Urged to Participate—The Governor and the Mayor Will Be Visited To-Day by the Delegation—They Are Enthusiastic Promoters.

The Transmississippi Exposition boomers got into Denver at 6 o'clock last evening on their special car "Montana," and are stopping at the Brown Palace hotel. They are ten prominent and influential business men of Omaha, who have been traveling for the past week in the interest of the big exhibition of Western products, manufactures, arts and industries, which is to be held in that city from June to November, inclusive, of 1898. These are the members of the itinerant delegation: Gurdon W. Wattles, vice president Union National Bank of Omaha; John A. Wakefield, wholesale lumber dealer; John H. Evans, president National Bank of Commerce; Chas. Metz, general manager Metz Brewing Company; Henry A. Thompson, Thompson-Belden Dry Goods Company; Gilbert M. Hitchcock, owner and publisher of the Omaha World-Herald; Zachary T. Henry, wholesale rubber goods dealer; H. E. Palmer, member of Fire and Police commission—all of Omaha; A. S. Hazelton, city attorney of Council Bluffs.

Gurdon W. Wattles is president of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association and John A. Wakefield its secretary. The other executive officers are Jacob E. Markel, vice president; Herman Kountze, treasurer; directors, Gurdon W. Wattles, Jacob E. Markel, William R. Bennett, John H. Evans, Dudley Smith, Dan Farrell, Jr., George H. Payne, Charles Metz, Isaac W. Carpenter, Henry C. Thompson, Carroll S. Montgomery. It is incorporated under the laws of Omaha and capitalized at $1,000,000. One-half of this sum is said to be already pledged.

Growth of the Idea.

The idea of holding an industrial exposition specially for the Transmississippi territory was first conceived during the sessions of the Transmississippi Congress held in Omaha last November. Before the adjournment of that body the association which is to carry through the project was created in embryo by resolution. Officers were then chosen and the association incorporated for the purpose of holding in Omaha in 1898 "an exposition of all the products, industries and capabilities generally of the said states and territories west of the Mississippi river."

Since the promoters of the scheme took on corporate existence they have used every legitimate means to assure the success of the proposed exposition. In both the national Senate and House of Representatives bills have been introduced recognizing it as an international exposition and appropriating the sum of $250,000 for the purpose of erecting buildings for governmental exhibits. The state of Iowa has also come forward with aid. There both legislative bodies have passed resolutions indorsing the enterprise and calling on Congress to pass the subsidy bill. There is also pending in the Iowa Legislature a bill ordering the appropriation of $50,000 for state buildings at the exposition, and the appointment of a commission to have charge of the Iowa exhibit thereto.

Resolutions Adopted.

While the Omaha delegation was in Utah the Legislature of that state rushed through the following preamble and resolutions:

"Whereas, Delegates representing the 24 states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the Transmississippi Congress of 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition of the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories; and

"Whereas, The said convention voted to hold the said exposition at Omaha, Neb., in the year 1898; and

"Whereas, The common interest of the states and territories constituting this great region will be promoted thereby, and the interests of the state of Utah will be especially benefited by such an exposition,

"Be it therefor resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Utah, That the holding of the said Transmississippi Exposition is heartily approved and that the people of Utah are urged to co-operate with the people of the other states of the Transmississippi region and to take this opportunity of making a fitting display of their resources, and

"Be it further resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the senators and representative from Utah in the national Congress by the secretary of state, with the request that they promote, as far as possible, the said exposition."

A Cordial Reception.

Wherever they have been during their tour of promotion, the exposition boomers have been given a support in their undertaking by public officials and commercial men. They are to remain in Denver until Friday night, and will confer with the governor, mayor of the city, heads of the different state departments and officers and members of the various business associations. A short visit will also be made to Cripple Creek by a majority of delegates.

"We have met with most enthusiastic receptions in all the sections of the West so far visited by us," said Gurdon W. Wattles last evening. "Encouragement and promises of co-operation in our work have come to us from every source. The exposition is not to be an Omaha undertaking; it is intended to benefit the entire West and the country at large. Our special purposes are to show to the United States, and the world what the Transmississippi section is doing and can do in industrial lines; to bring capital here for the development of our vast and almost virgin natural resources of wealth, and to divert to the West the streams of immigration which now flows Southward.

The people of Nebraska are a unit in their desire to advance the interests of the project and to ensure a successful exposition. We have the pledges of nearly every banker and important business man in Omaha to take stock in the exposition association, and they are all working shoulder to shoulder for its objects.

"Other Western states are showing equal zeal. Iowa has promised an appropriation of $50,000. Utah will introduce a bill for another big appropriation at next winter's session of its Legislature and we are assured of a third appropriation in Wyoming. Two bills in the National Congress, providing for a $250,000 appropriation, are receiving such support that we have no fears regarding their passage.

For Colorado's Aid.

"We shall expect strong aid from this state. The exposition will give Colorado an excellent and timely opportunity to advertise her mineral w ealth​ and other resources. A big exhibit will open the eyes of the East and foreign countries to what Colorado has to offer, and bring settlers as well as capital here. IF the entire West will only put itself forward and begin now to prepare for sending exhibits, the Omaha exposition will confer a greater benefit on our section of the continent than any enterprise we have undertaken for years past. All the present indications are that this will be done."

From Mr. Wattles an account of the party's progress up to date was obtained. On Friday last himself and his fellow delegates left Omaha on a special car furnished them by the Pullman company. They reached Cheyenne, Wyo., on Saturday morning and were received by Gov. Richards, Mayor Merrill and other state and city officials. "They gave us all the encouragement it was possible for them to give," is how Mr. Wattles describes his reception by the Wyomingites. "They promised us not only their undivided support, but pledged the assistance of Wyoming to the exposition."

Saturday evening the delegation left Cheyenne, arriving in Salt Lake on the following evening. At 11 a. m. next day they called, by invitation, on Presidents Buchanan, Smith and Woodruff of the Mormon church. George Buchanan was a delegate from Utah to the Transmississippi congress and takes a lively interest in the exposition scheme.

The Idea Popular.

The three presidents introduced them to the leading elders and apostles of the Mormon church, and an interchange of opinions followed. The exposition idea seemed to be very popular with the Mormon dignitaries, who pledged the support of their people. They were generally desirous of advertising the resources of their new state. In the evening the representatives of Mormonism took the Nebraskans on an excursion trip to Saltair.

Meanwhile Gov. Wells prepared to receive the visitors. Both branches of the Legislature were in session and he sent them a message, asking that they meet the Omaha men in his office at 4 o'clock in the afternoon. Similar invitations were dispatched to the state officials. When the meeting took place President Wattles and other exposition promoters explained the objects of the exposition and the scope of what it proposed doing. Gov. Wells and other officials responded, expressing their sympathy with the enterprise and their intention to give it financial and moral support.

On Tuesday the delegates were received by the mayor and other municipal officers, all of whom assured their support to the industrial show. At 3 p. m. the party left for Ogden, where they were met at the train by a deputation of officials and prominent business men, who entertained them during the four hours they remained in the city. At 8 o'clock in the evening they left Ogden on the Union Pacific train which reached here this evening.

To-day Mr. Wattles and his traveling companions will be received by the governor at the State Capitol building, when they expect to meet all the state officers who are in the city and confer on the matter they are engaged in forwarding. Later a visit will be paid to Mayor McMurray's office, and the remainder of the day is to be devoted to visiting the Chamber of Commerce, Mining Exchanges and other business institutions.

This evening most of the delegates are to take a train for Cripple Creek, returning here next day, and at 10:30 Friday night the journey Eastward will be resumed.

 
45

LIKE A GIGANTIC X RAY.

Omaha's Exposition Will Reveal Western Resources.

AVANT COURIERS NOW IN DENVER

8

Party of Prominent Business Men of the Metropolis of Nebraska on a Tour of the West Stirring Up Enthusiasm for the Trans-Mississippi Exposition Which Will Be Held in Their City in 1898—First Affair of the Kind in the West.

The advance guard of what promises to be the most stupendous and successful exposition ever held in the West arrived in Denver last evening. A special Pullman car brought to the city ten of the most prominent business and financial men of Omaha, who came to tell the people of Colorado what Omaha intends to in 1898, when the Transmississippi and International exposition will be held in that city. The party was made up as follows: Gurdon W. Wattles, president of the exposition corporation and vice president of the Union National bank; John W. Wakefield, secretary of the exposition and a wholesale lumber dealer; W. R. Bennett, president of Bennett & Co., department store; John H. Evans, president of the National Bank of Commerce; Charles Metz, general manager of Metz Bros'. Brewing company; Henry A. Thompson of Thompson, Belden & Co., dry goods merchants; Gilbert M. Hitchcock, owner and publisher of the Omaha World-Herald, and well-known champion of the silver cause; Zachary T. Lindsey, wholesale rubber goods; H. E. Palmer of the Omaha board of fire and police commissioners, and A. S. Hazleton, city attorney of Council Bluffs, Iowa. The party was taken to the Brown Palace hotel, and there received by a number of prominent citizens of Denver.

The party and the objects of the trip are best explained in the words of President Wattles: "We came for the purpose of feeling the pulse of the leading citizens of the transmississippi states regarding the coming exposition, which will be held at Omaha in 1898, and to try to encourage the people of Colorado to take early steps in the matter of getting up a suitable display for the affair.

Chance of a Life Time.

"The exposition was originally proposed at the transmississippi congress at its last session last November. A resolution was introduced at that congress at its last session last November. A resolution was introduced at that congress, at first as a sort of feeler among the delegates, and it took like wildfire. It was appreciated that it was the opportunity of a lifetime, and that, as the West had been neglected heretofore by congress in the matter of recognition of international expositions, it would be appropriate to hold one west of the river. Then the most appropriate place was a question. Omaha was selected because it was thought that more people could be goten​ there than further west.

"What we want to do now is to stir up enthusiasm so that congress will give official recognition to the exposition and contribute $200,000 toward providing for a government exhibit. Every section of the country has been recognized in this manner with the exception of the West. Philadelphia, New Orleans, Chicago and Atlanta have all received millions in appropriations, with the exception of the latter, where $200,000 was donated, and I believe it is time for the West to get its share of the attention of the world. I believe that the exposition at Omaha will stem the tide of investment and immigration which the East and South are receiving, and turn it toward the comparatively neglected transmississippi states. As a result of the exposition at Atlanta, more than from any other cause, the immigration which is now setting toward the Southern states is due and the exposition at Omaha will be held just at the right time to catch the flood when it is at high tide in the South.

Spontaneous Excursion.

"Our party left Omaha last Friday evening. It was hastily gotten together, mainly by telephone and there was a spontaneous response when the business men were asked to lay down their tools and go out to spread the tidings for the exposition. Our first stop was at Cheyenne, where we met the prominent business men and the governor and state officials and they all assured us of their hearty support, and announced that they would do all in their power to have an appropriation made by the legislature. The support of Wyoming was pledged to the exposition. Salt lake was reached Sunday evening, and Monday morning we held a conference with the three presidents of the Mormon church. George Q. Cannon, one of the presidents, was a member of the convention when the resolution to hold the exposition was passed, and he was an ardent supporter of the project. The enthusiastic support of the church and also of the officials individually was pledged and it was announced that a liberal appropriation would be made for an exhibit. During the afternoon we met the governor and special committees from both houses of the legislature, which is in session, and we were assured of their hearty support also. Everyone expressed a lively interest in the exposition and gave us grand encouragement.

"To-morrow we will call on the governor and state officials and city and county officers and also the commercial organizations and endeavor to interest them by placing our plans open for their inspection. To-night some of the party will leave for the mining camps and others will remain and visit Omaha friends who are now in Denver, and we will leave for home to-morrow night.

"I might add that the progress which has been made toward the exposition has been very encouraging. Iowa has promised a liberal appropriation and a bill is now before congress asking for national recognition and an appropriation of $200,000 for a government exhibit."

Gilbert M. Hitchcock, owner and publisher of the World-Herald, who is one of the party, is enthusiastic regarding the outlook for the affair. "I believe," he said last night, "that it will be a gigantic X-ray to reveal to investors of the world, and everybody who attends, the heretofore hidden resources not only of Colorado but of all the other comparatively neglected territory west of the river. It will command the attention of everybody and will throw the flood of business and immigration West instead of South. There is no rivalry between Colorado and Nebraska to detract from the affair. What Colorado wants we can't expect to get, and while we have mutual interests we are not rivals. Colorado has everything to gain by being properly represented, and I believe she will be."

COLORADO TO BE THERE

Hearty Acceptance of Omaha's Exposition Offer.

CORN HUSKERS ARE HUSTLERS.

Business Men Make the Rounds of Public Offices, Taking in the Capitol, City Hall and Chamber of Commerce—President Steele Extends the Glad Hand, and There Is a Burial of Old Grievances Against Nebraska.

Colorado will have an opportunity to open the eyes of the world to her boundless resources and the leading business men of Denver are going to grasp the opportunity with a vim and vigor that presage success from the start. The opportunity is to be offered at the proposed Transmississippi exposition which is to be held in Omaha, Neb., from July to November, 1898.

The Omaha delegation of prominent business men representing the proposed exposition met President Steele and the members of the board of directors of the chamber of commerce in the commerce building last evening.

President Steele in calling the meeting to order expressed regret at the fact that he had received no notice officially until a few hours before the meeting was to be held; otherwise he would have called a meeting of the entire chamber. He assured them a friendly greeting, however.

President Wattles' Address.

President Wattles, at the head of the visiting delegation, was the first speaker for the visitors. He is a slim man, of middle age, and of pleasing address. He said that the proposed Transmississippi exposition was an enterprise which originated at the last meeting of the Transmississippi congress at St. Louis. That congress had of its own accord selected Omaha as the place for holding the exposition, and the contract was therefore thrust upon Omaha without her asking for it. But since Omaha had been given the contract to fulfill she was determined to fulfill it if enterprise and energy and ambition could do so.

Mr. Wattles dwelt upon the vast resources of the West, and said that this exposition was to be held to display them particularly. Colorado, Utah and Wyoming were the neighbors of Nebraska, and the delegation came to ask them to aid in making the exposition a success.

Editor Hitchcock is a young man, an athlete in appearance, with black hair, dark complexion, smooth face and wears gold-rimmed eye-glasses. He looks like a fighter—a man with a stiff backbone. And that's what he is. He has been fighting some red-hot battles for free silver at 16 to 1 in his paper, and has given every gold bug within reach a number of right-hand upper-cuts with his editorial quill. So, Editor Hitchcock had no more than said, "Mr. President and gentlemen" than he put in a few good "sockdolagers" for free silver and everybody applauded. He good naturedly remarked that the unregenerated bankers who were with him were having their eyes opened since they came to Colorado, and they were in imminent danger of being converted to the silver cause before getting back to Omaha.

Energy of the South.

Then Mr. Hitchcock made a forcible speech in favor of the proposed exposition. He said the South had displayed nerve and energy in giving a most successful exposition which had just closed at Atlanta, and which had displayed the resources of the Southern section of the country; the East had given the Centennial, from which the East was benefited by immigration, but the West had never given a purely instructive Western exposition. The World's fair was weighted down with a multiplicity of interests, and the West did not derive the benefit from its exhibits there that it would derive from a distinctively Western exposition.

Mr. Hitchcock said that Omaha proposed to go down into her pockets and defray all expenses for all preliminary work in an executive and operative way up to the time of opening the gates, but she knew that the exposition could not be made a success unless it was given the support of Colorado, Utah and other states west of the Missouri river. He said the committee had visited Cheyenne and Utah and had received assurance of liberal support on every hand. At Salt Lake the committee was cordially greeted by Hon. George Q. Cannon, President Woodruff of the Mormon church, and the governor of the state and other leading citizens. While the visitors were there the Utah legislature passed a resolution unanimously in favor of having Utah represented at the exposition. Also the Iowa legislature had passed a resolution commending the enterprise, and a bill had been introduced to appropriate $50,000 to construct a building for the Iowa exhibit.

Mr. Hitchcock informed the board that a bill is now before congress asking for an appropriation of $250,000 to aid the exposition [?] bill had already been reported on [?] by the senate committee before [?] was placed for consideration. He [?] the leading men of Colorado [?]ask their representatives in congress [?]ll they could in support of the bill.

[?] said that all Omaha asked was for Colorado to bring an exhibit of her illimitable resources to the show. If the Western states would only stand together and make this show a success, they could tempt the homeseeker and attract the investor.

Acceptance by Colorado.

E. B. Coe, director of the Denver chamber of commerce, made a happy speech, which put everybody in good humor. He said that Denver felt irritated somewhat because the exposition was not to be held here, but Denver didn't deserve to have it, because she had not been wide awake. He admired the nerve and energy of the Omaha men, who, when they found the contract of getting up this exposition thrust upon them, went to work in the midst of a panic and raised $100,000 for the prosecution of the preliminary work. He assured the visitors that Colorado would go to the show with the best exhibit that would be there. While Nebraska had nothing more than hogs and corn and hominy to exhibit, yet Colorado would come in with gold, silver, lead, zinc and all known minerals, and then send fruits and agricultural products of rare perfection, and prove that Colorado, contrary to the general impression, is even greater in agricultural than in mineral wealth. In fact, Colorado would be the star exhibitor at the show. The homeseeker and the investor would come from the East to Omaha to visit the show and then they would come on out to Colorado to settle, "where the stuff comes from."

Mr. Coe paid Editor Hitchcock a flattering compliment for the good work he had been doing for free silver, and expressed regret that some formal appreciation could not be shown before he leaves.

Thirty-Six Years Ago.

Captain Palmer is a gray-haired pioneer, who was chief of staff for General P. E. Connor, commander of the district of the plains in 1865. The captain told about his experience in Denver thirty-six years ago, when flour was selling for $15 per barrel, and a biscuit was worth more than a silver dollar now; when it cost 35 cents to mail a letter to one's wife or sweetheart in the East, and the only whisky to be had was of a Mexican brand, with sixteen fights to the cubic inch. The captain hoped that Colorado would come to the Omaha exposition with a grand exhibit, and show the world the progress she had made since those pioneer days, and show the wonderful opportunity there is for still further development of her resources.

William G. Evans of Denver spoke in a praiseworthy way of the transmississippi exposition, and said there was no doubt but that Colorado would be represented in it.

A. S. Hazleton of Council Bluffs, Ia., who accompanied the Omaha delegation, told what his state was doing to aid the exposition, and expressed his views on the great benefit the West would derive from such an enterprise.

Robert W. Speer said that if a local committee were appointed to push the matter, he thought Colorado would come to the front all right.

The meeting ended with the general good feeling of a love feast. Captain Palmer and Editor Hitchcock will return home this morning. The other members of the delegation went to Cripple Creek last night to spend one day in that great gold camp.

At the City Hall.

The Omaha visitors waited upon Mayor McMurray yesterday. As soon as the arrival of the distinguished party was known about the city hall, the mayor's offices were filled with other officials. Lieutenant-Governor Jud Brush happened to be calling upon the mayor, and assured the delegation that Colorado would assist in all possible ways to make the Omaha exposition a success.

President Wattles of the exposition committee said that the help of the Centennial state was desired especially to secure national recognition and appropriation from Congress for the enterprise. He declared that it was time the West, comprising two-thirds of the territory of the country, begun to as[?] the place to which it was entitled [?] to insist upon proper recognition [?] claims.

G. M. Hitchcock, editor and proprietor of the World-Herald of Omaha spoke of the splendid firm, Colorado [?] Nebraska, the first the mineral trea[?] of the country and the world, the [?] destined to be the granery​ of the [?]tinent.

Mayor McMurray said that the c[?] Denver would extend heartiest co-operation, and that the debt, if it could be considered such, should be without int[?] barring a friendly return in 1903, [?] the anniversary of the Louisiana purchase would doubtless be appropr[?] celebrated in this city.

Secretary Wakefield said that the [?]tical help needed was in pushing the [?] now pending in congress, recognizing the exposition and making an appropriation in its aid.

Presdent​ Wattles was introduced [?] brokers of the mining exchange [?] morning, and made a brief address [?]plaining the objects of the proposed exposition and asking the to take [?]action in reference to it. He was accompanied by his delegation from Omaha and all were greatly surprised and pleased at the interest shown in the exposition.

President Steele brought the exposition matter before the meeting of the board of directors of the chamber[?] night. The board adopted a resolution to ask the Colorado senators and representatives to support the bill now [?] congress, asking for an appropriation [?] the transmississippi exposition. The [?] also resolved to ask the next Colorado legislature to appropriate a sufficien[?] of money to defray the expenses of a[?] exhibit at Omaha.

 

MISSION OF THE OMAHAS.

The Omaha delegation now in this city in the interest of the Transmississippi exposition to be held in 1898, should meet with encouragement. The gentlemen composing the delegation are making a tour of the West in order to awaken interest in the project and to arrange the preliminary steps for an exhibit from this state and the co-operation of Denver and all Colorado in the enterprise. At Salt Lake City and elsewhere they have met with cordial receptions, and the same is due them at the hands of the people of Denver.

From the start of this exposition project it has had the hearty approval of The News. It was discussed an indorsed at the last session of the Transmississippi congress, and Omaha has gone at it in a hearty and business-like manner. A local organization has been formed, and upon the board of vice presidents will be representatives from each of the transmississippi states and tributaries. A bill is pending in congress to give it aid and recognition, and all that is necessary to render it a magnificent success will be the cordial co-operation of all the states in whose interest the exposition will be held.

Among all these states and territories there is none that is the peer of Colorado in variety of resources or in industrial wealth and development. This eminence, when the time comes, must be made clear by an exhibit which it will be impossible to surpass and which will demonstrate her claim as chief of the Rocky Mountain states. The exposition is still two years away, but it is not too soon to begin to lay plans for Colorado's part in rendering it a success.

 

COLORADO WILL HELP THEM

Omaha Business Men Get Much Encouragement Here.

10

ARE BOOMING THE EXPOSITION

Visits Paid Yesterday to Governor McIntire, Mayor McMurray, the Mining Exchange and the Chamber of Commerce—Explained the Purpose of Their Proposed Exposition and Invited Colorado People to Join With the People of Nebraska—Promises of Help Given.

The influential delegation of business men who arrived here on Wednesday night from Omaha to arouse interest in the forthcoming Transmississippi Exposition to be held in that city in 1898, captured Denver and a portion of the state yesterday and left last night—the greater portion for Cripple Creek, the balance for home.

They had interviews with the representatives of the city, county and state governments, the Chamber of Commerce and Colorado Mining Exchange, and with the representative private citizens, and in each and every instance were given the most cordial assurances of co-operation and support. The local people were almost as well informed regarding the benefits that would accrue to the city and state by such an exposition as is outlined, as the visitors and everything possible will be done to further the objects in view.

The delegation was very well satisfied with the result of the visit to Denver and to the other places touched at in the West. G. M. Hitchcock, editor and proprietor of the Omaha World-Herald, and Capt. Palmer of the delegation returned home last night on account of business engagements, while the other eight went to the gold field for a short visit.

The party visited the Colorado Mining Stock Exchange during the call and were introduced to the brokers by President Root. Gurdon W. Wattles president of the association made a brief speech, setting forth the objects of the visit to Denver. He dwelt upon the great benefits that will result to Denver from the exposition and urged his hearers to join heartily in the efforts of Omaha to make the exposition the most important affair that has ever occurred west of the Mississippi river. President Root made a short speech on the same lines after which a resolution was adopted pledging the exchange to give all the assistance in its power to the enterprise.

Called on the Mayor.

The delegation called at the city hall in the forenoon and met all the officers and heads of departments. A meeting was held in the mayor's office at which the visitors, the city officials and Lieut. Gov. Brush, who happened to be in the building, were present.

Mayor McMurray, on behalf of Denver, extended a welcome to the party, and the lieutenant governor assured them that Colorado was in sympathy with the movement which had brought them here.

President Wattles of the exposition company stated the objects of the visitors. They desired the co-operation and the support of the West, first, in the endeavor to secure national government recognition and, second, in exhibits to the exposition. He believed the exposition would do a great deal to develop the West, as it was intended to be a Transmississippi affair and not local. He knew of no city that could aid as much as Denver, which was recognized everywhere for its enterprise and push. Mr. Hitchcock of the Omaha World-Herald also paid a neat compliment to Denver and the state and he believed that a partnership between Colorado and Nebraska was desirable and natural. The one was the mineral state of the world and the other was going to be the granery​.

Mayor McMurray assured the party that whatever could be done by Denver and its citizens to aid the enterprise would be done. What Colorado would do to Omaha in this matter would be reciprocated in 1903, when a celebration of the Louisiana purchase would be held. Lieut. Gov. Brush spoke briefly and in the same strain.

Mr. Wakefield, the secretary of the delegation, stated what in the opinion of Omaha and those interested in the exposition would be the most substantial bid that could be rendered. If resolutions could be adopted by cities, counties and state in indorsement and if the representatives in the United States Congress were called on to support a liberal grant from the government, they would be most effectual.

Before taking their leave the distinguished visitors were again assured that everything possible would be done to assist in the laudable effort to benefit the West.

At the Governor's Office.

At 2 o'clock in the afternoon the delegation paid a visit to Gov. McIntire. Other state officials had been called in for the occasion and there were present besides the governor, Secretary of State McGaffey, Treasurer Mulnix, Auditor Parks and Attorney General Carr. The gentlemen from Omaha were welcomed in the governor's large reception room and there, after greetings, they stated their object in coming to Denver at this time. President Wattles of the exposition association talked at some length of the aims of the people of Omaha in getting up an exposition. It was, he said, not to be a show for Omaha's benefit only but an opportunity for the entire West to display its products and attract attention to its great resources and latent wealth. It was hoped that every state west of the Mississippi would take an active part in the exposition. Colorado, Mr. Wattles felt sure, would not be behind the others in this regard. He hoped to see a valuable exhibit from this state, buildings suited to the occasion and the greatness of the state and an attendance of people equally as indicative of the energy of the people of Colorado.

Mr. Markel, Mr. Kountze and others of the delegation added a few words to what Mr. Wattles had said. Gov. McIntire, in replying, said that he felt confident that the people of his state would not be backward or cold in this enterprise but would consider the opportunity a good one to get to the fore with an exhibit showing the greatness of their resources and growing wealth. He could not officially promise anything except that in his message to the next Legislature he would recommend a suitable appropriation for the erection of buildings at the exposition and for the gathering together and presentation of a fine exhibit of Colorado products.

After this exchange of courtesies the guests were escorted through the corridors and apartments of the capitol, departing then to visit other officials.

Good Services for Silver.

Had it been known in time that Mr. Hitchcock was a member of the delegation a public reception would have been tendered him in recognition of the splendid educational services rendered by him and his newspaper to the cause of bimetallism.

The Board of Directors of the Chamber of Commerce held a special meeting last evening to hear from the Omaha delegation and to assure them of their sympathy and hearty assistance in the undertaking. There was a good attendance. President Steele of the chamber briefly introduced the visitors and bespoke for them the consideration of the board.

Mr. Wattles, the president of the Exposition company, spoke of what was intended to be done to make the exposition a success. The national government had been asked to subscribe $250,000 for buildings and exhibits and it was the intention to make it not only a Transmississippi, but an international exposition. He spoke of the remarkable undeveloped interests of the West which could be brought before the world through such an exposition. Nebraska desired to enter into partnership with Colorado in the undertaking.

Benefits for Colorado.

Mr. Hitchcock spoke in an entertaining manner of the visit to the West and its results. He said he had been a 16 to 1 silver man for years and he took the monometallists in the delegation West to convert them, and he believed he had succeeded; at least he had not heard them say anything to the contrary since they had been in the state. He believed the benefits to be derived by Colorado from the Omaha exposition would be greater than those derived from the World's Fair. The East had an idea that Colorado produced nothing but silver. It could open the eyes of many if it cared.

Capt. Palmer, another member of the delegation, and who was in Denver in the early days, spoke briefly.

W. G. Evans said the directors would no doubt take action to assure Omaha and Nebraska that Denver was heart and soul in the movement.

President Steele assured the delegation that the commercial interests of the city would be in line when the time arrived.

Earl B. Coe was called on and spoke in eloquent terms of the services rendered to the cause of silver by Mr. Hitchcock through his newspaper. Other speeches were made by Robert W. Speer and A. S. Hazelton of Council Bluffs.

We are glad the gentlemen from Omaha who are trying to work up interest in the exposition proposed to be held in that city have made a visit to Colorado, and especially that they have come to Denver. It has given them an opportunity to see what a truly beautiful city is, and they will be able to tell their friends in Omaha what a prosperous state looks like. We are sure there will be a readiness on the part of Colorado people to help the exposition when the time comes to make exhibits, provided the enterprise is on a sufficiently large scale. Of course it could not be expected that Colorado would exert itself to prepare an exhibit for a little county fair, but we understand that the intention is to make an exposition representative of the greater part of the transmississippi region.

GOES TO A SUBCOMMITTEE

Omaha Exposition Bill Argued Before the Full Ways and Means Committee.

MERCER MAKES A PLEA FOR THE MONEY

Presents a Strong Case and Secures a Reference Which He Thinks Will Result in a Favorable Report Soon.

WASHINGTON, March 28.—(Special Telegram.)—The house committee on ways and means at its session this morning gave a hearing to Representative Mercer on the Omaha exposition bill. Mr. Mercer went into full details of the proposed exposition, explained the advantages which would accrue to the western country generally from the holding of this exposition, and the unanimous endorsement by the surrounding states of the proposition. He produced for the committee's inspection a number of documents in support of his assertions, and urged that the committee make a favorable report on his bill providing for the holding of the exposition. After he had concluded his argument it was decided to refer the whole matter to the subcommittee on miscellaneous affairs, composed of Representative Grosvenor, Russell, Tawney, Crisp and Wheeler. Mr. Mercer will push this committee as fast as he can, and hopes to get a favorable report from it in a short time.

FAVORABLE REPORT SURE.

Mercer Confident of Success With the Exposition Bill.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., March 28.

Mr. Mercer of Nebraska made his argument today before the full committee on ways and means of the house for the passage of his bill for a Trans-Mississippi International exposition to be held at Omaha. At its conclusion the members of the committee discussed the merits of the bill. The committee was inclined to report it favorably, but as it had not been formally examined and reported by a sub-committee, the report was delayed.

Mr. Dingley asked that it go to a sub-committee of which he is chairman. Congressman Hopkins asked that it go to the sub-committee of which he is chairman, but a compromise followed, and it was sent to sub-committee No. 6, namely, Grosvenor, Crisp, Russell, Tawney, and Wheeler, all of whom are favorable to it, and fast friends of Mr. Mercer. Mr. Mercer called on General Grosvenor at his hotel, and requested that immediate action be taken by the sub-committee on the bill, as the whole committee will meet again on Wednesday. The general assured Mr. Mercer that the sub-committee would meet and report the bill on Wednesday. Chairman Dingley of the committee is opposed to the bill, but a large majority of the committee have pledged themselves to Mercer for the support of the bill.


FRED F. SCHRADER.
 
47

GROSVENOR GIVES A PLEDGE

Promises to Assist the Omaha Exposition Bill Through Committee.

WATTLES AND THURSTON IN CONFERENCE

President of Transmississippi and International Exposition Association Finds Lots of Correspondence to Look After.

President Wattles of the Transmississippi Exposition association has been busy since his return from his trip, in conjunction with the delegation of Omaha business men to Wyoming, Utah and Colorado, in the interest of the exposition project. He has been working hard to catch up with the correspondence and other matters that had accumulated during his absence.

In company with a number of other men interested in the enterprise, he called upon Senator Thurston yesterday to urge him to exert himself for the prompt passage of the exposition bill in both house and senate. The situation was carefully canvassed, and the new phase created by the submission of the house bill to a subcommittee of the ways and means committee, discussed.

Senator Thurston assured the delegation that General Grosvenor of Ohio, who is at the head of the subcommittee in question is a warm, personal friend, and expresses confidence in his support of the exposition measure. In order to expedite action by the subcommittee, if possible, Senator Thurston wired General Grosvenor, asking his earnest and prompt approval of the exposition measure, and before night received the following reply:

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 29.—Hon. John M. Thurston, Omaha Neb.: Your bill just came to my subcommittee. It shall have my earnest and persistent support; will consider it tomorrow.

CHARLES H. GROSVENOR

Senator Thurston assures the directors of the exposition that their bill will undoubtedly pass in the near future.

ALL FAVOR THE EXPOSITION

Wakefield Describes the Trip of the Delegation West.

ONLY ONE SENTIMENT IS EXPRESSED

Officials of Wyoming, Utah and Colorado Warrant Co-Operation of Their States in the Transmississippi Fair in Omaha.

The special Pullman car bearing seven of the delegation sent west in the interests of the Transmississippi exposition arrived at the Union depot last night. They were W. R. Bennett, G. W. Wattles, John A. Wakefield, J. H. Evans, Charles Metz, A. S. Hazelton of Council Bluffs and H. H. Thompson. Each spoke enthusiastically of the success that attended their efforts and the manner in which they were received by the business men in all of the cities along the route. A number of the business men of the city met the numbers at the train.

John A. Wakefield, in speaking of the trip, said: "The first city we visited was Cheyenne. We had given out no notice of our coming, with the exception of what had been stated in the newspapers, but found a large committee of officials and citizens waiting for us at the depot. Among them was Mayor Merrill and Governor Richards and a number of the state officers. After leaving the hotel we visited the capital building, and in the rooms of the governor a number of our delegation outlined the object of our visit. All those present gave their approval to the project and pledged individual aid to its successful execution. The mayor called a special meeting of the city council, at which a number of our city council, at which a number of our party again spoke of the exposition, and the project met with the council's hearty approval. It endorsed it and agreed to distribute literature on the subject left, and use its utmost influence to place the matter in the proper light before the leading merchants of the city. From the officials that I talked to I learned that the majority of the residents of the state would heartily concur in the movement, because the Wyoming display at the World's fair had wrought incalculable benefits to the state in placing before the public its resources, which up to that time had not been suspected by eastern investors. Wyoming, when called upon for an exhibit at the Chicago exposition, was first among all the states of the union to respond.

OMAHA JUST THE PLACE.

"In canvassing among the citizens I learned that Omaha was regarded in a kindly light by them as being the gateway of the great west and that the location was the best for showing western products, as Omaha stands midway between the eastern and western commercial empires. At the time of the World's fair there were no corporations of great magnitude in the state outside of the coal companies, but at the present time almost all products were represented by large firms, which would display large exhibits.

"We were treated royally by the Cheyenne people, who showed the regard in which they held the Nebraska metropolis. We were driven to Fort Russell and taken to all the points of interest around the city.

"At Salt Lake we met representatives of the Mormon interests, among whom was Mr. Smith, who was one of the delegates to the Transmississippi congress that convened in this city last November. Mr. Smith was one of the parties who used his influence at the convention in securing the location of the exposition in this city and rendered us valuable assistance in laying our plans before the proper officials. Governor Wells was seen and stated that when the project was properly placed before the people of the state their support was, he thought, a foregone conclusion. The inhabitants of the famous Salt Lake region, he said, were justly proud of their fertile valleys, in which almost every product known to the world was raised and they were always anxious for the opportunity to display them. He felt warranted in promising that Utah would have an exhibit second to none at the great exposition.

MEET LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES.

"In the evening we met a delegation from the legislature in the county building. It was addressed by Mr. Wattles, Mr. Hitchcock, Z. T. Lindsey and Captain Palmer. The warm reception the subject received was [?] a repetition of that accorded us at Cheyenne. The committees pledged us their unanimous support. In the afternoon of the same day we were taken on a short excursion to Saltair, a resort on the lake, and were shown through the mammoth pavilion coasting $250,000, erected by the wealthy Mormons of Salt Lake, and upon our return were driven around the city.

"On our return trip we stopped for three hours at Ogden and took our dinner at the hotel. We were met by the mayor and a committee of citizens and discussed the subject while at the hotel. All were in favor of the exposition and considered Omaha the proper place for it.

"At Denver we were met by Mayor McMurray, Lieutenant Governor Brush and a large number of city and county officials. Many of these parties formerly lived in Omaha and readily promised to show their interest in the welfare of the city by lending their aid in booming the project to the utmost. Mayor McMurray pledged the assistance of the city and state and promised that the Colorado exhibit would outshine all others. He, however, stipulated that the support of the Denver people should be given on condition that Omaha would return the favor when the exposition commemorating the purchase of the Louisiana tract took place in Denver in 1903.

"In the afternoon we met Governor McIntyre and the state officials at the capitol building. All pledged the state for an extensive exhibit. We then visited the Mining exchange, where the operators stopped transactions while Mr. Wattles addressed them. A motion was put at the completion of his speech that the directors be instructed to frame resolutions in favor of the exposition, and that they forward the same to the representatives in congress. In the evening we met the members of the Board of Trade and Chamber of Commerce, at which Captain Palmer, G. W. Wattles, G. M. Hitchcock and A. S. Hazleton spoke. The two bodies adopted resolutions endorsing the exposition and directed that they be forwarded to the representatives in Washington.

"Of our return trip from Denver little is to be said. We stopped over for a few hours at Cripple Creek and were shown through the upper works of the Independence mine and driven around the town. We met many Omaha people there, who seem to be conducting prosperous establishments. I can only say in conclusion that the excursion was a most prosperous one and productive of great benefit to the exposition."

TRYING TO SHIFT HIS RESPONSIBILITY.

When a man wants to pick a quarrel he seldom has any trouble in finding a pretext. In his peerless effort at self-laudation, made last Tuesday at the Boyd theater McKinley rally, Senator Thurston went out of his way to charge the newspapers of this city and the business men actively interested in the Transmississippi exposition with undertaking to trade off Nebraska presidential support for congressional support of the exposition bill. This charge was emphasized by the senator in the following insulting language:

If these self-constituted traffickers in presidential support had kept entirely out of this matter, the exposition bill would have gone through congress with the greatest of ease, and without any opposition. I do not make this statement idly; I know whereof I speak, and I add, kindly but firmly, that if these same newspapers had devoted one-half of the effort in sustaining and upholding their senator that they have in attempting to discredit him before the country and congress, their exposition bill would have been much more certain of success than it is under the present conditions, which they have heedlessly and unnecessarily created.

These uncalled for and baseless aspersions have been supplemented with an open letter over the signature of John M. Thurston printed in the World-Herald, in which the senator disclaims any reference to that paper, but singles out The Bee for his reprimand as follows:

The Omaha Bee is the only paper which has assumed to hold out presidential support in exchange for congressional and state support for our exposition.

Tom Reed and Senator Allison are both too broad and honorable to think of holding up our bill in congress because of any effort made by me or anyone else to secure delegates who would voice the sentiment of Nebraska republicans in favor of McKinley.

The danger is, however, that The Bee and some of the exposition managers have held out unwarranted inducements to the friends of Allison and Reed and have been asserting that my opposition was all that stood in the way of the favorite son plan, in the success of which they were supposed to have so much interest. I say again that this unwarranted attempt to exchange presidential support for exposition support is all that has endangered the exposition bill.

The senator comes about as near the truth in these assertions as he did in his dramatic declamations railing at bosses, politicians and railroad magnates. If he knows whereof he speaks, as he says he does, let him produce his proofs or retract his charges. There has been no attempt whatever to barter away Nebraska's presidential vote, unless the rumor is true that a cabinet place is to be held in reserve for the man who delivers the Nebraska delegation to William McKinley. We challenge the senator to point to a line in The Bee to substantiate his allegation. The Bee has never said one word derogatory to McKinley. On the contrary, it has said more in his favor than in favor of all other candidates combined, including General Manderson.

The efforts of The Bee and those of the exposition managers have been exerted solely with the view of enlisting the good will and assistance of senators and congressmen who are in position to expedite or retard the passage of the exposition bill. Instead of holding out promises of presidential support from Nebraska, as the senator alleges, appeals for support have sought to dissipate expectation of political reciprocity. In proof of this, Senator Thurston's attention is invited to the following response from Senator Chandler to a letter invoking his influence in behalf of the exposition with Chairman Dingley of the house committee on ways and means:

 

WASHINGTON, March 20, 1896.—Dear Sir: Your letter is at hand. I have not yet had time to talk with Mr. Dingley, but will do everything I can for the Transmississippi exposition, no matter who is president. I believe a national, not international, exposition in the interior of the country will be [?] helpful in all respects. Truly yours,

WILLIAM E. CHANDLER.
[?]E. Rosewater, Esp.

If Senator Thurston is to be believed, the exposition bill would have passed long ago had it not been for the interference of The Bee and the Omaha business men, who are laboring for its success. While this is a very flattering imputation as to the influence of The Bee at Washington, it is also a humiliating confession on the part of the senator. Had his open letter been dated from his post of duty at Washington instead of from political headquarters at Omaha it might have afforded some sort of excuse for the delay in securing senatorial action on the bill. The trouble with Senator Thurston is that he is trying to shift the responsibility and appears to be totally oblivious of the relations to the public imposed upon him by his official position. He seems to have forgotten that the first duty of a senator is to the people of his state whose interests should not be sacrificed to personal ambition or political glory. The senator's maiden speech has been duly delivered, but his maiden bill is yet to be passed.

Fine words butter no parsnips. The people of Omaha and Nebraska prefer substantial results to presidential rainbow chasing. They are asking themselves, What is Nebraska's only republican senator doing in Nebraska when measures of state and national concern are awaiting the action of congress in session at Washington? They applaud him when he says he trusts the people. But they cannot comprehend why he refuses to trust the people to select their own delegates to the national convention. Neither can they comprehend why he should loiter at home after he has secured all the political honor that he demanded in his recent ultimatum.

Nobody regrets more than The Bee does to be forced to use such plain language or to be driven into a controversy which cannot but be annoying to all concerned. The blame must rest where it belongs. There was no occasion for the arraignment of any paper or any man for laboring zealously to promote the Transmississippi exposition project.

SENATOR THURSTON'S MISTAKE.

Public men, no matter how gifted, are liable to be indiscreet. Henry Clay, the most popular orator America ever produced, once wrote a letter that lost him the presidency. James G. Blaine failed of his life's ambition because he accepted an invitation to dine with the Wall street nabobs at a gold plate dinner. These historic incidents should have suggested themselves to Senator Thurston before he ventured upon the course which he is pursuing in the present presidential campaign. Senator Thurston has a host of enthusiastic admirers, but this man worship should not be misconstrued or abused. Like every other public man the senator has a right to champion his preferred candidate in any legitimate way, provided always that in so doing he does not neglect his officials duties to the public and does not arrogate to himself the privileges and prerogatives that belong under a republican form of government to the rank and file of the party.

No exception can be taken to Senator Thurston's efforts to promote the candidacy of ex-Governor McKinley through the medium of the press or from the platform and banqueting board. It was also his privilege to define his position fully before the republican state committee as to the respective claims of rival candidates. The assurance which the senator gave on that occasion that he had no desire or disposition to dictate the course of Nebraska republicans either as to presidential preferences or delegates to the national convention was applauded and accepted in good faith by the party. But the subsequent ultimatum promulgated from Washington over Senator Thurston's name naturally created surprise even among his friends. Here was a peremptory command that he should be chosen as one of the delegates to St. Louis and that he should in addition name two of the delegates-at-large.

The return of the senator to Nebraska after he had publicly announced that he would not return, and that, too, after all his unprecedented demands had been conceded, and his utterances since his return, are not calculated to strengthen him in the public esteem. The senator, in view of his own career, creates a suspicion of insincerity when he arraigns the politicians and denounces political bosses and railroad interference in politics. His constituents ought to be credited with some intelligence. And he further invites rebuke when he takes the business men and the newspapers of Omaha to task for their alleged attempts to barter presidential support for congressional support of the Transmississppi​ exposition bill. He goes so far as to ascribe his failure of the newspapers to sustain and uphold their senator and their attempts to discredit him before congress and the country.

This charge is not only puerile, but baseless. The senator, like some other public men, seems to forget that no man is infallible. He has been generously treated by the press and every effort made by him in behalf of his constituents has been commended. He has no right to expect the press of Nebraska to be so servile as to play the hypocrite for any public man by praising views at variance with its honest sentiment. Such a thing is unheard of in American politics in our day.

On the other hand, the senator underrates the intelligence of his constituents when he seeks to make them believe that his inability to secure much-needed legislation is due to interference with his own plans with respect to the Nebraska delegation to St. Louis. The business men actively interested in the Transmississippi exposition have endeavored so far as possible to divorce the enterprise completely from politics. But Senator Thurston is too much of a politician not to know that legislatures and congresses are political bodies and people must not look for favors from men whom they antagonize. If Senator Thurston had not projected himself so far into the front of the McKinley fight when there was no necessity for it, and had remained at his port of duty, he might have been more successful with the legislative measures desired by the people of Omaha and Nebraska.

   
T. L. COMBS & CO.
(INCORPORATED)
THE BUSY JEWELERS
MANUFACTURING, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
1520 DOUGLAS STREET.
OMAHA.
Form No. 260.

THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY.

THOS. T. ECKERT, General Manager.
NORVIN GREEN, President.
Receiver's No.Time FiledCheck
SEND the following message subject to the terms on back hereof, which are hereby agreed to.}
To Hon. David H. Mercer,
Washington, D. C.

Governors and leading State Officials of Iowa, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, South Dakota, Missouri, California, Arizona and Nebraska have all pledged State appropriations, and other will follow as soon as your Bill becomes a law. Legislatures do not meet until next Winter except Iowa and Utah. They have passed Joint Resolutions and formally promised appropriations as soon as Government recognition and appropriation passes.

G. W. Wattles, Pres.
John A. Wakefield, Sec'y.
READ THE NOTICE AND AGREEMENT ON BACK.
 
 

SENATOR THURSTON'S STAND

CRITICISES THE MANDERSON MANAGERS

Complains They Did Not Take Him Into Their Confidence and Were Therefore Suspected of Duplicity.

The announcement of a mass meeting at Boyd's opera house last night in the interest of William McKinley was sufficient to draw a crowd which filled every seat on the lower door and balcony, while a large number of people were compelled to stand up during the opening. The audience was composed largely of men, but many women were present. The upper boxes on each side of the house were draped with national colors.

At the back of the stage Old Glory was draped in graceful folds, surrounding a portrait of William McKinley. The stage was completely filled with chairs, in which were seated a number of local politicians of more or less note , among them being E. P. Davis, [?] L. Chaffee, John Lewis, Judge Keysor, Judge Slabaugh, Judge Baxter, City Comptroller Westberg, Councilman Axford, Ben-[?], Allan, Police Judge Gordon, County Clerk Redfield, County Commissioner Williams, Peter Shwenck, Richard Smith, Colonel C. S. Chase, J. L. Kennedy, C. A. [?]ss, P. L. Perrine, H. G. Whitmore, St. A. [?] Balcombe, B. C. Smith, Dr. W. O. Rodg-[?] James Walsh, J. L. Kaley, Lee Estelle, [?]ry Sedgwick, J. W. Carr, H. C. Akin, James Woodard, Charles Youngers, Phil E. [?]ter and others.

Daniel H. Wheeler called the meeting to order and read a lengthy address, dealing almost entirely with statistics relating to the amount of money per capita in this country under republican rule as contrasted with the amount under democratic rule, the wealth of the country and various other points.

At the conclusion of Mr. Wheeler's talk Senator Thurston appeared upon the stage and was greeted with a burst of applause.

The McKinley club double quartet was announced and sang a campaign song which pleased the audience immensely.

SENATOR THURSTON'S ADDRESS.

Senator Thurston was the chief, though the [?]st, speaker. He said:

"Much as I dislike to enter upon any personal statement, I find it necessary to briefly review the events which have led up to the present Nebraska situation with respect to the presidency.

"About the 6th of February General Manderson came to Washington, stopped at the same hotel with me, and we have daily pleasant, friendly conversations. I left Washington on the evening of February 11, without the least idea that the political situation in my state had changed, or that there was any thought of General Manderson's candidacy. As a matter of fact, however, at this same time certain of his friends were making all arrangements to have the candidacy announced through the state committee, which had been hastily called together by telegraph for a meeting on February 14. I reached Omaha on the forenoon of that day, and learned for the first time that some sort of plan was on foot to have a declaration made in his favor by the state central committee that evening at Lincoln. I also ascertained beyond all question or dispute that certain individuals in the city of Omaha, pretending to act in his interest, had been quietly but effectively engaged in the attempt to defeat my election as a delegate to the St. Louis convention. I felt then and I feel now that any man who desires to announce himself as a candidate for the high office of president ought to consult the wishes and desires of the republicans of his state in the first instance, and without any intention of reflecting on any one, I am compelled to state as my solemn conviction that the unfortunate and deplorable political situation which has resulted is almost wholly due to the fact that the republicans of Nebraska, the rank and file of the party, were not in any manner taken into the confidence of those who had in charge Mr[?] that almost every [?]fied with that mo[?] known as a friend [?]Kinley, and that t[?] sought to inaugurate [?] directly calculated [?] that their wishes [?] that they were as [?] previous conviction[?]nouncement of the[?]

NO CHAN[?]

"This is the peo[?] in the republican [?] will of the republ[?] one national conv[?] country believe t[?] men who stand f[?] bosses of the coun[?]spiracy to overri[?] to compel the no[?] is not the first [?]selves. The man[?]derson's candidacy [?]braska almost ne[?]picion that it wa[?]son program so op[?]nounced by the p[?] their perfected pl[?] far as General [?]cerned. I desire [?]assert my belief [?]cerity of his ca[?]tunate for him, a[?] of Nebraska, tha[?] of his candidacy, [?] impressed the p[?] they were engaged [?] the popular will [?]ually concerned, [?] deeply hurt—not[?] that the candida[?]acter, on the pa[?] of my state, sh[?] one suggestion of [?] to my attention [?] still feel, that [?] friends of Will[?] should have been [?] this matter. I [?] it was due to my as the only [?]acter from this state, that I should at least be notified of a purpose to change the entire political course of the party in my state from what I had been led to believe was in the hearts of the people themselves. Had the McKinley men in Nebraska, including myself, ever been approached with the suggestion that our distinguished fellow citizen, Charles F. Manderson, desired to be presented by his state it is at least presumable that we would have been entirely willing to have given that suggestion favorable consideration, and that the presentation of Mr. Manderson's name to the national convention could have been agreed upon around the fireside of the republican party, under such conditions and accompanied by such announcement as would relieve his candidacy from any appearance of confederation with the political bosses, or of direct antagonism to the wish of our people, that William McKinley should be their next president. There was not a moment from the time that General Manderson's candidacy was first thought of that his friends could not have secured, without contention or quarrel, from the supporters of William McKinley in Nebraska as favorable an arrangement with respect to the support of both candidates as has now been reached after these weeks of unfortunate contention.

"Much as I deprecate factionalism in the party—much as I dread anything which makes republican success in Nebraska less certain—I insist now, as I have insisted at all times, that those who precipitated another candidacy than that which had its spontaneous birth in the hearts and the judgments of our people are responsible for anything which followed or may follow, not for the best interests of the republican party.

"I regret more deeply than I can express those personal reflections which have been cast upon men and upon my course by many of those who had direct charge of General Manderson's campaign. So far as I cam individually concerned, I shall overlook and forget, and shall devote myself in every honorable way to the complete restoration of harmony in the republican party of this state. I rejoice for one that an honorable settlement has now been reached between the supporters of McKinley and the supporters of Manderson.

[?] AS DELEGATE.

49

[?]the fact that efforts were [?]efeat my election as a dele-[?] Omaha district, I felt I had [?] that under my amicable [?] opposition to my candidacy [?]wn by the friends of Gen-[?] It had been practically set-[?]rsal expression on the part [?] republicans of this state [?] carried the state conven-[?] Webster and Peter Jensen [?] the delegates, without op-[?]ore felt it to be my duty [?]vide against any possible [?]r election on the part of [?] supporters. Beyond that I [?] to make any suggestion; [?] manner undertake to bind [?] William McKinley to the pro-[?]t, contenting myself with [?]t I believed I could secure [?]e McKinley republicans of [?] harmonious adjustment of [?] the party in favor of a [?]y fair and satisfactory to [?]ey.

[?]eve it is necessary for me [?]publicans of this state that [?]e intention of dictating, or [?]cipating their action. I felt [?] holding the responsible po-[?] do toward the republican [?]rything I reasonably could [?]creation of factional issues [?]ferences which might en-[?]e republican success. I con-[?]o the McKinley republicans [?]stand by me in this action, [?] everything that any real [?]cKinley can ask in aid of [?] I believe that the repub-[?]tate know that I am Mc-[?]ied, unswerving, unfaltering [?]roud of the fact that that [?] and American has given [?]ce, and is willing to trust [?] and my judgment so far [?] a situation is concerned. I [?] and fairly fought the Mc-[?]not as the self-constituted [?]McKinley forces, but as one [?] file of the republican party [?]nd the only men who will [?] has been done after they [?]ghly understand its purposes [?] those who desire strife and [?] the party, that party suc-[?]endered doubtful, and that [?] dictation, as newspaper ed-[?]rwise, may be thereby in-[?]

[?]UND TO RAILROADS.

[?]word in a personal way. In my address to the republicans of Nebraska, recently published, I referred to the representatives of a well understood political power in this state, that had advised me that it would be unsafe for my political power in this state, that had advised me that it would be unsafe for my political future to oppose the program which had been arranged at the meeting of the state central committee. The Omaha World-Herald, referring to that, declared that I had been elected United States senator by that same well understood political power. I state here and now, in the presence of all mankind, that I was not elected United States senator by any railroad company, or because of the fact that I had been for many years a railroad attorney, but I was elected in spite of the fact of the important position I had held with one of the great railway corporations of this country. It is true that for many years I was at the head of the law department of the greatest railway system of the universe. I went into the railway service a comparatively poor man, and I left the railway service a comparatively poor man. Notwithstanding the many opportunities I might have taken advantage of for speculation, I never made or attempted to make one dollar except what came to me as my stated salary for services performed. I have the proud satisfaction of knowing that my client never complained of me on account of any failure to do my whole duty for my client's interests. While I was connected professionally with the railway company I devoted myself to its interests utterly, regardless as to whether or not what I did for my client might prejudice me in the public estimation. I left the railway service without feeling myself obligated in the least degree, so far as any official action of mine may be concerned. I recognize the fact that the great railway interests of this state are entitled to receive equal consideration by all public officials with similar interests of individual citizens. I propose in the senate of the United States to deal fairly and justly with every interest in the state of Nebraska, corporate or otherwise, and I believe I have enough courage to do what I think is right for the corporations of this state, although I may at times bring upon myself the criticism and censure of my people. I will do what is right by all corporations, not because they have any right to demand anything of me, but because I shall feel it a duty. But I have never forgotten, and I never shall forget, that I am born of the plain people; I am the lineal descendant of eight generations of American farmers. I was born to humble conditions and brought up in a life of toil.

PEOPLE'S INTERESTS FIRST.

"I believe I know the thoughts and hopes and aspirations and desires of the common people of this country. I believe that I instinctively turn to them in all great matters affecting the public welfare, and I take this occasion to say, openly and publicly, in the face of the world, that if it comes at any time to an issue between the corporations and the people, if I am compelled to choose between the corporate demand [?] and the wishes of the plain people [?] other, then regardless of consequences [?]out thought of result, for weal or [?] cast my lot with the people. It [?] that I have entered upon the only [?] term in public office I may ever be pa[?] to hold—but while I am senator of the [?] States, representing in that august b[?] people of the state of Nebraska, I [?] to do what I believe is for the w[?] of my country, of my commonwealth, [?] the people among whom I have pas[?] many years of my life, and in the p[?]ance of my duty as an American [?] republican I will not be dictated to [?] power, however great, by any combi[?] however strong.

"One other matter of a somewhat p[?] kind, which I desire to refer to. The [?] papers of this city and some of our b[?] men who profess to be deeply interes[?] the success of the Transmississippi [?]tion have been endeavoring to mix [?] presidential issue with the exposition [?] congress, and have undertaken to tra[?] Nebraska presidential support for co[?]sional support of the Omaha bill. If the self-constituted traffickers in presidentia[?]port had kept entirely out of this m[?] the exposition bill would have gone t[?] congress with the greatest of ease, and [?]out any opposition. I do not make this [?]ment idly; I know whereof I speak, [?] add, kindly but firmly, that if these [?] newspapers had devoted one-half of t[?]fort in sustaining and upholding thei[?]ator that they have in attempting t[?]credit him before the country and co[?] their exposition bill would have been [?] more certain of success than it is und[?] present conditions, which they have [?]lessly and unnecessarily created. I b[?] however, that under the present turn [?]fairs I shall go back to the senate a[?] in a position to render a good account [?] people of Omaha and Nebraska in thi[?]ter of the establishment of the Tra[?]sissippi exposition."

MOVEMENT OF THE PEOPLE.

John C. Wharton was the first s[?] Referring to the fact that this ca[?] was booming at a time when it had [?] been thought too early for political [?] he attributed the interest manifeste[?] the fact that it grew out of a determin[?] on the part of the people to throw off d[?]cratic rule. He drew a striking con[?] between the prosperity under Harrison'[?]ministration and the prostration of bu[?] under Cleveland, and referred to Se[?] Thurston as the Moses who was to lea[?] people of Nebraska over the Red sea [?]pression to the promised land. In 186[?] speaker said the people made an [?]whelming demand for Lincoln's election [?] in 1896 the cry was going up from a [?]rections for McKinley as the embod[?] of the principles and doctrines of the r[?]lican party.

W. J. Connell said the people of O[?] had met to add their share to the [?] wave of popular sentiment which was s[?]ing across the country in favor of Mc[?]ley. If any other man were nominated [?] St. Louis, he said, the people of Nebraska would give him loyal support. The [?] and the republicans of Nebraska have [?]creed, the speaker said, that the nam[?] the next president shall begin with the letter "M," and it will be either McKinley or Manderson. Mr. Connell said he wa[?] ardent advocate of the principle of 16[?] on the silver question, but was willi[?] accept the amendment offered by Senator Thurston making the rule apply to the American product, but the McKinleyites had [?] one better and had offered to make [?] to nothing.

Joe F. Barton then appeared on t[?] and struck a popular chord by s[?] song written by I. W. Miner and s[?] music of "Marching Through Georgia[?] refrain was sung by the Glee club, [?] by the audience. It was:

Hurrah! hurrah! he's smashing [?] slates;
Hurrah! hurrah! he leads all candidates[?]
His vote is growing day by day, a[?] hear from other states,
Hurrah for McKinley and protection.

This song was enthusiastically cheered [?] the last verse was repeated as an encore.

M'KINLEY A GENERAL FAVORITE.

General John C. Cowlin was then introduced. He said the heart of every old so[?] in the audience was thrilled by the mus[?] that stirring song, and he knew of no[?] on whom the mantle of the noble She[?] might better fall than on William McKinley. Sherman had marched through Georgia, [?] McKinley through the entire south. He [?] but one candidate. The great mov[?] which was sweeping over the country[?] said, was not a mushroom growth fos[?] by the politicians, but had its origin in[?] homes of the workingmen, and it could [?] be turned aside by the united efforts of [?] political bosses. He referred to McKin[?] schooling during the war in the principl[?] patriotism, and said that McKinley's [?] object since the war was to elevate the [?]dition of the masses. He then read from [?] newspaper clipping a report of a schem[?] the part of certain members of the nat[?] republican committee to defeat the no[?]tion of McKinley by organizing the co[?]tion with delegates unfavorable to the [?] man, and said that Senator Thurston [?] do no better than to be clothed with [?] power to go to that convention and [?] with the promoters of his scheme. H[?]pealed to the voters of Nebraska to [?] none as delegates to the convention [?] those who would protect the interests [?] people, and who would see that no de[?] was seated who was not entitled to [?]

Senator Thurston's Card.

Omaha, March 28.—To the Editor of the World-Herald: I find on careful examination of World-Herald files that I did your paper an injustice in stating that "the newspapers of Omaha" had been mixing up the exposition matter with the republican presidential question.

The Omaha Bee is the only paper which has assumed to hold out presidential support in exchange for congressional and state support for our exposition.

Tom Reed and Senator Allison are both too broad and honorable to think of holding up our bill in congress because of any effort made by me or anyone else to secure delegates who would voice the sentiment of Nebraska republicans in favor of McKinley.

The danger is, however, that the Bee and some of the exposition managers have held out unwarrainted​ inducements to the friends of Allison and Reed and have been asserting that my opposition was all that stood in the way of the favorite son plan, in the success of which they were supposed to have so much interest. I say again that this unwarranted attempt to exchange presidential support for exposition support is all that has endangered the exposition bill. I feel in duty bound to exonerate the World-Herald from any participation in that.

So far as the McKinley-Manderson contest is concerned, I make no complaint, as you evidently published both sides, and it may be the opposition had as much to object to or even more than myself or friends.

I do not object to any criticism of any public action of a political character, and could not expect a free silver advocate to approve my position on the money question. Outside of political differences I certainly hope to stand well with my home newspapers and do not wish to do any of them the least injustice.


JOHN M. THURSTON.
 

JOINT RESOLUTION.

By the Committee on Manufactures and Commerce.

Relative to the Trans-Mississippi Exposition to be Held at Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898.

WHEREAS, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi River, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress of 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the hold ng of an exposition of the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories; and

WHEREAS, The said Convention voted to hold the said Exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898; and

WHEREAS, The common interest of the states and territories constituting this great region will be promoted thereby, and the interests of the state of Utah will be especially benefitted by such an Exposition,

BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Utah that the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is heartily approved and that the people of Utah are urged to co-operate with the people of the other states of the Trans-Mississippi region and to take this opportunity of making a fitting display of their resources, and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the Senators and Representative from Utah in the National Congress by the Secretary of State, with the request that they promote as far as possible the said Exposition.

 

House Joint Res. #4

By Con. on Manufacture and Commerce.

"Relating to the holding of Trans-Mississippi Congress at Omaha 15-
March 3rd 1896
Read 1st + 2nd times + Referred to Con on Mfrs + Commerce.
March 4th, 1896.
Referred to Com. on Mfrs + Com. Recalled and bid read 3rd time and passed in placed on final passage and passed.
[?] 33
Hayes 0
[?] 12
transmitted to Senate
Wm H. Thompson
Chief Clerk

The Board of Trade

John A Wakefield Esq
Sec Omaha Neb
My Dear Sir

At a meeting of the Board of Trade held on the 12th Instant the amended resolution was passed and Corpus forwarded to the Representatives from this State

Very Truly Yours

Wm. D. Thomas
Sec

A resolution was passed asking our representatives in congress to aid in every way possible the donation of aid to the exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898, as follows:

Resolved: That it is the sense of this board that every possible encouragement and aid should be given to the promotion of the transmississippi and international exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898; that we respectfully recommend that the senators and representatives from Wyoming in congress support such movement for a liberal appropriation for a government exhibit at such exposition; and that we urge upon the legislature and the citizens of Wyoming early and vigorous preparation for presenting the industries and resources of Wyoming at such exposition.

Extract from the Minutes

Wm D Thomas
 

HOT SPRINGS STAR.

Hot Springs, So. Dak.

TERMS OF THE WEEKLY STAR.

(Introduced by Wells.)

RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this Convention, that the holding of a Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha in 1898, would be productive of great good to the entire country and we hereby express our hearty approval of the enterprise and request our Senators and Representatives in Congress to lend all possible assistance in carrying out this project.

This resolution was unanimously adopted by the Hot Springs City Republican convention held at Hot Springs, S. D. on March 21st, 1896.


E. B. WARREN, Sec.

THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION

A Project of Vast Importance to the Black Hills.

The Black Hills country, through its Improvement association or some other suitable organization, should at once take some steps to further the important enterprise known as the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, to be held in Omaha in the fall of 1898 and to make a strong and united effort to secure national and state appropriations.

Thomas H. Wells, of this city, who was recently appointed vice president of the exposition for the state of South Dakota, in response to a request from the World-Herald for his ideas regarding the exposition, says:

"I am proud to state that I was a member of the Trans-Mississippi congress, which held its last session in your hospitable city last November and had the pleasure of voting for the resolution then adopted by a unanimous vote of the congress, which is as follows:

Whereas, We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the states west of the Mississippi river, made at some central gateway, where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these wealth producing states, but to all the home seekers of the world, therefore,

Resolved, That the United States congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi exposition at Omaha during the months of August, September and October in the year 1898, and that the representatives of such states and territories in congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases, to assist in carrying out this enterprise.

I thought at that time, and think so yet, that such an exposition successfully carried out will so advertise our immense resources that we will be benefited in every way and our eastern neighbors will also be greatly benefited by being enabled to send thousands from their crowded cities to till the soil and delve into the earth for hidden wealth and become well-to-do stockmen instead of eking out a miserable existence in overcrowded labor markets of the east.

The 'idea' was a good one in every way and I trust that congress will do its duty by the great west, whose people are asking so little and promising so much.

I assure you that I will do all that I can to further the interests of the exposition and hope that it will culminate in a brilliant success."

51
Important

Write a letter, something like the following, to anyone you may know east of the Mississippi River who would likely comply with your request, especially to people of influence:

Omaha Real Estate Exchange

DEAR SIR:—A bill is now pending before Congress to make an appropriation to aid the Trans-Mississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha in 1898. I would regard it as a personal favor if you would write your Congressmen and Senators requesting them to give their support to this bill and aid in its early passage.

Please attend to this at once
rgs [?]

The Globe.

No. 531 Broadway.
Telephone 41.
COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA.

Don't Imperil the Exposition.

It will be cold day for the trans-Mississippi exposition if Nebraska lends her influence or uses it to defeat Speaker Reed for the republican nomination for president. The promoters are soliciting congressional aid in the form of an appropriation and if this be refused it will be a death blow to the enterprise. As Mr. Reed is speaker and exercises great influence the importance of having his support is not to be discounted. But how is his friendship to be gained and retained? By supporting some other candidate? Hardly. Mr. Reed will not be slow to recognize the position taken by Nebraska. If that state be for him Nebraska would have every reason to hope for his aid in the matter of obtaining an appropriation. If it be against him Nebraska could not reasonably solicit favors at his hand, nor would it have any cause to complain if he exerted his influence against it. Reciprocity is human, and so is revenge. They are diametrical, yet distinct elements of human nature. Reed is lacking in neither. He is reciprocal and revengeful. His right to trail personal questions into his official acts may be questioned, but that he is inclined that way no one can dispute. Nebraska may with safety oppose Reed in the interests of Maderson, Allison or any western candidate, but if that state opposes him in the interest of McKinley, Morton or some other eastern man Mr. Reed will likely strike back, and would have a right to. The business men of Nebraska ought not permit politicians to kill the trans-Mississippi enterprise. If the exposition be a success it will be the making of Omaha. It will greatly stimulate the commercial interests of that city, and will infuse new life into her various industries. It will relieve Omaha and Nebraska of the burdens under which they have been staggering the last two years. Omaha needs commercial relief more than any thing else. She can well afford to sacrifice the political standing of professional politicians like Thurston, Webster and Connell to gain commercial prosperity. Should the exposition prove a failure it would be a bitter and destructive blow, not alone to Omaha and Nebraska, but to the whole west. Yes, Nebraska can consistently support Manderson or Allison, but when she crosses the Mississippi for a candidate she will best promote and subserve her own interests by extending her hand to Reed.

"We, your special committee, to whom was referred the communication of the Honorable Mayor Broatch of Omaha, Nebraska, beg leave to submit the following resolution and recommend its adoptiol​.

"Whereas, It is intended to promote the common interest of the states and territories of the United State, lying west of the Mississippi river, by holding in the city of Omaha, state of Nebraska, during the year 1898, an exposition of the products, industries, arts and civilization of said region, to the end that its wonderful and diversified resources may become better known to mankind; and

"Whereas, Such exposition will afford to the people of Utah an opportunity to bring to the notice of the world, not only what they have accomplished by patience, persistence and toil in transforming a barren and desolate wilderness into a productive and prosperous state, but as well, knowledge of the marvellous diversity of the mineral resources which it possesses, the magnificence of its climate and the multitude of its attractions; and

"Whereas, It is most fitting that the people whose pioneers broke the first trail over the region to be illustrated in the exposition and first conveyed to civilization an account of its boundless undeveloped wealth, should be participants in said exposition; and

"Whereas, The state of Utah contains within its borders not only the best illustrations of the efficacy of irrigation in the redemption of our arid lands, but as well mines of almost every mineral known to mineralogy, knowledge of which ,if communicated to the world, will result in attracting to the state vast capital and a large additional population;

"Therefore, Be it resolved by the city council of Salt Lake city, that we are in hearty accord with the plan of holding at Omaha the said exposition; that we applaud the progressive spirit shown by the citizens of said city in entering into the work of bringing it about, and that we will lend our aid and encouragement to all efforts made by Utah citizens to secure for the state a creditable exhibit of the resources of the state at said exposition; and

"Be it further resolved, That our honorable senators, Messrs. Brown and Cannon and our other representative, Mr. Allen are hereby requested to assist and do all in their power to aid the city of Omaha in procuring the appropriation asked by them from congress; and

"The recorded is hereby instructed to send a copy of this report and resolution to the honorable Mayor Broatch of Omaha ,Nebraska, and to our honorable senators and representative."

 

Resolutions Colorado Mining & Stock Exchange.

WHEREAS, Delegates representing the 24 Trans- Mississippi States and territories at their last Convention which was held at Omaha in November 1895, passed resolutions for the holding of a Trans-Mississippi and International Ex position at Omaha, Nebraska, beginning in June and ending in November, in 1898, and,

WHEREAS, The holding of such an exposition would greatly promote the material interests of the Trans-Mississippi States and territories by advertising their resources to the world, and

WHEREAS? The State of Colorado would be especially benefited by exhibiting its resources at this Exposition and the mining interests of the State would be greatly promoted by an Exposition of this character;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED: By the Board of Directors of the Colorado Mining Stock Exchange that we heartily approve of the proposed Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition; that we will use our influence in promoting the same, and,

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the senators and Representatives in Congres from Colorado will be reuested to use their influence in se curing the passage of the bi ll now pending before the House and Senate, recognizing the said exposition and making an appropriation for a Government Building and a national exhibit.

I hereby certify that the above is a true copy of the resolutions passed by the Board of Directors of the Colorado Mining Stock Exchange at their regular meeting held March 26, 1896.


L. Haines
Secretary
 

COMMERCIAL CLUB

WHEREAS, the City of Omaha has taken the preliminary steps for holding an exposition, international in character, and giving special prominence to the products and resources of the States and Territories lying west of the Mississippi river, and,

WHEREAS, a project involving such far reaching benefits to the country and people west of that great waterway of the nation, and at the same time bringing into view, and within the ready reach and inspection, of the people of the Eastern portion of the United States, its vast and varied capacity, production and resources, with a glimpse at its enlightened methods and educational factors, should be encouraged not only by the National government, but by the local government of the states and territories west of the Mississippi, and would be a national blessing in educating officers of the Government, who have never had the benefit of travel in the West, in a knowledge of the civilization that is building up the Great West, and,

WHEREAS, Nature in her benevolence has not favored any locality more highly than the Great Puget Sound Basin, in bringing together so many elements contributing to man's happiness and material welfare, under a sky, covering a perpetual sanitarium, and in a climate carrying throughout the year less discomfort than in any locality where energy contributes to thrift;and no  

Fairhaven, Washington,
part of the Puget Sound country could hope to reach a greater benefit from such Trans-Mississippi Exposition than Fairhaven and the Bellingham Bay country, Therefore,

Resolved by the Commercial Club of Fairhaven Washington, that the project for holding a great Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha, Nebraska, in 1898 is heartily endorsed, and we hereby respectfully ask the Senators and Representatives in Congress, from the State of Washington, to give their influence and vote to any proper measures that may come before Congress to give National aid to carry forward said project.


Roland L. Lamwell
Prest. e.
Edgar Lee Cowgill
Secy e.
 
53

RECOGNIZED THE EXPOSITION

City Council Asks the Legislature to Appropriate Funds.

MATTER OF LOCATION NOT AN ISSUE

Committee Will Start to Des Moines Tonight to Promote the Interests of the Great Transmississippi Show.

The city of Council Bluffs officially recognized the proposed Transmississippi exposition last night and took action in the direction of the promotion of the project by asking the legislature of the state of Iowa to make an appropriation for a state exhibit at the exposition in Omaha in 1898.

Early in the history of the movement in favor of the exposition those who were urging the matter in Council Bluffs became imbued with the idea that the location of the exposition grounds was the most important feature of the show, so far as this city was concerned, and secured the adoption of resolutions declaring in favor of the location of the exposition at East Omaha and opposing an appropriation for an Iowa exhibit if the exposition were located elsewhere. Investigation has made evident the fact that the particular site selected for the exposition is really of minor importance when compared with the immense benefits to be derived by Council Bluffs and Iowa from the successful consummation of the exposition idea and the city council adopted resolutions endorsing the idea and asking the state legislature to make an appropriation for the purpose of properly representing Iowa in the proposed exposition.

This action of the council was taken at a special meeting held last night. There were present from Omaha, representing the Omaha directory of the exposition society, G. W. Wattles, John A. Wakefield, G. M. Hitchcock, Z. T. Lindsey, Dan Farrell and George H. Payne. After the council had been called to order the resolution endorsing the project was read.

COMMITTEE WORK REVIEWED.

George F. Wright made a brief address, in which he reviewed the work of the committees that had been considering the propositions. He said he had become impressed with the importance of the prestige that would be given the movement if the Iowa legislature should make an appropriation for an exhibition at the exposition and of the weight it would have in securing national recognition of the enterprise. He was anxious that the council listen to the statements of the case by members of the Omaha directory, and called upon G. W. Wattles to address the council.

Mr. Wattles said that the exposition had been located in Omaha by the Transmississippi congress. It was not an Omaha exposition nor a Council Bluffs exposition, but was an enterprise for the good of the entire western country. The men who composed the directory had been selected by the people of Omaha and had laid aside their personal prejudices and personal benefits and were working for the success of the project without reference to any one section or any one set of people. The project was one that had grown on the committee. When it was remembered that two-thirds of the territory, one-third of the population, and one-half of the wealth of the nation was represented in the Transmississippi region it could not be imagined what a proper exposition of the region's resources would mean. He believed that the exposition, properly carried out, would be one of the greatest enterprises the west had ever seen. He cited figures of expositions held in other cities of the world with the attendance at each and said a conservative estimate would place the attendance at the Omaha exposition at 5,000,000. The benefits, direct and indirect, that would come from such a gathering were simply beyond estimate.

IOWA'S DIRECT INTEREST.

He spoke of Iowa's direct interest in the project. The question of location, he said, was one that could not be discussed until the financial matters connected with the project had been settled. It would require the people of Omaha and Nebraska to raise at least $500,000, and this money should be raised before any question of location should be considered. The present directory was not pledged to any location, had not discussed any location and would not do so until the money problem had been settled. He asked for the co-operation of the council in furthering the project.

G. M. Hitchcock was called upon and spoke enthusiastically of the scope of the work. He had recently made a trip through the west and was more than ever impressed with the wonderful wealth of the transmississippi country, and said an exposition such as planned would rivet the attention of the world on the great west and would turn the channel of commerce in this direction and would inure to the everlasting benefit of the people of the transmississippi country.

PROVOKED ENTHUSIASM.

John A. Wakefield of Omaha uncorked a good deal of enthusiasm and told the council and the committees that the more they looked around the more satisfied they were that they had builded​ wisely so far in laying the foundations for the great exposition. The exposition idea was one of the features of the times. Half a dozen expositions had been started, but all but the Transmississippi project had been abandoned, largely for the reason that their promoters had not begun right. The Texas, St. Paul and Denver schemes were practically dead, although Denver had appropriated $300,000 and used $15,000 of it. They started wrong by not securing the positive home endorsement before going any further. "In our scheme we have the home endorsement and are morally sure of the national. The only step that remains to be taken to make the foundations of the great enterprise impregnable is to procure the financial endorsement of the great state of Iowa. If we can induce the Iowa legislature to make an appropriation, even though it be small, with a promise that $50,000 or more will follow, it will knock the legs from beneath Chairman Dingley's objections to the congressional bill."

Spencer Smith said he had been out of the city all winter and knew less than he should about the contemplated enterprise, but if he ever had any doubts about its feasibility they were removed. He thought it unfortunate that the matter of asking an appropriation from the Iowa legislature had been delayed to so late a date.

TIME VERY SHORT.

The time was short when any action could be taken. The appropriation committees had finished their work and made their reports and he feared that it would be extremely difficult to get them to consider any new propositions to take money from the state treasury. This was particularly the case since the appropriations already reached nearly $1,500,000, and all of the state institutions were begging and praying for additional sums. He urged that whatever action was taken that it should be taken at once.

Alderman Casper moved that the report of the committee be adopted. It was seconded and carried unanimously.

George F. Wright spoke of the importance of having the Iowa legislature make the necessary appropriation, which was the only sort of recognition that would satisfy Chairman Dingley. A carload of resolutions would do no good unless the right sort of committee was sent to Des Moines to present them and urge the necessity for prompt action. That committee should consist of at least seven men, and they should be representative men and real workers. As vice president of the executive committee for Iowa, which would be the banner state in the group, he would consent to be a member of the Des Moines committee, and he thought Mayor Carson should be another.

After nominating himself and the mayor he thought the other members should be named by members of the council. Alderman Pace then took the responsibility of naming the mayor, George F. Wright, Spencer Smith, I. M. Treynor, T. C. Dawson, R. J. Clancey and T. J. Evans. At the suggestion of Alderman Shubert the members of the Omaha executive committee were invited and requested to accompany the Council Bluffs men to Des Moines.

The resolutions as amended by Alderman Barstow read as follows:

RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED.

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the Transmississippi congress held in Omaha in 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories; and

Whereas, Said congress voted unanimously to hold the said exposition at the city of Omaha in the year 1898; and

Whereas, The common interest of all the states and territories constituting this great region, as well as the country at large, will be greatly promoted thereby, and the material interests of this city will be especially benefited by such an exposition; therefore, be it

Resolved, By the city council of the city of Council Bluffs, that the holding of said Transmississippi exposition is hereby heartily approved, and that the senators and representatives in congress from Iowa are requested to use their best efforts in procuring the passage at this session of congress of a bill giving national recognition to said exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a national exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same, and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolutions be sent under seal of the city of Council Bluffs to the senators and representatives in congress from Iowa, and be it further

Resolved, That we request our senators and representatives from this district to use every effort to secure a proper appropriation through our state legislature at the present session to properly represent the state of Iowa, and in necessary recognition of the great benefit to be derived therefrom by the citizens of the west and the state of Iowa.

The committee will leave at 5:20 this evening, and will be on hand when the legislature convenes Monday morning. The men will all go with the intention of staying a week, or longer if necessary. Mayor Carson will not go until Tuesday morning on account of his presence being required at the first regular meeting of the new council Monday night, when he will announce his appointments.

MERCER WINS OVER DINGLEY

Objections of the Maine Man to the Omaha Exposition Wiped Out.

RESULT OF A PRIVATE CONFERENCE

Talks the Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee Into Promising Support to the Transmississippi Measure.

WASHINGTON, April 4.—(Special Telegram.)—The ways and means committee disposed of the filled cheese bill today, but the Transmississippi bill was not taken up, as was expected. However, Representative Mercer feels more sanguine over the outcome tonight than he has felt before at any time. The chief opponent of the measure up to the present has been Chairman Dingley. There was reason to fear Dingley's opposition might be dangerous to ultimate chances of the bill. Today Mercer had a long talk with Dingley, during which he pointed out that Omaha asks no more from the government than was accorded similar expositions held during the past ten years at New Orleans, Cincinnati, Louisville and Atlanta.

Mr. Mercer explained to Dingley that Omaha people expect to open an exposition that will Omaha people expect an exposition that will not be merely local, but one which will represent the entire country. After the conference between the two gentlemen, Mr. Mercer told The Bee correspondent that he was satisfied that Dingley may henceforth be counted as among the friends of the project. In fact, Mercer is satisfied, now that the principal opposition has been virtually silenced, that the bill will be reported favorably by the entire committee. Turner of Georgia is the only democrat opposed to the bill. He opposed the Atlanta appropriation, but did so from principle. He will not support the Omaha bill, but will take no steps to oppose it. The matter will come up probably Monday, and final action will be taken by a full committee report to be agreed upon not later than the end of the week.

Representative Andrews today succeeded in passing the bill to pension ex-Governor Thayer at the rate of $100 per month. This bill was down about No. 200 on the private calendar of the house. When Andrews tried to get it taken up for consideration, at the pension session last night, he was opposed [?] bills on the cal-[?]

 

USING HER BEST ENDEAVORS

Council Bluffs Exerting Herself to Have Exposition Appropriation Made.

City Council at a Special Session Passes Resolutions to Be Sent to Des Moines.

Urges That the Iowa Legislature Make Some Provision for This Before Adjournment—Much Enthusiasm.

The recent western trip of City Attorney Hazelton with the Omaha committee representing the Trans-Mississippi exposition resulted in a special meeting of the city council last evening. There were present, in addition to the mayor and councilmen, Mr. Hazelton, George F. Wright, vice president of the Trans-Mississippi exposition from Iowa, and a delegation from the Omaha directorate, consisting of G. W. Wattles, G. M. Hitchcock, John A. Wakefield, Z. T. Lindsey, G. H. Payne and Dan Farrell, jr.

Resolutions were introduced and read, and Mr. Wright in a characteristic speech introduced Mr. Wattles, who briefly recalled the session of the trans-Mississippi congress in Omaha last year when it was decided that the exposition in 1898 should be held in Omaha. This exposition, he said, does not belong to Omaha, to Council Bluffs or to any other city or section, but it belongs to all the twenty-four states and territories for whose benefit it is to be held. The men who have been chosen to take charge of the preparations for it have laid aside their personal interests in their labors in behalf of this enterprise, which is representative of two-thirds of the territory of the union, one-third of its population and one-half its wealth.

In connection with what might be expected from the exposition, Mr. Wattles gave some interesting figures showing the attendance on other great expositions. At the exposition held in London in 1851, lasting 144 days, 6,000,000 people attended. At Paris in 1855, during 200 days, 5,167,000 persons attended. In London in 1862, 6,211,000 persons attended during 171 days. At the Paris exposition in 1867, during 217 days the attendance was 10,200,000. At the Philadelphia Centennial, which continued 159 days, the attendance was 9,910,000. The Chicago World's fair had an attendance of 27, 539,000 during the 180 days, and the Atlantic exposition in 1895, during 100 days, showed an attendance of 1,200,000.

Mr. Wattles said careful estimates showed that the Trans-Mississippi exposition should have an attendance of 5,000,000, and he dwelt briefly but forcibly on the advantages which such an influx of people should bring to this community.

This line of thought was taken up by Mr. G. M. Hitchcock, who said that he was a doubting Thomas when the exposition was first proposed, because he felt that the west, its people and particularly its business men, had been pushed too far and burdened too heavily. Investigation, however, had convinced him that the exposition should be made a success at whatever cost. Waves of financial depression are inevitable, and have their following waves of prosperity. He believed the time now ripe for this enterprise. The first fruits of the exposition to this locality would be not only that the hotels would be filled for six months and Council Bluffs and Omaha would be thronged with strangers, but the channels of commerce would be turned this way, just as commerce was turned to Chicago by the world's fair and to the south by the Atlanta exposition. The eyes of the nation and of the world would be turned on the west, and whatever advantages the great districts to the west of us might receive, Council Bluffs and Omaha would receive their share, because here is the great center of commerce in the west. Mr. Hitchcock spoke of the trip he recently took with others through the west. Mr. Hitchcock spoke of the trip he recently took with others through the west, the manner in which they were received, the promises made to them and the enthusiasm they everywhere found for the exposition.

Messrs. Lindsey and Wakefield spoke briefly and Spencer Smith made a short talk, in which he expressed the belief that it will be difficult to secure an adequate appropriation from the Iowa legislature owing to the fact that the movement in this direction was started late.

The resolutions before offered, together with an amendment suggested by Alderman Barstow, were passed. They were as follows:

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the trans-Mississippi congress, held in Omaha in 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories, and,

Whereas, Said congress voted unanimously to hold the said exposition at the city of Omaha in the year 1898, and,

Whereas, The common interest of all the states and territories constituting this great region, as well as the country at large, will be greatly promoted thereby, and the material interests of this city will be especially benefited by such an exposition; therefore be it

Resolved by the city council of the city of Council Bluffs, That the holding of said Trans-Mississippi exposition is hereby heartily approved, and that the senators and representatives in congress from Iowa are requested to use their best efforts in procuring the passage at this session of congress of a bill giving national recognition to said exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a national exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same. Be it further

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolutions be sent under seal of the city of Council Bluffs to the senators and representatives in congress from Iowa; and be it further

Resolved, That we request our senators and representatives from this district to use every effort to secure a proper appropriation through our state legislature at the present session to properly represent the state of Iowa and in necessary recognition of the great benefit to be derived therefrom by the citizens of the west and the state of Iowa.

A committee, consisting of Mayor Carson, George F. Wright, Spencer Smith, T. C. Dawson, I. M. Treynor, R. J. Clancy and T. J. Evans, was appointed to go to Des Moines to use their influence to secure the passage of the bill for the appropriation for the Iowa representation. The committee, with the exception of the mayor, will leave this evening for Des Moines. The mayor will leave Thursday.

THE EXPOSITION PRESIDENT.

Here is a selection from the Washington Post in which the Trans-Mississippi exposition president is honored with a promotion:

The sub-committee of the house ways and means committee will report on the proposed international exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898. Representative Mercer yesterday received the following telegram from the Nebraska committee, which has been traveling through the western states working up an interest in the exposition:

Omaha, March 31.—David H. Mercer: Governors and leading officials of Iowa, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, South Dakota, Missouri, California, Arizona and Nebraska have all pledged state appropriations, and other states will follow as soon as your bill becomes a law. Legislatures do not meet until next winter, except Iowa and Utah, which have passed joint resolutions and formally promised appropriations as soon as government recognition and appropriation passes.

GOV. WATTLES, President.
JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, Secretary.

If President Wattles keeps on standing up for Omaha and the west as he is now doing, after the success of the Trans-Mississippi exposition the people of this state may take it into their heads to elect him governor of Nebraska.

"Governor Wattles" sounds well. It would be an honor worthily won by one of the best and most progressive men of this great commonwealth.

 

WHEREAS, The residents of the City of Omaha, Nebraska, are proposing during the year 1898 to hold an international exposition to be known as the Trans Mississippi International Exposition, for the purpose more particularly of exhibiting to the world the products, industries, and civilization of the States west of the Mississippi River, and such Exposition would necessarily result in great benefit and material advantage to the people of the Trans Mississippi States &

WHEREAS, The State of Colorado with its boundless resources both developed and undeveloped, both mineral and agricultural will be particularly benefited by the success of such an exposition as that proposed, and realizing the impracticability of carrying the stupendous work involved in such an enterprise to complete success without the assistance of municipal and national aid, and being in entire and hearty accord will all of the aims and objects in said enterprise, therefore,

Be it resolved, by the Chamber of Commerce of the City of Denver through its Board of Directors, that it is the sense of the Chamber of Commerce of the City of Denver that proper recognition and aid of said enterprise should be given by the National Government, and

RESOLVED, Further that our Senators and Representatives in Congress, from the State of Colorado, be requested to aid in securing such legislation as will best promote the success of the proposed exposition, and a proper appropriation for the making of a complete exhibit by the National Government for that purpose.


Signed Henry P. Steele
President.
Attest:-
M. C. Jackson
Secretary.
 

RESOLUTION RELATIVE TO THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION TO BE HELD AT OMAHA, NEBRASKA, IN THE YEAR 1898.

WHEREAS, The Trans-Mississippi Congress, which met at Omaha, in 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the many products, manufactories arts and industries of the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi River; and,

WHEREAS, Said convention voted to hold said exposition at the City of Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898; and,

WHEREAS, The particular interests, as well as the general growth of the undeveloped industries of the states of this great region, as well as the country at large, will be greatly promoted thereby; therefore

Be it resolved by the Immigration Congress assembled at Boise City, Idaho;

That the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is hereby heartily approved, and that we request and urge the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Idaho to cooperate with the Senators and Representatives from the State of Nebraska and the other Trans-Mississippi states, in procuring the passage by the present Congress of a bill giving National recognition to said Exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a national Exposition and the necessary and proper building to contain same.

Resolved, Further, That we urge the coming Legislature of the state of Idaho to make provisions to have the undeveloped and unlimited resources of our state properly represented in said Exposition.

Cont
 
April 4 1896 I hereby certify that this above Resolution was on April 3 1896 forwarded in this Immigration Congress, being held in Boise City Idaho, by J. B. Cessman, and unanimously adopted by said Congress

W J McConnell,
Governor
+ President of
this convention
Attest
J M Haines
Secy
 
Council Bluffs City Council, 4/4/96

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the Trans-Mississippi congress held in Omaha, Neb., in November, 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories, and

Whereas, Said congress voted unanimously to hold the said exposition at the city of Omaha, Neb., in the year 1898, and

Whereas, The common interest of all the states and territories constituting this great region, as well as the country at large, will be greatly promoted thereby, and the material interests of this city will be especially benefited by such an exposition, therefor be it

Resolved, By the City Council of the City of Council Bluffs, That the holding of said Trans-Mississippi exposition is hereby heartily approved, and that the senators and representatives in congress from Iowa are requested to use their best efforts in procuring the passage at this session of congress of a bill giving national recognition to said exposition and providing for an appropriation for a national exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same; be it further

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be sent under seal of the City of Council Bluffs to the senators and representatives in congress from Iowa.

Be it further resolved that we request our senators and representatives from this district to use every effort to secure a proper appropriation through our state legislature at the present session to properly represent the interests of Iowa and in necessary recognition of the great benefit to be derived therefrom to the citizens of the west and the state of Iowa.

 
2.
OFFICE CITY CLERK OF COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA.
April 4th, 1896.

I, N. C. Phillips, City Clerk of the City of Council Bluffs, Iowa, hereby certify that the above and foregoing Preamble and Resolutions were duly and unanimously adopted by the City Council of said City at a reagular meeting of said Council, held on this 4th day of April, 1896, and were duly approved by the Mayor of said City.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and official signature, and affixed the seal of said City hereto at my office therein, this 4th day of April, A. D., 1896.


N. C. Phillips
City Clerk of the City of Council Bluffs, Iowa.
 
SALT LAKE CITY SEAL
UTAH
 
57
Salt Lake City, Utah, March 31st, 1896.
TO THE HONORABLE PRESIDENT AND MEMBERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL:-
Gentlemen;-

We, your special committee, to whom was referred the communication of the Honorable Mayor Broatch, of Omaha, Nebraska, beg leave to submit the following resolution and recommend its adoption.

WHEREAS, It is intended to promote the common interest of the States and Territories of the United States, lying west of the Mississippi River, by holding in the City of Omaha,State of Nebraska, during the year 1898, an Exposition of the products, industries, arts and civilization of said region, to the end that its wonderful and diversified resources may become better known to mankind; and

WHEREAS, Such Exposition will afford to the people of Utah an opportunity to bring to the notice of the world, not only what they have accomplished by patience, persistence and toil in transforming a barren and desolate wilderness into a productive and prosperous State, but as well, knowledge of the marvellous diversity of the mineral resources which it possesses, the magnificence of its climate and the multitude of its attractions; and

WHEREAS, It is most fitting that the people whose pioneers broke the first trail over the region to be illustrated in the Exposition and first conveyed to civilization an account of its boundless undeveloped wealth, should be participants in said Exposition; and

WHEREAS, The State of Utah contains within its borders not only the best illustrations of the efficacy of irrigation in the redemption of our arid lands, but as well, mines of almost every mineral known to mineralogy, knowledge of which, if communicated to the world, will result in attracting to the State vast capital and a large additional population; therefore

BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of Salt Lake City;that we are in hearty accord with the plan of holding at Omaha the said

 
BE IT RESOLVED,

by the Mayor and City Council of the City of York, Nebraska, that it is the sense of this body that we are heartily in favor of the holding of the
TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION
in Omaha, in 1898, as proposed by the Trans-Missippi Congress, as an enterprise highly beneficial to the people of Nebraska, as well as all the people of the great West; and we request our Senators and Representatives in Congress to use their best efforts to aid in the passage of a bill for the appropriate recognition, of this enterprise and for a suitable appropriation to assist in the same.

Passed April 2nd, 1896.
C. N. Carpenter
City Clerk.
Approved April 2nd, 1896.
J. N. Kildow
Mayor.
 
WHOLESALE FRUIT AND PRODUCE.
APPLES AND POTATOES IN CAR LOTS A SPECIALTY.
John A. Wakefield Esq
Omaha Neb.

Dear Sir: Enclosed find copy of resolution unanimously adopted at regular meeting of City Council 4/2/96 a copy of same as per request has been forwarded to Congressman from this district Wishing you success in the grand enterprise I am


Yours truly
C. N. Carpenter -
City Clerk.
 
59

Resolutions Adopted.

The following resolutions were passed at the meeting of the Black Hills Improvement association held at Hot Springs last Saturday evening:

WHEREAS:—Appropriation bills are now before the ways and means committee of congress intended to aid in carrying on a Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition at Omaha in 1898 for the purpose of exhibiting to the world the limitless agricultural, mineral and other resources of the great west; therefore, be it;

Resolved, That this association, hereby heartily expresses its approval of this enterprise and respectfully urge upon our senators and representatives in congress to use all honorable means to secure the passage of all needed appropriation bills in aid of same.

Resolved, further, that the secretary of this association is hereby directed to transmit a copy of this resolution to Hon. John A. Wakefield, secretary, Omaha, Nebr., and also to South Dakota senators and representatives in congress.

 
[?]—Jas Halley.
Hot Springs—H. D. Clark.
Custer City—D. W. Webster.
Sturgis—John Scollard.
Spearfish—John Wolzmuth.
Whitewood—H. T. Cooper.
Terry—John Blatchford.
Edgemont—A. L. Sharrock.
Sundance, Wyo.—Thomas H. Moore.
Piedmont, S. D.—T. D. Murrin.
F. T. EVANS, President.
JOHN BRENNAN, Vice-President.
J. W. JONES, Rec. Secretary.
WM. SELBIE, Cor. Secretary.
D. A. McPHERSON, Treasurer.
VICE-PRESIDENTS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
Tilford—J. D. Hale.
Belle Fourche—Arthur Marble.
Buffalo Gap—L. Ballou.
Hermosa—A. Walker.
Keystone—A. J. Simmons.
Hill City—E. W. Speed.
Terraville—John Gray.
Galena—C. B. Harris.
Newcastle—M. B. Camplin.
Carbonate—F. S. Bryant.
Elk Creek—John F. Sawyer.
Black Hawk—Charles Ward.

THE BLACK HILLS
Improvement Association.

Hon John A Wakefield
Omaha Neb

Dear Sir- I take pleasure in transmitting with this letter a copy of resolutions passed at a recent meeting of our organization


Respectfully yours
J W Jones
Sec.
 

PLEDGES A GOOD ROUND SUM

Senate Passes the Omaha Exposition Bill Without a Word of Opposition.

Allison Causes It to Be Trimmed From a Quarter of a Million Down to an Even $200,000.

It's the Same Amount Atlanta Received—Allen and Thurston Have Kept Their Word and Secured the Money.

Washington World-Herald Bureau.
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., April 10.

The senate today passed the Omaha exposition bill without opposition, and with but one amendment suggested by Mr. Allison, reducing the amount of the appropriation for a government exhibit from $250,000 to $200,000, the same as that appropriated for the Atlanta exposition. The bill carries no actual appropriation, but it pledges the government to appropriate that sum.

In the absence of the vice president, Mr. Frye rep., Me.) occupied the crair​ today as president of the senate pro tem. Mr. Call (dem., Fla.) inquired of the chairman of the judiciary committee whether that committee had made any progress in the consideration of the matter heretofore referred to it as to the legislation necessary to restrain United States courts in cases of contempt. He made the inquiry, he said, at the request of Eugene V. Debs and the leaders of the labor movement in the United States.

IN HILL'S HANDS.

Mr. Hoar (rep., Mass.), chairman of the judiciary committee, stated, in reply, that the matter had been referred to Senator Hill (dem., N. Y.), as a substitute committee, who had undertaken to make a careful collection of the laws on the subject and to prepare a measure in the committee. A carefully prepared bill on the subject had been introduced yesterday by another member of the committee—Mr. Thurston (rep., Neb.) The matter, therefore, had not been overlooked. The committee was dealing with it as rapidly as the nature of the case admitted. How soon the matter would be ripe for a report by the committee was a question which ought to be addressed to the senator from New York—not now present.

The Indian appropriation bill was then taken up, the first 65 pages of it having been already disposed of, except as to reserved amendments.

The bill having been read in full, the senate proceeded to act on the reserved amendments.

WANTED A CHANGE.

There was almost a unanimity of sentiment against a sudden change of system from contract schools to government schools, and there was an almost equal unanimity in favor of such a gradual change as would not do injustice either to the religious societies which had established the schools, or to the Indian children who attended them. The matter went over, however, without action.

Earlier in the day a joint resolution on the subject of the imprisonment of Mrs. Maybrick in England was introduced by Mr. Call of Florida, to the apparent annoyance of Mr. Sherman of Ohio, chairman of the committee on foreign relations, who desired such a proposition should not have been introduced, as the senate had no jurisdiction over the subject. He moved to lay the joint resolution on the table; but finally consented to have it referred to the judiciary committee, which disposition was made of it.

The senate at 5:25 o'clock adjourned until Monday.


FRED F. SCHRADER.

Iowa Senate Appropriates $2515,000 for the Omaha Exposition.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Des Moines, Ia., April 10.—The house bill appropriating $2515,000 for the Omaha exposition passed the senate today. The house bill permitting the use of public parks as sites for public libraries was passed. The house today passed the senate bill fixing the amount of revenue required by the state for the next biennial period at $1,400,000 per year. This necessitates a state levy by the executive council of 2 mills which is 2-100 of a mill higher than has ever been levied before, even with the increased levy it is not thought that the income will be sufficient to meet the appropriations made by the legislature. An amendment by Representative Porter (dem.), to make the levy 2½ mills was defeated by a straight party vote.

In the house today the senate resolution to require all portraits of actual soldiers, living or dead, to be taken for the soldiers' monument was agreed to. The senate bill to prohibit the operations of Lloyds Insurance companies in the state was defeated. The senate bill permitting the trustees of the soldiers' home to retain the pension money of the inmates in excess of $6 per motnh​ was passed. The senate bill to create a state board of embalmers was killed. The committee bill for a new jury law was killed. The pardon of James Johnson, convicted of murder in Pottawattamie county, was recommended. The senate amendments to create a bill for the control of the pharmacy commission, was agreed to. In the senate the bill to create the board of police and fire commissioiers​ to be appointed by the governor to have charge of these departments in all cities with more than 50,000 population was passed. The bill was backed by the present employes of the departments who fear discharge by the incoming administration. Desperate effort will be made tomorrow to put the bill through the house.

ALLEN BILL GOES THROUGH

Senate Passes the Measure Recognizing the Omaha Exposition.

GOVERNMENT IS PLEDGED TO TAKE PART

Objections of Senators Overcome by the Persistence of Nebraska Members and Not a Vote Went Against It.

WASHINGTON, April 10.—(Special Telegram.)—Following the lead of Iowa in appropriating $10,000 for preliminary work on the Transmississippi exposition, the senate of the United States today passed Senator Allen's bill with amendments, recognizing the Omaha exposition and pledging the government to appropriate $200,000—$50,000 for an exhibit and $150,000 for a building and incidental expenses.

To press the senate bill at once was decided upon by Senators Allen and Thurston after the failure of the subcommittee of the ways and means committee of the house to take definite action, and holding up the report for a fortnight. Even Dave Mercer, who is in charge of the bill in the house, had grown considerably uneasy over the dilatory policy shown by the subcommittee and was almost convinced that the only thing to do to save the bill at this session was to report it in the form as introduced by Senator Allen and amended by the committee on international expositions. This morning, however, the subcommittee, through General Grosvenor, reported the bill to the full house committee on ways and means, but the report carried with it no recommendation, leaving the whole matter to be churned over before the committee. Under these circumstances Senators Allen and Thurston decided to blaze the pathway and this morning immediately after the regular order of business had been completed Senator Allen called up his bill. Unexpected objection was met from Senator Brown of Utah, who either did not understand what Senator Allen desired or was afraid that a bill in which he was greatly interested would lost its place on the calendar by reason of taking up the exposition bill. His objection carried the bill over for the time being. In the meanwhile Thurston looked after the republican side of the chamber, while Allen did like service with his democratic and populistic colleagues. Senator Thurston overcame the objection that Senator Sherman had shown to the bill yesterday, and fully explained to Senator Brown that no intention was meant to displace his bill on the calendar. After these disturbing factors had been taken care of, Senator Pettigrew was importuned to yield a few minutes at the close of the day's session to put the bill on its passage, he being in charge of the Indian appropriation bill. Just as the senate was about to adjourn the bill was called up. Senator Allison, chairman of the committee on appropriations, expressed himself as being enthusiastically in favor of the bill, but thought it should carry no more than the Atlanta exposition bill carried, namely, $200,000. Rather than be considered captious Senator Allen accepted the amendment and the bill was passed without a negative vote being recorded against it.

MAY HAVE A LITTLE TO SPEND.

Senator Allison stated to Senator Thurston after the passage of the bill that if the senate bill could be gotten through the house within the next week or two, he would see to it that a small amount of money, say $25,000, might be made immediately available by a place in the sundry civil bill, which he would take upon himself to accomplish.

While the bill, as passed, differs very materially from the house bill, it is evident that nothing more could have been obtained from the senate, opposition on the house side, and the disposition of the senate to hold down all appropriations for new legislation, and the eve of a presidential election, all combining to make a larger appropriation impossible at this time. The senators in charge of the bill recognize that it is a tub to a whale, but they took what they could get, with hope that a new congress and a new administration might give them an increased amount if such proved necessary.

Congressman Grosvenor, chairman of the subcommittee having the Transmississippi exposition bill in charge, reported the measure to the full ways and means committee this morning without amendment. Through the efforts of Congressman Mercer every member of the committee was present. Mr. Grosvenor desired immediate action, but chairman Dingley objected to what he characterized as snap judgment. Consequently the bill will have a hearing on its merits.

Chairman Dingley is by no means hostile to the bill. He has some objections, to its present form, however, and if these objections are met by the western states interested in the project Mr. Dingley's objections may prove of great benefit to the promoters of the bill. He desires some assurance that the western states are back of the project, and to the end that these assurances may be given he stated today that he would consent to a proviso that the government should make an appropriation of $500,000, conditional upon the appropriation of a like amount by the states and territories in the transmississippi territory.

HOT SPRINGS STAR.

By the request of the mayor the following resolution was presented, and was unanimously adopted:

Be it resolved by the mayor and city council of the city of Hot Springs, S. D., that the holding of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition at the city of Omaha in 1898 will be the means of producing a revival of immigration westward, thus benefiting all sections of the country by distributing the population in the undeveloped fields and we hereby express our hearty approval of the enterprise and urgently request our representatives in both houses of congress to use their best endeavors to further the success of the same.

 
61
John A. Wakefield Esq
Omaha

AT a meeting of the City Council of the City of Fremont, Neb. heldApril, 9th, 1896. the following resolutions were unanimously adopted.

Whereas? delegates representing the twenty four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi River, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress held in the City of Omaha in 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an Exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories, and

Whereas, Said convention voted unanimously to hold the said Exposition at the City of Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898,

Whereas, The common interest of all the states and territories constituting this great region, as well as the country at large, will be greatly benefitted thereby, and the material interests of this city will be especially promoted by such an exposition; therefore,

Be it resolved, By the City Council of the City of Fremont the Mayor of the City concurring,

That the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is hereby heartily approved, and theSenators and Representatives in Congress from Nebraska and the other Trans-Mississippi States are requested to use their best efforts in procuring the passage, at this session of Congress, of a bill giving National recognition to the said Exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a National Exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to containt the same.

Be it further resolved, Thata copy of the foregoing resolution by sent under seal of hte City of Fremont, to the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Nebraska.

Passed and approved April, 9th, 1896.
Wm. Fried
Mayor.
Attest.
W. J. Bullock
City Clerk.
CITY OF FREMONT NEB
CITY CLERK
* SEAL *
 

ALL DID GOOD WORK

HOW THE $10,000 APPROPRIATION WAS SECURED.

GEORGE F. WRIGHT TELLS OF THE LOBBYING DONE BY THE COUNCIL BLUFFS COMMITTEE FOR THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION AT DES MOINES—SENATOR PUSEY'S STRENGTH IN THE SENATE.

The committee appointed by the city council last Saturday to go to Des Moines and work for the passage of a bill for an appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi Exposition have returned from the capital and are well pleased with the result of their labors. The members of the committee who took part in the work were George F. Wright, I. M. Treynor, T. C. Dawson, A. S. Hazelton and R .J. Clancy. By hard work they succeeded in getting an appropriation for the preliminary expenses ,with an assurance from the members of both houses that a larger amount would be granted if requested at the next session. There will probably be an extra session called before the regular meeting in 1898.

In speaking of the work of the members of the committee in getting the bill through, Mr. Wright said: "Too much praise cannot be accorded Messrs. Treynor and Dawson for the thorough and efficient manner in which they assisted in accomplishing this work. Being young and energetic and in touch with the politicians of the state they are once, on their arrival, organized their forces. They called to the aid of the committee the veteran in legislation, Gib Prey and Col. McMillan, chairman of the republican state central committee, whose ability to secure results is unlimited. With the assistance of Representative Weaver of Louisa county, who had already introduced the bill in the house, the house committee on appropriations was called. This was its last meeting as a final adjournment had been agreed upon for today. City Attorney Hazelton appeared before the committee and made an able presentation of the bill and secured a favorable report on the measure.

"Good missionary work was done among the representatives by the members of the committee, Mr. Clancy getting his democratic friends in line. Our own representatives, Messrs. Putnam and Potter, showed by their work that they were among the most influential members of the house. Speaker Byers was also heartily in favor of the bill and, perhaps, did more than any one person to secure the prompt passage of the same, and the people of Council Bluffs and this vicinity should accord to him a full measure of their thanks for his efforts on their behalf. Sergeant at Arms Wilson of Casey also did efficient work in securing members for the support of the bill.

"The committee at once, with the assistance of Representative Weaver, had the bill taken over and reported to the senate. Here again Messrs. Dawson and Treynor were able to call to their aid their political friends. Senator Pusey, than whom there is no better worker or more influential legislator in the state, had the house bill at once referred to the senate committee on appropriations, secured a favorable report and when it was put upon its final passage made a brilliant speech in its support. Thus, with the aid of Senators Waterman of Ottumwa, chairman of the committee on appropriations; Junkin, of Red Oak, Phelps of Atlantic, Rank of Iowa City, Bonson of Dubuque and Mr. Clancy to bring his democratic friends in line, the bill was passed without a dissenting voice. The committee are frank to say but for the personal popularity of Senator Pusey with every member of the senate, the bill could not have been passed at the late hour it reached that body."

SETTLES ON THE ALLEN BILL

Senate Exposition Measure to Be Pushed Through the House.

RESULT OF WATTLES' WASHINGTON TRIP

President of the Association Canvasses the Situation Thoroughly Before Deciding on a Course of Action.

WASHINGTON, April 13.—(Special Telegram.)—Renewed impetus, if such a thing were possible, was given today to the Transmississippi exposition bill by the presence in Washington of President Gurdon W. Wattles of the exposition association. Mr. Wattles, true to western instinct, allowed no grass to spring up under his feet upon his arrival, and at once called upon members of the Nebraska delegation to ascertain the status of the bill now pending in the house, and also the chances of the senate bill passing the house. Accompanied by Mr. Mercer, he had an interview with Chairman Dingley of the house ways and means committee, which was entirely satisfactory to Mr. Wattles. He stated to Mr. Dingley that it was the desire of his people to have an appropriation of $500,000, one-fifth of which was to be spent upon the erection of a building and the remainder of the amount appropriated on a governmental exhibit and incidentals. This was in line with Representative Mercer's bill, which was reported to the full committee last week by Grosvenor's subcommittee.

Chairman Dingley remarked that had the east asked for such an appropriation he would be bitterly opposed to any such legislation at the present session of congress. He recognized, however, that two-thirds of the area of the United States was included in the territory sought to be benefited; that one-third of the population lived west of the Mississippi river, and that a great deal of the wealth of the United States was to be found in the twenty-four states and territories moving for the exposition. Under these considerations he would not antagonize the bill, but would, within a few days, give it a hearing before the full committee. He stated that several amendments would have to be attached to the bill, one of which would be to the effect that $250,000 be subscribed as capital stock and approved by the secretary of the treasury. To this Mr. Wattles agreed.

Later in the day Mr. Wattles called upon Senator Allen, who explained to him the difficulty that was in the way of securing any larger appropriation than that contained in the senate bill. He stated that he had canvassed the situation in the senate very closely and had been long enough in legislative life to know if $200,000 was pledged by congress at this session that a larger amount might be forthcoming from the subsequent congress. He asserted that he wanted the bill to become a law, and to this end had accepted amendments proposed by Chairman Allison of the appropriations committee, because he recognized that nothing else was obtainable.

DECIDED ON THE SENATE BILL.

With these divergent views before him, Mr. Wattles has decided to bring all his influence to bear upon the senate bill, now pending in the house, and will ask his friends who have influence with Speaker Reed to ask for a speedy recognition of the bill when reported, to the end that it may be passed and get to the president within the next six weeks, for congress will be gone by that time should present indications continue. President Wattles, speaking of his impressions as gathered in a somewhat hasty view of the situation, said:

"Our people were somewhat surprised at the action of the senate on Friday in passing the senate bill. We thought our delegation was acting together in the interests of the bill. While The Bee reflected exactly the situation as I find it today in its dispatches of Saturday morning, it was thought best that I should come on here on see what could be done to advance the interests of the measure. While I do not believe the senate bill is adequate to the needs of the association, I think it is the best we can obtain at this time, and I shall use every endeavor to have the bill pass the house, with such amendments as the ways and means committee shall agree upon. I have assurances from Senator Allen that any reasonable amendment will be agreed to by the conference committee to which the bill will have to go in event of any amendations. Our people are being aroused to the importance of the measure and will be able to take care of it in a manner creditable to the great section of country which the exposition will seem to represent. Mr. Dingley, while not antagonizing the bill, stated that his only objection to it was upon the ground that the government would have to borrow money to further the enterprise. This was to him a serious objection, but as the great west had never asked for any appropriation for such an undertaking he was inclined to waive his objection for the advertisement and consequent building up of the transmississippi country which must inevitable follow."

SETTLING A BANK'S AFFAIRS.

Mr. Wattles is accompanied by Mrs. Wattles and Mr. Henry Wyman, who is here to look after the liquidation of the debts of the American National bank, growing out of the amalgamation of the Union and American National banks. They will have an interview with Comptroller Eckels in the morning to decide upon the details necessary to the American National going out of business, the Union National having assumed the liabilities of the former bank. Mr. Wattles is vice president of the Union National and Mr. Wyman cashier of the American National. Upon the settlement of the questions which brought them here, Mr. Wattles and Mr. Wyman will devote several days to furthering the interests of the Omaha exposition.

Senator Thurston (through Senator Allen) introduced a pension bill today for the relief of Mary F. Hawley, widow of the late General John B. Hawley, at $50 per month. He also introduced a petition of members of Hancock Circle No. 12 of Burwell, Neb., asking for the passage of a service pension bill.

Representative Mercer presented the resolution of the National Association of Stationary Engineers of Omaha, praying for the passage of a bill to organize and increase the efficiency and personnel of the navy; also a resolution of the city council of Aurora, Neb., favoring the Omaha exposition.

Senator Pettigrew of South Dakota introduced a bill granting to the Nashville Presbyterian church of Nashville, S. D., certain lands for cemetery purposes.

Chairman Hainer of the republican state central committee has wired members of the committee that it will be impossible for him to participate in the deliberations of the state convention next Wednesday, in view of the fortifications bill, now pending in the house, which his committee reported. He has wired Vice Chairman Mallalleu to call the convention to order and to officiate in his stead.

Representative Andrews returned from his quest for a second nomination Sunday morning, exceedingly happy over the result.

 
63

WHEREAS, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress, held in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an Exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories, and

WHEREAS, Said convention voted unanimously to hold the said Exposition at the City of Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898, and

WHEREAS, The common interest of all the states and territories constituting this great region, as well as the country at large, will be greatly promoted thereby, and the material interests of the City of Omaha will be especially benefitted by such an exposition; therefore,

BE IT RESOLVED, By the City Council of the City of Chadron, the Mayor of the city concurring; That the holding of said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is hereby heartily approved, and that the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Nebraska and the other Trans-Mississippi states are requested to use their best efforts in procuring the passage, at this session of Congress, of a bill giving national recognition to said Exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a National Exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be sent under seal of the City of Chadron to the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Nebraska.

Passed April 1st, 1896.
Approved April 1st, 1896.
CITY OF CHADRON
CORPORATE SEAL
DAWES COUNTY, NEBRASKA.

L. J. F. IAEGER.
City Clerk.
JAMES C. DAHLMAN.
Mayor.
M. E. ROSE.
President City Council.

REQUESTS CONGRESS TO ACT

Plattsmouth City Council Passes Resolutions Anent the Exposition.

Realizing the Importance of the Big Show to the State, It Takes Official Notice.

Representatives and Senators Asked to Do All Possible to Secure National Recognition at This Session.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Plattsmouth, Neb., April 14.—The city council, at its session last evening, unanimously adopted the following resolutions:

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at a convention held in the city of Omaha, Neb., in 1895, adopted a resolution calling for the holding of a great Trans-Mississippi exposition in the said city of Omaha, Neb., in the year 1898; and,

Whereas, It is the belief of this body that said exposition will greatly promote the general welfare of the country at large and the state of Nebraska in particular; therefore, be it

Resolved, By the mayor and city council of the city of Plattsmouth, Neb., that the holding of said Trans-Mississippi exposition is hereby approved, and the senators and representatives in congress from Nebraska and the great west are requested to use their best endeavors to procure the passage at this session of congress of a bill giving national recognition to said exposition and providing for an appropriation for a national exhibit and the necessary buildings to contain the same; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolutions be sent under the seal of the city of Plattsmouth to the senators and representatives in congress from Nebraska.

SENATE BILL GOES.

Transmississippi Directors Decide to Accept It.

Secretary Wakefield of the Transmississippi exposition has received this letter from Senator Thurston, which throws some light upon the situation in congress toward the exposition bill now before that body:

Washington, D. C., April 11.—Dear Sir: I enclose you a copy of a letter just sent to Mr. Mercer which contains concise statement of congressional situation. We were compelled to accept the $200,000 limit, as Senator Allison insists that was the amount appropriated for Atlanta exposition. If the bill goes through there will be no trouble about securing an appropriation to start the building with at this session, and if by the next session sufficient assurances are obtained that the exposition is to be of greater magnitude than Atlanta's we can probably secure an increase of the limit. Permit me in this connection to say that we are all greatly indebted to Senator Allen for the interest he has taken and the assistance he has rendered in the passage of the bill. Yours truly,

JOHN M. THURSTON.
John A. Wakefield, Esq., Omaha, Neb.

Mr. Wakefield says that President Wattles, who is now at Washington, governed by the situation as it appeared to him there, has decided to accept the senate bill. That measure is now in the hands of a house committee, and will be amended by the adding of the appropriation, and possibly passed at an early date, and with the present feeling in the senate these amendments will be readily accepted. After this is done, Mr. Thurston in another letter, said there would be no trouble in getting a small appropriation tacked to the sundry bill for the commencing of work on the government building.

At 4:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon the following telegram was received by Mr. Wakefield from Washington:

Washington, D. C., April 14.—John A. Wakefield, Secretary: Dingley consents to [?] senate bill with amendment at once. [?] says if bill is changed it cannot pass [?]arrying $500,000 limit through house, [?] $50,000 available by attaching provis-[?]overed by our resolution. Or he will [?] senate bill and take no chances, and [?]on next congress to increase amount. [?]nsus of opinion is we better take a [?]thing. Confer with leaders and wire [?] they prefer to take chances.

G. W. WATTLES.

Upon receipt of the dispatch Mr. Wakefield got the directors and others interested in the exposition together at [?] office to get an expression of opinion. The result of the meeting was the word-[?] of a telegram, which was sent to Mr. Wattles before 6 o'clock, as follows:

Gurdon W. Wattles, Ebbitt House, Washington D. C.: Meeting of the full directory, with Messrs. Rosewater, Lindsey and Hitchcock, decided as follows: We favor Dingley reporting senate bill immediately, with amendment increasing limit and making definite amount available.

JOHN A. WAKEFIELD,
Secretary.
 

WHEREAS, it was suggested by the Trans-Mississippi Congress recently held in Omaha that an international exposition be held in Omaha in 1898, and the project was heartily and unanimously urged and endorsed by that body, made up of men representing the progress, and interested in the prosperity of all the States and Territories from the Mississippi now to the Pacific coast, and

WHEREAS, such an exposition would bring to the attention of the people of the United States and the world, the industrial, commercial and agricultural advantages and resources of this vast territory, and

WHEREAS, the Live Stock interests of the West would be especially benefitted by an exposition of this character which would advertise to all nations the fact that we are able to feed their people with the best of beef, pork and mutton for an indefinate period and without any serious drain on our resources; therefore, be it

RESOLVED, by the South Omaha Live Stock Exchange that we most heartily approve of the plan to hold this exposition, and will do everything in our power to make it a success, and be it further,

RESOLVED, that the Nebraska senators and representatives in congress be earnestly requested to put forth every effort to secure the passage of the bill now pending before congress, making the exposition international in Character and providing for proper recognition and assistance from the government.

 
R. GILCHREST, President.
W. I. STEPHEN, Vice-President.
THOS. B. McPHERSON, Treasurer.
A. L. LOTT, Secretary.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS.
C. E. BOGART,
S. L. DEGEN,
E. S. HERRALL,
D. B. OLNEY,
L. E. ROBERTS.

South Omaha Live Stock Exchange.

Jno. A. Wakefield, Secy.,
Omaha, Neb.
Dear Sir:-

Enclosed please find Resolutions adopted by the So. Omaha Live Stock Exchange in regard to the Transmississippi Congress. I am,

Very truly yours,

A L Lott
Secretary.
 
65

MANY HANDS PUSH THE BILL

Omaha Exposition Measure Assured of Strong Support in the House.

WATTLES ASKS ADVICE FROM OMAHA

Final Choice of Two Bills Deferred Until Word Can Be Had from the Local Managers of the Project.

WASHINGTON, April 14.—(Special Telegram.)—President Wattles, after consultation with Chairman Dingley of the ways and means committee, Representatives Dolliver of Iowa, and Mercer, Hainer and Meiklejohn of Nebraska, this afternoon wired Secretary Wakefield of the Exposition association to ascertain of the leaders in the movement as to their judgment on the pending senate and house bills. He stated that the consensus of opinion here was that the senate bill should be accepted, but desired advice from Omaha people that there might not be any discrimination should one or other of the bills have to be dropped. He wanted to know if the exposition managers desired to take changes on the house bill with a view of increasing the appropriation it carries later on.

Mr. Wattles had a long conference with Mr. Dingley today in which the chairman of ways and means stated that his committee would report the senate bill without amendment, or if the exposition people desire to take chances, he would attempt to have the house bill reported, carrying $500,000 appropriation surrounded by the safeguards he proposed yesterday, namely, that $280,000 should be subscribed as capital stock certified by the secretary of the treasury, before the money of the government should issue.

While Mr. Mercer believes he can pass the house bill, the uncertainty attaching to the senate's action makes him hesitate to push the measure and he has thrown the whole matter on the people of Omaha to say what they want. In view of the short time remaining of the session the best opinion seems to be that the senate bill had better be taken and that if the states come forward next winter as expected in the way of appropriations, it will be time enough to attempt an additional appropriation from the government.

DOLLIVER IS VERY ACTIVE.

Representative Dolliver, who is enthusiastically in favor of the bill, will have a conference with Senator Allison with a view of ascertaining the possibility of increasing the appropriation, everybody conceding that $500,000 is absolutely needed to make the exposition international in its character and reflective of the great country which it will exploit. Dolliver, however, is not hopeful of securing Senator Allison's sanction for the increases.

Here is where the whole matter will stand till Mr. Wattles can hear from Omaha as to the wishes of his people. Whatever they decide upon he will go in to accomplish and in this he will have the support of the whole northwest section. Dingley wanted to report the senate bill tomorrow, but he was asked to hold off until Friday, at least until Mr. Wattles might become acquainted with the desires of the managers in Omaha, and at the same time satisfy himself that whatever was done would be to the best interests of the exposition.

WILL PUSH THE SENATE BILL.

Transmississippi Exposition Scheme Will Go Through This Session.

WASHINGTON, April 16.—(Special Telegram.)—A conference this morning between President Wattles and members of Nebraska delegations resulted in its decision to push the senate exposition bill. Congressman Mercer will arrange with Dingley when the committee will take up the bill, which in all probability will be next Monday.

Chairman Dingley says some of the members of the ways and means committee desire to surround the bill with the safeguard of having the Omaha people raise a certain amount of money before the government appropriation is made available. This is satisfactory to President Wattles.

WAS TOO BUSY WITH ALCOHOL

WATTLES EXPECTS A DECISION TODAY

Hopes to Have the Action of the Omaha Managers to Present to the Congressmen Who Are Interested.

WASHINGTON, April 15.—(Special Telegram.)—The exposition bill still rests in the hands of the committee on ways and means. Representative Mercer endeavored to have a definite agreement with Chairman Dingley as to when it should be reported, but the chairman was too busy on the alcohol bill to take up anything not german to that subject today. It is thought that a definite course of action will be decided upon tomorrow, when Mr. Wattles will undoubtedly have advices from Omaha as to the decision of the managers there. The bill for the Nashville centennial exposition, carrying an immediate appropriation, has been introduced in the house, and this, it is thought, will give an additional string for the Transmississippi people to pull. Nashville intends holding the exposition next year and needs the money at once. When the ways and means committee adjourned today it was to the next regular meeting next week. There is nothing, however, in the way of calling a special meeting to consider the Omaha exposition bill, which will be done whenever a concerted plan of action is agreed upon.

Messrs. Wattles and Wyman had a talk with Comptroller Eckels today relative to liquidating the debts of the American National bank. A plan was agreed upon and Mr. Wyman left for home tonight. Mr. Wattles will remain until something definite as to the exposition bill is decided upon.

Percy Lamoreux, special examiner of the general land office, who was sent to Wyoming to examine certain lands in which the Globe Canal company of Omaha is interested, has returned to Washington. While his report has not been made public, enough has been learned by the members of congress interested in securing these lands for the company, that the report, now before the secretary of the interior, finds that on certain forties timber is growing in sufficient quantity to warrant the government's intercession, but that on a large portion of the land in controversy he found little timber, and recommends that a title be given the company for these. There are about 1,000 acres held up and the company is growing anxious to have the matter settled, in view of intending settlers desiring to take up lands along the canal. It is further stated that the report recommends most liberal treatment to this company in the use of water rights, the location of dams, etc., on the timber reservations. The return of Secretary Smith will probably wind this matter up in a very short time.

Acting Secretary of the Interior Reynolds today transmitted to the commisioner​ of the general land office instructions to local officers at North Platte, Neb., land district as to entries upon lands embraced in the abandoned Fort McPherson military reservation. The report of the appraisers shows that the reservation embraced 19,500 acres, all of which is surveyed, except the original reservation of four miles square, or about 10,240 acres. Of the land embraced in the reservation odd numbered sections accrue to the Union Pacific Railroad company, in part satisfaction of the grant to aid its construction. The even numbered sections of the surveyed land, except a military road 200 feet wide and seven-eighths of a mile long, have been appraised at $11,432. The land will be patented to actual settlers under the homestead law at its appraised value. Settlement can date back to August 23, 1894, the date of the approval of an act restoring the reservation to the public domain.

Semi-Weekly Union

The Semi-Weekly Union has a larger Circulation than Any Other Newspaper in Madison County.

OMAHA'S BIG FAIR.

Work Begins for the Trans-Mississippi Exposition of 1898.

The trans-Mississippi congress, which met in Omaha November 25, last, adopted resolutions unanimously concurred in by delegates present from the trans-Mississippi states, locating the proposed trans-Mississippi exposition in 1898 at Omaha.

From that day leading men in Omaha and the congressional delegation from Nebraska have been busily engaged in pushing preliminary work incident to a full organization of working forces. The exposition will not be, strictly speaking, an Omaha enterprise. The articles which were adopted at an enthusiastic mass meeting of Omaha citizens recently contemplate an exposition of all the products, industries an civilization of the states and territories

GORDON W. WATTLES, PRESIDENT.
of the United States west of the Mississippi river, and also such exhibits as may be provided in the United States, in any state of the union or any foreign country, for the purpose particularly of exhibiting to the world the products and capabilities of said states and territories. The articles provide that the exposition shall be opened in June and closed in November, 1898. The responsibility for the success of the enterprise must therefore devolve upon the vast empire embracing the western and Rocky mountain states.

The people of Omaha and Nebraska, however, are determined that the project shall be pushed to a successful issue. It was left to them to take the initiative and to put the machinery in motion. To this task the citizens of Omaha have addressed themselves with energy and enthusiasm. The corporation is organized with a capital stock of $1,000,000, with shares at ten dollars, there being a proviso that when $10,000 of the stock shall have been subscribed business shall be commenced. At a recent meeting nearly $11,000 was subscribed by those present within a few minutes and strong committees were named to further subscriptions. A board of eleven directors, as provided was named, among them being the active and influential business men of the city. This board elected as their president G. W. Wattles, and as secretary John A. Wakefield.

 

ALL FOR M'KINLEY

No Sixteen to One Free Coinage for Nebraska Republicans.

SENATOR THURSTON EXPEDITES THINGS

Secures the Election of Three Delegates-at-Large by Acclamation.

WEBSTER, KENNARD AND JANSEN GO

Plan of the Wharton Letter Carried Out Without a Hitch.

CROUNSE INTRODUCES A RESOLUTION

Seeks to Shame the Senator, but is Overridden by the Delegates.

THUMMEL CHOSEN AS THE FOURTH MAN

Matt Daugherty Lacks Several Votes of Being Even a Good Second.

PLATFORM REPORT PLEDGES MANY THINGS

Endorses the St. Louis and Lincoln Conventions in Advance and Promises to Support to the Ticket Next Fall.

For delegates-at-large:
JOHN L. WEBSTER of Douglas.
THOMAS P. KENNARD of Lancaster.
PETER JANSEN of Jefferson.
GEORGE H. THUMMEL of Hall.
Alternates:
O. G. SMITH of Buffalo.
C. B. DEMPSTER of Gage.
L. P. JUDD of Boone.
A. C. WRIGHT of Cass.

Above are given the names of the men elected as delegates to the national convention at St. Louis by the republican state convention which met for that purpose at the Coliseum last evening. This part of the proceedings was most quickly and harmoniously accomplished, all the delegates being elected by acclamation except George H. Thummel, who triumphed after a close tussle with his only opponent, Matt Daugherty of Ogalalla.

Besides selected the delegates the convention adopted a money plank which declared in so many words against the free coinage of silver after a futile effort to silence the convention on that issue. The only other difference of any consequence was over the ratification of the resolutions adopted in Omaha some time ago as a compromise between the supporters of McKinley and Manderson. In this case Senator Thurston's plea for the compromise resolutions failed to find a sympathetic response and a substitute resolution was adopted which contained no other name than that of William McKinley.

The convention hall itself was the largest, best ventilated and most convenient ever tendered for the use of a state gathering in Nebraska. There was no crowding of delegates into narrow aisles, on the stage and in galleries. Everybody had plenty of room, and the arched ceiling nearly a hundred feet from the floor gave ample opportunity for breathing—a luxury seldom enjoyed by conventions in Nebraska. The floats and paraphernalia belonging to the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben lent a picturesque feature to the otherwise severe plainness of the Interior. The Second Infantry band from Fort Omaha was in attendance, and while the huge crowd was assembling played a varied program, literally interspersed with lively campaign melodies. On the immense stage back of the speaker's desk, on the west side of the auditorium, [?]sented a large number of the prominent [?] ng [?] time [?] Mallalieu of the [?]vention called the con-[?]r. In the absence of Chairman [?]er, who is detained in Washington by important duties in connection with his official position, Mr. Mallalieu had had general charge of the preliminary work of preparing for the convention. When he arose to call the convention to order he faced an assemblage of fully 3,500 people. He first introduced the John L. Webster Glee club of Omaha. The club sang a campaign melody, the accompanying words portraying the ponderous woes of one Grover Cleveland and depicting in general terms the panic stricken condition of the democrats. The big crowd liked the sentiment and applauded the glee club. Tim Sedgwick of York, secretary of the republican state central committee then read the call. This formality being over, Vice Chairman Mallalieu introduced as the temporary chairman of the convention Hon. William P. McCreary of Hastings.

Mr. McCreary's brief speech was listened to with close attention by those close enough to the platform to hear it. Unfortunately, however, the crush of delegates constantly crowding into the rear and sides of the auditorium created so much noise and confusion that the greater portion of the audience was unable to catch much of the best part of the eloquent speaker's address. The temporary chairman was frequently applauded, his references to McKinley giving full opportunity for the escape of the pent-up enthusiasm and his demand for the complete demonetization of democracy and the free and unlimited coinage of republicanism, honest money, protection and reciprocity brought down the house. Mr. McCreary said in part:

M'CREARY'S ADDRESS.

"It would be indeed a cold heart that would not be warmed by such an occasion as this. Especially is this true at this time because this is the beginning of a campaign of people who have sent their representatives to this convention to declare their views upon the vital questions of the hour. Never was there a time in American politics since the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, when the people were so serious as they are today. It is not a blow struck at a statesman this time, but one struck directely​ at American industries and the American homes. The people who have selected these delegates are entitled to the deliberate judgment of this convention. Like the Israelite of old, they are seeking for a Moses to lead them out of the wilderness. It has been charged that in selecting the delegates to this convention there were cases in which the will of the people was not consulted. I have no need to deny this accusation. The people have but one idea in this campaign, and this convention would be false to them if it did not declare in favor of one great exponent of the protective tariff principle. I refer to Major William McKinley of Ohio. (Prolonged applause.)

"It has been said that Major McKinley is no more entitled to credit for the McKinley law than any other member of the committee. I remember that at one time

(Continued on Fifth Page.)
ALL FOR M'KINLEY
(Continued from First Page.)
Mr. McKinley was downed in his own district because it was held that he was responsible for that law. We hear a good deal of talk about the money question, but what the American people want is the demonetization of democracy and free coinage of republicanism."

Continuing, Mr. McCreary paid his respects to the populist party, which he characterized as the political harlot of the nineteenth century.

The purely ornamental work of the convention being finished, the business of the evening commenced in earnest.

On motion of John C. Wharton, J. M. Gillan of Omaha was made temporary secretary.

COMMITTEE ON RESOLUTIONS.

Senator Thurston took the floor to move that in order to expedite business the chairman appoint a committee on resolutions, to consist of a chairman and one member from each congressional district, to which all resolutions should be referred without debate.

Ex-Governor Crounse suggested that there was one question before the people which should be honestly faced. He hoped that the republicans of Nebraska would be brave enough to meet the issue squarely, and in order to do that open debate was necessary.

Senator Thurston explained that his motion was not intended to stifle debate, but to permit it at the proper time, which was after the report of the committee. The convention, he said, would have the courage to fight for the cardinal principles of the republican party—sound money and protection.

Senator Thurston's motion was then carried without opposition and the committee was appointed, as follows: Senator Thurston, chairman; G. M. Lambertson, First district; Cadet Taylor, Second district; W. H. Needham, Third district; Thomas Wolfe, Fourth district; John J. Lamborn, Fifth district; Henry Gibbons, Sixth district.

J. L. McPheely of Minden moved that as there were no contests the services of a committee on credentials be dispensed with and that the list of delegates as in the hands of the secretary be declared elected. This was carried.

The temporary organization was then made permanent and the convention listened to a song by Joe Barton of this city.

TURN IT OVER TO THURSTON.

Chairman McCreary announced that the selection of the delegates to the national convention was in order. The announcement brought Senator Thurston to his feet with a motion to expedite the work of the convention. He suggested that inasmuch as there was no difference of opinion as to the names of three of the delegates-at-large, much time could be saved by selecting them by viva voce vote. He therefore moved that John L. Webster of Douglas, Thomas P. Kennard of Lancaster and Peter Jansen of Jefferson be selected by acclamation.

The motion was seconded by a Gage county delegate, but before the question could be voted upon ex-Governor Crounse sent to the secretary's desk a substitute, which he asked to have read. The reading of the substitute was attended with some difficulty, but, when finally before the convention, was found to be as follows:

Whereas, Senator John M. Thurston has kindly volunteered to leave his seat in the United States senate and journey several times half way across the continent to attend the meeting of the state republican committee and direct its proceedings in issuing its call for this convention; also to have himself made delegate to ward and county conventions, and, as self-constituted dictator, happily styled King John the First, has issued his edict directing the selection of himself, John L. Webster and Peter Jansen as delegates to the national republican convention and fixing the boundaries from which this convention may elect the other two delegates-at-large; and,

Whereas, It is understood that, having gathered to himself the several titles and offices of senator, delegate and dictator, he is ambitious for the additional honor of being nominated as vice president, or holding a place in the cabinet, when, as secretary of the interior or attorney general, he can be of further and greater service to the Pacific railroads, whose passes and stolen millions have been used to advance the honored gentleman to his present commanding position; and,

Whereas, The senator by innumerable proclamations, letters and interviews has given the public in general and presidential candidates in particular to understand that he carries the republican party of Nebraska in his pocket; and,

Whereas, In order that this impression may continue and the chances of the senator for gratifying his ambition be not impaired by any act of independence or disloyalty on the part of the republicans here assembled; and,

Whereas, We recognize in the senator a willingness and a confidence in his own ability to go to St. Louis, as the entire sixteen delegates allotted to Nebraska, and regret that the authority of this convention will not permit us to thus constitute him, therefore in order to effect the same, and as nearly as may be; therefore be it

Resolved, That Senator Thurston be requested to name all the delegates to the St. Louis convention we are assembled supposedly to select, which delegates are hereby instructed, and the district delegates are requested to vote and act in said convention under the direction and for the glory of the senator.

Resolved, That an apology is due from ex-Senator Manderson to Senator Thurston for permitting the use of his name as a presidential candidate without having first obtained the consent of the senator, and for attempting to usurp the title of "Favorite Son," when it is well known that the name of our favorite is not Charles, but John; and

Resolved, lastly, That we can but admire and applaud the magnanimity of our senator in graciously consenting that the name of ex-Senator Manderson may be mentioned at St. Louis at such time or manner as will injure no one else or do him any good.

FOLLOW THE SENATOR'S SUGGESTION.

A delegate from Pawnee county moved that Crounse's substitute be laid on the table.

The reading of the substitute was greeted with a hearty and prolonged outburst of hisses which the chairman could scarcely restrain.

C. E. Holland of Seward county moved to table the substitute without any further reading. Senator Thurston arose and found it impossible to speak because of the tremendous cheering. He said that he had too much respect for the author to ask other than that the substitute be read in full. He added that if, after reading, it was found to reflect any honor on the author, he hoped the convention would adopt it. When he finished the secretary was allowed to continue with the reading. At the mention of the selection of Senator Thurston for vice presidential candidate or for secretary of the interior the convention showed its appreciation of the suggestions offered by applause loud and long.

The chairman put the motion to table and it was carried with a shout.

The rules were suspended and the three men who had been nominated as delegates at large were unanimously chosen to represent Nebraska at St. Louis.

John L. Webster was called for and in reply made a short speech, which was well received. He said it was simply his desire to go to St. Louis and voice the sentiment of the republicans in casting his vote for Major McKinley. He said his time, his services and his whole attention should be at the command of the party in the fall campaign.

TWO PRETTY PROUD MEN.

Thomas P. Kennard was called for. He said he had been nominated twice for a state office and stood upon a platform of republicanism. But, he said, the honor and trust that had just been confided to him he esteemed more highly. He hoped to return from St. Louis and announce the nomination of William McKinley.

Peter Jansen was called for from several quarters of the hall at once. Mounting the stage, he said he wouldn't trade places even with the czar of Russia. He felt prouder at the honor given him by the sovereign people of the state of Nebraska than at any honor all the crowned heads of Europe could confer upon him. He said the foreign element in the republican ranks loved the nation of its adoption and would always rally around its flag. He believed under the administration of William McKinley the republican party would again bring commercial prosperity to the nation.

A double quartet from Beatrice was then announced and rendered a timely parody on a familiar college air, picturing the distress of the democratic party in strong words. The boys were rewarded by a hearty encore and responded with a parody on "In the Sweet Bye and Bye." It told of the failure of the populist party and predicted that it, too, would be laid on the shelf along with the democratic party.

A Douglas county representative moved to count the old soldiers in the convention in order to refute the charge that there were but few old soldiers present. The rising vote showed a large number of Grand Army men present. As they arose to be counted they were cheered to the echo.

OPENED THE ONLY DISPUTE.

Representative W. H. Harrison of Hall nominated George H. Thummel of his county for the fourth delegate-at-large.

The delegation of Webster counted seconded the nomination.

A Stanton county representative seconded the nomination also. This was the signal for representatives from a large number of counties to fall into line, and they kept the chairman busy recognizing them in order that they might second Mr. Thummel's nomination.

Representative Sullivan of Custer county placed in nomination Matthew Daugherty. Sheridan county, Banner county, Buffalo county and Valley county seconded the nomination of Daugherty.

As the roll call proceeded it became evident that Thummel was not in for a walk away. Not until the call was nearly over was it sure that he was elected, but the final result was: Thummel, 554; Daugherty, 498. And Mr. Thummel was declared the unanimous nominee of the convention for the fourth place on the delegation at large.

He briefly returned his thanks for the honor conferred and Matt Daugherty took the platform to say that he was highly pleased with the selection of his opponent. He expressed his thanks to those who had stood by him in what he characterized as the "most unholy war ever waged on a man." He declared that like the Saviour he had suffered for the sins of others and had been handicapped by the name of Daugherty.

Someone nominated Mr. Daugherty for alternate, but he declined in favor of O. G. Smith of Buffalo county, who was nominated by John T. Mallalieu and elected by acclamation. C. B. Dempster of Gage county, L. P. Judd of Boone county and A. C. Wight of Cass county were then placed in nomination. A motion to elect Mr. Judd and Mr. Dempster by acclamation prevailed, and another motion included Mr. Wright in the program. They were declared elected at the moment when the committee on resolutions appeared with their report.

RESOLUTIONS REPORTED.

In behalf of the committee, Senator Thurston read the following:

The republicans of Nebraska in convention assembled congratulate the country upon the certain return of the republican party to power, and rejoice that our land is to be speedily redeemed from the disasters and sufferings of democratic incompetence, error and misrule.

This is the year of the people, and the people demand that their great champion, William McKinley, shall be nominated and elected president of the United States.

We reaffirm our loyalty to the declared principles of the republican party and to those great American policies for which our party always stands.

We pledge ourselves in advance to the platform of the forthcoming republican national convention, believing that it will declare against the free and unlimited coinage of silver and for a currency of gold, silver and paper "as sound as the government and as untarnished as its honor," and for that American system of protection and reciprocity of which William McKinley is the best living exponent and under which out people attained the greatest national and individual prosperity.

We assert that the republican party stands for the supremacy of the constitution of the United States; the maintenance of law and order; the protection of every American citizen in his right to live, to labor and to vote; a vigorous foreign policy; the enforcement of the Monroe doctrine; the restoration of our merchant marine; American markets for American products; the governmental supervision and control of transportation lines and rates; the protection of the people from all unlawful combination and unjust exaction of aggregated capital and corporate power; a pension policy just and generous to our living heroes and the widows and orphans of their dead comrades; coast defenses against foreign navies, pauper immigration and the products of cheap foreign labor; a rigid observance of our naturalization laws; the expenditure of all moneys collected from the people for public uses and under direction of public officials.

We extend our sympathies to the struggling patriots of Cuba in their heroic efforts to establish a government of the people, and we demand the recognition of their rights as belligerents by the national administration.

We remit all presentation of state issues to the convention called for the nomination of state officers, pledging ourselves to support its nominees, and assuring the country that Nebraska is a republican state.

HAD A FREE SILVER PLANK.

W. J. Connell of Omaha offered the following substitute for the money plank as recommended by the committee:

We declare that both gold and silver should be primary money and recognized as such by the government of the United States, and should be a full legal tender for all debts, both public and private; that the governments should not discriminate in favor of gold as against silver, and that the mints should be opened upon equal terms to both gold and silver at the ratio now established by law. We oppose the issuing of government bonds in times of peace.

In support of his substitute Mr. Connell spoke at some length and submitted a petition signed by 450 republicans.

Delegate Corbin of Johnson county moved to lay the substitute on the table, and after some further debate the motion prevailed.

The same controversy was renewed when Hon. John B. Wright of Lancaster county moved that the anti-free coinage clause in the money plank be stricken out. He declared that the convention had no right to instruct the national convention, and the republican party could not afford to declare for the elimination of either gold or silver as a basis of money.

Ex-Governor Crounse declared that the free coinage clause was the only part of the plank that meant anything. The remainder consisted of glittering generalities on which any one might ride.

G. M. Lambertson of Lancaster county made a vigorous appeal for an out and out declaration against free coinage. He said that Connell was standing exactly where Bryan stood. Other republican state conventions had declared for sound money, and Nebraska should not be silent.

A. E. Brown of Lancaster county quoted a resolution offered in the United States senate by McKinley in 1878 as evidence that McKinley was for silver.

Judge Allen W. Field asserted that McKinley had carried Ohio against a party that had declared for the free and unlimited coinage of silver by more than 170,000 majority.

The motion to strike out was lost by an overwhelming vote, and the platform as submitted by the committee was unanimously approved.

ENDORSES THE EXPOSITION.

The following resolutions were presented by the committee and adopted without debate:

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river at the Transmississippi congress of 1895 adopted resolutions providing for the holding of an exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts, industries and capabilities of these states and territories; and,

Whereas, The said congress voted unanimously that said exposition should be held at the city of Omaha in the year 1898; and,

Whereas, The common interest of the states and territories constituting this great region will be greatly promoted and benefited thereby, and the interests of the great state of Nebraska will be especially benefited by such an exposition within her borders; therefore be it

Resolved, by the 1,057 citizens of the state of Nebraska, assembled together as delegates to the Nebraska republican state convention in the Coliseum building. Omaha, April 15, 1896, That the holding of said Transmississippi and International exposition is hereby heartily approved, and that the senators and representatives in congress from Nebraska are requested to fully co-operate with the senators and representatives from the other transmississippi states, and thoroughly and actively endeavor to procure at this session of congress the passage of the bill giving national recognition to said exposition, and providing for an appropriation for national exhibits and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be certified by the secretary of the convention and sent to the senators and representatives in congress from Nebraska.

Senator Thurston then presented for approval the resolutions which were adopted by the Douglas county convention as the result of the compromise between the McKinley and Manderson committees some weeks ago.

The senator prefaced the reading of these resolutions by an explanation of the circumstances which had led to their conception. This was largely a repetition of the same ideas which he had expressed on previous occasions, but he included a reference to the resolutions introduced by ex-Governor Crounse earlier in the evening. He denied that his championship of the cause of William McKinley in Nebraska was associated with any personal ambition. He denied that he had any desire or expectation to be vice president, and declared that if Nebraska should be fortunate enough to be offered a cabinet position he would not accept it for himself, but would turn it over to one of the many worthy republicans of the commonwealth.

OUT AND OUT FOR M'KINLEY.

After Senator Thurston had read the resolutions Frank Collins of Lancaster county offered the following substitute:

Whereas, The republican party of Nebraska, in state convention assembled, believes in the rule of the majority and recognizes that the overwhelming sentiment of Nebraska republicans is favorable to the candidacy of William McKinley of Ohio for president of the United States, therefore, be it

Resolved, by this convention, That we heartily commend the candidacy of William McKinley for nomination by the national republican convention to the highest office in the gift of the American people, because of his spotless private life, his sterling honesty, his undoubted political integrity, his high moral courage, his lofty patriotism, his splendid citizenship and his superb statesmanship. We unqualifiedly endorse his candidacy because he is the acknowledged champion of the overshadowing issue: "American markets for American producers, protection to American industries and American labor."

We regard him as the logical and invincible leader of the republican hosts in their victorious campaign of 1896, and triumphal re-entry into power on March 4, 1897. Be it further,

Resolved, by this convention, That the four delegates-at-large and the four alternates-at-large selected by this convention to represent this commonwealth at the national republican convention at St. Louis, be, and each of them, is hereby instructed to use all honorable means to secure the nomination of William McKinley at the hands of said convention, and to this end they, and each of them, are further instructed to vote for William McKinley on the first ballot, and on each succeeding ballot until he is nominated or his name is withdrawn from the contest.

In support of his substitute Mr. Collins asked for whom the delegates for the various counties had been instructed. For McKinley and no one else. He appealed to them to remain true to their instructions.

John L. McPheeley appealed to the convention to stand by Thurston in this matter as he had earned the right to be heeded.

The roll call on Collin's substitute resulted: Ayes, 488; nays, 410.

It was declared carried and C. E. Holland of Seward county offered a balm to Senator Thurston in the following, which was unanimously adopted:

Resolved, That in the person of Senator John M. Thurston we recognize an able statesman whose only ambition is to promote the best interests of his constituents and to stand between any foe, political or otherwise, that endangers their prosperity or attempts to throttle the popular expression of the people on any political question. Undaunted by any political power, he has the courage to voice the sentiments of the sovereign people on any question of moment in the face of any organized opposition.

On motion of Seth Mobley of Grand Island, a vote of thanks was tendered to Chairman McCreary for his services, and the convention adjourned.

 
67

GETS A HEARING ON MONDAY

Transmississippi Bill a Special Order Before the Ways and Means Committee.

ALLISON'S INTEREST JUST AROUSED

Chairman of the Senate Committee Gives Assurance of His Willingness to Advocate a Greater Appropriation.

WASHINGTON, April 17.—(Special Telegram.)—Chairman Dingley of the house ways and means committee, after an extended conference with President Wattles of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association, has set apart Monday morning for a hearing on the senate bill. This result has not been accompanied without considerable hard work on the part of Messrs. Wattles and Mercer, who have rounded up matters to such an extent that a favorable result is almost certain. Before holding his conference with Chairman Dingley the president of the exposition had a long conference with Chairman Allison of the senate appropriations committee, to whom he explained in minute detail the plans and purposes of the exposition. He showed Mr. Allison that $250,000 would have to be appropriated by the United States before the exposition could realize any portion of the $10,000 appropriated by the Iowa legislature for preliminary work on the Iowa building. This was news to the senior senator from Iowa, who had no conception of the magnitude which the exposition is assuming. After going over the subject very fully Mr. Allison gave Mr. Wattles assurance that he would favor an amendment increasing the amount of the appropriation to $250,000, suggesting that $75,000 be appropriated for buildings and $175,000 for the government exhibit and expenses attaching thereto.

This strong show of friendliness on the part of Senator Allison for the bill acted as a tonic upon the spirits of President Wattles, who for a time was at a loss to know just exactly what was best to be done in view of the complicated situation. After this conference with Allison it was comparatively easy to make headway with Chairman Dingley, who finally agreed to make the senate exposition bill a special order before the committee for Monday morning. President Wattles will go before the full committee on that occasion, and will put before it the plan and scope of the enterprise, which is broader and more comprehensive than the Atlanta exposition. He will fortify himself with the Iowa bill appropriating the amount above named and considerable other material for which he has telegraphed. Chairman Dingley is not averse, according to Wattles, to increasing the appropriation carried by the bill. He still holds out, however, for a stipulated amount to be raised by the people of Omaha and the west before the government appropriation becomes available, and it is thought $250,000 will be named as the sum to be raised by the exposition association, to be passed upon by the secretary of the treasury. Thus the atmosphere has cleared considerably in the last twenty-four hours regarding the fate of the exposition bill. President Wattles tonight is more hopeful than at any time during his visit here. Thurston is expected to arrive Monday and at once to put his shoulder to the wheel.

Nebraska will be represented in Washington next week by a number of its strongest lawyers. John M. Woolworth will be here for the Omaha bridge cases will be reached on Tuesday. Ex-Senator Manderson will also be here to argue the sugar bounty cases, and there will be several lesser legal lights present who will have business before the supreme court and departments. Three briefs have been filed in the Omaha bridge cases, John F. Dillon and John M. Thurston for the appellants; J. M. Woolworth files another as solicitor for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific, he having as his associates M. A. Law and Robert Mather, while George R. Peck and Burton Hansen have presented a brief for the Milwaukee. By agreement of counsel, both cases will be argued and submitted as one.

SHOULD PRESS SENATE BILL

Thurston's Advice Regarding Legislation for the Exposition.

LETTER SENT TO SECRETARY WAKEFIELD

Thinks it Would Be Dangerous to Attempt a Course Different from that Which Has Been Commenced.

Yesterday Senator Thurston sent a letter to Secretary Wakefield of the Transmississippi and International Exposition company. The communication explains itself, and is as follows:

"Telegrams received yesterday from Senator Allen seem to demand that I should once more state to you, and through you to your organization, what we believe to be the congressional situation.

"From the very outset I urged the exposition officials to moderate their present demands for congressional action to correspond with what was done for the Atlanta exposition. I have never changed in my belief as originally expressed, that we could secure the same aid without serious opposition, and that we could secure nothing more from the present congress. I also insisted that it was not wise to ask this congress to make any greater present appropriation of money than would be necessary for expenditures in the way of commencing the government building prior to July 1, 1897. The bill being passed, appropriations would follow at succeeding sessions of congress, as needed, without the slightest difficulty, as appropriations are always made, as a matter of course, to carry out the provisions of existing laws.

"Senator Allen and myself, early in January, canvassed the congressional situation very carefully. Our views have coincided throughout; we have worked together and co-operated together in every respect, and we are all indebted to Senator Allen for the interest he has taken in the exposition legislation and the work he has done to secure it.

HANDLING THE BILL.

"I was advised by your managers that you felt confident of securing a very large appropriation in the house of representatives, and it was upon such representations, and not because we believed that any such great present appropriations could be secured that Senator Allen and myself decided to hold the senate bill as long as we could with safety to await the action on the house bill. With this end in view I secured a unanimous report of my committee in favor of the senate bill and had the bill placed on the calendar with the accompanying report nearly two months since. We carefully canvassed both sides of the senate and succeeded in removing all opposition to our bill, and had it in a position to pass at any time. We held it waiting for action in the house just as long as we dared, Senator Allen being very pronounced in his views that further delay in the senate would jeopardize the chances of legislation, and no action being taken in the house, and so far as we could see there being no immediate prospect of any action in the house, we got our bill up last Friday and passed it by unanimous consent.

"This bill gives to your exposition the same aid as was extended to the Atlanta exposition, $200,000 for government building and exhibit. We had the assurance that if the senate bill could be speedily passed, whatever immediate appropriation was necessary would be placed upon the sundry civil appropriation bill, and there is no question but what such immediate appropriation would be followed next winter with further appropriations as needed.

"I do not know what you have been led to expect in the way of success in the house of representatives, but urgent dispatches from Senator Allen confirm my judgment, that unless your people immediately unite and urge the passage of the senate bill without any amendment you will seriously endanger and probably defeat any legislation at this session. It is absolutely dangerous to attempt to amend the senate bill at this late day in the session.

PERILOUS TO ATTEMPT MORE.

"With this plain statement of the case, if your managers see fit to take the responsibility of action different from what is advised by Senator Allen and myself, the responsibility will be upon you. We have had your bill well in hand at all times, and its passage practically guaranteed. We have labored earnestly and industriously to make certain the passage of such legislation as we believed could be put through, and have held out no hope to you of any greater results than will be accomplished by the passage of the senate bill. So far as I am concerned, I have felt at all times that it was my duty to discourage your expectation of any more favorable legislation at the present time, although I have been fully aware that I have been publicly criticised by members of your organization because I did not hold out to you promises or encouragement of a much greater appropriation than there was any possibility of securing under existing conditions. It is also true that at one time certain reported political negotiations between your representatives and the people of some other states threatened most seriously the defeat of any legislation at the present session of congress, and under the circumstances I think it has been somewhat surprising that we secured such ready and unanimous support of our senate bill.

"If your managers feel certain of securing more favorable action in the house of representatives, then it is self-evident that you have the power to put the senate bill through the house just as it stands. In the interest of the success of the exposition, I feel it my duty to say to you on behalf of Senator Allen and myself that you should immediately direct your energies to securing the prompt passage of the senate bill without any amendment. Otherwise you are taking most dangerous and unnecessary risks.

"I write this letter from a sense of duty and because there are many people here who seem to think that congress will appropriate any sum of money for the exposition enterprise which its promoters see fit to ask for, whereas it is most difficult, on the eve of a presidential election, to secure any appropriation of any king not absolutely needed to carry on the business of the government."

EXPOSITION DIRECTORS MEET.

By Telegraph President Wattles Reported Progress.

There was a full attendance at the meeting of the Transmississippi exposition directory yesterday in the rooms of the Commercial club. Mr. Montgomery moved that the press of Omaha be requested to show to the people that the exposition of 1898 is bound to be a greater institution than the expositions of Atlanta or New Orleans. The motion was seconded by Mr. Bennett and unanimously carried. A letter was received from Governor W. J. McConnell of Idaho naming B. P. Shawhan of Payette, Idaho, as vice president of the exposition from that state. A telegram was read from President Wattles in which he stated that he hoped to secure something definite at the hands of the national legislators yesterday. This appointment was ratified by the directory and the meeting adjourned.

 

[?]mitted [?] squares with [?]

"I am authoriz[?] knows nothing [?] application of a committee [?] organization to visit him at [?]ton. He has never refused to meet any person or any committee of any kind, nor declined to have any interview upon any subject whatever. It should be also stated that both Mr. M. A. Hanna and Mr. Boyle are life-long members of the Protestant Episcopal church. I make this statement in behalf of truth, so that every American citizen may know the exact facts."

NORTH DAKOTA REPUBLICANS.

Emphatic Declaration Against Free Coinage of Silver.

FARGO, N. D., April 15.—The republican state convention just closed in this city was one of the most notable in the history of the state and in most respects it was the most interesting. The whole northwest has looked to this state with interest and has waited patiently for the result on the silver question and the presidential support. At the convention today free silver was turned down. The delegates to the St. Louis convention were instructed to use all honorable means to support McKinley. The following are the delegates: C. M. Johnson, Richland; A. S. Halson, Traill; S. T. Satterwaite, Cass; J. M. Devine, Lamoure; Alexander Hughes, Burleigh, and J. H. Bingenheimer, Morton.

The following is the money plank adopted by the convention: "The republicans of North Dakota, in convention asembled​, renew their devotion to the doctrine of protection. The republicans of North Dakota are unyielding in their demand for honest money. We are unalterably opposed to any scheme that will give to the country a depreciated or debased currency. We favor the use of silver as currency, but to the extent only and under such restrictions that its parity with gold can be maintained. We are therefore opposed to the free and unlimited coinage of silver until it can be arranged by international agreement."

 

WHEREAS, At a meeting of the Trans-Mississippi Congress held in the city of Omaha in 1895, action was taken providing for the holding of an Exposition to be known as the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts, industries and resources of the Trans-Mississippi States and Territories, and

WHEREAS, Believing that the common interests of all the States and Territories lying west of the great Mississippi river will be greatly promoted and the material interest of our own State be benefitted should the prospect Exposition be held, therefore,

Be it Resolved, By the City Council of the City of Boone, Iowa,

That we heartily approveof the holding said Exposition and request our Senators and Representatives in Congress to use their best endeavors in procuring legislation at the present session of Congress giving national recognition to said Exposition.

Be it Further Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be sent under seal of the City of Boone to each of the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Iowa, and also to the Mayor of the City of Omaha.

JAMES McINTOSH,
JOHN BIRMINGHAM,
}Committee,
Adopted April 8, 1896.
[ATTEST] JESSE L. HULL,
City Clerk
A. S. FARROW,
Mayor.
CITY CLERK
BOONE
IOWA.
CITY OF BOONE
SEAL
IOWA
 

The Mayor's Office.

WHEREAS, a corporation has been organized under the same of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition for the purposes of bettering and developing the recourses of the Western States and Territories, beleiving the common interest of all Western States and Territories with its vast undeveloped recourses, also the Eastern States which will be greatly benefited by such an exposition: Therefore,

BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Aurora, Nebr., and Mayor of the City concurring that the holding of said Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha, Nebr. in the year 1898 is hereby approved and that the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Nebraska are requested to use their best efforts to procure the necessary appropriations for a National exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings for the exposition.

BE IT RESOLVED, that a copy of the foregoing resolutions be mailed to each Senator and Representative from Nebraska in Congress, also to each of the local papers for publication.

Passed April 2nd. 1896.

F. J. Forbes,
Mayor.
J. B. Cunningham,
City Clerk.
 
69

In City Council Chambers. Chamberlain, S.D.

A RESOLUTION.

WHEREAS, The trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress, composed of leading business men representing all classes of business interest of the states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, did, at a meeting held during the month of November last, determine that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the states west of the Mississippi river, made at some central gateway, would be of great value, not only to the trans-Mississippi states, but to all homeseekers of the world; and the said trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress, did, by a unanimous vote, wisely select the City of Omaha as the proper location for such exposition, therefore; RESOLVED, By the City Council of the City of Chamberlain, that we heartily approve the action of the trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress, that we consider such an exposition to be of the highest importance to the trans-Mississippi states and territories, of which our own state is not the least, and deem it but just that Congress recognize this enterprise by making such an appropriation as will aid materially in the success of the undertaking, to which end we hereby request that our representatives in congress use their best efforts, toward bringing about such an issue.

Adopted April 6th 1896.

INCORPORATION
SEAL
CHAMBERLAIN, SOUTH DAKOTA.

A. H. Domer
Mayor.
Attest.
B. G. Wattson
City Auditor.
 

RESOLUTIONS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
OF THE
CITY OF RAWLINS, CARSON COUNTY, STATE OF WYOMING,
ENDORSING THE PROPOSED TRANS-MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION AT OMAHA, NEB.

WHEREAS, That portion of the United States lying west of the Mississippi River, abounds in economic resources of all kinds that are comparatively little known to the world at large; and

WHEREAS, Any means by which the products, resources and civilization in this portion of the United States may become advertised and more generally known would be to great advantage to the people living in that section and to the country at large as drawing the attention of capital to the possibilities contained in the development of the various resources of said region; therefore,

BE IT RESOLVED, That we heartily endorse the project of holding an exposition at the City of Omaha during the summer of the year 1896;

RESOLVED, That we believe that such an exposition as is proposed to be held in the City of Omaha in the year 1896 will result in untold advantage to all the Trans-Mississippi country and the nation at large;

RESOLVED, That the United States Congress should lend such aid and assistance to such proposed exposition as may be necessary to fully carry out the intention of its projectors;

RESOLVED, That we request the Senators and Representatives in the Congress of the United States from the State of Wyoming, to lend their assistance to the holding of said exposition in all ways in their power and especially by their votes in favor of any bills that may propose aid thereto;

RESOLVED, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the Hon. Francis E. Warren, The Hon. Clarence D. Clark, and The Hon. Frank W. Mondell.

Passed by the Board of Trustees of the City of Rawlins, this first day of April A. D. 1896.

J. H. Clause,
President Board of Trustees.
Approved,
H. Rasmusson,
Mayor.
Attest,
J. T. Williams,
City Clerk.
THE CITY OF RAWLINS, WYOMING
CORPORATE SEAL
   
71

An Interesting Suggestion.

Omaha, April 18.—To the Editor of the World-Herald: Every loyal citizen of Omaha and Nebraska is proud of what has been done in behalf of the Trans-Mississippi exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898. The World-Herald has accomplished wonders in drawing the attention of prominent persons of the whole country to the great trans-Missouri attraction, and thereby getting the people of all sections fully aroused in its behalf. The officers of the association have accomplished much in the short time they have been to work. No set of men, we take it, could have done more. Every bit of machinery necessary to put in motion has been "greased" and the mills are grinding, and before the grass is growing in 1897 there is every assurance and confidence that each state and territory within the trans-Mississippi radius will have made its appropriation to be seen and represented at this "greatest show on earth."

Up to date everybody is satisfied with what has been done. The foundation has been laid, and well laid, and now for the real work—the work that tries the metal that men are made of—yes, bi-metal if you please. It will take "goldbugs" and "silverbugs" both to build an exposition that will make Omaha and Nebraska proud and do imperishable honor to the great states and territories of the trans-Mississippi country. The plain English of it all is that money must be raised, and lots of it. And how are we going to do it? How did Chicago and the state of Illinois do it when the local governments pledged their sacred honor that if the World's fair went to Chicago the American people would have no cause to regret the location. As I remember the state of Illinois appropriated something like $1,000,000 for a building and a state exhibit, while the city of Chicago and Cook county voted $5,000,000 in bonds. Independent of this money wealthy citizens of Chicago subscribed stock aggregating thousands of dollars. All this was done to launch the great Columbian exposition in 1893—the greatest panorama of landscape and architectural beauty the world has ever seen, to say nothing of the art and mechanical exhibits under cover of the colossal structures. The liberality of Chicago and of Illinois surprised the nation and the states vied with each other in erecting buildings and making state exhibits.

In order to be brief let me ask "what Omaha and Nebraska expect to do to make the exposition of 1898 a success?" As yet no requisition has been made, but the time is near at hand when one will be made, but how much no one knows, but for not less than a half million dollars it is safe to predict. And how can it be raised? Some will say "by subscription." I say it can't be done. Then "how shall it be raised?" will be the inquiry. My idea is by taxation. Let the state legislature appropriate $200,000 for the occasion and as for Omaha and Douglas county bonds to the amount of $300,000 can be pledged. In my judgment this will be the easiest and most equitable method of raising the necessary funds.

Every taxpayer in Nebraska is interested in the exposition, and his interest in dollars and cents is measured by the amount of property he owns. Therefore, let each person pay according to his "means." Somebody has got to foot the bills for this coming big show and as our people are all poor these dull times, we can easily make a loan by voting a tax, whereas if we are called upon for spot cash there will be a vigorous kick on all sides and the dashboard is liable to be knocked off the trans-Mississippi vehicle and somebody in the front seat will get hurt. The exposition of 1898 is an assured success if Douglas county and Nebraska will do their whole duty. If they fail in this the exposition will be a failure, too. Yours for the success of the exhibition.

I. W.

NEXT TO THE WORLD'S FAIR

Dolliver of Iowa Tells the House of the Importance of the Exposition.

It Will Be on a Larger Scale Than the Show at Atlanta and Many States Back It.

Explains the Necessity of Government Encouragement—More Than Half the Country Vitally Interested.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23 Post Building,
Washington, D. C., April 20.

Mr. Dolliver of Iowa today made the report of the ways and means committee on the Omaha exposition bill, with the amendment requiring a bona fide subscription of $250,000 by the stockholders as a precedent for making available the money provided by the government appropriation, as per the senate bill, which is favorably reported. He said:

"Twenty-four states and territories are vitally interested in this enterprise, each of which has given assurances that it will make an exhibit and an appropriation in order that the exposition may be a great success. The government has encouraged expositions of similar character at New Orleans and Atlanta, while government aid has been extended to some lesser affairs in other parts of the country. We are assured that this exposition will be on a larger scale than the one lately held at Atlanta and will be of special benefit to the trans-Mississippi country. It has been urged on the committee by friends of the exposition, including members of the house, that the amount should be increased to $250,000, in order that the enterprise might be of a character commensurate with the greatness of the trans-Mississippi country, but while conceding the full force of this contention, in view of the deplorable condition of the treasury and the significance of the fact that the senate in passing the bill without division or objection, reduced the amount from the $250,000 provided by the bill originally to $200,000, we do not feel justified in raising the amount to $250,000. The amendment, proposed by the committee, will insure a definite subscription or appropriation on the part of the exposition before any money, provided by the government, shall be available."

Mr. G. W. Woolworth of Omaha is in the city stopping at the Shoreham.

Thisba H. Morgan, a teacher at the Pine Ridge, S. D., Indian school, has been transferred to the Seger Colony school in Oklahoma. a

The leave of absence granted Lieutenant Farand Sayre, Eighth cavalry, department of the Platte, is extended one month.

The following transfers in the Fourth cavalry are made: Captain Wilber E. Wilder, from troop H to troop D; Captain James B. Erwin, from troop D to troop H.

The following transfers in the Twelfth infantry are made: Lieutenant Charles C. Ballou, from company G to company C; Lieutenant William G. Elliot, from company F to company E; Lieutenant William C. Bennett, from company C to company G; Lieutenant Willis Uline, from company G to company I; Lieutenant Glenn H. Davis from company I to company G.

The comptroller of the currency notes that the appointment of the National Bank of North America of New York, as reserve agent for the First National bank of Council Bluffs has been revoked.

A new postoffice has been established at Higgins, Uinta county, Wyoming, and Irvine W. Steele appointed postmaster.


FRED F. SCHRADER.

TWO HUNDRED THOUSAND.

Trans-Mississippi Committee Fails to Get the Appropriation Restored.

Washington, D. C., April 20.—The ways and means committee today ordered a favorable report on the bill of Mr. Mercer of Nebraska to aid the Transmississippi and International exposition at Omaha.

The bill appropriates $200,000 for a government building and exhibit, but requires the exposition company to raise $250,000 before the government allotment is made available.

G. C. Wattles, president of the Exposition, and Representative Mercer of Nebraska addressed the committee on the measure just before it was ordered reported.

President Wattles wires the World-Herald thus:

"Washington, D. C., April 20.—We presented the exposition bills to the ways and means committee this morning. We urged an increase of the amount named in the senate bill with all force possible, by Mercer and myself.

"On account of the economy necessary in all legislation at this time the committee voted to recommend the senate bill unchanged as to amount. Dingley insisted on attaching an amendment providing that we must satisfy the secretary of the treasury that we have $250,000 raised before any money can be expended by the government. It was attached to the senate bill. Dolliver made a strong plea for an increase, but it was voted down. We did the very best we could under all adverse circumstances."

 

MONEY FOR THE EXPOSITION

WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE WON OVER

Senate Bill for the Big Transmississippi Fair Agreed to by Chairman Dingley and Will Be Passed by the House.

WASHINGTON, April 20.—(Special Telegram).—The Transmississippi and International exposition project is now an assured certainty as far as congressional aid is concerned. The ways and means committee has agreed to the senate bill, making a few amendments which will in nowise hamper the work of the managers of the enterprise, and has instructed Congressman Dolliver of Iowa to make a favorable report to the house. That the bill will pass is almost a foregone conclusion.

The success achieved by the promoters of the enterprise has been reached only after a hard fight—not so much against opposition as against a lack of knowledge of the project and of the almost unanimous desire of the states and territories of the transmississippi country to see it carried into execution. As soon as the members of the ways and means committee understood the magnitude of the project and the desire of the west for its success all opposition vanished and a unanimous report in favor of the bill is the result.

The ways and means committee met at 10 o'clock today for the purpose of taking up consideration of the bill for the promotion of the exhibit already passed by the senate. President Wattles of Omaha was invited to appear before the committee, and did so. He spoke at length upon the magnitude of the enterprise, quoted many facts and figures to show the rapid progress and development of the transmississippi states and territories, and explained the purpose of the citizens of Omaha to work unitedly for the success of the enterprise. President Wattles laid especial stress upon the fact that the Transmississippi exposition was not a local enterprise, conceived in the minds of the citizens of Omaha for the pecuniary benefit of Omaha alone. He reviewed the history of the project, showing how it had been conceived by delegates in attendance upon the Transmississippi congress, which assembled in Omaha a few months ago, with representatives from every state and territory west of the Mississippi river. He laid before the committee a large mass of documentary evidence, consisting of resolutions from commercial bodies, boards of trade, societies, and memorials from state legislatures, all supporting the project and urging congressional action.

Congressman Dave Mercer was also given time for a brief address upon the merits of the enterprise, and he talked with his usual characteristic energy.

At the conclusion of the arguments the committee went into executive session. The session was brief and decisive. Congressman Dolliver of Iowa was instructed to make an immediate and favorable report upon the bill which has already passed the senate.

The committee made but one amendment to the bill. Section 5 is so amended as to provide that no liability against the government shall be incurred, and no expenditure of money under the act shall be made, until the officers of the exposition shall have furnished to the secretary of the treasury proof to his satisfaction that there have been obtained by the exposition corporation subscriptions, donations or appropriations from all sources, for the purposes of the exposition, a sum aggregating not less than $250,000.

The bill will have plain sailing from this time forward. The committee on rules will arrange for its proper presentation, and will facilitate its passage through the house. Speaker Reed will consent to an early consideration, and the senate will, beyond a question of doubt, agree to the house amendment.

Whereas, the late Trans-Mississippi Congress, composed of delegates from twenty-four states and territories, lying west of the Mississippi River, adopted a resolution providing for holding an exposition to display the products, manufacturies and industries of these states and territories at Omaha, Neb'r., in the year 1898 and,

Whereas,, the holding of such exposition must greatly benefit the state of Missouri, and especially St. Joseph, and other cities and towns adjacent thereto, therefor be it

Resolved, by the Commercial Club of St. Joseph that the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha is hereby approved and that our Representatives and Senators in Congress be requested to co-operate with the Senators and Representatives from Nebraska in procuring the passage at the present session of Congress a bill giving National recognition of said exposition and providing for an appropriation for National exhibits and the necessary buildings to contain the same.

 
73

HURRAH FOR THE EXPOSITION.

The action of the committee on ways and means of the house of representatives in favorably reporting the senate bill for the Trans-Mississippi exposition practically assures the holding of the great show at Omaha from July to November, 1898.

President Wattles may well congratulate himself upon the success of his Washington trip. It is true the committee was not willing to grant all that he asked, but it is also true that the bill in its amended shape, with its excellent chances of passage, concedes all that is actually necessary to the success of the exposition, and is really all that we could reasonably expect from congress at this time.

As Chairman Dingley has said with force and truth, congress is going far in the direction of patronage and public spirit when it endows an enterprise like the Trans-Mississippi exposition with $200,000 of the public money before the people immediately interested have subscribed sufficient support to the enterprise to insure its success.

Up to the present time only a few thousand dollars have been subscribed to capital stock of the enterprise, and with this fact in view it is remarkable that we have been able to make such progress as has been made in Iowa, in other western states and in congress.

The bill which congress will pass will appropriate $200,000 for the government exhibit upon condition that we raise at least a quarter of a million dollars ourselves. This is proper. We must raise a quarter of a million dollars and we must raise very much more than that amount. We might as well face the proposition now as later. This is a great enterprise upon which we are embarked. It promises vast results and it also calls for considerable sacrifice. We must not only raise a quarter of a million dollars here among ourselves in the west, but it is probably that before the project reaches maturity we must raise, all told, three times that amount. This is no petty enterprise. It is a vast undertaking and it must be carried forward with breadth of view and liberality.

The people of Omaha must realize now, if they have never realized before, that they are face to face with a great undertaking—a national affair—one which has itself splendid possibilities of Omaha. To get the true value and utmost benefit out of it for the city, we must bend every energy to it and exhaust all our resources in promoting it. Then, when we reap the harvest we will find that it is a rich one.

The preliminary work has now been almost completed. Most of the western states in the trans-Mississippi region have been aroused. Some have acted. The machinery of congress has been set in motion. The time has now arrived for organization at home. Every man must put his shoulder to the wheel and this town must be raked from one end to the other and the same degree of public spirit must be aroused among out​ people as was aroused in Chicago in securing subscriptions among all classes—the poor as well as the rich—the stingy as well as the liberal.

PRESIDENT WATTLES' ARGUMENT

What He Said in Support of the Exposition Before House Committee.

Washington, D. C., April 20.—The full text of the argument made by President Wattles of the Trans-Mississippi exposition before the house committee on ways and means was as follows:

Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen: The Trans-Mississippi and International exposition was proposed by the trans-Mississippi congress by a resolution, which passed that body by unanimous vote at their last session, which was held at Omaha in November, 1895. The trans-Mississippi congress is an organization composed of delegates appointed by the governors of states, mayors of cities and by commercial organizations throughout the trans-Mississippi country. It meets annually to discuss measures of importance to the growth and prosperity of the west. It is a representative body of the best men in business and politics in the west. The arguments in favor of this exposition brought out the fact that the tide of immigration which has steadily flowed westward for a century was ebbing; that the great depression in business during the last few years, coupled with the partial failure of crops in some of the western states and the activity of other sections of the country in advertising their resources, was liable to show at the next census for the first time in fifty years that the center of population had moved eastward. It was argued that an exposition of the character proposed would counteract these influences and by advertising in a fitting manner the resources of the west and educating the people of our country and of the world in the variety and magnitude of these resources this exposition would result in lasting benefits, not only to the west, but to the entire country.

Omaha was selected as the place for the exposition on account of its convenient location and numerous railroad connections. Our citizens appreciate the burden that has been placed upon them, but have assumed it with their characteristic enterprise. A corporation with an authorized capital of $1,000,000 has been formed and much preliminary work has been done. It was early decided that without the recognition of the general government and its participation the exposition could not assume the magnitude and influence its projectors had designed, hence one of the first steps that was taken was the introduction by our senators and representatives of bills to secure this recognition and participation. These bills are now pending before your honorable body. As the time for holding this exposition has been fixed for 1898 one of these bills must pass at this session of congress or the exposition must be abandoned. A bill has passed the senate which only differs from the house bill in the amount of the limit to be expended by the government. The senate bill when introduced fixed this limit at $250,000, but was amended on its passage by reducing this limit to $200,000. At this exposition only $50,000 was appropriated for a building, but in addition the government building at the World's fair at Chicago was donated and the appropriation was simply used in removing it to Atlanta. Besides the Atlanta exposition was participated in by only a part of the southern states, while the Trans-Mississippi exposition is for the entire country west of the Mississippi river, comprising twenty-four states and territories and covering nearly two-thirds of the entire area of the United States, whose inhabitants number nearly one-third the population and possess nearly half the wealth of the nation. In this territory there are 73,960 miles of railroad. The government owns millions of acres of unoccupied lands and has expended hundreds of millions of dollars in buildings, railroads, improvement of its rivers and other agencies to develop this great country which but a few years ago was marked on our maps as the great American desert, but which now furnishes homes for nearly 20,000,000 of our population. Embraced within this territory is every variety of soil and climate. We not only produce a large part of the grain and meat consumed in this country, but locked within the bosom of our mountains is untold mineral wealth, only waiting the developing agencies of civilization to furnish prosperity and riches to millions yet to be. The oil fields of Wyoming, the mountains of coal and iron of Utah, the wonderful mines of gold and silver in South Dakota, Colorado, California and other of our states have been heard of, but a great majority of the people of our own country even do not appreciate their extent. In my own state we have a soil peculiarly adapted to the production of sugar from beets. Already two large factories are in successful operation, but there is room for a hundred more, and ample opportunity in the west to produce all the sugar for which this nation now pays foreign countries more than $100,000,000 annually. It is to educate our own people regarding these resources of a part of their own country and to advertise them to the world that we propose to hold this great exposition. Surely an exposition of the resources and civilization of this great empire of states should not be classed as a local affair, and no matted​ how depleted the treasury, should command proper recognition from congress.

The senate bill fixing the limit of $250,000 was introduced before the full needs and magnitude of the enterprise were fully appreciated even by those most active in the matter. Since then the only two western states whose legislatures have convened (Iowa and Utah) have passed joint resolutions favoring the exposition. Iowa has passed an appropriation for preliminary expenses of her exhibit, conditioned, however, as I understand, on the passage of a bill by this congress authorizing an expenditure by the government of at least $250,000. If you will read the petitions and resolutions favoring this measure that have been presented to congress from states, cities and commercial bodies from all over the west you will appreciate to some extent the enthusiasm which the proposition to hold this exposition has aroused. They come from Iowa to California and from North Dakota to Texas, and all ask liberal and prompt action by congress. We believe that the house bill providing for a limit of $500,000 to be expended by the government should be recommended by your honorable committee, but we realize that this session of congress is drawing to a close and that any bill must have the indorsement of your entire committee to secure its passage. If the house bill does not command such an indorsement then we urge you to so amend the senate bill as to restore the original amount asked, $75,000 for building and $175,000 for an exhibit, and speedily report it to the house. We have no objections to such further amendments as you may deem proper requiring a specific amount to be raised by our people before the government shall be called upon to expend any of the money provided in this act.

I thank you, gentlemen, for this hearing and for your attention.

 

WILL FAR SURPASS ATLANTA

Congressmen Feel When That Is Realized the Omaha Exposition Can Get More.

President Wattles Tells of the Obstacles Met in Gaining the Appropriation.

He Feels That All Things Considered the Exposition and the Government Have Both Been Well Cared For.

G. W. Wattles, president of the board of directors of the Transmississippi exposition, returned yesterday from his trip to Washington, where he went in the interest of the exposition bill.

He said the outlook for the bill was very dark when he first arrived in Washington, and the first obstacle he met was the statement that the government was borrowing money at 3 per cent to pay its running expenses, and that it was not considered good business under those conditions to appropriate money for an exposition which was not a necessary institution.

Chairman Dingley told him that if the times were as good as they were a few years ago there would have been no trouble in getting an appropriation of $1,000,000 for the enterprise, as the government had a few years ago given $1,600,000 for the exposition at New Orleans.

Another barrier to the success of the larger appropriation was the feeling among the members of congress from the east and south that the exposition was to be something of the magnitude of the one at Atlanta, whereas there is every indication that it will greatly exceed that exposition. The Atlanta exposition was under the patronage of only eight states, while the Transmississippi exposition has twenty-four states back of it, and all of them heartily in favor of it. It will be second only to the exposition at Chicago in 1893, and as soon as this fact is made clear to congress further appropriations may easily follow.

The ways and means committee told Mr. Wattles that it would not for a moment consider an appropriation which was not hedged about with suitable safeguards to protect the government, and for that reason the provision was attached to the bill making it incumbent upon the city of Omaha, before the government appropriation can be used, to subscribe $250,000 toward the capital stock of the exposition company, or in donations.

Mr. Wattles thinks there is now little doubt that the bill in its present shape will pass congress, and under all conditions, he thinks the exposition has secured all it could get, and in the only way that it could be had, and is thankful it got that much.

RETAILERS ENTHUSE.

They Talk Over the Exposition With Mr. Wattles.

The regular meeting of the Omaha Retailers' association last evening at the Commercial club rooms was largely devoted to getting up steam for the Trans-Mississippi exposition project. Intense enthusiasm was aroused by the addresses.

Mr. Guerdon W. Wattles spoke of his trip to Washington, of the results already secured in the form of a $200,000 government appropriation and of that which is necessary for Omaha yet to do, especially to build a union depot. His talk upon the depot question was taken up by succeeding speakers.

Judge C. R. Scott believed that the citizens of Omaha could well afford to give one-half of their property for the exposition, for all that would be left, the exposition once secured, would be worth more than the whole amount at present.

Mr. Edward Rosewater dwelt at length upon the magnitude of the enterprise, stating that it embraced twenty-four states, more than two-thirds of the area and nearly one-half of the wealth of the United States, and that there would be spent in Omaha upon the completion of the exposition not less than from $3,000,000 to $5,000,000.

The concluding speaker, Mr. G. M. Hitchcock, brought out particularly the benefits that would accrue to Omaha in the event of a successful exposition, such as increased property values, increased population, and an impetus to business that would last through the exposition and become permanent.

Previous to the addresses, Mr. W. O. Beatty, chairman of the insurance investigation committee, reported that the committee and the insurance companies were approaching a basis on which they could agree on lower rates of insurance in such a manner that benefits would acrue​ all around, and that the investigations would be carried further.

BANQUET TO WATTLES.

It was a delicious dinner that was served at the Commercial club rooms last evening, it being complimentary to Guerdon W. Wattles, president of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition company, upon the return from his successful mission at Washington in behalf of the government appropriation. Mr. Wattles submitted his report and talked of his trip.

Those present were Messrs. G. W. Wattles, J. E. Markel, W. R. Bennett, J. H. Evans, Dudley Smith, Charles Metz, H. A. Thompson, Z. T. Lindsey, H. E. Palmer, G. M. Hitchcock, Edward Rosewater, John A. Wakefield, A. S. Hazleton, George L. Wright, vice president for Iowa, and Dan Farrell, jr.

Upon adjournment the gentlemen participated in the regular meeting of the Omaha Retailers' association.

Nebraska Democrats Pledge Themselves to Stand by the White Metal.

Will Send a Solid Delegation to Chicago Convention Headed by W. J. Bryan.

Eight Hundred Delegates Attend a Most Enthusiastic Gathering at the State Capital.

Mr. Bryan's Name Mentioned Again in Connection With the Nomination of President.

An Eloquent Address by Governor Stone Completes the Program of a Memorable Day in Nebraska Politics.

DELEGATES-AT-LARGE.
W. J. BRYANLincoln
C. J. SMYTHOmaha
W. H. THOMPSONGrand Island
W. D. OLDHAMKearney
DISTRICT DELEGATES.
First District—
F. J. MORGANPlattsmouth
C. S. JONESLincoln
Second District—
JOHN A. CREIGHTONOmaha
C. H. BROWNOmaha
Third District—
C. HOLLENBECKFremont
G. A. LUIKARTNorfolk
Fourth District—
C. J. BOWLBYCrete
E. C. BRIGGSSeward
Fifth District—
F. A. THOMPSENClay Center
P. WALSHMcCook
Sixth District—
JAMES C. DAHLMANChadron
DR. J. C. BLACKBURNAtkinson

Oldham carried the convention, as usual, and closed with the following: "You ask where I stand? My sole reply shall be, I am for 16 to 1 democracy, and hail from old Missouri."

INDORSE THE EXPOSITION.

C. J. Smyth introduced resolutions indorsing the Trans-Mississippi exposition, which were adopted.

The resolutions are as follows:

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories west of the Mississippi river at the trans-Mississippi congress of 1895 adopted resolutions providing for the holding of an exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts, industries and capabilities of those states and territories, and

Whereas, The said congress voted unanimously that said exposition should be held at the city of Omaha, in the year 1898, and

Whereas, The common interests of the states and territories constituting this great region will be greatly promoted and benefited thereby, and the great state of Nebraska will be especially benefited by such an exposition within her borders; therefore be it

Resolved, By the 800 citizens of the state of Nebraska, assembled together as delegates to the Nebraska democratic state convention, held in the Funke opera house, at Lincoln, Neb., on April 22, A. D. 1896, that the holding of said Trans-Mississippi exposition is hereby approved, and that the senators and representatives in congress from Nebraska are requested to co-operate with the senators and representatives of the other trans-Mississippi states and thoroughly and actively endeavor to procure at this session of congress the passage of the bill giving national recognition to said exposition and providing for an appropriation for national exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same; and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be certified by the secretary of the convention and sent to the senators and representatives in congress from Nebraska.

 
75

At a regular meeting of the city council held at Beatrice, Nebraska, on the evening of April 14, A. D. 1896, the following resolution was unanimously adopted.

Whereas:- Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress held in the city of Omaha in the year 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an Exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries, of these states and territories, and

Whereas:- Said convention voted unanimously to hold said Exposition at the city of Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898, and

Whereas:- The common interests of all the states and territories lying in this district, as well as the country at large, will be greatly promoted by holding said Exposition, therefore,

Be it Resolved, By the City Council of the City of Beatrice, the Mayor of the city concurring,

That the holding of said Trans-Mississippi Exposition, is hereby heartily approved, and the Senators and Representatives, in congress from Nebraska, and other Trans-Mississippi states are requested to use their best efforts in procuring the passage at the present session of congress, of a Bill giving National Recognition to said Exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a National Exhibit, and the necessary buildings to contain the same.

Be it further resolved:- That a copy of the foregoing resolutions be sent under seal of the city of Beatrice, to the mayor of the city of Omaha.

__________________
Mayor.
SEAL OF THE CITY OF BEATRICE
NEBRASKA
Attest,

J. E. Hays
City Clerk.
 

EUREKA CITY.

MAYOR.
JOHN McCHRYSTAL.
COUNCILMEN.
WILLIAM HATFIELD,
E. BOWEN,
I. H. SPRIGGS,
CHARLES HANKS,
G. J. FIELD.
RECEIVED
APR 24 1896
ANSWERED
RECORDER,
J. A. PIERCE.
TREASURER,
T. J. BLUE.
CITY JUSTICE OF THE PEACE,
J. A. SHEARER.
MARSHAL,
GUS J. HENRIOD.
CITY ATTORNEY,
B. N. C. STOTT.
CITY HEALTH OFFICER,
DR. C. W. CLARK.
STREET COMMISSIONER,
A. J. URQUHART.
CITY SEXTON,
JAMES EUSTICE..
Hon. W. J. Broatch.
Mayor. Omaha
Dear Sir

Yours of March 3rd in reference to Exposition duly read and referred to City Council. They being very favorably inclined. Appointed Special Committee to draft suitable resolutions. They returned the copies. Approved by Council with instructions to forward to [?] of our Representatives in Washington, all which has been done.


Respectfully [?],
J. A. Pierce
City Recorder
 
WM. NEVILLE. . . .
. . . A. F. PARSONS.

Neville & Parsons

LAWYERS.

John A. Wakefield Sec'y
Dear Sir,

The inclosed, clipping, from Daily Record, was adopted by our Irrigation Fair Association Yesterday, along request.


Yours truly
Wm Neville

The following resolution offered by Mr. E. M. Searle, was adopted: "Knowing the great importance of the movement for a Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha, and the immense benefit which will result to Nebraska and the western states if carried to success, we the directors of the Nebraska Irrigation Fair association, heartily endorse the effort for such exposition, and recommend that congress and the legislative bodies of the western states render such assistance as may be necessary to make such exposition a second World's Fair."

 
77

Be it Resolved

By the City Council of the City of Galveston:

THAT the holding of a Trans-Mississippi International Exposition at the City of Omaha, Nebraska, in the year Eighteen Hundred and Ninety-eight, is hereby heartily approved and endorsed, as promotive of the material interests of all the States and Territories lying West of the Mississippi River, as well as of the prosperity and welfare of the country at large.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That the Senators and Representatives in Congress, from Texas, are requested to use their best efforts in procuring the passage at this Session of Congress, of a Bill giving National recognition to said Exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a National Exhibit, and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be sent to the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Texas, and also a copy to the Mayor of the City of Omaha, Nebraska.

Adopted unanimously at a Regular Meeting of the City Council, held Monday, April 20, 1896.
Approved, April 21, 1896.
A. W. FLY,
Mayor.
ATTEST:
G. BOWDEN SETTLE,
City Clerk.
CORPORATION OF GALVESTON CITY
       

WORKINGMEN ARE JUBILANT

The Trans-Mississippi Exposition Causes Great Rejoicing Among All Classes.

Reasons Why Differences Between K. of L. and A. F. L. Have Not Been Settled.

Typographical Union Protests Against C. L. U. Censuring President Fisher—General Labor Notes.

It is a subject of much self-gratulation among some workingmen of this city. It is the sole topic of discussion when workingmen get together to learn of matters which are encouraging to them. It is a well settled opinion that Omaha workingmen will profit by it. It is looked forward to by them with the greatest anticipation of enjoyment coupled with pecuniary profit. To the workingmen it is the embodiment of hope, pleasure, happiness, comfort and prosperity. It is to them the epitome of all greatness and their hopes are to be realized. "It" is the Trans-Mississippi exposition.

The Trans-Mississippi exposition is already bringing about a revival among the trades. From every grade and class come statements of increasing demand for workingmen, a stiffening of prices for labor and a corresponding decrease of the gloom which has for a year past pervaded labor circles.

The carpenters are already beginning to have plenty of work, not only in small repairs, but in the building of dwellings, some of which are being erected in expectation of the demand to be created during the exposition. It is the prevailing belief that Omaha workingmen will be given the preference on the buildings which will have to be erected to accommodate the exhibits and exhibitors at the coming exposition.

The work itself is considered as a matter of the greatest importance to Omaha, because all classes of trades will have to furnish the material or do the work of preparing for the great show.

The upholsterers and mattress makers report that a considerable demand has already been made upon them for their products by prospective boarding house and hotel keepers, and they expect to reap a rich harvest as a result of the exposition.

The iron workers, the chair factories, the wood working establishments, and store keepers in all lines are preparing to provide for the great demand which it is expected by them will be made upon their work and stocks.

And all Omaha smiles.

THE OMAHA EVENING BEE.

TO BE CONSIDERED NEXT MONDAY.

Congressman Mercer Telegraphs Concerning the Exposition Bill.

President Wattles of the Transmississippi Exposition association received a telegram from Congressman Mercer this afternoon, which read as follows: "Everything favorable for action on the exposition bill next Monday."

Mr. Andreesen of Lee-Clarke-Andreesen Hardware company—It is a good thing for Omaha and for the whole west. And coming with our good crops makes us feel still better. Business will be better from this time forward.

Isaac Carpenter of the Carpenter Paper company—It is one of the best and greatest things which could happen, not only in Nebraska, but to all the trans-Mississippi states. California, where I spent several weeks recently, is preparing to lead all states in its exhibit, and I am satisfied all of the states will come forward in good shape. There will not be any trouble in complying with the provision of the bill requiring the local association to raise $200,000.

Commissioner Utt of the Commercial club—It is the greatest event in the history of Omaha.

John R. Webster of the Omaha Bridge and Terminal Railway company—Magnificent. The passage of the bill will have a great influence favorable to the building of a union depot. The railroads will realize that they must provide facilities to handle the exposition visitors.

A. B. DeLong of the East Omaha Land company—One of the best things for the general interests of Omaha, and the west as a whole, which could possibly occur.

H. T. Clarke—It is the forerunner of better times. It will bring many people from the east and after getting out here they will find they want some of the west. In the forty odd years I have been in Nebraska there has never been a time I have been more sanguine of the future, nor has there ever been a better time to invest.

C. W. Lyman of the Commercial National bank—It will bring a great many people to Omaha, will advertise the west in a very effective manner, and doubtless some of those who come will invest.

MERCANTILE AGENCIES.
REED
TRANS-MISS EXPOSITION
THURSTON
PRESIDENTIAL SUPPORT
Clarke G. Powell
REED (singing)—
I don't want to play in your yard,
I don't like you any more;
You'll be sorry when you see me
Sliding on our cellar door;
You can't "holler" down our rain barrel,
You can't climb our apple tree;
I don't want to play in your yard
If you won't be good to me.
 

Whereas, Delegates representing the twenty-four States and territories lying west of the Mississippi River, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress held at Omaha, Nebraska, in 1895, adopted a resolution providing for the holding of an Exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories, and

Whereas, Said convention voted unanimously to hold the said Exposition at the City of Omaha, Nebraska, in the year 1898, and

Whereas, The interests of the state of Utah in common with the other Trans-Mississippi states and territories at large will be greatly promoted thereby; therefore,

Be it resolved, By the City Council of the City Logan, the mayor of the City concurring,

That the holding of said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is hereby heartily approved, and that the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Utah and other Trans-Mississippi states are requested to use their best efforts in processing the passage, at this session of Congress, of a bill giving national recognition to said exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a national exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same.

Be it further resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be sent under seal of the City of Logan, to the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Utah.

Passed April 16th 1896
CORPORATE SEAL OF
LOGAN CITY

John E. Carlisle
President City Council.
Jos. B. Nelson
City Recorder
Approved April 17th 1896
Newel W. Kimball
Mayor.
 
79
THE COMMERCIAL CLUB
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
H. R. W. HARTWIG, President
E. L. MARNEY, 1st Vice-Pres.
MILTON TOOTLE, JR., 2d Vice-Pres.
S. E. CRANCE, 3d Vice-Pres.
PURD B. WRIGHT, Secretary
L. C. BURNES, Treasurer
F. C. DAVIS
C. A. SHOUP
L. M. SMITH
C. G. SAMPSON
HENRY KRUG, JR.
H. J. CAMPBELL
ED. O. WILD
J. E. LONSDALE
F. W. MAXWELL, Ass't Sec'y
COMMERCIAL CLUB BUILDING
Col. John Doniphan,
St. Joseph, Mo.
Dear sir:--

I take great pleasure in advising you that the Directors of this Club, at a recent meeting, passed the following resolutions:

Whereas, the late Trans-Mississippi Congress, composed of delegates fromm twenty-four states and territories, lying west of the Mississppi River, adopted a resolution providing for holding an exposition to display the products, manufacturies and industries of these states and territories at Omaha, Neb., in the year of 1898, and,

Whereas, the holding of such exposition must greatly benefit the state of Missouri and especially St. Joseph, and other cities and towns adjacent thereto, therefore be it

Resolved, by the Commercial Club of St. Joseph, that the holding of the said Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha is hereby approved and that our Representative and Senators in Congress be requested to co-operate with the Senators and Representatives from Nebraska in procuring the passage at the present session of Congress a bill giving national recognition of said exposition and providing for an appropriation for national exhibits and the necessary buildings to contain the same. And be it further

Resolved, that a copy of the foregoing by furnished the Senators from Missouri and the Hon. George C. Crowthers, Congressman.

I have also carried out the part to not fy​ the representatives in Washington, and Senator Vest advises me that such a bill has already been passed by the Senate. Congressman Crowthers also advises that he will do all in his power to hurry a similar bill thro' his branch of Congress.

Yours truly,

F. W. Maxwell, a sec'y
 
Wyoming

THE BOOMERANG.

VISITOR FROM OMAHA.

William R. Bennett, an Exposition Director, in the City.

THE CHANCE FOR THE WEST.

The Buildings Will Cost One Million Dollars—Omaha Is Complying with the Resolution of the Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress—The Exposition Will Be International in Character.

William R. Bennett, of Omaha, was a pleasant caller at The Boomerang office this morning. He arrived in the city this morning, accompanying his wife and child this far on their way to California. They will rest here today and Mrs. Bennett will continue west tomorrow morning, while Mr. Bennett will return to Omaha. Mr. Bennett is one of the directors of the Trans-Mississippi exposition, and is also president of the Omaha Fair and Speed association. In speaking of the exposition this mornig​ Mr. Bennett said:

"I was greatly delighted with our trip west through here recently when we visited Salt Lake in the interest of the exposition. We did not have an opportunity to stop at Laramie then, so I accepted this opportunity to visit Laramie. The exposition, of course, is the main thing with us in Omaha now. It is in a sense an undertaking that was thrust upon Omaha, but one which we undertake with a great deal of pleasure and great expectation. You know the Trans-Mississippi Commercial congress held their last meeting in Omaha and then decided to hold an exposition somewhere in this western country. Omaha has undertaken the fulfillment of that resolution. We are beginning to look upon the fair as a certainty. A bill appropriating $200,000 has already been passed by the senate and has been favorably reported by the house committee, and we are quite sure of its progress. At the next session of congress we expect a still better appropriation. A million dollars will be spent in the erection of the main exposition buildings an d​ in beautifying the grounds. In addition to this the fourteen states will probably erect state buildings. The exposition will be of greater magnitude than either the Atlanta or the Tennessee exposition.

"So far we have received every encouragement from the western states. Laramie, for instance, will want to show to the world her mineral riches and her natural facilities for manufacturing glass, your soda and all the other various resources. As the exposition is to be made international it will be the great opportunity of the western states to state their cases to the world.

Mr. Bennett, who is also the president of the Omaha Fair and Speed association, says the summer meeting will be held there on the 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13th of June, and that $20,000 will be offered in purses.

WORKING WITH THE SPEAKER

Friends of the Transmississippi Exposition Bill Renew Their Efforts.

RECOGNITION IS SOUGHT FOR DAILY

Mercer of Nebraska and Dolliver of Iowa Untiring in Their Efforts and Ably Supported by the Others.

WASHINGTON, May 9.—(Special Telegram.)—A renewed effort will be made during the coming week to advance the Omaha exposition bill. It is understood here that several influential citizens of Omaha will be on the ground to assist the Nebraska delegation in advancing the bill. It will be recalled that Chicago had just such an experience in getting its measure before the house after the fight for location was ended in its favor. Speaker Reed continues to hold out against the measure, and there is a fear that politics is playing no inconsequential part in his opposition. Should this prove true it would be most unfortunate for the bill, although hardly to be understood by people west of the Mississippi river. The delegation has not allowed a day to go by during the last week without holding a conference with the speaker and urging him to recognize a member to put the bill on passage. Representative Mercer has been persistent, but the speaker is as stoical, as silent as the sphinx over the question, and no one can tell what the outcome will be. Representative Dolliver of Iowa said tonight: "I have labored with the speaker and have shown him, I believe, the wishes of our people. Politics should play no part in this matter. It didn't with Senator Allison; why should it with Speaker Reed? I cannot say whether recognition will be accorded the bill or not. I know that the Iowa delegation will vote as a unit for the measure when it is placed on its final passage."

The Fort Omaha military bill will come out of the senate committee with a favorable recommendation it is confidently believed. Senator Shoup, member of the military affairs committee, stated that he was in favor of the bill. He knew of the depression that existed in all western states, and that the prices of five years ago were in sad contrast to those existing today. General Manderson has taken interest in the matter and has written a personal letter to each member of the committee, urging the passage of the bill.

ONE BILL SURE OF PASSAGE.

A number of senators were discussing the probability of President Cleveland vetoing the river and harbor bill, and the consensus of opinion was that he was sharpening his pen for that very purpose. "And then what," said Senator McBride of Oregon, who has nearly $20,000,000 worth of interest in the bill. "Oh, we will pass it over his veto," said Senator Vest, "because nearly every member of congress has got some 'pork' in it. I have not heard of a single man who has lost a dollar by the disagreement in the two houses. If there is such a man I should like to know him. So long as the dump holes for money are provided for, senators and representatives wink the other eye and put it on to the other fellow. I should like to have the president given the power to veto a single item in a bill. Such a law, applicable to federal appropriations, as exsists​ in many states of the union, applicable to state appropriations, would be a good thing. The river and harbor bill, as it will come out of conference, is one of the biggest steals in the whole country, passed, not for the purpose of bettering the condition of rivers, harbors and streams, but as providing reasons for the return of senators and representatives to Washington."

Senator Allen is the recipient from one of his admirers in Virginia of a quaint cane, carved from a limb of one of the old trees which overshadow the tomb of Thomas Jefferson, near Monticello, Va. The cane, although not very handsome in appearance, is at least a novel souvenir of the spot that marks the last resting place of the illu[?]

CHAT ABOUT THE EXPOSITION

Transmississippi Enterprise the Common Topic of Conversation.

All Who Are Posted on the Subject Are Sanguine of Its Splendid Success.

What Twenty-Four States and Territories Can Do—Individual Opinions Expressed by Men From Western States.

The Transmississippi exposition, its purpose and prospect, is becoming more and more the topic of conversation at the hotels, second only, perhaps, to the question of what will be the presidential choice of the St. Louis convention. All who are posted on the subject speak enthusiastically and hopefully of its success. A realization of the scope of an exposition, which will be participated in by twenty-four states, has set people to thinking.

"I see that commercial and municipal bodies of many Transmississippi states have passed resolutions indorsing the exposition," said a gentleman from the Pacific coast the other day. "This indicates the interest which the enterprise is excited among leading citizens of the west, the men who make towns and locate cities. It also indicates that the Omaha men who are working in its interests are doing some very effective advertising. I believe that Omaha will do its share in making the exposition a success. I believe that Omaha will do its share in making the exposition a success. I have visited this city off and on for the past twenty years, and I want to say that the business men and capitalists of Omaha are real live hustlers. If anyone can engineer this enterprise successfully, they can.

"What a magnificent thing the big show will be if the plans of its projectors are realized. Just remember what a part the west had in the World's fair. The magnificent exhibits of the states and the buildings erected by them respectively were something to be proud of. The Transmississippi exposition will be second only to the World's fair in magnitude. The California midwinter fair, the Atlanta show, will be pigmies in comparison. That is, of course, provided that the states west of the great river realize their opportunity at the time to introduce eastern capital into the west. If times are good, as the prospect seems now, it will be the most favorable and opportune event that has ever presented itself to the western states. Capital will be loosening up and seeking investment to a degree hardly recognized at this time. I only hope congress will be always ready to do the right thing. If each state would only exercise its pull to show that honorable body what this exposition really, contemplates, it would swing around mighty quick. Twenty-four states! Why that's half the union!"

"Omaha has seen some pretty dull times, just as other cities throughout the country have experienced in the past few years," said General William C. Carlin, formerly commander of the department of the Columbia, the other night at the Paxton. "Still, I see business is already recovering here, and I am certain that the bottom has been reached. Now is a good time for investment, as will be realized two years from now, when a great stimulus will be given Omaha by the Transmississippi exposition."

General Carlin has real estate interests in the city, and although residing in Illinois, is familiar with Omaha and the west.

"Of course the exposition, like the San Francisco midwinter fair, and the World's fair, will leave a lot of driftwood in Omaha, which is not very desirable material for making good citizens. But real estate will appreciate suddenly, and with the immense crowds of people, business will magnify and the final result will be to the upbuilding of the city. If conditions are favorable at that time, the exposition will certainly prove a big success, and will be a great thing for the transmississippi commonwealth."

The general's property interests are largely in the west, as in his fifty years experience with the army, he lived in Washington. And during the financial depression at Spokane in '89, he invested considerably in that country, which has since come to the front.

 
81

Los Angeles Sunday Times.

A WESTERN EXPOSITION.

An international exposition of an interesting character is projected for the year 1898. It is to be known as the "Transmississippi and International Exposition," and will be held at Omaha from June to November, 1898. The origin of the enterprise was in a resolution unanimously adopted by a rising vote of the Transmississippi Commercial Congress at its eighth annual session in Omaha in November last. On that occasion it was resolved to ask Congress to take the necessary steps and to ask the representatives of various States and Territories to favor an appropriation. A bill has since been introduced in Congress, and it is assured that the Congress will receive at least $200,000 from the government, while it is hoped that the amount will be increased to $250,000.

The object of the coming exposition is to display on a grand scale all the products, resources, industries and evidences of civilization of the States and Territories west of the Mississippi River, twenty-four in number, and embracing two-thirds of the area of the United States. The total wealth of these States and Territories had increased in 1890 123 per cent, over the figures in the census of 1880, the total wealth being given in 1890 at more than $20,000,000,000. It is considered by the projectors of this enterprise that, as the East had a big exposition at Philadelphia in 1876, the Central States at Chicago in 1893, while the South has recently had expositions at Atlanta and New Orleans, the time has arrived for the great and rapidly-growing West to make a display of its latent and developed wealth on a scale commensurate with the importance of the grand territory west of the Mississippi.

A permanent organization has been formed in Omaha, composed of leading and representative men of all classes in the States and Territories west of the Mississippi, who assemble at stated periods to discuss the subject. The amount of capital stock necessary to begin business has been more than subscribed. The management will not be local, as each State and Territory in the Transmississippi region will have a share in it through the appointment of a vice-president by the governor. For California George W. Parsons of this city, a public-spirited citizen, who will work hard for the enterprise, has been nominated vice-president by Gov. Budd, at the suggestion of the Chamber of Commerce, and has been elected to that position by the board of directors of the exposition. I. W. Carpenter of Omaha, a member of the board of directors, is at present in Los Angeles on a trip combining business and pleasure, and expresses himself as much encouraged at the evidence of interest in the forthcoming exposition that he has found in this section of the country.

The selection of Omaha as the site for the exposition is based chiefly upon the convenience of railroad access to that city and the large population which is immediately tributary to it. An exposition in Omaha will draw hundreds of thousands of eastern visitors who would not make the journey to a more western point, such as Denver or Salt Lake.

The idea of this exposition is an excellent one, and The Times heartily indorses it. There is still far too much ignorance prevalent among the people of the Atlantic seaboard in regard to the great empire west of the Mississippi, which has practically come into existence as a wealthy and civilized region since the close of the war. On account of this marvelously-rapid growth it is not surprising that many of the old-timers in the East, who have not visited this section, cannot get it out of their heads that we are still "wild and woolly." Such an exposition as is proposed would be an eye-opener to thousands of eastern people. It would also be a good idea, if possible, to get the entire United States Congress to visit the show. It would enlarge their minds and tend to make them more liberal in dealing with a section of country of which may​ among them appear to know little or nothing.

Southern California, as the Ultima Thule of western civilizations; as the transmississippi section that has been most highly favored by nature; as a section whose products are unique, whose climate is unsurpassed, and whose inhabitants are "chock full" of energy and enterprise, should come to the front at such an exposition in grand style, and even surpass the good showing made at Chicago, at San Francisco and at Atlanta.

The Laramie Republican
Transposed

Mr. William R. Bennett and wife of Omaha are in the city today. They will remain until tomorrow, when Mrs. Bennett and her little girl will take the morning train for her old home in California and Mr. Bennett will take the noon train for Omaha. Mr. Bennett is a prominent business man of the Gate City and is deeply interested in the great exposition to be given there in 1898, of which he talks in a manner at once entertaining and enthusiastic. He is the president of the Omaha Speed association, and is otherwise interested in that progressive western city.

"Why doesn't Kansas City fall into line on this exposition?" said a traveling man at one of the hotels. "Surely because it is to be held in a rival city the Missouri town is not going to sulk to her own detriment. I have heard considerable talk in favor of the show down there among individuals, but nothing has appeared in the papers nor has any interest been shown in a public way, which I have noticed. It seems to me that hearty co-operation among the large cities of the different states will of itself insure success. And now is the time for them to work together and agitate the subject."

THINKS REED WILL RELENT.

Congressman Mercer Expects to Bring Up the Exposition Bill.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., May 10.

Mr. Mercer was interviewed today in regard to his exposition bill. He said Speaker Reed had indicated to him that the bill might be brought up in the house on Monday. There is, however, hardly a possibility of such being done, because Monday is district day in the house, and all members of the district committee are friends of the bill and it would not be wise to antagonize them. Mr. Mercer, however, has every reason to believe that it will be brought up on Tuesday if not on Monday. He says that there is plenty of time, for there is no danger of the house adjourning until about June 15. He further said that now there are only about half a dozen members opposed to the bill and their opposition will not be active.

Mr. Rosewater was seen at the Shoreham this afternoon and he stated that Mr. Manley had promised him to do all he could to secure the passage of the bill. He further stated that Senator Gear had called upon him at the Shoreham and they had tried to see Speaker Reed, but that they were unable to find him about. Ex-Senator Kellogg has also called upon him and assured him that anything possible he could do to further the interest of the bill he would be glad to do.

FRED F. SCHRADER.

Nebraska's Appropriation

Editor World-Herald: To decide a dispute please state just how much Nebraska appropriated for an exehibit​ and building at the World's fair in Chicago. LENTZ.

Answer: The legislature of Nebraska made two appropriations for the exhibit of the state at the Columbian exposition. The first, which was made at the 1891 session, was for $50,000; the other, made by the session of 1893, was $35,000, making a total of $85,000.—(Ed. World-Herald.)

 
 

SPEAKER REED CAPITULATES

Agrees to Allow the Exposition Bill to Come Before the House.

ITS PASSAGE IS EXPECTED THIS WEEK

Senator Gear and Mr. Rosewater Lay the Matter Before the Man from Maine and Induce Him to Relent.

WASHINGTON, May 11.—(Special Telegram.)—The Transmississippi exposition bill will be allowed to come before the house on its merits, Speaker Reed having stated today that he would probably have to yield to pressure. For an hour this morning Senator Gear and Mr. Rosewater argued with the Maine statesman over the features of the bill, and brought to bear all their persuasion in behalf of the measure, which is already exciting attention throughout the western half of the continent. Senator Gear did yoeman​ service in behalf of the bill and stated that Iowa was quite as much interested as Nebraska in this great enterprise. Mr. Reed presented his well known views on economy, but finally he agreed to give the bill a chance for its life. Mr. Rosewater was anxious to have the measure put upon passage tomorrow, but there were many important matters of legislation pressing upon the speaker, which have priority, and in all probability it will be late in the week before the exposition bill is given recognition. Mr. Rosewater also had a long interview with Senator Caffery, whom he succeeded in interesting, as to Louisiana representation at the exposition. Senator Caffery went so far as to state he would use his best efforts to secure Governor Foster's co-operation in securing an appropriation at the present session of the legislature, which convened today.

The success which the promoters of the enterprise have met has instilled new hope into the Nebraska delegation, and it is now believed the bill will be passed this week.

OTHER MATTERS ADJUSTED.

Mr. Rosewater, with Congressman Mercer, had a satisfactory interview with First Assistant Postmaster General Jones over Omaha postoffice matters. June 1 carrier service in Omaha will be adjusted to conform with the new orders, three carriers being dropped. These carriers, instead of losing their positions, will be put on the substitute list, pending an increase in the service, when they will be re-employed. General Jones stated he had no desire to reflect upon Omaha; that 100 carriers had been dropped in Philadelphia, and that a reorganization of the service was going on all over the country. While he was inclined to do all for Omaha possible, he felt that at least three carriers could with safety be dropped, and the Omaha men were content to let well enough alone, in view of the fact that ten men were recommended in the report for dismissal.

A representative of the court of claims was in Omaha recently and gave General Jones a fair impression of the situation. With this before the first assistant postmaster general, neither Mr. Mercer nor Mr. Rosewater was anxious to criticise the action of the special examiner, although the dropping of ten men from carrier service would have greatly retarded business in the Omaha office, which has an excellent reputation for efficiency and earning capacity.

The Fort Omaha military reservation bill, another measure which brought a delegation of Nebraska citizens to look after, is safe. Interviews were had today with Senators Hawley, Walthall, Shoup, Sewell and Bate by Mr. Rosewater, and the result was entirely satisfactory. Conditions not understood at his long distance were satisfactorily explained to the members of the committee on military affairs, and the bill will be reported Thursday from the committee. Much misinformation had to be overcome in this latter care, but when General Hawley understood the situation and saw the comprehensive scope designed by the bill, he unhesitatingly gave it his support.

IN A GENERAL WAY.

A favorable report was made today on Representative Hainer's bill pensioning Samuel McConaghy of Benedict at $72 per month.

Representative Cousins of Iowa succeeded in passing the bill appropriating $35,000 for the Indian Industrial school at Tama, Ia. This amount will be made part of the Indian appropriation bill now in conference, conferences had after the passage of bill mak-[?]

EXPOSITION BILL TODAY.

Speaker Reed at Last Agrees to Recognize the Measure.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., May 11.

Mr. Manley after a short discussion with Speaker Reed today secured his promise of recognition to the Trans-Mississippi exposition bill on tomorrow.

Mr. Strode of Nebraska received petitions today signed by 800 residents of his state praying for the passage of the Trans-Mississippi exposition bill.

Asher Wirick has been appointed postmaster of a new postoffice to be established at Wald, Cedar county, Iowa.

The comptroller of the currency notes the following changes in the officers of national banks:

Nebraska—The Geneva National bank, Geneva, H. C. Brunner, cashier, in place of M. R. Chitty.

Iowa—The City National bank of Cedar Rapids, J. R. Amidon, cashier, in place of John B. Bever; John B. Berer, assistant cashier in place of J. R. Amidon.

Dr. L. E. Goodell has been appointed a pension examining surgeon at Wilber, Neb.

FRED F. SCHRADER.

MONTANA'S OPPORTUNITY.

To Advertise Her Recourses​ at the Omaha Exposition.

Editor of the Daily Herald:—Dear Sir:—The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition of all the products, resources, industries and civilization of the states and territories west of the Mississippi River, embracing two-thirds of the area of the United States, to be held at Omaha, beginning in June and ending in December in the year 1898, is owing to a resolution adopted by a rising vote of the Trans-Mississippi Commercial Congress at its eighth annual session held at Omaha in November, 1895.

This region embraces nineteen states and territories, this territory has been, increasing very hapidly​ in population and reliable estimates indicate that certain sections are capable of supporting 70,000,000 people without crowding, still leaving a vast domain where the homeless can find millions of prosperous pursuits and homes.

This problem presented itself to the Congress at its session in Omaha, and during the discussions ,official and unofficial, among the members ,the question arose ,as to the best method of impressing these facts upon the people of the United States and other nations, and the best manne rin​ which the tremendous resources, wealth and possibilities of the Trans-Mississippi region could be made known to the people of the world. The enormous wealth and increase of the country west of and including the Mississippi Valley states, were conceded in a general way, the rapid growth of its principal cities, like New Orleans, Galveston, Houston, St. Louis, Little Rock, Kansas City, Topeka, Leavenworth, Atchison, Des Moines Council Bluffs, Sioux City, Burlington, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Lincoln, Omaha, Denver, Pueblo, Salt Lake, Ogden, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Tacoma, Deadwood, Helena, Butte, Anaconda, Great Falls and Billings, with Chicago, Milwaukee and numerous other manufacturing centers on the East depended on them, were universally admitted, but the powerful forces at work creating these communities and adding to their prosperity, as well as the states wherein they are located, were not appreciably considered. To supply this needed information, as well as to attract the further attention of all persons seeking homes, and avenues to improve their fortunes, as well as investing capitalists ,was the desire of this congress.

The East held the exposition at Philadelphia ,in 1876, the central states at Chicago in 1893, the southern states at Atlanta in 1895, where they displayed their resources and wealth, it was deemed proper that the great West should also hold an exposition in 1898, which should be second only in magnificence to the Columbian Exposition.

The business men of Omaha have taken hold of the matter and organized an exposition company with a capital of $1,000,000, of which $500,000 is to be pain​ in at once. They have also engaged the leading architects of the country to prepare plans for grounds and buildings, which will compare favorably to the Columbian Exposition.

The United States government has appropriated $50,000 for a building and $150,000 for a state display, Nebraska will put up a building that will cost fully $200,000. The following states have already made appropriations for putting up buildings, viz: Louisiana, Utah, Wyoming, Arkansas and Colorado. In the remaining states and territories, the legislatures do not convene until this winter, when a sufficient amount will be appropriated by a majority of them to make a creditable showing of their respective wealth and resources.

The Republic of Mexico has recognized the exposition as International and has notified the exposition company that it would make a fine display. Brazil, Uruguay, Peru, Chili and Central American states have written, asking for information concerning the exposition.

The management will not be local. Each state and territory in the Trans-Mississippi region will have a share in it, through the apartment of a vice president by the Governor thereof, so that the full force and authority of the government of each one of the states will be fully enlisted in the great enterprise.

The following well-known business men of Omaha have been elected as officers of the exposition company:

President—G. W. Wattles, vice president of the Union National bank.

Vice President—J. E. Markel, President of Pacific Hotel Company.

Treasurer—Herman Kountze, President of First National bank.

Secretary—John A. Wakefield, wholesale lumber merchant.

Montana should awaken to the importance of this vast undertaking and the benefits arising from making a creditable showing at the first grand exposition ever held in the West. It is of the greatest importance that Montana should make an effort to outdo the display made at Chicago, as no such opportunity has ever before been offered to this state to advertise its products and resources to the people of this country, who have become dissatisfied with their homes in the East, and are seekin gnew​ homes in the Great West, as this exposition will afford. Governor Rickards should appoint the vice president for this state at once, and should also seek some one who has a personal knowledge of knowing how to collect the material and afterwards to make a creditable showing therewith. This state should also appropriate a sufficient sum to put up a state building at Omaha ,that will be a credit to Montana "THE TREASURE STATE" of the Union.

F. J. L.
 
83

MAY CONSIDER IT SETTLED

Congressman Mercer Says the Exposition Bill Is as Good as Passed.

House Will Not Adjust Before June 15 and There Is Plenty of Time for Action.

Speaker Reed Will Recognize the Measure at the First Possible Moment—News From the Nation's Capital.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., May 13.

Mr. Mercer said today in regard to his exposition bill that it is with other important matters which are now before the committee on rules. He does not think the house will adjourn before June 15 at the earliest, so there is no cause for the friends of the bill to be uneasy on that score.

"The people," he said, "should rest on their oars, for the bill has been pushed to such a point that it is sure to pass."

Speaker Reed did not keep his promise of recognition yesterday, for such business came up that it was impossible for him to do so. When the bill passes the credit should mostly fall to Mr. Mercer, for ever since its introduction he has labored hard for its passage. Mr. Mercer has great influence in the house, and many prominent members, friends of his, have promised to take an active part in favor of the bill.

Mrs. Allen, the wife of Senator Allen, will leave this city tomorrow and go to Chicago, where she will spend a few days with relatives. She will then go to Chicago, where she will spend a few days with relatives. She will then go to Grinnell, Ia., and spend about a week with friends residing there, and then will take her departure for her home in Nebraska.

WANT A PARK AT VICKSBURG.

All of the Iowa representatives have received numerous petitions from Grand Army posts in Iowa, praying for the establishment of a military park at Vicksburg, Miss.

In the land case of John Graff, sr., against Christian Paschold and others, from the Lincoln, Neb., land district, Secretary Smith today overruled the decision of the commissioner, awarding a preference right of entry to Paschold, and holds all entries for cancellation, pending the issuance of a patient to the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad company.

The secretary also rendered a decision adverse to the state of South Dakota on its claim for the payment of 5 per cent of the money derived from the sale of Indian lands, and also the estimated price at $1.25 per acre of all land in the state which has been retained or allotted to the Indians. He holds that there is no law authorizing the payment of this claim, and that under the present law the state is only entitled to [?] of the money derived from [?] entries [?]

ALLISON AGREES TO ASSIST

PASSAGE OF THE EXPOSITION BILL ASSURD

Conditions in the House Indicate that the Allen Bill Will Go Through—Fort Omaha Matter Coming Up.

WASHINGTON, May 12.—(Special Telegram.)—Mr. Rosewater left for home this afternoon, satisfied that the matters which called him to Washington were in safe hands, with very excellent prospects of getting through both houses of congress this session. Senator Allison has volunteered his interest in behalf of the Omaha exposition bill, and will see Speaker Reed tomorrow to induce him to give his recognition to the measure. Senator Allison's help in this respect is vital. It shows his strong interest in the exposition. There is no question of political preference with him. It is the building up of the west that he aims for, and he volunteers help because of his strong interest in the section of country seeking recognition. No day has been set by Speaker Reed for a hearing upon the exposition bill. There is every indication that the bill will pass at this session. It may not be this week, but those who are nearest Speaker Reed believe that he intends to give the Omaha exposition bill a day and the Nebraska delegation is watching for some indication to relieve them.

Senator Warren of the committee on military affairs will on Thursday move to take up the Fort Omaha military bill, which had tacitly been shelved for the present session. Senator Walthall, who has a bill in charge, will not oppose such a motion. Before leaving for home to meet William Jennings Bryan in a debate upon the finance question, Mr. Rosewater saw almost every member of the committee, and with one or two exceptions they are in favor of allowing the state of Nebraska to say whether it will accept Fort Omaha for school purposes and whether it will maintain an institution in the west similar to those maintained in the east and south. These measures are very vital. The military reservation bill meets the hearty support of General Brooke, who directed the parade today, and even General Batchelder has nothing to say against the measure. In view of this condition, it seems safe to predict that both bills above referred to will be favorably acted upon.

The contract for the interior finish of the public building at Sioux City, Ia., was today awarded to the Butler-Ryan company of St. Paul, on its bid of $54,050.

A new candidate for vice president is announced in the person of Cornelius N. Bliss of New York, who is one of the successful business men of that section. He is treasurer of the republican national committee.

EVERY STATE IS FRIENDLY

Representatives From All Parts of the Union in Favor of the Exposition.

World-Herald Man Finds the Big Men at the Capital Enthusiastic for Omaha's Big Show.

Measure Well Cared For in the House and Only a Little Patience Is Asked—Doings in the Departments.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23, Post Building,
Washington, D. C., May 14.

Mr. Mercer's exposition bill is resting easily and all the congressmen interested say that the only thing to do is to have patience, as the bill will positively pass before congress adjourns. Outside of what the members interested say, the World-Herald correspondent has spoken of the bill to members from nearly every state in the union and finds the sentiment universally in favor of it.

Senator Allen today in the senate secured the passage of the house bill providing for the payment of $750 to John Breitling of Fremont, Neb.

He also offered an amendment to the appropriation bill, providing that $600 be paid Henry T. Clarke for the use of Bellevue rifle range, Nebraska, for the year ended June 30, 1895.

Mr. F. A. Platt and wife of Iowa are in the city and are stopping at the St. James.

The secretary of the interior today decided the following South Dakota land cases, which have been appealed from the commissioner of the general land office: William J. Hill against John Hill, Aberdeen district, decision of commissioner affirmed, John Hill's entry to be [?]

 

EXPORT AND IMPORT EDITION--FORTY PAGES.

GALVESTON TRIBUNE.

OMAHA'S EXPOSITION

An Exhibit of Resources of the Trans-Mississippi.

STATISTICS OF PRODUCTION.

Facts and Figures Showing the Advantages of the Gulf Port to the Great West.

The letter of Mr. John A. Wakefield, secretary of the trans-Mississippi congress, to Mr. Tom Richardson, secretary of the deep water utilization committee, herewith, fully explains itself and is worthy of careful perusal as a document of much value. It will appear also in The Tribune's export and import edition:

Omaha, Neb., March 5. — Mr. Tom Richardson, Secretary Deep Water Utilization Committee—My Dear Sir: Referring to your recent favor relative to the advantages to be derived from holding the exposition of the trans-Mississippi states and territories at Omaha in 1898, with reference to encouraging business with the south, Mexico, Central America and the West Indies, and also the exporting and importing of western products through the gulf ports, to tough upon the origin of the exposition of the products, resources and development of the 24 states and territories lying west of the Mississippi river, from Manitoba and British Columbia on the north to Mexico and the Gulf of Mexico on the south, and from the great river on the east to the Pacific ocean on the west, and the trans-Mississippi congress, which has unanimously indorsed it, selecting Omaha as the most central and convenient point where the people living in this vast region can easily congregate.

The trans-Mississippi congress is composed of leading men of all classes, pursuits and professions, living west of the Mississippi river, who come together at stated periods to discuss methods and measures to promote the development and prosperity of these western states and territories, recommending such of them as its best judgment dictates to the national congress, the states and the people for adoption. It knows neither creed, class nor politics, nor any special system of finance, but men of all opinions freely commingle and fraternize, with the sole purpose of serving their constituency to the best advantage. In this they act in unison, although the largest liberty of discussion is permitted.

The eighth annual session of this congress was held in this city in November last. It had a most notable and successful session. It was composed of high tariff men, free trade men, gold men, silver men and men of all shades of opinion. It was in every sense a representative body of the people of the western half of the United States, from the gulf to the British possessions. In the discussions the fact became apparent that the states lying east of the Mississippi had been favored with great expositions of their resources and development, beginning with the centennial in 1876 at Philadelphia and continuing through the New Orleans exposition, the world's fair at Chicago and the cotton states'' exposition at Atlanta, while the Pacific coast was favored by the mid-winter fair at San Francisco.

While no exposition of the growth and prosperity of the trans-Mississippi states and territories, as the east, south, west and Pacific coast had such exhibits, the suggestion was made to have one for the states and territories west of the Mississippi at some central point, which should be second only to the Columbian exposition at Chicago in 1893. This met with instant favor and the following [?]voring the exposition, a memorial was offered by a delegate from California asking the present national congress for such legislation as to insure a prompt completion of the Nicaragua canal, under the control of the United States government, to insure to American commerce and other nations low tolls and freedom from discrimination of any kind. At the same session Hon. Howel Jones, president of the deep water utilization committee, speaking of the advantages of deep water harbors on the gulf of Mexico to western agriculture, showed that on this latitude and longitude [Omaha] the distance to Galveston was 585 miles less than the distance to New York. This being the central point the difference will vary more or less according to locality. He said the great body of our exports are derived from the farm (about 74 per cent or $627,216,656 in 1890) and that all of the coffee and seven-eighths of the sugar is imported (or $194,721,363 and $78,547,021 of wines in 1890) and most of the coffee consumed in the territory commercially tributary to Galveston is imported from southern countries and the sugar is imported from Cuba. Therefore by virtue of the shorter route via Galveston, as soon as this new trade is established the people of the northwest can import all the coffee and sugar we consume and save money now paid to the longer route (of say 585 miles) via New York.

As to the exports, I am using the figures of the last census because they are official. The value of the cotton and cotton seed oil exported in 1890 amounted to $256,259,970, and the exports of bread-stuffs $154,925,927. Of the latter the exports of corn amounted in round numbers to $43,555,000, wheat $45,275,000 and flour of all kinds $57,980,000. In the same year the value of flour manufactured in the five northwestern states was: Minnesota, $60,158,088; Missouri, $34,486,795; Nebraska, $6,365,492; Kansas, $17,420,475; Iowa, $11,833,737, or a total of $130,264,587. I mention the item of flour because you will see that much of it is drawn from Minnesota and Missouri, the two largest western flour manufacturing states, for export to South American ports via New York, which can be handled to greater advantage at Galveston with a through trunk railroad line and the completion of the Nicaragua canal, making Galveston or New Orleans the nearest sea port to the Pacific South American states, as well as Europe, Brazil, Mexico and other points on the east.

Speaking of the importance of the Nicaragua canal, the Hon. Warner Miller, in a recent address to the manufacturers in New York, said we furnished $14,000,000 exports to Mexico, or 45 per cent, and took 75 per cent of her imports in 1893. The Central American states imported $21,000,000 of products, of which we furnished 24 1-2 per cent; they exported $30,000,000, of which we took 32 1-2 per cent. The South American states imported $400,000,000, of which we furnished 8 1-4 per cent; they exported $456,000,000, of which we took 45.6; Cuba exported $87,000,000, of which we took 81 per cent, and imported $55,000,000, of which we furnished nearly 34 per cent. He said "there is but one proper way of securing the United States its proper proportion of the vast trade of the Pacific and that is by the construction of the Nicaraguan canal."

Owing to its deep water facilities and the possession of a trunk railroad line (the Illinois Central) from Chicago. New Orleans is experiencing an expansion of trade and exports such as that city has never known before. Its exports of corn to Europe in January of the present year show an increase of 2,519,705 bushels, and the Illinois Central is making arrangements for it to attain to much larger proportions.

Before closing this communication, I desire to call your attention to the vast wealth and resources of the trans-Mississippi states, exclusive of the territories, as compiled in the last census. Comprising two-thirds of the area of the United States, they contained a population of $16,545,506, an increase of nearly 46 per cent in 10 years. They had 271,730,999 acres in farm lands, an increase of 49 per cent over 1880. Of these farm lands, 158,166,581 acres were improved, an increase of 65 per cent in 10 years. The value of farm lands, fences and buildings was $4,651,767,082, an increase of 112 per cent over 1880. The value of live stock on farms was $1,000,297,247, an increase of 81 per cent in 10 years. These trans-Mississippi states had 8,335,484 head of horses and [?], an increase of [?]

[?]are the hottest months of the year. It ranged from 75 to 90 degrees, rare extremes 95 degrees; nights always cool.

How does the thermometer go in winter?

Very rarely below freezing point.

What is the average rain fall?

Forty-five to 56 inches, fairly distributed throughout the year.

To what production is the climate and soil adapted?

To almost all those of the eastern and northern states, besides many of those of tropical countries.

Is irrigation required to produce crops?

No; but at times it does good.

What are the leading market fruits?

Pears, figs, grapes, plums, peaches and strawberries.

Is the acreage adapted to pear and fruit culture being enlarged?

It is, rapidly; thousands of trees have been put out this last winter.

How many years after planting before trees begin bearing?

Pears, four to five years; plums and peaches, two years, figs and grapes, two years.

What is the value of the product per acre after trees begin to bear?

From $200 to $500.

What can be made per acre in small fruits and vegetables while an orchard is coming into bearing?

From $100 to $300 and in some cases more has been made.

What kinds of vegetables are grown?

Nearly all those grown in every section of the United States.

How long is the growing season for vegetables?

The entire year for the more hardy varieties.

What profits are there in poultry?

Fowls sell from $3 to $4 per dozen; eggs average 15 to 20 cents.

What inducements are offered to dairymen?

The very best; dairy products find a ready market at high prices.

What are the rates of living?

About the same as in the north, with fuel and clothing cheaper.

What is the cost of fuel?

Hard wood, $3 to $4 per cord; but much less wood is needed here.

What are the inducements for immigration to southern Texas?

The moderate price of land, considering its fertility and location, the certainty of large returns under proper care and cultivation and good public schools.

Why is it better for a poor man?

On account of the moderate climate one can work nearly every day in the year.

What is the price of building material?

For ordinary house building, lumber runs from $10 to $14 per 1000.

What can a plain house of four to five rooms be built for?

From $200 to $500.

How many acres of land in the coast country will support an average family?

Ten to 20 acres.

What are taxes?

$1.75 on each $100, state, county and city tax.

What kind of people reside in the coast country?

The very best people from the east, north, west and south, representing true American enterprise, stability and religious refinement.

These questions are fairly asked and answered as is possible to be done. They are based on actual experience in this country on these lines.

The board of trade was organized as [?] annum.

In no[?]ons, which are close kin to dry-goods, the volume of monthly trade will reach $30,000 in the course of thirty days, or almost three quarters of a million in twelve months.

Boots and shoes form another staple in which Galveston deals largely. One house here deals exclusively in footwear, and its business will touch the hundred thousan​ dollar mark every month, and is constantly growing. To reach the result of its year's transactions it is a simple matter of multiplication.

In hats an average amount of $15,000 per month would safely indicate that town's transactions in a wholesale way.

If there is any error in these figures it has been made on the conservative side.

In this connection, only eight of the leading lines of trade have been taken into consideration. The business in coffee, sugar, flour and like staples which are handled in large quantities are omitted because the figures to which The Tribune gained access could not be made to accurately reflect the precise conditions of trade.

The retailers have also been omitted, on account of the almost utter impossibility of securing correct informations.

The ramifications of the retail dealers are so extended as to defy accuracy. The hundreds of small dealers play their part in summing up the grand total as much so as the great merchant, with his scores of clerks, whose business runs into the thousands daily.

A tour of the retail district will indicate to the most skeptical that Galveston's home trade is not to be despised. The great bazaars are thronged daily with eager buyers. The silks of the rich man's wife rustle against the cheaper fabric of their less favored neighbor, and the whole go to create the great volume of Galveston's retail trade.

The conditions obtaining here are more favorable to the small dealer than those to be found in the great centers of trade. Adjoining the establishment of the great merchant may be found the place of business of one of more modest means. The two dwell together in harmony and prosperity. The tendency found in large cities wherein trade passes by the small dealer to pay tribute to the great house, is, as before indicated, conspicuously absent in Galveston. This is a feature of the business of this town which at once impresses itself upon the visiting merchant whether he comes here for recreation or for purposes of investigation. It is a condition, also, which has contributed largely to Galveston's quick and general prosperity. The proprietor of limited means finds here an opportunity to embark in business with a chance of success denied him in many of the larger and busier centers of trade.

The territory covered by Galveston's wholesale merchants includes the State of Texas and extends into Oklahoma, Kansas and Mexico. Year by year extensions are made to the territory covered, the growth being uniform and healthy.

As to the methods pursued by the Galveston merchants, their facilities have improved with the increase in their trade. While a tour of the Strand, where the great houses are largely located, would not perhaps impress one with the magnitude of their business transactions, a visit to the great warehouses, near the depots of the railways, would leave a different impression. Foreign trade is beginning to attract its share of attention. What it will amount to is as yet problematical.

On the whole, a careful investigation of Galveston's business interests results in showing a most satisfactory and healthy condition.

 

COMES UP SHORTLY.

Omaha Exposition Bill, Mercer Thinks, Will Easily Pass.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., May 15.

The exposition bill will probably be reached in a few days, as the house is now disposing of all legislation as rapidly as possible. All interested, and especially Mr. Mercer, are still working in its interests. Mr. Mercer now thinks the bill will be passed without a dissenting vote. Mr. Mondell of Wyoming introduced a bill in the house today increasing the pension of J. F. Crawford to $50 per month.

Mr. Pickler's bill granting an honorable discharge to Daniel Martin was favorably reported today from the committee on military affairs. The bill was amended by dating the discharge July 28, 1848, the time at which he and his company were mustered out.

Melville T. Miller has been appointed postmaster of Metz, Jasper county, Ia., vice P. H. Earley, resigned. Edward Satterlee has been appointed postmaster.

BILL'S CHANCES ARE BETTER

JOE MANLEY AFTER SPEAKER REED

Promises Mr. Rosewater to Use His Influence with the Man from Maine in Behalf of the Bill.

WASHINGTON, May 10.—(Special Telegram.)—Since the presence of Mr. Rosewater in the city the exposition matters have been advanced materially, although he has yet to secure consent of Speaker Reed to allow the bill to be called up. He has, however, succeeded in gaining the friendship of Hon. J. H. Manley for the measure, which is decidedly advantageous, in view of the known relation Mr. Manley holds to the Maine statesman. In an interview Mr. Manley tonight told Mr. Rosewater that he would do all in his power to secure the speaker's consent to place the bill on passage. This is the best piece of news thus far since the bill passed in the senate and was reported favorably in the house.

Another strong factor for the good of the exposition is the outspoken sympathy of ex-Governor William Pitt Kellogg of Louisiana, who has large property holdings in Omaha. Mr. Kellogg has suggested a number of things which might be done to induce Speaker Reed to favor the measure, and they will be acted upon. It is essential that the bill pass this week, as the Louisiana legislature meets next week, and an effort will be made to have the governor of that state send a communication to the legislature calling its attention to Nebraska's participation in the New Orleans exposition and asking for similar representation at Omaha.

The presence of Mr. Rosewater has stirred the Nebraska delegation to renewed action and there is now hope that the bill will pass this week.

Senator Thurston, Congressman Mercer and Mr. Rosewater will call upon First Assistant Postmaster General Jones in the morning and attempt to adjust the difficulties as to the Omaha carriers in a way that will be satisfactory to the carriers and to the citizens.

[?] arrived Saturday and is [?]reham.

   
85

FAVORS THE BIG EXPOSITION

People of Missouri Will Do Their Share Toward Making it a Success.

LEGISLATURE CAN BE DEPENDED ON

Hon. John Doniphan Meets with the Local Directory and Discusses the Outlook for the Big Show in 1898.

Hon. John Doniphan of St. Joseph, vice president of the Transmississippi exposition from Missouri, was present at yesterday afternoon's meeting of the Transmississippi exposition directory. Among other things, he said: "Politics has been absorbing so much of our attention down in Missouri recently that the Transmississippi exposition has hardly been fairly presented to our people. I think there is no doubt but that when the matter gets squarely before the people of our state it will meet with their hearty disapproval. Our legislature convenes the first Wednesday in January next, and the friends of the exposition will see that men favorable to the enterprise are chosen as state legislators. If I weren't so old I'd run for the legislature myself. This session of the legislature will elect a United States senator. Should the democrats be in the majority, it is probable that either Gibson or Stevens will be elected. The former is an enthusiastic supporter of the exposition and I think the latter is not opposed to aiding it. Should the republicans have control of the legislature, Mr. Warner of Kansas City will undoubtedly be elected United States senator and I believe he is favorable to the exposition."

Mr. Doniphan was asked by President Wattles what he thought of the scheme of four or five states combining their exhibits and making a grand display in a building erected by the joint appropriations of those states. Missouri's vice president in reply said: "I've never heard the matter suggested before, but it is exactly in line with what was forcibly brought to my attention at the Columbian exposition. Our state appropriated $150,000 for a building there and I presume some one retired on the earnings. At any rate the exhibit of Missouri amounted to little save on paper and the people of our state who had placed their expectations high were grievously disappointed. I believe the states would be represented to greater advantage, that there would be a better class of buildings and that the visitors from the states concerned would be better pleased if such a move were made."

It was explained by President Wattles in support of his scheme that each state going into such a combination would receive space proportionate with its appropriation and that at the close of the exposition it would also receive its proportionate share of the proceeds derived from the sale of the building.

In reply to a question for information on the part of Vice President Doniphan, Secretary Wakefield said that nine of the transmississippi states had thus far appointed vice presidents. He also states that the legislature of only two of the states interested had been in session during the past winter. He said that as soon as congress acted favorably on the bill now before it systematic work would be begun in the other states with a view to securing their endorsement and their appropriations. He stated that he had just written to the governor of [?] recommending an appropriation be [?]state, which is now [?]

I. W. Carpenter, one of the directors, was present after an absence of two months in California. He said that he had found sentiment throughout the state very favorable to the exposition. He believed that he was justified in concluding from what he had seen and heard while there that California would be well represented.

The meeting adjourned until 12:30 o'clock this afternoon, at which time the report of Edward Rosewater on his recent trip to Washington in behalf of the exposition will be received.

WANT A DATE FIXED

Friends of the Exposition Bill Annoyed by the Present Uncertainty.

Are Attending Every Session of the House to Be Ready for the Vote.

Think Speaker Reed Should Set a Day on Which He Will Recognize the Measure.

His Promise Gives Them Assurance That the Matter Will Receive Fair Treatment Soon.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23, Post Building,
Washington, D. C., May 16.

Mr. Mercer does not think that much more time will elapse before the house passes upon his bill. Senator Allen said today in a jocular manner: "If these fellows in the house would hustle like we did in the senate the bill would have been passed long ago."

That is not the case, however, for Mr. Mercer has hustled and continues in the interests of the bill. Again, it is a rare occurrence for any legislation in the house to be passed by that body without its being delayed. A large amount of business has been done away with this week.

Mr. Reed is the only obstacle in the way of its immediate passage. The bill would have been passed long ago except for him. Since he has promised recognition, everybody interested in the bill has been present at the meetings of the house daily in the hope of it being brought up.

Something will be done soon, but Mr. Mercer does not like the continual hope of recognition thrown out to him and then drawn back. He would like a definite date set for consideration of the bill.. Many of the most prominent members, friends of Mr. Mercer, have tried to get Mr. Reed to set a day, but as is well known their efforts were unavailing. All the members, possibly excepting half a dozen, will vote for the passage of the bill.

Something will be done soon, but Mr. Mercer does not like the continual hope of recognition thrown out to him and then drawn back. He would like a definite date set for consideration of the bill. Many of the most prominent members, friends of Mr. Mercer, have tried to get Mr. Reed to set a day, but as is well known their efforts were unavailing. All the members, possibly excepting half a dozen, will vote for the passage of the bill.

Commissioner Lamoreaux will shortly prepare instructions for the guidance of the settlers on the Burlington railroad lands in Nebraska, in preparing the evidence of the bona fides, required by the act of March, 1896. These instructions will be prepared with a view to saving the settlers as much expense as is possible in securing patents for their holdings.

Lieutenant Charles G. Lyman, Second cavalry, having been found by an examining board unfitted for promotion on account of physical disabilities contracted in the line of duty, will proceed to his home and report by letter to the adjutant general of the army.

FRED F. SCHRADER.

OMAHA MUST BEAR THE BURDEN.

Great enterprises cannot be pushed to success in a moment, and the friends of the Trans-Mississippi exposition, especially the directors, should not be discouraged if the bill for a government appropriation moves slowly. No exposition in years, except that at Chicago in 1893, had so good a claim upon the government as this one, which purposes to show the progress and wealth of the great west. Congress will recognize this fact eventually and the appropriation will come. Citizens of Omaha, capitalists in particular, should profit by the annoyance occasioned by congressional delay and at once awake to the importance of the enterprise which they will be called upon to care for. Government recognition and appropriation will insure the holding of the exposition, but its success depends on ourselves.

 

NOT ON THE PROGRAM.

Exposition Bill Forgotten in the Forecast for the House.

Washington, D. C., May 17.—The program of business in the house of representatives depends largely upon the developments from day to day, so that a forecast for the week, especially of the order in which measures shall be considered, cannot be given. Tomorrow, under the rules, will be suspension day and Mr. Dalzell (rep. Pa.) will ask for the committee on ways and means the passage of the bill which is known as the "package bill." This provides that packages of imported merchandise weighing less than 100 pounds and valued at less than $500 may be transported in bond over the Canadian railroads to destination.

Mr. Scranton (rep. Pa.) has given notice that he will ask the house immediately after the reading of the journal tomorrow to reconsider the vote by which it refused some days ago to order to a third reading the bill to provide for the election of a delegate to congress from Alaska. An effort will be made to lay that motion on the table if Mr. Scranton presses it, but should that fail the subject will be open for discussion and may occupy a good portion of the day. Should there be any time left after the house has disposed of the motions to pass bills by suspension of the rules, it will probably be given to the committee on immigration for the consideration of bills reported by it. This committee will probably have Tuesday's session. It will present the McCall bill to regulate immigration from Europe, and the Corliss and Mahany bills, intended to relieve the cities on the Canadian border of the competition of labor from Canada which does not find an abiding place in the United States.

The committee on rules is inclined to give the committee on labor a day for the Phillips commission bill and the Erdman arbitration bill, the latter embodying the proposition of the then Attorney General Olney, passed at the last session of congress and which it is understood the labor organizations approved. The Phillips bill appropriates $500,000 to enable a commission to make an exhaustive investigation into the relations between labor and capital.

Another day will also be allotted to the committee on territories, which wants the house to consider the New Mexico bond bill (as amended in the senate) and the bill to protect the salmon fisheries in Alaska.

Should there remain any time at the disposal of the committee on rules, it will be devoted to the consideration of the contested election cases on the calender—three of which are likely to be fought out with much earnestness—Murray vs. Elliott, First South Carolina district; Yost vs. Tucker, Tenth Virginia district, and Johnson vs. Stokes, Seventh South Carolina district.

What the Senate Will Do.

Washington, D. C. May 17.—The appropriations committee intends to keep the senate hard at work on appropriation bills during all of the week. The District of Columbia bill is now the unfinished business and it may be that this will consume the better part of three days. Especially is this true if the subject of appropriations for the various charities precipitates a debate at all like that in the house.

The fortifications bill will come up next. It will be reported to the senate tomorrow. Considerable of increase is understood to have to be made to this bill. When this comes up Mr. Gorman will offer an amendment providing for an issue of $50,000,000 or $100,000,000 of low interest bearing certificates and will make a speech. This certificate amendment will in all probability cause a discussion that will run over two or three days, but it will not be permitted to indefinitely postpone the final vote on the appropriation bill.

TOM REED'S OLD JOLLY SELF.

Tom Reed is beginning to be his old jolly self again, in which character he is much more pleasing to the public than when wearing the forced dignity of a professional aspirant.—Kansas City Journal.

If Mr. Reed will be his old jolly self and loosen up the strings on the Trans-Mississippi exposition bill so it can pass through the house he will put a great many poor men to work who are now idle and look with dread upon another winter of severe hardship.

And the omnivorous west will rise up and call him blessed, even if not president.

STILL THE BILL SLEEPETH

House Continues to Ignore the Measure in Aid of Omaha's Big Exposition.

Friendly Members Hope That It Will Be Given a Hearing Within the Next Few Days.

Otoe and Missouri Indians Want to Employ an Attorney While Talking of Compromise—Department News.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23 Post Building,
Washington, D. C., May 20.

There is nothing new today in regard to the exposition bill, though some members think that something in its direction will develop in the house during the course of a few days time.

The Otoe and Missouri Indian delegation had a conference with Secretary Smith today in reference to their differences with the settlers on their lands in Nebraska and Kansas. The conference was devoted to determining the question of whether the Indians could employ Mr. Barnes of Barneston, Neb., as their attorney at these conferences. [?]

EVENTS IN COUNCIL BLUFFS

Number of Omaha Business Men Make a Friendly Call on Mr. and Mrs. McCormick.

Citizens From Over the River Think Their Visit Had Business of Importance Included.

However, This Was Denied By Several Members of the Party and Nothing Further Would They Say.

A delegation of prominent Omaha business men visited Council Bluffs last evening and made a friendly call upon Mr. and Mrs. Harold McCormick at the Grand hotel. The visitors said that their call was purely an informal one and solely for the purpose of becoming acquainted with Mr. and Mrs. McCormick and to welcome them to their western home. Mr. McCormick, too, having arrived here but recently, is not quite up to date in the matter of the Trans-Mississippi exposition, and the visitors from Omaha desired to secure his interest in furtherance of that project.

There was some suspicion among Council Bluffs people that the Omaha gentlemen were endeavoring to manage a removal of the McCormick interests to that city from Council Bluffs, but this was denied by members of the party who were spoken to.

The visitors spent an hour or more very pleasantly with Mr. McCormick. The company included: Messrs. G. M. Hitchcock, E. Rosewater, E. E. Bruce, F. P. Kirkendall, Z. T. Lindsey, G. W. Wattles, Alfred Millard, H. A. Thompson and George H. Payne.

 
87

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI GREATNESS.

Frank Grice, editor of the San Antonio Daily Express, was in Denver last week, and in the course of an interview he gave the people of that city a specimen of his enthusiasm for the nineteen states and five territories of the trans-Mississippi region, and the necessity for having a deep water harbor at Arkansas Pass in the state he hails from. Mr. Grice said: "More than 75 per cent of all our exports originate in the trans-Mississippi. More than 25 per cent of our entire population live west of the great river. More than three-fourths of the coal and iron of the whole country lies in that region. It produces one-half the cotton crop of the world. It contains practically all the gold, silver and copper, and most of the lead of the entire country. Statistics show its population to be actually the most intelligent on earth, far higher on the average than even the North Atlantic states. They are the most progressive of all Americans and they are developing their region the most rapidly.

"All history fails to show any such development as has taken place within twenty-five years in the trans-Mississippi. I tell you, that with the enormous traffic already tributary to a Texas port, the opening of a twenty-six to thirty-foot harbor—and mind you, twenty feet is not deep water in these days—will see the development of a city on the shores of that harbor surpassing in rapidity of growth the best growth ever before witnessed even in this land of magic cities."

It is to be hoped that Mr. Grice will turn himself loose with the same eloquence for the great Trans-Mississippi exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898.

Council Bluffs Nonpariel
May 8th 1896
Nonpariel

THE EAST OMAHA EXPOSITION.

The Omaha Bee, in opening its mouth to speak in regard to park commissioners, puts its foot in it clear up to the shank. It urges that commissioners should be chosen who have ability and wisdom enough to not only look after Omaha parks, but also to do the landscape gardening and the financiering for the Trans-Mississippi Exposition. The Bee remarks, with a coolness which would make ice in Hades, "it is among the probabilities, if not an assured thing, that the exposition will be located in one of our public parks, or on land contiguous to one of our parks so that the grounds will be under control of the park board."

Now, we would be mad if we thought for an instant that the Bee knows what it is trying to talk about, but it seems that this paragraph must have broken away from the wit and humor column where it was first placed and got through the column rule into the editorial field. It would be intensely funny to see an Omaha park commissioner scattering Iowa's appropriation on his own ground like blue grass seed and building an Omaha band house at the expense of Uncle Sam. Some way the idea has got abroad that there were to be twenty-four states represented in this exposition, and now to have an Omaha paper declare that the only show is to be the show which a park commissioner makes of himself in trying to boss the whole job, spend all the money and reap all the benefits is proof sufficient that Bill Nye has a worthy successor.

We know we do wrong in referring again to the fact that East Omaha is the only practical site for the exposition, for the Bee has time and again told us to keep still about the question of location, because any discussion of the matter would jeopardize the desired acquiring of appropriations from congress and the various states. But since the Bee itself has started it this time perhaps we may be forgiven for just remarking, quietly and inoffensively, that the directors of the exposition project have given Council Bluffs and others interested, the assurance, clear and unqualified, and accompanied by the best bond on earth, the word of honorable manhood, that when the proper time comes, the question of location will be fairly and impartially determined and only after all parties interested have had due opportunity to present the advantages offered by various sites.

No, Council Bluffs has worked and will work for the exposition, and work with its coat off, but it is not ready to believe that the directors of the exposition will break its pledge, nor that it will step aside while the Bee picks out one of Omaha's parks for a site and directs a park commissioner to put the money where it will do the most good for Omaha.

   

EXPOSITION POINTERS.

"I had never heard of your proposition to hold a Transmississippi exposition," said Mr. Strauss of New York, one of the representatives of the bondholders of the American Water Works company, "until I reached Omaha, and was engaged in conversation with one of your citizens. I found out pretty soon that you western people have got your minds set on it and will be satisfied with nothing short of success. But I am assured, without knowing any more about it than I do now, that it will be a good thing, and nothign would please me more than to see Omaha get it. Do I think eastern people as a class are ignorant of the vast resources of the west? Well," and a smile broke over the New Yorker's face, "no, I don't. The fact is, I think mose of this talk about easterners having crude and prejudiced ideas of the west, originated entirely with the newspapers. A good many of you people out here are easterners by birth, and men of means in the east, those whom you want to attract to this country, are just as cognizant of the great resources and untouched wealth of the western states as you are. But expositions of the kind are always a good thing for the country. It is not going to benefit the west alone, either. My idea is that such an enterprise is a splendid thing for the whole country. It shows the proper spirit and push, and will attract capital this way, which will result in as much good to the east, which makes the investment, as the westerners who make the sales. This is a big country, and what benefits one section is bound to help the other. There ought to be no rivalry between us, and there isn't only in the newspapers."

Winthrop Smith of Philadelphia, also one of the bondholders' committee, broke in at this point. "I am a western man by birth myself," he added, " was born and lived for many years in Ohio. (To Mr. Smith that was enough to make him a true son of the far west.) And of all the cities I have been in out here, Omaha is the prettiest and most up-to-date one of them all. Now this is not flattery, because to speak with you frankly, in my business ventures and investments here I have not been very fortunate. But Omaha is a nice little city, and ought to, some day, be a big metropolis. Back of Omaha, in the mountain states and the rich agricultural regions, there is all the natural wealth that could be wished for. What you need is capital to develop, of course. This exposition ought to do a great deal toward attracting investors this way. But right in this line, I think western newspapers and politicians make a mistake in fighting corporations the way they do. It doesn't do any good and confidence is scattered to the winds. You like to legislate against them and give them the worst of it whenever you can. Now I could mention several cities which have not profited by this sort of thing. We are not greedy monsters ready to devour a farm at every meal with the voracity with which Bluebeard chopped off the heads of his wives. We often get the worst of it, and suffer the consequences just as much as the farmer whose farm is foreclosed. Many investments in the west have been lost by bad securities and false representations of western men seeking loans. We suffer for it. Omaha is on the eastern border of the transmississippi commonwealth and I hope you will get that expostition​, and that the east and west will be drawn into closer relations by it, for their mutual good."

"I hope that Omaha will get the exposition," said Elliott S. Miller of Des Moines, the other night at the Paxton. "Sometimes it seems to me that we have almost too many of those enterprises nowadays, but after all they accomplish a good deal of good which it is difficult to estimate. There is no doubt that the Atlanta exposition did considerable for the south, the New Orleans and the California expositions did as much for the country which produced them. It will bring lots of people here and that alone will be a great thing for the west and a greater thing for Omaha. This exposition is built on a magnificent scale and the western commonwealth ought to be able to put up a great show. It is something that all the states should take a vital interest in, as it will beat any advertisement they have ever had. I hope it will be a success."

"Whenever we want anything out at Hastings," said Attorney J. J. Buchanan, "we get together, populists, republicans, democrats and all, and make a strong united pull. A united pull is the only thing that will secure the Transmississippi exposition and make it a success. There ought to be no politics in it whatever. Why, we ought to everyone of use here in Nebraska labor and talk constantly until we have worked up everybody on the subject, and it will be made a success. Of course, we can't do anything unless times are better by that time. A big crop will do more toward restoring prosperity than anything else. But pshaw, there is no use talking about crops; it looks as though we could bank on that question for now. I look for a change for the better after the presidential inauguration. And as times are improving this exposition ought to catch us on the up grade and carry Nebraska right to the crest of the wave. But it is a mighty undertaking and imposes an awful responsibility upon Omaha. The plucky city will find itself equal to the task, however, I do not doubt. We have been passing through a trying crisis and the turning point is just upon us. The states ought to work harmoniously and the project will be a big success."

A. Rosenberg, one of a company at San Francisco, proprietor of one of the largest canning industries in California, was in the city during the week. Regarding the Transmississippi exposition, Mr. Rosenberg said: "Although absent for nearly two months from San Francisco, I remember that the exposition was, before I left, being commonly agitated by the newspapers and already more or less the topic of conversation among those who are generally the first to see the benefit to be derived from such an undertaking. The idea of the exposition is a grand one, if it can be carried out as it is anticipated. It ought to be the best advertisement the west has ever had, and at this time it is very opportune. There is no reason why it should not be a big success, if each state would do its part. I am sure that California will not be slow to do what she can. You remember our state legislature appropriated $300,000 for the state building at the World's fair, more than any other state except Illinois, I believe. And I think our exhibits there were something that we could all be proud of. You may be sure that California will be on hand with as fine a representation at the Transmississippi exposition as any of her sister states.

"Yes, I think such enterprises always bring big commercial returns to the country. It is lots of work to get them before the people and properly appreciated, but the work and time are more than compensated by the ultimate results. California's delegation to the Transmississippi congress last fall was very much enthused over the plan and the papers are working with them to agitate it thoroughly in anticipation of the time, when interest must be shown in a more practical way, by planking down the yellow stuff, as individuals, and making appropriations as a state."

The Big Exposition.

Omaha, May 22.—To the Editor of the World-Herald: It seems to me, Mr. Editor, that the best site for the great exposition of 1898, by all odds, would be Fort Omaha, Miller park and the intervening property.

First—I would suggest that the United States retain title to Fort Omaha till after the fair is over. With proper care and judgment the $250,000 to be voted by congress might be so expended that a large percentage of the improvements might remain to bless succeeding generations. The city could loan Miller park, getting as much permanent improvement as it is possible to have under the conditions. There is little doubt but the property lying between Fort Omaha and Miller park could be secured on leave for a comparatively small consideration. Then, Mr. Editor, I am free to say that the board of managers would have a site which could not be surpassed. Yours for the trans-Mississippi,

CIVITAS.
 
89

COPY OF RESOLUTIONS

ON THE SUBJECT OF

The Trans=Mississippi Exposition

TO BE HELD IN OMAHA, NEBRASKA, IN THE YEAR 1898.

PASSED BY THE DIRECTORS OF THE LOS ANGELES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MAY 13, 1896:—URGING NATIONAL AND STATE APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE ASSISTANCE OF THAT ENTERPRISE.

Whereas, The Trans-Mississippi Congress held in the City of Omaha, Nebraska, in the month of November, 1895, passed the following resolution:

"Whereas, We believe that an exposition of all the products, industries, and civilization of the States west of the Mississippi River, made at some central gateway where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth-producing States, would be of great value not only to the Trans-Mississippi States, but to all the home-seekers of the world, therefore

"RESOLVED, That the United States Congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha in the year 1898, and that the Representatives of such States and Territories in Congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases, to assist in the carrying out of this enterprise."

And Whereas, For the purpose of facilitating the work of the proposed Exposition a corporation has been formed in the City of Omaha under the style of the "Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition," and the complete success of the undertaking has become assured fact, and

Whereas, The State of California has been asked to participate in said Exposition, and the Governor of said State has duly appointed George W. Parsons, Esq., of Los Angeles, California, as Vice-President of said Exposition for the State of California, it is therefore

RESOLVED, By the Board of Directors of the Chamber of Commerce of the City of Los Angeles that the Legislature of this State be requested to appropriate the sum of $75,000 to be expended in having the products of the State properly represented at said Exposition. It is further

RESOLVED, That the Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce be instructed to forward copies of these Resolutions to the several members of the Legislature previous to the assembling of that body, and to request them to render all possible aid to the Vice-President of said Exposition for the State of California, in his efforts to secure the proper presentation of the State at said Exposition; and that the Secretary of the Chamber be further instructed to communicate with similar bodies in the State of California, asking their coöperation in securing an appropriation to properly represent the State's interest at said Exposition, and to mail to each of said bodies a copy of these resolutions.

Certificate.

I HEREBY CERTIFY That the above is a true and exact copy of the Resolutions on the subject of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition introduced at the meeting of the Board of Directors of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, by Judge L. A. Groff, and passed by unanimous vote.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto affixed my hand and the seal of the corporation.

SEAL
C. D. WILLARD, Secretary.
 

GOSSIP OF THE EXPOSITION.

"How are you, Transmississippi," said Colonel Downey of Laramie to the interviewer at the Paxton the other night. "O, yes, the exposition will come out all right. There have been a good many things liable to discourage such a movement during the present financial depression, but it will be a success. I am just on my return from Washington where I have been attending to professional matters in the supreme court. On making inquiry at the capitol about the prospects of that appropriation bill, I was assured by Congressman Mondell of our district that there was no opposition at all to it." The only thing that threatens it," said the colonel anxiously, and he spoke with the wisdom of one who had "been there," "you see although there is no opposition to the exposition, some fellow may get mad and 'object,' which would spoil everything. However, I do not think there is any doubt that the enterprise will secure government recognition. Out in Wyoming we are all waiting to see what is the fate of the bill in congress, and people there are very much concerned about the outcome. There is a good deal of talk about what a big thing it would be for the west, but all that is subservient to the question whether we will have it at all. As soon as the exposition is assured by act of congress, the state and individuals will doubtless take hold at once to see what part Wyoming shall have in the exhibition.

"H. Hayes of Oakland came down to Omaha about a week ago, bringing a train load of 1,500 cattle with him over the Rockies, to place on the market. He is one of the big ranch owners of the Pacific coast. Regarding the exposition, he said: 'I think it will be a big thing for the west. There is only one thing that must be secured and that is recognition by the government. When that is obtained, the real work of the enterprise of course will begin. I do not doubt that each state of the twenty-four will take a just pride in making a good showing for itself. There will be a wholesome rivalry among them as to which shall leave the best impression upon the sight-seers who may be attracted from the east. This emulation alone will be a good thing for the Transmississippi commonwealth. You see we have been as it were under a cloud, for the past few years, and nothing could be more opportune at this time when we think we are emerging from it, for rousing us from a sort of lethargy and infusing the old life and spirit which has always characterized the west. California will do her part. She has always taken a conspicuous position at the front in similar undertakings and she will not be found wanting at this time.'"

"Of course it will be a big thing for the west," said E. J. Churchill, an energetic young lawyer of Cheyenne. "And if you send another delegation like the last one which visited Cheyenne you will have the people of our state in a regular sweat of eagerness for it. O, yes, I can speak for the citizens of our section in saying they are right in line. And when the time comes for putting up exhibits, we shall not be slow in making as creditable a showing as possible. There is no doubt of the success of the undertaking, with the great and resourceful country of Transmississippi states back producing it. Not one of them can afford to be left out, as the opportunity is great, greater than any ever presented in the history of the west. Some of the eastern states have never done much advertising so far. They have been overshadowed more or less by the great booms of the mining regions and the consumptive and 'cure-all' climates, while real sensible advertising has been neglected."

W. A. Adams is secretary of the board of trade in the bustling little burg of Sundance, which is working all kinds of schemes to get some railroad started its way. To hear some of the live hustlers of that place talk, one would think that Crook county might have been the garden which Rasselas left to pay the funeral expenses of the mother of Samuel Johnson, the author. "Wyoming has always been too backward about advertising, more so than any other state of equal resources. I believe in advertising a city, a county, a state, just as the merchant advertises his business. We have felt the good effects of advertising at fairs, and smaller expositions, along the line of immigration. Why half the people of the United States think that Wyoming is no good except for purposes of grazing or mining. That is not so. They do not know that it has some rich agricultural districts. Crook county without any system of irrigation raises immense crops of wheat, and is the banner agricultural county of the state. The state of Wyoming ought to be well represented at the Transmississippi exposition to make up for lost opportunities. It is a new state and now is its chance for getting properly placed before people seeking homes and capital seeking investment. I intend myself to try to get a commission from the government to work up the exhibits from our section of the state."

STILL ANOTHER DAY GONE

Mercer Stays on Watch, but the Exposition Bill Does Not Come Up.

Six More Suspension Days Before the House Adjourns, So There Is Yet a Chance.

Kem Continues to Obstruct the Business—Conditions of Nebraska Banks—Two Orders Affecting Fort Omaha.

Washington World-Herald Bureau,
Room 23, Post Building,
Washington, D. C., June 1.

All of today Mr. Mercer spent on the floor of the house expecting to be recognized at any minute on his exposition bill. He only met with disappointment, however, and toward the close of the day's session learned that a list of unfinished business had been made out, and that the exposition bill would not be reached until another suspension day has been passed.

Today's delay is annoying, but should occasion no worry to those interested in the bill, for the last six days of the session are always suspension days.

Mr. Kem still continues his interruption of business in the house. Apparently there are no chances of him and Speaker Reed making up.

The comptroller of the currency notes the following changes in the officers of national banks: Iowa—The Sioux National bank of Sioux City, James F. Toy, president in [?]

END NEAR AT HAND

Big Appropriation Bills All That Hold Congress Together.

SPEAKER REED'S BEST SUPPORTER

Kem of Nebraska Unwittingly Acts as His Staunchest Ally.

COMING CONTESTS AT ST. LOUIS

Boast of Clarkson Not Successful in Frightening McKinley Adherents—Conjecture as to the Currency Plank.

WASHINGTON, May 30.—(Special.)—Congress is now engaged in handling the tailings of the session. Adjournment is in the air. The great appropriation bills still in congress are all that hold both houses together. Conferees in committee rooms are swapping and trading items in strenuous efforts to reach agreement by compromise. The routine of "morning business" in the senate, which means the introduction of bills, memorials and petitions and which ordinarily occupy two hours of the attention of that body, has simmered down to a mere fraction of its earlier importance. The remainder of the official day is taken up with time killing debate upon meausres​ which everyone knows cannot pass, but which operate as stop gaps between the monotonous recognition of the reports of the conference committees. The work of the session so far as affirmative legislation is concerned is about concluded and congress is quite ready to adjourn and to attend the national conventions just as soon as the money bills are disposed of.

KEM AIDS THE SPEAKER.

The pressure for recognition of measures in the house is as fierce as usual at the end of the session. Speaker Reed is holding the reins with a firm hand and has found a coadjutor in Kem of Nebraska, who, under the impression that he is piquing the speaker, is playing daily into Mr. Reed's hands, greatly to the delight of the ruler of the house. Every request for unanimous consent is blocked by Kem. Every attempt to secure consideration for bills not provided for by routine or by the rules is met by an objection from the gentleman from Broken Bow. This simply relieves the speaker from responsibility and enables him to be generous with his recognitions because he has full knowledge that Kem will prevent the bills from being taken up. It is just about the easiest job Mr. Reed ever had and he thanks his stars every day that he refused to accord Kem recognition for the Ft. Sidney reservation bill, and thereby secured an enmity which helps him out wonderfully in his policy of holding back all bills carrying appropriations and for whose consideration unanimous request is demanded. No doubt Kem had a right to resent Reed's refusal to favor him; but a representative with a grain of common sense would discriminate between measures. Because Sidney cannot at once secure for a normal school the old Ft. Sidney reservation, it is certainly no reason why a Nebraska representative should exert himself to kill all other measures in which Nebraska is interested.

Kem will have a pleasant time explaining to his people at home his remarkable performance of Wednesday last in knocking out patents for Union [?]Nebraska district. But the feelings of the members of the house towards Kem are too deep for expression. Unpopular as he has always been, he has increased his unppopularity​ a thousand fold and the number of his associates who are waiting for him with a stuffed club is legion.

PAYING JUST CLAIMS.

It is very apparent that th[?]

 
91

MERCER STILL ON WATCH.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Washington, D. C., May 30.—Mr. Mercer tonight refused to be a member of a special party going to Nashville, Tenn. His reason for refusing was that he has every hope of securing recognition on his exposition bill Monday. He said that he would rather lose the pleasures of the trip to Nashville and secure the earlier passage of the exposition bill.

SCHRADER.

KEM BLOCKS THE OMAHA BILL

DAVE MERCER SECURES RECOGNITION

Effort for Unanimous Consent for Its Passage Failed Through Objection of a Nebraska Member—Left for Another Day.

WASHINGTON, June 5.—(Special Telegram.)—Omer Kem, in the face of a constituency undoubtedly in favor of the Omaha exposition bill, objected to that measure being called up in the house this afternoon.

Representative Mercer endeavored to secure unanimous consent for consideration of the Omaha exposition bill. After the reading of the bill Mr. Payne, who was acting as speaker, put the question, and immediately Mr. Kem arose and said: "The gentleman from Nebraska, Mr. Kem, objects."

The speakers gavel fell, and he stated that objection had been made.

Mr. Mercer then made a motion to have the house go into committee of the whole for the consideration of the bill, but the motion was ruled out of order. This disposes of the matter for today.

Pressure was brought to bear on Kem not to object, but he insisted upon his rights to oppose any and all legislation out of regular order. Ex-Senator Paddock and Representative Hainer labored with him, but he was obdurate and the bill goes over. Mercer says he will attempt to secure consideration at another time.

There was a moment of intense silence. Members were amazed; none, however, more so than the other members of the Nebraska delegation. Then a derisive cheer went up that a Nebraskan should stand in the way of a measure so vital to the interests of the transmississippi country. Shafroth of Colorado, out of all patience, turned to Kem and in tones heard a dozen seats away, said: "You have made the mistake of your life. You could have made friends of every member in this house by announcing that you had grown tired of objecting and would allow the exposition bill to pass. Instead, you have injured your party, which is on record as favoring this bill. I am disgusted with the whole business. Withdraw your objection and allow the bill to go through."

Kem, however, sat silent in his seat and the defeat of the exposition bill for the day was complete.

Mercer was completely dumbfounded when objection was made, as he had reasons to believe that Kem would at least absent himself from the chamber when recognition was granted. Everything was in shape for the passage of the bill. All of the interests had been seen to and no obstacle would have been met had not Kem unexpectedly interposed his objection.

Kem. when seen afterward, in explanation of his course, said he was heartily sorry at the defeat of the bill, but he could not consistently deviate from the course he had mapped out. He said he was fighting on the floor of the house for a constituency without representation, and would fight until the last. When it was suggested that the Sixth district was vitally interested in the passage of the bill he became silent.

It may be that Speaker Reed will recognize Mercer tomorrow, it being personal suspension day, but there are scores of men demanding recognition, some of whom must be placed on the list, and whether the exposition bill is to be favored will only be known when tomorrow's legislative day is far along.

OMAHA PEOPLE ARE DISAPPOINTED.

Have Sent Telegrams to Both Mercer and Kem.

There was universal disappointment expressed in Omaha yesterday evening at the news from Washington concerning the exposition bill. All along it had been known that the only difficulty in the way of securing its passage was in getting it before the house for consideration. At first the antagonism of Speaker Reed caused uneasiness. He objected to its consideration on the score of economy. Although the present bill carries no appropriation, it pledges the government to make one in the future. After persistent labor the objections of the speaker were overcome during the recent visit of Mr. Rosewater to Washington. Congressman Mercer has been watching ever since for an opportunity to call the bill up out of its regular order by unanimous consent.

Congressman Kem has of late been objecting to the consideration of every measure out of its usual order, but it was hoped he would not block the passage of a measure in which the people of his own district, in common with the rest of Nebraska and the west, were vitally interested. All pressure brought to bear on him up to date proved unavailing, but the friends of the measure still expect to get it up by inducing Kem to withdraw his objection, or on a general suspension day.

A special meeting of the city council was held yesterday and the following telegram was authorized to be sent to both Congressmen Mercer and Kem:

Whereas, O. M. Kem, a representative in congress from Nebraska, has by his objection delayed action by the house of representatives upon the bill pending thereon for recognition and aid to the Transmississippi exposition, proposed to be held in the city of Omaha; therefore,

Resolved, by the city council of Omaha in special session assembled, That we respectfully and earnestly urge Representative Kem to withdraw his objection and co-operate with Congressman Mercer in securing the passage of said bill, which is being favored by the people of twenty-eight states and which is of vital importance to the entire transmississippi country.

The following correspondence passed between here and Washington yesterday afternoon:

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 5, 1896.—John A. Wakefield: I called up exposition bill just now and it would have passed, but Kem obected​ and knocked it out.

D. H. MERCER.

OMAHA, Neb., June 5, 1896.—D. H. Mercer, Washington, D. C..: Wire received. We must not lose this bill. Is there no way open? Have we no other chance? Advise.

JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, Secretary.

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 5, 1896.—John A. Wakefield: I will fight it out on this line if it takes all summer and expect to pass bill before adjournment.

D. H. MERCER.

An Omaha citizen who has given some attention to politics, said yesterday: "The friends of the big exposition bill ought not to worry themselves into quick consumption. To a man up a tree it looks as though the exposition bill is booked for passage. There are a great many things that lead me to the conclusion that the friends of the bill are being purposely frightened. Mr. Mercer will pull the bill through all right at this session. I read that in the 'tea grounds' and see it in the wool of the little African concealed in the woodpile."

ASKS KEM TO RELENT.

Telegram to the Congressman From His Constituents.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Kearney, Neb., June 6.—The populist county central committee met here today and fixed July 11 as the date for holding the county convention. While in session the attention of the members was called to the Washington dispatch in today's World-Herald regarding the action of Congressman Kem on the Omaha exposition bill, and in the discussion that followed they all seemed to think that Kem had made a mistake and they directed the chairman to send the following telegram to Mr. Kem at Washington:

O. M. Kem, Washington, D. C.: We, the county central committee of the people's independent party of Buffalo county, Nebraska, in meeting assembled, would most earnestly and respectfully request that you render your influence and work for the passage of the Omaha exposition bill, now pending before congress. This is a matter in which the west is interested, and particularly your constituency. We sincerely hope you will render a helping hand in this matter. Adopted by the full committee this 6th day of June, 1896.

JOHN S. SALSBURY, Chairman.
J. M. CHISM, Secretary.

HUNG IN EFFIGY.

Benson People Are Wrought Up Over Kem's Actions.

Kem was hung in effigy last night at Benson. An alleged picture of him was obtained and attached to a figure with inscriptions upon it. Then, after being hung, it was set on fire and riddled with bullets.

Cadet Taylor yesterday received this explanation from Congressman Kem regarding his objection to unanimous consent for consideration of the Omaha exposition bill, when it was called up by Representative Mercer in the house yesterday afternoon:

Washington, D. C., June 6.—Cadet Taylor, D. H. Wheeler or Isaac Hascall. City Council: Am contending for principle higher than all the expositions on earth, viz.: the right to represent my constituents on this floor, and nothing shall swerve me from my purpose to do this.

O. M. KEM.

And this is another telegram addressed to Messrs. Taylor, Wheeler and Hascall:

The action of Kem in objecting to exposition bill has probably killed it for this session. Hope not, however.

D. H. MERCER.
   

SPEAKER REED SURPRISED

Says He Did Not Expect Kem to Oppose the Omaha Exposition Bill.

Dingley, Who at One Time Was Its Worst Enemy, Is Now Most Friendly to the Measure.

Mr. Mercer Expects to Regain His Lost Ground and Win Before Congress Adjourns--Interviews at the Capitol.

Washington World-Herald Bureau.
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., June 6.

Mr. Mercer was interviewed today on his exposition bill. He said: "Speaker Reed expressed his surprise to me today on the failure of the bill yesterday, and he said to me that he never had the slightest idea that Mr. Kem would object to the measure which would be so beneficial to his state and constituency."

Yesterday, when the bill came so near receiving recognition, Mr. Dingley, chairman of the committee on ways and means, arose from his chair and made ready to speak. Mercer, knowing Dingley was strongly opposed to the bill when introduced, feared that strong opposition was coming, so he immediately went across the chamber to try to persuade Mr. Dingley not to oppose the measure. Chairman Dingley assured Mercer that he had been completely won over to the bill, and he arose to speak a few words in its favor.

SAY IT WOULD HAVE PASSED.

About fifty members expressed themselves to the World-Herald correspondent today as believing that the bill would have passed without a dissenting vote yesterday had it received recognition. Mr. Mercer is working hard to regain what he lost yesterday.

HANGS BY A SINGLE THREAD

Fate of the Omaha Exposition Bill Now Very Uncertain.

RESULT OF KEM'S OBSTINATE OBJECTION

Speaker Reed May Not Be Willing to Revise His Schedule to Give the Measure Another Chance.

WASHINGTON, June 6.—(Special Telegram.)—The fate of the exposition bill now hangs by a single thread, and there is grave fears that the bill will not pass this session, the action of Representative Kem being wholly responsible for this condition of affairs. Speaker Reed is quoted as saying the he could not see how a representative could go back to his constituency after such a display of spleen, and is credited with wondering what sort of treatment Kem will be accorded when he reaches home. Representative Mercer is non-committal as to the outlook for the bill, although he is laboring for recognition on Monday, as under the recess taken by the house tonight, the legislative day will still be Saturday. There are, however, so many men pressing for recognition that it seems almost out of the question to expect Senator Reed to revise his personal calendar. Mercer is satisfied that if his bill is given recognition there will be little difficulty in passing the measure. Mercer is greatly disappointed over his defeat on Friday. Under these considerations, the bill is in imminent danger, and all through a Nebraska congressman.

Judge Strode left for Nebraska today, to remain until congress convenes for the next session.

Dr. John McGregor, pension examining surgeon at Yankton, S. D., is in bad odor with the Pension department, protest having been filed against the doctor by Phil Kearney post, Grand Army of the Republic, of Yankton. McGregor has tendered his resignation, which will be accepted, and, in all probability, Dr. James Roan of the same place will be appointed his successor.

Representative Andrews introduced pension bills today for John L. Sanders and George W. Howard, residing in his district.

A board of survey, to consist of Major C. W. Williams, quartermaster; Major C. A. H. Mulley, quartermaster; Major C. A. H. Mulley, quartermaster, and Captain A. C. Markley, Twenty-fourth infantry, is ordered to assemble in Philadelphia, to fix the responsibility for deficiencies in or damages to property.

First Lieutenant Benjamin H. Randolph, Third artillery, is detailed to attend the encampment of the Alabama state troops, at Mobile. Captain Hobart K. Bailey, Fifth infantry, is detailed to attend the encampment of Alabama state troops at Birmingham.

J. J. Dahl, has been appointed postmaster at Silver Lake, Ia.

HE IGNORES HIS CONSTITUENTS.

Kem Deliberately Disregards the Wishes of the Sidney People.

SIDNEY, Neb., June 6.—(Special Telegram.)—The people here regret the step taken by Congressman Kem in his objection toward the unanimous consideration of the Omaha exposition bill. While all feel that Speaker Reed has treated the people of western Nebraska outrageously by his refusal to permit the Fort Sidney bill to be considered, they do not want the state to believe that they stand in the way of the passage of the exposition bill. The following telegram was sent to Mr. Kem a week ago, signed by the leading citizens of this city, which is self-explanatory: "While unqualifiedly commending your heroic efforts to pass the Fort Sidney bill, we desire you to forego any opposition likely to defeat the Omaha exposition bill. We understand the exposition bill comes up tomorrow. See that its defeat is not chargeable to you, or the people of western Nebraska."

HAVE NOT YET ABANDONED HOPE.

Friends of the Exposition Bill Laboring to Save It.

The friends of the exposition bill have not given up hope of securing its passage this session, despite the backset it received by the action of Mr. Kem in objecting to its consideration by unanimous consent. Mr. Kem started on his role of objector because Speaker Reed declined to grant consideration for his bill to dispose of the Fort Sidney military reservation, which has been abandoned by the government. He announced he would object to granting unanimous consent for the passage of any measure until his bill was given a chance, and has followed out that purpose. In defense of his action he stated to those who have been laboring with him to withdraw his objections, that he was bound to be consistent.

In spite of Mr. Kem's attiture​, the friends of the measure have not abandoned either hope or effort. The leading people of Sidney have telegraphed to Mr. Kem, asking him to change his attitude, as the exposition bill is of more importance to them than the Fort Sidney reservation bill.

The following telegram was received at 6 o'clock last evening:

EXECUTIVE CHAMBER, LINCOLN, Neb., June 2.—Hon. E. Rosewater: Yours of the 30th ult. came to hand yesterday and I at once wired Mr. Kem as follows:

"Approve of your general course in insisting on recognition on behalf of your constituents. Hope, however, you will lend every assistance possible to take up and pass Omaha exposition bill. All our friends here endorse this sentiment."

I do not believe that he would intentionally do anything to embarrass the efforts of the Nebraska delegation in forwarding the interests of any bill intended for the benefit of Nebraska. I believe that he will support the exposition bill.

With kind personal regards, I am, very truly yours,

SILAS A. HOLCOMB.

Speaker Reed's word is as good as his bond. The people who have been expressing doubts as to his intention to give the Exposition bill a hearing as promised simply didn't know the man.

 
93

GOSSIP OF THE EXPOSITION.

L. C. Verplast of Deadwood, S. D., was in the city on business the first of the week. Mr. Verplast is from Maine originally, and has been in the west for about five years. In that time he has become thoroughly western and is always interested in anything that promises to benefit the country of the Transmississippi.

"I think it would have been difficult to select a more appropriate place for holding the exposition than Omaha. I am quite in love with this city on general principles. Coming west from the New England states, among the first things I missed out here were the old forest trees of that country. The prairie was something that I couldn't get accustomed to. Omaha has so many beautiful shade trees and lawns, and with its fine street railway system, beautiful drives—it is withal a city of which the west may be proud. Located on the border of the western commonwealth, it is situated at the confluence of railroads where tourists may easily arrange to stop on their way to the coast. You can accommodate a big crowd of people without any trouble if preparations are properly made.

"Expositions of the kind are always a good thing, I think. It will demonstrate to the east what progress the country has been making since this section was denominated the wild and woolly west. Do I like to live out here? Ah, yes, it's a good place to live. One thing I noticed when I came to South Dakota in the Black Hills was the peculiar lightness of the atmosphere. It was tough on me at first. I shouldered my rifle and went out after deer one day after my arrival, and, by George, I had to stop and sit down several times, much to the amusement of my companion, to catch my breath. Of course we like the west or we wouldn't stay here. Anything that will push us along ought to receive the endorsement of each of the twenty-four great and youthful states."

Colonel J. M. Paul of St. Paul was in the city the last of the week. When shown the dispatch of the World-Herald, relating to Congressman Kem's part in promoting the cause of the exposition in congress Friday, he said, angrily: "That man ought to be scalped. He is a disgrace to the state, and that act alone ought to keep him from ever expecting anything again at the hands of the Nebraska people? Does he know how many people in this country his little act affected? We shall all hope, anyhow, that the bill will get another chance and be unanimously passed. If we have another good year, as this one promises to be in Nebraska, and the exposition on top of that, it will set us a-flying. Nebraska will be benefited, directly, in a great many ways. Although it will help Omaha, it will bring lots of people west, who will want to see something of the country. They will naturally run about our state a good deal at first, and then many of them will doubtless make a tour farther west. Eastern capitalists will receive some idea of what a great country this is, and capital will be started this way for investment. There is no telling all the good we may get from the exposition. At any rate, it will be a big card for Omaha and Nebraska, as well as the entire Transmississippi commonwealth. There has never been an undertaking in the west that promised to do us so much material good. It is an opportunity, at the end of a period of fearful depression, for the west to recover its equilibrium and start on a high road to prosperity."

Attorney General Fowler of Cheyenne expressed himself as being very anxious to see congress make the appropriation for the exposition before it adjourned. "We are all waiting now to see what is the outcome of that bill," said he. "If it does not pass this session we will have to make our plans accordingly. I would have been glad to see it tacked on to the general deficiency bill, and think it would have had a much better show. The policy of our committee just now seems to be to wait the outcome of the congressional legislation. Our representatives are working unitedly for the bill and seem to think that it will pass all right. Now there seems to be nothing to be done until we know what congress is going to do. As soon as that question is settled Wyoming will go to work, agitate the exposition and make practical plans for the getting ready a creditable exhibition of its products and resources. Although your committee which visited us was received with the greatest possible enthusiasm, yet its visit of course accomplished nothing more than aspiring interest in it on the part of leading citizens and municipal bodies. They seemed to have no definite plan at that time and we didn't see that we could work with them in any way until government recognition is secured and some definite plan or scale of operations is determined. We all expect great things to come from the enterprise if it is consummated. The feeling of the people generally is that nothing can be done until congress does its work, and then they will, I'm sure, be eager to do their share toward making as much out of its for Wyoming as they can."

 

EXPOSITION BILL IS SAFE

Speaker Reed Notifies Mercer That He Will Recognize Him Today.

No Objection Can Be Raised and a Two-Thirds Vote of Those Present Will Be Enough.

Measure Now Seems Sure of Success—All Its Friends Will Be On Hand to Aid the Nebraska Man.

Washington World-Herald Bureau.
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., June 8.

The exposition bill will positively receive recognition in the house tomorrow. Speaker Reed sent for Mr. Mercer this evening after adjournment and informed him that he should be given recognition on the exposition bill tomorrow. Mr. Kem cannot prevent the bill being considered, because tomorrow is a suspension day and unanimous consent is not necessary. Two-thirds of the house voting are required to secure the passage of a bill brought up on suspension day. If there be not a quorum present Mr. Kem may succeed in further delaying the passage of the measure. Such, however, is not likely to be the case, for Mr. Mercer will have his numerous friends on hand to assist him.

Mr. Mercer made vigorous objections today to the consideration of the Aldrich-Underwood contested election case, and in order to pacify him the speaker made the muchly desired concession. It is thought that every member voting will vote in favor of the bill.

The First National bank of Kansas City, Mo., has been approved as reserve agent for the First National bank of Humboldt, Neb.

The National Park bank, New York city, has been approved as a reserve agent for the Nebraska National bank of York, Neb. The appointment of the Hanover National bank, New York city, as reserve agent for this bank has been revoked.

The comptroller of the treasury notes that A. D. French has been appointed assistant cashier in place of G. B. Van Horn of the Mills County National bank of Glenwood, Ia.

The retirement from active service at this date of Colonel Henry W. Glosson, Fourth artillery, is announced.

Captain Levi P. Hunt, Tenth cavalry, is detailed to attend the encampments of the national guard of Missouri at Springfield, Mo., from July 3 to 12, and at Warrensburg from July 20 to 27.

Lieutenant W. P. Burnham, Twentieth infantry, is detailed to attend the encampments of the Fourth regiment of infantry, national guard of Missouri, at such place as may be selected from August 9 to 16, and of the Second regiment of infantry and light battery F at Lamar, Mo., from the 16th to the 23d.

Leave of absence for two days is granted Lieutenant Charles Miller, Eleventh infantry, recruiting officer.

Captain Crosby P. Miller, assistant quartermaster, will proceed from this city to Little Rock, Ark., on official business, pertaining to construction at the post named.

FRED F. SCHRADER.

The following telegram was received last night by John A. Wakefield from Congressman Mercer:

Washington, D. C., June 8.—Expect to pass exposition bill in spite of Kem.

MERCER.

TOM REED'S PROMISE

Word of the Speaker Given that the Exposition Bill Will Pass.

MERCER TO BE RECOGNIZED TODAY

Last Obstacle to the Bill's Enactment Has Been Removed.

OBJECTION WILL BE OF NO AVAIL

House is Still Acting Under the Legislative Order of Saturday.

EVERYTHING READY FOR THE LAST ACT

Dave Mercer Prepares the Way to Rush the Bill to Mr. Cleveland Without Delay.

WASHINGTON, June 8.—(Special Telegram.)—Unless something at present entirely unforseen​ should interfere the Transmississippi exposition bill will pass the house tomorrow.

It is a bold statement to make in view of the vicissitudes the bill has been compelled to undergo during the past few weeks, but conditions tonight seem to warrant this assertion. Speaker Reed has consented to recognize Representative Mercer tomorrow, and as it will be still individual suspension day, objection will not be a part of parliamentary procedure. The house will proceed as under Saturday's legislative day, the flag over the south wing of the capitol hanging limp as a dish rag, but marking a recess, which was take nlast​ tonight, until the rise of another sun, the dawn of the same legislative day, but forty-eight hours removed from its original inauguration. This is one of these legislative fictions seen during the closing days of congress, but made necessary by very exigencies of laws.

The day has been one of conference with Speaker Reed. Not only has Mr. Mercer importuned the speaker, but a long talk was had with Mr. Reed by ex-Senator Paddock, who has taken a lively interest in the bill. Mr. Paddock called Mr. Reed's attention to the condition of the whole transmississippi country, how it had suffered during the past few years, and showed him the bank clearings for Omaha, indicative that recovery from business depression had just commenced.

CATCHES THE SPEAKER.

He said it was a popular measure, and that the states included in the great Transmississippi country would hail this exposition as an opportunity to show the world the greatness of the western half of the continent. There was considerable personal talk between the two of a character beyond the range of a newspaper's columns, but that the conversation was satisfactory is upon the authority of the ex-senator himself.

William Pitt Kellogg has also done yeoman service for the bill, and Mr. Reed is quoted as saying that no popular measure this session has called out such pressure as the transmississippi bill.

Mr. Mercer, when he saw his last chance for today go down through the filibustering of the democrats on the Underwood election case, approached Speaker Reed, and a decidedly animated talk resulted within sight of the press gallery. When they parted there was a smile on both faces. The bill was safe. In order that no time be lost when it is put upon its passage, Mercer will have the bill engrossed in the morning, ready for the signature of the president of the senate and the speaker of the house. It will be rushed over to the senate, and that body will concur in the house amendment at once, and if all goes well it will be in the president's hands before the sun goes down tomorrow. The chief executive will be seen by Mercer, Senator Warren and others, and there are no fears but that he will sign it at once, as it carries no appropriation, but simply guarantees the government to erect the building and make an exhibit at the proper time.

SCORCHING ROAST FROM JOHNSON.

Grove Johnson of California, under a question of personal privilege today, indulged in what is conceded to be the most scathing denunciation of an editor of a newspaper ever heard in the lower hall of congress. He called Hearst of the San rFancisco​ Examiner a liar and other similar expressions usually tabooed in polite society, and all because that paper had made a personal attack upon him as to his conduct of the mineral lands bill. In his speech, which attracted wide attention, he said of Mr. Omer Madison Kem of Nebraska: "When the bill came back from the senate Kem had already engaged in that warfare which had denominated him assistant speaker of this house, and was making objection to the consideration of all bills by unanimous consent. I know of no way to silence Kem but to kill him, but I had not money enough to pay the fine if I did that, though perhaps I would have been justified in doing it under the circumstances."

The deficiency bill [?]

BLOCKED BY BAILEY

Texas Statesman Refuses to Allow the Omaha Exposition Bill to Pass.

HE INSISTS ON HIS TECHNICAL POINT

Claims He is Actuated by Conscientious Opposition to Such Measures.

MERCER SAVES THE BILL'S RIGHT-OF-WAY

Withdraws it from Consideration to Be Presented This Morning.

IF A QUORUM IS PRESENT IT WILL PASS

Vote Yesterday Stands 104 to 1, Bailey Being Alone in His Effort to Prevent the Bill's Passage.

WASHINGTON, June 9.—(Special Telegram.)—At 6:30 o'clock this evening Representative Mercer succeeded in obtaining recognition from Speaker Reed on the Transmississippi and International exposition bill. The bill was read at length and was about to be placed on its passage when Bailey of Texas raised a point of consideration and a count was ordered. Mercer and Bailey were appointed tellers and 104 members voted in the affirmative to take up the bill and only one against it—Bailey of Texas. When the result was announced the statesman from the Lone Star state raised the point of "no quorum," and a dead silence fell upon the house. In front of the speaker's desk a crown gathered. Payne of New York, Richardson of Tennessee and Haynes of Nebraska importuning Bailey to withdraw his point of quorum, but he would not yield and sullenly waived them aside. A whispered conversation between Payne and Mercer followed, during the awkward position, and then Mercer announced that he would withdraw the bill. Bailey followed by a withdrawal of his point of "no quorum" and the house proceeded to regular business.

Throughout the day Mercer had expected recognition, but one thing after another interfered to keep his bill just on the border of victory. An hour was wasted in counting a quorum at the start, then the election case of Aldrich and Underwood was taken up and considered until 4 o'clock. This bill out of the way everything seemed favorable for Mercer, who sat throughout the day at his desk watching for a favorable opportunity to get the exposition bill before the house. Just as he arose, about 5 o'clock for the purpose of placing the bill on passage, conference reports commenced to come in. Being privileged, the reports took the time of the house until 6:30, when Speaker Reed recognized Mr. Mercer. Great interest was manifest in the bill, and its friends were abroad, the Nebraska delegation working hard to secure a favorable result, but when Bailey objected the house seemed to be under a spell. It was the unexpected that had occurred. When the point of "no quorum" was raised it seemed as if the whole fabric had parted, but a quiet tip from the speaker to withdraw the bill still left it among the favored measures, and tomorrow another attempt will be made to pass it.

HAS THE RIGHT OF WAY.

As the house meets at 10 o'clock in continuation of the legislative day of Saturday it is confidently believed that by 11 o'clock a quorum may be secured and the bill placed on passage. It has now the right of way and has gained strong sympathy from those who cannot conscientiously endorse the methods of Bailey. It was Bailey of the Fifty-second congress, containing the $5,000,000 appropriation for the World's fair. Congress was ready to adjourn and many of the members had disappeared and Bailey forced the sergeant-at-arms to require a quorum from all parts of the country. For nine days he held the sundry civil bill in abeyance, and was only beaten by superior numbers. He sees in the Transmississippi bill a like condition. In a speech upon the Chicago appropriation he made the statement that not one person in 70,000 would see the World's fair, and he was therefore opposed to it. As a matter of fact, one person in twenty-five saw the Chicago [?]   the World's fair Bailey admitted in reply to a question that he had never been north of Washington.

When asked the reason of his opposition Bailey said to The Bee corrsepondent​: "I am opposed to these schemes on principle. The government has no right to go into the show business. It is much better to spend the money wasted on these expositions for the betterment of the public schools. If Galveston or Dallas wanted such an exposition I would oppose it. If this thing goes on every Jim Crow town of 30,000 will have something to celebrate and want the government to make a show. I was opposed to Chicago, I am opposed to Omaha, and nothing could change my idea that this exposition is out of all reason."

Mercer is sanguine that he will pass his bill tomorrow.

 
95

MERCER'S BILL IS FLOORED

Nebraska Man Will Try Again Today and Hopes to Save the Measure.

Bailey of Texas Makes the Point of No Quorum When It Is Called Up in the House.

Says He Doesn't Like to See the Public Money Spent in Such a Manner—Just One More Chance.

Washington World-Herald Bureau.
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., June 9.

Mr. Mercer met with another failure today in attempting to secure the passage of the exposition bill. He presented the bill to the house at 6:25 o'clock this evening and had it read. At that time numerous other members had bills they desired considered, but Mr. Mercer was too quick for them, and Speaker Reed remembered his promise of yesterday. When about to take a vote Representative Bailey of Texas demanded the second. This was taken and showed 104 members in favor of the bill and Mr. Bailey and one other member opposed to it. Mr. Bailey then made the point of "no quorum." Many of the most prominent members begged him to withdraw his objection. They only wasted time, however, for Mr. Bailey was deaf to all appeals. Finally after Mr. Mercer had withdrawn the bill, Mr. Bailey withdrew his objection to "no quorum." It was a noticeable fact that Mr. Kem was one of the 104 who voted for the bill.

TELLS WHY HE OPPOSED.

After it was settled that the bill would not come up again today, the World-Herald correspondent had an interview with Mr. Bailey. "The reason why I opposed the bill," said Mr. Bailey, "is because I am opposed to the spending of the public money in that matter. I think that so much public money, instead of being thrown away on expositions, should be expended upon the public schools of the United States. Money when expended upon public schools would reap great benefit to the country, while as far as education is concerned none will be acquired in an exposition."

Mr. Mercer was seen immediately afterward and expressed his feelings in a manner that could not be misunderstood. Tomorrow is probably the last day of the session, and Mr. Mercer will make another effort to pass the bill. His friends claim that if he makes one more effort it will be crowned with success despite all Mr. Bailey can do. Even Speaker Reed seemed disappointed at the failure of the bill. Tomorrow there is to be a quorum and the friends of the bill need have no fears as to the treatment the bill will receive at its hands.

TORPEDO BOAT STAYS.

Mr. Mercer, by the use of his influence, today secured the promise of the committee on naval affairs that it would keep in the naval appropriation bill the appropriation for a $100,000 torpedo boat to be built on the Missouri river.

Mr. Gamble of South Dakota today reported favorably from the committee on Indian affairs his bill confirming the title of mixed blood Indians to their lands, and allowing the same to be alienated under certain circumstances. Affixed to the report was a letter from Indian Commissioner Browning, and the principal parts thereof are as follows:

"To the first part of this bill I do not see any particular objection, although I do not think that any necessity exists for its passage. To the second part of the bill, allowing mixed blood Indians to sell and convey their lands and providing for a fee simple patent, I have a very serious objection."

NOT GOOD MANAGERS.

He gives as his main reason for objections to the latter part of the bill that many Indians, full blooded and mixed, are not capable of managing their affairs directly.

THE EXPOSITION BILL PASSES

Sound the Timbrels, Beat the Drums, We'll No Longer Live on Crumbs—The Exposition Is in Sight and Omaha Is Now All Right.

The West Has Uncle Sam's Assistance, Thanks to Mercer's Strong Insistence, and Two Years Hence We All Shall See Great Times in Trans-Mis-sis-sip-pi.

Four and Twenty States Will Share in the Glories of the Fair, and the Farms. Mine and Field Will Prove How Much the West Can Yield.

Each Great State Will Do Its Best to Show the Good Things of the West, and the Wise Men of the East Will Come to See and Stay to Feast.

Then Hurrah for the Work So Well Begun, Hurrah for the Men That Did It, Hurrah for the Town Which the Prize Has Won, Let All Who Helped Have Credit.

Washington, D. C., June 10.—The house passed the senate bill appropriating $200,000 to aid and encourage the Transmississippi and International exposition to be held at Omaha, Neb., in 1898.

The bill just passed by the house must now go to the senate for concurrence, because it contains one provision which is an amendment of the senate bill as follows:

Provided, That no liability against the government shall be incurred and no expenditure of money under this act shall be made until the officers of said exposition shall have furnished the secretary of the treasury with proofs to his satisfaction that there has been obtained by said exposition corporation subscriptions of stock (in good faith), contributions, donations, or appropriations from all sources for the purposes of said exposition, a sum aggregating not less than $250,000.

The bill directs that a Transmississippi and International exposition shall be held at Omaha from June to November, 1898.

That all exhibits from other countries shall be admitted free of duty.

That the national government shall erect a building for its exhibits at a cost of not to exceed $50,000.

That the government shall exhibit in this building such articles and material as illustrate the functions of all departments of our government in peace and war. That the cost shall not exceed $150,000.

That medals shall be made at the United States mint for awards made to exhibitors.

That the national government shall not be liable for any debts of the exposition company.

The directors of the exposition have not pretended to do much of anything except of a routine nature for the last few weeks, realizing that the success of the enterprise depended entirely upon what action congress took in regard to this bill. The board has held its weekly meetings regularly, and spent the time speculating upon the prospect of favorable congressional legislation.

In the meantime the Iowa legislature has appropriated $10,000 for the purpose of a state exhibit, and the friends of the exposition in that state are confident in their claims that an additional appropriation will be made the next session of the legislature, which meets in two years, as by that time the success of the exposition will be so firmly assured that there will be no hesitancy on that ground, and the great state to the east of Nebraska will want to get in with an exhibit which will be a credit to its wealth and importance.

The legislature of the new state of Utah did not make an appropriation at its session last winter, but that is easily acounted​ for from the reason that it was the first session of the body, and there was so much to do in connection with the advent of the territory into sisterhood, that the members had little time to give in considering measures from outside the state. The body passed resolutions indorsing the exposition, and pledged itself to make a suitable appropriation at the session next winter. The governor of the state has also written letters in which he has expressed a friendliness for the exposition, and promising to do what he can to get his state properly represented when the time comes.

The chamber of commerce at Los Angeles, Cal., recently passed resolutions favoring the enterprise, and urging the legislature of that state to make an appropriation of $75,000 to aid in making an exhibit such only as California can make.

A friendly expression has been received from several other states, but as Utah and Iowa were the only two states where the legislatures held a session last winter, no definite action could be secured, and the result of the work to date has been satisfactory to the directors in the highest degree.

Nine of the twenty-four states in the Transmississippi country have recognized the exposition by the appointment of state vice presidents to co-operate with the local board in the management. No special effort was made to secure like action from the other states for the reason that congress had done nothing toward making the appropriation. This work will also be pushed now, and the board hopes before long to have a full quota of vice presidents, backed by recognition of the exposition by all the states concerned.

The board will now get down to work in earnest, and will be encouraged by the almost assured success of the enterprise, where in the past everything was problematical.

 

PASSED AT LAST

TRANSMISSISSIPPI BILL GOES THROUGH

Omaha's Exposition is Now an Assured Fact.

SPEAKER REED IS AS GOOD AS HIS WORD

Congressman Mercer Recognized Almost at the Last Moment.

KEM WAS UNABLE TO INTERPOSE OBJECTION

After Months of Hard Work the Efforts of the West for a Great Exhibit Are Crowned with Success.

WASHINGTON, June 10.—(Special Telegram).—The Transmississippi exposition bill passed the house at 1:20 o'clock this afternoon. There was no opposition. The bil lwas​ at once hurried over to the senate for the latter's concurrence in the house amendments. The bill has been properly engrossed for two days and it will be delivered to the president immediately.

For a short time today the prospects for the passage looked dubious in the extreme. It would have passed last evening, but for the unexpected opposition of Congressman Bailey of Texas. None of the many friends of the measure looked for opposition from the Texas representative. His point of order last evening came as a complete surprise. His defiant attitude toward the bill and his sullen refusal to withdraw his objections, even when urged to do so by many of the leading members of the house, made the bill's prospects somewhat doubtful. But not one of the men who have worked so earnestly for the ultimate success of the measure lost hope. Taking a quiet hint from Speaker Reed, Congressman Mercer withdrew the bill from consideration last evening, thus giving it another chance today.

The house met at 10 o'clock today with but 100 members present. It was at first expected that the exposition bill would be given the right of way, but other legislative matters of a routine nature were called up, among them being Mondell's resolution directing the secretary of the interior to proceed at once to issue patents on Union Pacific lands, a matter of much interest to the transmississippi region.

As the time passed it was feared that the senate might finish its labors before the bill could be passed. Senator Allen of Nebraska was on hand, doing everything in his power to further the interests of the bill, and he announced that if necessary he would, by filibustering, keep the senate in session until the exposition bill reached the president.

In the meantime Congressman Mercer was bringing his persuasive powers to bear on Congressman Bailey of Texas, whose further opposition was the one thing most to be feared. If Baily​ persisted in raising his point of order against the bill the last hope for the present session would be gone.

For fully half an hour Congressman Mercer labored with the member from Texas. He did not fail. Mr. Bailey agreed to absent himself from the hall when the bill was brought up.

Then another unexpected and entirely unforseen complication arose. Representative Richardson of Tennessee insisted for consideration of the Nashville exposition bill. There was grave danger that, with the impatience of the members to get away, both exposition bills would be lost in the shu¼e​. Agains​ Senator Allen's influence came in play. He quickly assured Mr. Richardson's freinds​ that any attempt to force the Nashville bill ahead of the Omaha bill would prove unavailing, as if necessary he would hold up the Nashville bill in the senate. Senator Allen held the trump card and Mr. Richardson subsided.

With every obstacle out of the way Mr. Mercer waited with as much impatience as he could command for a favorable opportunity to bring up the bill. Finally, shortly after 1 o'clock, Mr. Bailey arose and quietly proceeded to the cloak room. As soon as possible Mercer caught the eye of Speaker Reed. The recognition he wanted was instantly given and the Nebraska congressman called up the exposition bill. Richardson of Tennessee remained quietly in his seat. Mr. Mercer made the simple sctatement​ that the bill had been read twice according to rules and moved that it be passed. There was no friction. The bill was put on its passage under suspension of the rules. Speaker Reed brought his gavel down sharply and said: "Two-thirds having seemingly voted in favor of the bill, it is passed.' Again his gavel fell and in another instant Congressman Mercer was surrounded by the members of the house and enthusiastically congratulated on the successful outcome of the long and earnest battle for the passage of the measure.

The bill, even after it passed the house, was incomplete. It had first to go back to the senate in order that the amendments insisted upon the house committee in ways and means could be concurred in. Mr. Mercer had made every arrangement to expedite the journey of the bill to the senate wing of teh​ capitol. The ofrmal​ notification of the passage of the bill by the clerk of the house was all prepared and the messengers to carry the notification in readiness.

How Mercer's arrangement had been planned may best be judged by the fact that in just fifteen minutes from the time the bill had passed the house it had been reported to the senate. Senator Allen had moved that the house amendments be concurred in and the senate had voted to so concur.

The signatures of the president of the senate and the speaker of the house were attached as soon as a new engrossed copy of the bill could be made.

Congressman Mercer will carry the bill to the president in person and will be accompanied by ex-Senator Paddock. Senator Allen has arranged with Senators Allison, Pettigrew and others to keep the senate in session until tomorrow in order to give the president a chance to sign the bill.

Senator Faulkner his​ written a personal note to Private Secretary Thurber, requesting him to give the exposition bill right of way in transferring papers to the president.

Not in years has the passage of a measure affecting local interests been attended with so much interest as has the Transmississippi exposition bill. No bill had had more determined opposition from the leading members of the ways and means committee until its merits were understood, and no bill has had more friends on the floor of the house. Its popularity in the house has been largely due to the energetic labors of Congressman Mercer, who has worked night and day for its success.

RECEIPT OF THE NEWS IN OMAHA.

Expressions of Approval Heard on Every Side.

The news that the exposition bill had passed the house spread over the city like wildfire. It was known on the streets within ten minutes after the vote was announced in the house of representatives. Men shook one another by the hand and mutually congratulated themselves and everybody else. Business men assumed a satisfied air and on every hand were heard expressions of joy and predictions of improvement in the near future. Flags were quickly displayed on public and private buildings and within a short time the city had put on a gala appearance, indicative of the joy felt by every citizen at the receipt of the long expected news.

At the Commercial club the board of governors of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben were at lunch and a mighty shout went up as news was told to them. The light on the chandeliers shook with the noise and those lunching in the adjoining room came running in to see what had occurred. The telephone was kept hot by the joyous members in calling up their respective places of business and all their friends and telling the news. Hearty expressions of approval were heard on every side from the members and the exposition formed the sole topic of conversation. The board of governors sent the following telegram to Representative Mercer at once:

"Hon. D. H. Mercer: The Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben congratulate you on your successful fight for the exposition bill. We are with you to a finish. Hip! Hip! Hurrah!

"SAMSON, Lord High Chancellor."

The fire bell on the engine house at Eighteenth and Harney streets, which has been discontinued as a fire alarm, was rung for several minutes to announce the glad news.

The telephones in the newspaper offices were kept going all afternoon, answering questions regarding the bill and confirming the reports circulated on the streets.

President Wattles of the Transmississippi association returned home today in time to hear the news and at once commenced making arrangements for having the event properly celebrated when the bill shall have received the signature of the president. The other members of the directory of the association were at the fair grounds attending the races.

 
97

GOVERNMENT PLEDGED TO AID

Transmississippi and International Exposition to Be Held at Omaha Receives the Official Recognition That Its Promoters Have Fought For.

President Has Signed the Bill Passed by Both Branches of Congress Providing for a United States Building and Exhibit at the West's Great Show.

House Gives the Measure Appropriating $200,000 Its Unanimous Approval While Mr. Bailey of Texas, the Only Unfriendly Representative, Is Eating Lunch in the Capitol Restaurant.

Senator Allen Hustles the All-Important Document Through the Upper Chamber and Mr. Mercer at Once Carries It to the Nation's Chief Executive, Who Affixes His Signature.

Long Drawn Out Agony Ended at Last and the Success of the Enterprise is Assured—Speaker Reed Keeps His Promise and Gives the Nebraska Congressman Every Possible Help in Securing the Victory.

Washington World-Herald Bureau.
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., June 10.

President Cleveland's signature has been affixed to the bill providing government recognition and aid to the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition and appropriating $200,000 for a building and exhibit. The measure was brought up in the house today by Mr. Mercer and passed by a unanimous vote. Senator Allen then took it in charge and secured its passage, as amended, through the upper house, and with the executive's approval, which was at once given it, the bill became a law.

The passage of the exposition bill relieves Mr. Mercer of a great burden, which he has been bearing for some time. The bill was brought up in the house under suspension of the rules and required two-thirds of those voting to secure its passage. Every one who voted was in favor of the measure.

In an interview with Mr. Bailey as to why he was absent from the floor of the house when the bill received recognition, he said: "I was down to my lunch." The World-Herald correspondent then asked him if he was lured down to his lunch by friends of the bill, as was a current rumor in the house this afternoon. He said: "I desired to lunch, so, therefore, I went down to the restaurant alone. No one had anything to do with my leaving the floor of the house."

WOULD HAVE FOUGHT IT.

When asked if he had been present when the bill was recognized if he would have made an active opposition, he replied that he most certainly would, and have as his reasons the same as those stated in the Woarld-Herald​ of yesterday. However, whether there is any truth in the statement of his being lured down the stairs or not, there is one thing which is absolutely certain, and that is that three members engaged Mr. Bailey in a conversation on the river question. Mr. Bailey did not show the least resentment, except that he did not desire anybody to think him [?]spy or that he put in his time watching for the exposition bill to defeat it if possible.

It is quite an interesting story as to how Mr. Mercer succeeded in getting the bill through. Mr. Bailey has started out of the house, presumably to lunch, when suddenly a member rushed into the house and said to Mr. Mercer: "Dave, Bailey is going down to lunch." This [?] had hardly left when another [?]o Mercer and announced that [?] had reached the bottom of the [?] Immediately after another said: "Mercer, I just this moment saw Bailey going into the restaurant, and I presume he was going to lunch." About five minutes later a member from the west announced that Mr. Bailey had given his order to the waiter for a few delicacies of the season on which he was going to lunch.

BY A UNANIMOUS VOTE.

Mr. Mercer by this time had unlocked the drawer of his desk and abstracted the bill which he was going to make another mighty effort to pass. He had just taken it out when another member rushed in breathlessly and stated betwen​ gasps that Mr. Bailey was down in the restaurant and when seen by him had just secured his lunch and was in the act of masticating the first mouthful. Mercer immediately seized upon the golden opportunity and asked for recognition, which was instantly granted by Speaker Reed. The bill was not even read, but the title was announced, and a vote taken within the space of two minutes, which resulted in the unanimous passage of the bill. The time was so quick that it is claimed Mr. Bailey did not even have time to swallow the first mouthful of food he had taken.

The speaker used his gavel in vain trying to quiet the mighty shouts and handclapping that resulted from the passage of the bill. After the passage of the bill Mr. Mercer spent the greater portion of the day in receiving the congratulations of his numerous friends in the house and senate.

SIGNED BY THE PRESIDENT.

The bill was quickly finished by the senate, and armed with it, Mr. Mercer started for the White house. As he went into the mansion he passed the president's messenger carrying to the house the president's veto to the Fort Omaha military reservation bill. Not knowing that, he hastened in and in a few minutes' time came out triumphantly with the signature of the president attached to the exposition bill. Many members remarked about the expansive smile which Mr. Mercer wore the rest of the day.

Mr. Hopkins of Illinois in an interview with the World-Herald correspondent, said: "At the start the ways and means committee was strongly opposed to the exposition bill, but we changed our views on account of the persistence of Mr. Mercer in the work for the bill and because Mercer thoroughly convinced us that the only thing to do was to pass the bill. I am highly delighted at the passage of the bill and am seriously thinking of commencing the construction of buildings on my lots in Omaha, for the exposition is sure to boom that place."

Representative Dolliver said: "Mr. Mercer is an exceedingly successful man in all legislation undertaken by him."

MERCER IS COMPLIMENTED.

Mr. Payne said that Mercer was the one man of the house who could get an exposition bill through congress, and that he had shown himself to be a man untiring in his efforts to do that for his constitutuents​ which was desired by them.

It will not do to take up too much space, so I will state that between thirty-five and forty other members expressed themselves in a like strain.

Mr. Kem was missed from the floor of the house, where he could have killed considerable time today, and upon inquiry, it was learned that he left, in the company of Representative Heatwole, at 11 o'clock this morning for Omaha. While on the train Heatwole sent a telegram to Mercer in which he said: "Kem is gone, hasten the bill."

Representatives Hainer and Andrews deserve credit for the way in which they assisted Mr. Mercer. Both of them did everything they could, and that is saying a great deal.

FORT OMAHA BILL VETOED.

The main reasons for the president's veto of the Fort Omaha bill are as follows: "The sale of Fort Omaha was to partially pay for the new site of the post. The authority to sell and remove any of the buildings from the old reservation to the new site still remains, however, unimpaired. In this condition of affairs it is now proposed to lease this land and buildings to the state of Nebraska at a nominal rent, allowing the government to repossess then only when the interests of the United States shall require such action. Of course, it would be claimed that this language, in view of the statute of 1888, should not be construed as permitting the government to retake the property for the purpose of selling it, because that is not stipulated in the bill. Furthermore, it would be plausibly argued that the lease was paramount to the power of sale contained in the law of 1888, and that the omission of any provision that possession might be resumed for the purpose of sale plainly indicated that the interest of the United States, which allows such resumption, contemplates some other and different emergency.

"As a practical question we all know that transactions of this character relating to government property amount to a permanent alienation, or certainly pave the way for an absolute grant. I do not think there should be anything done with this valuable property which will in the least embarrass the government in its sale, and to that extent reimbursing itself for the cost of the new military post, which was plainly contemplated in the law of 1888."

FRED F. SCHRADER.

EXPOSITION BILL.

Full Text of the Measure Introduced in the Senate.

The full text of the bill as introduced in the senate was as follows:

An act to authorize the holding of [?]mississippi and International exposition at the city of Omaha, in the state of Nebraska, in the year 1898.

Whereas, It is desirable to encourage the holding of a Transmississippi and International exposition at the city of Omaha, in the state of Nebraska, in the year 1898, for the exhibition of the resources of the United States of America and the progress and civilization of the western hemisphere, and for a display of the arts, industries, manufactures and products of the soil, mine and sea; and

Whereas, It is desirable that an exhibition shall be made of the great staples of the Transmississippi region, which contributes so largely to domestic and international commerce; and

Whereas, Encouragement should be given to an exhibit of the arts, industries, manufactures and products, illustrative of the progress and development of that and other sections of the country; and

Whereas, Such exhibition should be national, as well as international, in its character, in which the people of this country, of Mexico, the Central and South American governments, and other states of the world should participate, and should, therefore, have the sanction of the congress of the United States; and

Whereas, It is desirable and will be highly beneficial to bring together at such an exposition, to be held at a central position in the western part of the United States, the people of the United States and other states of this continent; and

Whereas, The Transmississippi and International Exposition association has undertaken to hold such an exposition, beginning on the 1st day of June, 1898, and closing on the 1st day of November, 1898; therefore,

Be it enacted by the senate and house of representatives of the United States of America in congress assembled, That a Transmississippi and International exposition shall be held at the city of Omaha, in the state of Nebraska, in the year 1898, under the auspices of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association; provided, that the United States shall not be liable for any of the expense attending or incident to such exposition nor by reason of the same.

EXHIBITS ADMITTED FREE.

Section 2. That all articles which shall be imported from foreign countries for the sole purpose of exhibition at said exposition upon which there shall be a tariff or customs duty, customs fees, or charges, under such regulation as the secretary and treasury prescribe; but it shall be lawful at any time during the exhibition to sell for delivery at the close thereof any goods or property imported for and actually on exhibition in the exhibition building, or on the grounds, subject to such regulation for the security of the revenue and for the collection of import duties as the secretary of the treasury shall prescribe; Provided, That all such articles when sold or withdrawn for consumption in the United States shall be subject to the duty, if any, imposed upon such article by the revenue laws in force at the date of incorporation, and all penalties prescribed by law shall be applied and enforced against the persons who may be guilty of any illegal sale or withdrawal.

Sec. 3. That there shall be exhibited at said exposition by the government of the United States, from its executive departments, the Smithsonian institution, the United States fish commission, and the national museum, such articles and material as illustrate the function and administrative faculty of the government in time of peace, and its resources as a war power, tending to demonstrate the nature of our institutions and their adaptions to the wants of the people; and to secure a complete and harmonious arrangement of such government exhibit a board shall be created, to be charged with the selection, preparation, arrangement, safekeeping and exhibtion​ of such articles and materials as the heads of the several departments and the directors of the Smithsonian institution and national museum may respectively decide shall be embraced in said government exhibt​. The president may also designate additional articles for exhibition. Such board shall be composed of one person to be named by the head of each executive department and museum and by the president of the United States. The president shall name the chairman of said board, and the board itself shall select such other officers as it may deem necessary.

GOVERNMENT BUILDING.

Sec. 4. That the secretary of the treasury shall cause a suitable building or buildings to be erected on the site selected for the Transmississippi and International exposition for the government exhibits, and he is hereby authorized and directed to contract therefor, in the same manner and under the same regulations as for other public buildings of the United States; but the contract for said building or buildings shall not exceed the sum of $50,000. The secretary of the treasury is authorized and required to dispose of such building or buildings, or the material composing the same, at the close of the exposition, giving preference to the city of Omaha, or to the said Transmississippi and International Exposition association to purchase the same at an appraised

"Drouth-sticken Nebraska." Johnson 1896.
value to be ascertained in such manner as may be determined by the secretary of the treasury.

Sec. 5. The United States shall not be liable on account of said exposition for any exppense​ incident to, or growing out of same, except for the construction of the building or buildings hereinbefore provided for, and for the purpose of paying the expense of transportation, care and custody of exhibits by the government, and the maintenance of the said building or buildings, and the safe return of articles belonging to the said government exhibit, and other contingent expenses to be approved by the secretary of the treasury upon itemized accounts and vouchers, and the total cost of said building or buildings shall not exceed the sum of $50,000; nor shall the expenses of said government exhibit for each and every purpose connected therewith, including the transportation of same to Omaha and from Omaha to Washington, exceed the sum of $150,000, amounting in all to not exceeding the sum of $200,000; provided, that no liability against the government shall be incurred, and no expenditure of money under this act shall be made, until the officers of said exposition shall have furnished the secretary of the treasury proofs to his satisfaction that there has been obtained by said exposition corporation subscriptions of stock in good faith, contributions, donations, or appropriations from all sources for the purpose of said exposition a sum aggregating not less than $250,000.

Sec. 6. That the commission appointed under this act shall not be entitled to any compensation for their services out of the treasury of the United States, except their actual expenses for transportation and a reasonable sum to be fixed by the secretary of the treasury for subsistence for each day they are necessarily absent from home on the business of said commission. The officers of said commission shall receive such compensation as may be fixed by said commission, subject to the approval of the secretary of the treasury, which shall be paid out of the sums appropriated by congress in aid of such exposition.

Sec. 7. That medals, with appropriate devices, emblems, and inscriptions commemorative of said Transmississippi and international exposition and of the awards to be made to the exhibitors thereat, shall be prepared at some mint of the United States, for the board of directors thereof, subject to the provisions of the fifty-second section of the coinage act of 1893, upon the payment of a sum not less than the cost thereof; and all the provisions, whether penal or otherwise, of said coinage act against the counterfeiting or imitating of coins of the United States, shall apply to the medals struck and issued under this act.

Sec. 8. That the United States shall not in any manner nor under any circumstances, be liable for any of the acts, doings, proceedings or representations of said Transmississippi and International Exposition association, its officers, agents, servants or employes, or any of them, or for any subscriptions to the capitol stock, or for any certificates of stock, bonds, mortgages or obligation of any kind issued by said coropration​, or for any debts, liabilities or expenses of any kind whatever attending such corporation or accruing by reason of the same.

That nothing in this act shall be so construed as to create any liability of the United States, direct or indirect, for any debt or obligation incurred, nor for any claim for aid or pecuniary assistance from congress or the treasury of the United States in support or liquidation of any debts or obligations created by said commission in excess of appropriations made by congress therefor.

Passed the senate April 10, 1896.

Attest: WILLIAM R. COX,
Secretary.

MERCHANTS ARE JUBILANT.

Means Increased Business From Now On in Omaha.

Three merchants in the retail district said that immediately upon hearing that the bill had passed they had closed heavy contracts which had been pending upon the passage of the bill.

Samuel Burns, crockery—It can't help but give us a position before the world we have never had before. The success of the bill alone is a credit to the city and an advertisement for the energy of our people. The money spent on the exposition, to say nothing of the show itself, will be of vast benefit to the business interests of the city.

C. E. Yost, Nebraska Telephone company—What we must do now is to send a delegation to the state legislature next winter that has a state acquaintance and that will be able to do us some good in legislation.

H. J. Penfold, druggist—Many enterprises have been dormant in the city awaiting action on this bill, and they will now have new life given them. Many new enterprises will spring up and it will undoubtedly give us the new depot.

M. H. Bliss, crockery—It is a first class thing to start up business in the city which has needed something of that kind.

C. W. Lyman, Commercial National bank—The effects of the exposition is an open question.

John Baumer, jeweler—It is a good thing for Omaha.

SPLENDID THING.

A. S. Stiger, Kelley & Stiger—There can be no two sides to the question. Everybody must concede that it is a splendid good thing for Omaha.

Drexel & Rosenzwig, boots and shoes—A grand good thing for the city, the best that ever happened. It will mean a 100 per cent increase in business.

T. J. Rogers, hardware—It is the best thing that has happened for us for some time.

M. Rosenthal, People's Furniture company—Bound to bring a boom, and every business man ought to give liberally toward raising the sum of money needed to make the affair a success.

A. H. Rawitzer, Omaha Rubber company—One of the best things that ever happened to this part of the country and is bound to help us.

H. J. Abrahams, Omaha Furniture and Carpet company—Best thing this western country has ever had to bolster up business interests. Biggest thing since the Union Pacific road came into the city.

M. T. Barlow, United State National bank—It is a glorious triumph for this part of the country, and means the reelection of Dave Mercer.

J. H. Richards, cigars—It is the best thing that could happen for our business.

ADDITIONAL HELP.

Hene & Co., cigars—Out of sight. We will employ 100 additional men when the show becomes assured.

John Francis, passenger agent of the Burlington & Missouri River railroad—Best thing that ever happened to the town. Brings us a prominence we could not have secured otherwise.

Riley Bros., liquors and cigars—Say anything good, and we will indorse it.

Frank Murphy, Merchants National bank and Omaha Street Railway company—Gratified to hear the news, and consider it a grand good thing.

Frank Parmelee, sporting goods—[?]

 

Mrs. J. Benson, milliner—People don't enthuse over these things as they used to, but after two very hard years in business, this looks like a return to prosperity.

INFLUX OF CONTRACTORS.

R. S. Wilcox, manager of Browning, King & Co. Clothing company—Business will jump from the start in my opinion. I understand that fifty contractors were getting ready to leave the town if that bill did not pass. Now there will be an influx of contractors, houses will be filled and the next two years will see a marked change in all business.

C. S. Raymond, jeweler—I view it as everybody else does, as the greatest for Omaha that ever happened. Business will improve at once. The city and state should now go down in their pockets and keep the ball a-rolling.

T. B. Norris, shoe merchant—I am tickled to death, of course. I expect all business to improve at once, and business will be on the boom for the next two years. Confidence will be restored and Omaha will profit directly and immediately.

C. M. Wilhelm, Orchard & Wilhelm—It will help our business at once. Why, I have heard people say that if the exposition bill passed they would have their houses recarpeted and furnished. We cannot tell what great things the enterprise will accomplish for us. The passage of the bill will make everybody feel that now they can afford to spend a little money.

Morris Levy, Nebraska Clothing company—Didn't they prophesy that if the bill passed we would all get rich? I may not be afflicted with great wealth, but the effect of the passage of the bill will be felt locally at once. Those who are idle now will be earning something and those who have hoarded their [?] will spend it more freely.

T. J. Beard, wall paper—We are feeling jubilant. It is the biggest [?] that Omaha ever had. We expect[?] the effect of it in our business right away.

SALVATION OF BUSINESS.

M. A. Free, plumbing—In my mind it is the salvation of the business int[?] of Omaha. I have yet to meet a [?] who doesn't think the exposition [?] good thing, and the passage of the bill assures it success.

A. Mandelberg, jeweler—Th[?] opinion will now be that Omaha [?] right. I heard a real estate ma[?] other day that he would give [?] of his own pocket for the exposition just for the profit he would [?] his personal property. Real estate [?] doubtless appreciative, capital con[?]

(Continued on Second Page.)
 

[?]of the twenty-four states in the Transmississippi country have recognized the exposition by the appointment of state vice presidents to co-operate with the local board in the management. No special effort was made to secure like action from the other states for the reason that congress had done nothing toward making the appropriation. This work will also be pushed now, and the board hopes before long to have a full quota of vice-presidents, backed by recognition of the exposition by all the states concerned.

The board will now get down to work in earnest, and will be encouraged by the almost assured success of the enterprise, where in the past everything was problematical.

NO CRIMINAL INTENT.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Cheyenne, Wyo., June 10.—William Newton, formerly a lawyer of Rock Springs, who was arrested at Butte, Mont., several months ago charged with defrauding Cheyenne business men by [?]ing worthless drafts, was today acquitted of the charge in the district court for this county. Newton's defense [?] that a friend had promised to place money in the bank to his credit to meet drafts drawn by him while in Cheyenne and had failed to do so. Judge Scott said that these facts relieved Newton of criminal intent in having the drafts [?]ed, even when he had no funds to his credit in the banks.

LOCAL BREVITIES.

Chief of Police Mileck and Detective [?] of Lincoln were in the city yesterday [?]messes in a counterfeiting case in the [?]d court.

[?]R. Runnels, a peddler, poked J. H. [?]ld in the eye Tuesday afternoon and [?]d $1 and costs by Judge Gordon yesterday morning.

[?]fficers of Walnut Hill Boys' bri-[?] meet at Forty-sixth and Seward [?]hreaten to prosecute boys who [?] their meetings.

[?]Bando has sworn out a complaint [?] Philip K. Young with assault [?]nt to do great bodily injury. The [?] occurred yesterday.

[?] German lodges of the Order of the [?] will give a grand ball at Miller's [?] Seventeenth and Vinton streets, June [?] benefit of Peter Schneiderwind, [?] sustained serious injuries.

[?] Frank Mayo's manager, J. H. [?]acted fever while at Denver, [?] now an inmate of St. Joseph's [?] this city. The Elks, of which [?]mber, are watching over him [?]

[?], formerly of Omaha, died at [?] D., yesterday. Mr. Case lo-[?] Sarpy county in 1857. He was a member of Nebraska lodge No. 1, [?] Free and Accepted Masons. He [?] wife and daughter, Mrs. D. M. [?] to mourn his loss.

[?]when invited to respond to an impromptu toast,, talked jubilantly of the situation.

Mr. C. F. Weller, president of the Commercial club, responded to the introductory toast, "Past Work of the Club," in which he reviewed the achievements of the two years gone by, and the steps leading up to the great Trans-Mississippi exposition.

FUTURE OF THE CLUB.

Mr. J. H. Dumont, in presenting the "Future Work of the Club," believed that the plans of the past should be pushed forward with unabated vigor, and especially should every effort be given to make Omaha a great convention city. In speaking of new projects needed at once, Mr. Dumont mentioned a wholesale dry goods house, with a capital of at least $500,000, and a union depot, more advertising and a better grade of it. The club should at a moment's notice be prepared to give all the information necessary regarding Omaha and its business interests.

Although the club has ruled that politics shall not become a part of the club life, yet Mr. Dumont believed that it could consistently urge new laws for better local government, and pure food laws, which should prevent the manufacture and sale of adulterated articles of diet; to aid in securing municipal ownership and control of lighting and water plants.

In regard to manufacturing institutions, the speaker believed that the giving of large bonuses would result in failure, and that it would be far better to encourage smaller institutions to locate under natural conditions. The problem of securing better railroad rates, he believed, must be solved before Omaha could become a great commercial center. With judicious and harmonious action by the individual members of the club, rates due to Omaha may in all probability be secured. An outlet by railroad to the lakes, or to some other point than Chicago, will, he believed, bring it about and would adjust the long and short haul difficulties of today, and make the Missouri river a basic point. In regard to the proposed Yankton & Southwestern railway, if built, he believed it would be disastrous to Omaha, as it would create a rainbow route around the city.

KNIGHTS OF AK-SAR-BEN.

"The Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben" was the topic of which Major R. S. Wilcox treated. He briefly traced the history of the organization, and spoke with satisfaction of the Mondamin festival of last year. He called attention to the fact that the directors received no direct benefit from the parade, and also that almost all of the $16,000 of expense of last year was spent in the city, and all would be this year. He concluded with [?]

[?]the best ever held." He asserted that the Omaha people had done magnificently last year. Briefly criticising the distance of location, and the insufficient transportation facilities, he said he had received assurances that the distance this year would be measured by minutes and not by miles.

"We are safe in estimating that the state fair of 1896 will leave half a million dollars in the city of Omaha," said he in conclusion.

In presenting the topic, "Jobbing Trade of Omaha, Present Outlook," Mr. Allen T. Rector began with a sunshiny talk on "Look Up, Not Down," commenting upon Nebraska's enormous crops of 1893, the prospects of a 25 per cent increase this year, and Omaha's brilliant showing at the head of the bank clearings column. And from all the adversity the Omaha jobbers have driven the Chicago jobbers from the surrounding country, leaving the Omaha jobber to repeat with Alexander Selkirk: 'I'm monarch of all I survey.'"

Mr. Edmund M. Bartlett, chairman of the executive committee of the Commercial Law league of America, spoke briefly of the coming convention of that body in Omaha this year. He assured the club that at least 1,500 delegates, many accompanied by their wives, would be the guests of the city. They must be royally welcomed.

He urged that every means possible be used to entertain the guests, for "never before," said Mr. Bartlett, "has such a glorious opportunity been given to advertise Omaha throughout this broad land," and with a humorous story he concluded.

THANKS TO MERCER.

W. B. Taylor preceded his response to the toast "Real Estate and Its Relations to the Prosperity of Omaha," by offering this resolution, which was unanimously adopted:

Resolved, That the chairman be authorized to send a telegram to Senator Allen and Representative Mercer expressing our hearty approval and high appreciation of the efforts of our friends in congress, particularly Speaker Reed, Senators Allen and Thurston, and Representative Mercer, in national recognition of and appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition.

He then discussed the relations of real estate men with the business world.

"The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition in Omaha in 1898" was discussed by Mr. E. Rosewater. Beginning with a reminiscence of December 3, 1863, when the first spadeful of dirt was thrown for the Union Pacific railway in Omaha, he spoke of an address by Andrew J. Poppleton, who on that day mounted a wagon and began:

This is the day we long have sought,
And worried because we found it not.

"So with the coming of the great exposition, the preparation of which will involve the building of a new $2,000,000[?]

Every train in the city yesterday morning from the state had on[?] a number of Masons, and before [?] about 200 had reported at Masonic [?] The first session of the annual meeting of the grand lodge of Nebraska was [?] in the afternoon. From present indications it will be a short meeting, as [?] matters of importance are to be brought before it. The session this morning will be taken up principally with receiving and acting on committee reports and a final adjournment may be taken this evening.

The grand officers present are: H. [?] Wilson of Lincoln, grand master; [?] H. Phelps of Schuyler, deputy grand master; J. B. Dinsmore of Hebron, grand warden; Frank Young, grand junior warden; A. W. Crites of Chadron, grand junior deacon; J. E. King, grand tyler; W. R. Bowen, grand secretary; Chris Hartman, grand secretary; Past Grand Master Davidson of Tecumseh.

TERRELL RETURNS TO TURKEY.

New York, June 10.—Hon. Alexander Terrell, minister to Turkey, sailed today on the steamer St. Paul for Southampton on his way to Constantinople.

 

Pluck and Enterprise Equal Carrying Through the Great Exposition—Other Topics of Interest Discussed.

The Commercial club held its regular [?] meeting under most auspicious circumstances last evening. It took the form of a formal dinner and was followed by one of the most brilliant series of practical [?] prominent Omahans that has ever [?]d in this city. The fact that the Transmississippi exposition bill had just been [?]w gave additional interest to the [?]and enthused the speakers and [?]o a high degree. President C. F. Weller presided and at the speaker's table [?] were seated Edward Rosewater, Ex-Governor Robert W. Furnas, E. M. Bartlett, A. T. Rector, William B. Sterling, Robert S. Wilcox, J. H. Dumont, G. M. Hitchcock and W. B. Taylor.

[?] the three long tables which [?]at right angles away from the [?] table were seater: Charles S. [?], H. H. Hardy, James A. Munro, [?]edict, James R. Buchanan, J. A. [?], Henry Whitney, James Black, J. [?], E. P. Berryman, G. G. Wallace, [?]empster, Frank Wead, A. B. [?]. P. O'Brien, Herman Heyn, W. [?] George Palmer, Francis A. [?]. A. Thompson, E. F. Dowd, C. [?] C. D. Thompson, William J. [?]. J. Penfold, Emil Brandies, A. [?] A. J. Beaton, E. B. Branch, P. [?] A. J. Mandelberg, Edward M. [?] Alfred C. Kennedy, William H. [?] John Steel, E. A. Dayton, Jules [?]. H. Gayheart, Frank Barrett, A. [?]ck, W. C. Goss, O. N. Davenport, [?]ant, R. S. Hall, O. C. Holmes, [?]elm, W. S. Balduff, A. Shiverick, [?]enter, C. E. Bedwell, Louis Hug-[?] Utt, Samuel Rees, C. H. Picken, [?]land, G. N. Hicks, W. F. Allen, [?]d, St. A. D. Balcombe, A. B. [?] H. Vance, George W. Wattles, [?]nell, H. E. Palmer, George H. [?]. Brison, A. L. Carson, Dr. Foote, [?] Wheeler and W. S. Jardine.

President Weller opened the post-prandial [?]y calling for three cheers for Congressman Mercer and the exposition [?] They were given with hearty good-[?]s address President Weller de-[?] many discouragements the club [?]d under, the prevailing hard [?] the chief, but in spite of that [?] able to accomplish a great deal [?] never been discouraged at the [?] get anything and everything [?] They had learned that busi-[?] could best help themselves by [?]h other and that the selfish [?]t caring for other people's wel-[?]either right or profitable. The [?] brighter day was in sight and [?]as encouraged to go on and [?]till greater things.

[?]RAH PERIOD IS HERE.

[?] Wattles of the Transmississippi [?] directory was called upon for [?]rks. He said; "The hurrah [?]w upon us. We have met with [?]at success. The directory from [?]s taken the position that un-[?]ured the endorsement and the [?] of the government the suc-[?] exposition would be doubtful. [?]we have secured what we so ired our work is fairly started. [?]ment has pledged itself to ex-[?] on its exhibit, but I feel sure, [?] what I've been told in Washington [?] it will appropriate $500,000 be-[?]osition is finished.

[?]quired no little diplomacy to [?] through congress. The work [?]omplished only by the hardest [?]k upon the part of Omaha's [?]ens. Their friends all over [?] have been importuned to use [?]e in behalf of the bill, and [?]e greater part of the citizens [?]do not know to what extreme[?] have resorted in the interests[?] All the while we have had [?]th in the speaker and we have [?]appointed. Now we begin [?] the mammoth proportions of [?]. We now realize that much [?]e done on our part. The [?] of the exposition will accrue [?]erefore the greatest share of [?] must be borne by this city.[?] our business men into the [?] firmly believe that they will [?] exposition their energy, their [?] money that are required to [?]ess."

WORK OF THE CLUB.

[?]t, chairman of the Commercial [?] executive committee, spoke upon [?] of the club. He advocated [?]me lines that the club has [?]He thought that every ef-[?]ade to bring conventions [?]atherings to this city, say-[?] encouraged the merchants [?]or the railroads. He depre-[?]ng of land or money to Allen and Congressman Mercer upon the passage of the exposition bill, expressing the thanks of the assemblage to the senators and representatives of Nebraska and to Speaker Reed. The motion was unanimously carried.

E. M. Bartlett spoke of the coming of the Commercial Law League of America to this city and appealed for aid in entertaining the 1,500 visitors. He urged all true Omahans to lay aside their bickering and to join hands in a mighty effort to build up the city.

Edward Rosewater spoke briefly upon the Transmississippi exposition. He said that on December 3, 1863, he had stood on the river bank near the foot of Farnam street and witnessed the digging of the first spadeful of earth preparatory to the beginning of the Union Pacific railway. At that time Andrew J. Poppleton exclaimed:

This is the day we long have sought,
And mourned because we found it not.

That was the way he felt over the passage of the exposition bill. He said that with the exposition would come a new union depot, greater hotel accommodations, a great market house, an auditorium, better street railway service, and the removal of the wooden pavements. He moved that a telegram be sent to Senator Allison thanking him for the assistance the Iowa delegation had rendered in securing the passage of the bill. The motion prevailed.

G. M. Hitchcock closed the program with an address on "The New Omaha." He advocated a friendly alliance with the west and made a strong plea for the support of western products, not barring the white metal.

The consensus of local opinion among citizens of all parties is that Congressman Mercer deserves the highest praise for his work in behalf of the exposition bill. While Mercer's name is on everybody's tongue, the runners of other candidates for congress are active in charging that Mercer had resorted to a mean political trick in holding the bill till the end of the session. We doubt very much, however, whether such detraction will inure to the benefit of anybody who aspires to fill Mercer's shoes.

The Omaha Commercial club should desist from attempting to hammer down too many nails at one time. If the club would center all its energies on raising the necessary funds for the exposition and bring all its influence to bear upon the railroads to agree upon building the union depot the club would accomplish more for Omaha than by scattering its fire into every direction.

ALL ARE COMING TO SEE IT

Members of Congress Show They Are Interested in Omaha's Exposition.

Senator Allen Is Complimented for the Able Manner in Which He Pushed the Bill.

Mr. Mercer's Great Work in Behalf of the Measure Commended by His Colleagues—News of the Departments.

Washington World-Herald Bureau.
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., June 11.

The Trans-Mississippi and International exposition to be held at Omaha was the chief topic of conversation today in the lobbies of the senate and house of representatives. The senators claim that most of the credit for the bill's passage should be given to Senator Allen. They say, and it is true, that the senator was the originator of the bill. The original bill was introduced in the senate by him on January 3, and was referred to the committee on international expositions, of which Senator Thurston of Nebraska was chairman. While in that committee Senator Thurston did all in his power to further the interest of the bill.

At first the bill was not received favorably in the senate, but Senator Allen being a man of great influence in that body, soon succeeded in overcoming all obstacles and as a result the bill passed. After passing the senate, the bill was sent to the house, where after long and numerous delays it was passed yesterday.

The members of the house claim that most of the credit should be given to Mr. Mercer, for they say that though it passed the senate it might have failed to pass the house had it not been for the work of Mr. Mercer. To the credit of both Senator Allen and Mr. Mercer it must be said that if men ever labored unceasingly and apparently tirelessly in the interests of their constituents they most certainly did.

The good effects of the exposition law are already felt. To the prospective investor it makes the way clear; to the property owner it gives confidence, and to everybody, delight. Yet the passage and approval of this important measure imposes upon Omaha and her people a load of responsibility and hard work such as they have never before assumed. Somebody's brains and somebody's money are now in active requisition. Both are here in great abundance. All that was needed to put them into motion was an exposition bill.

From the moment the exposition bill is signed by the president Omaha's burden of responsibility will steadily increase. A task compared with which all other public enterprises espoused by Omaha dwarf into insignificance will be imposed upon the leading men of this city by the success of the bill. The exposition is not, strictly speaking, an Omaha enterprise, but our people cannot evade the responsibility of providing a place for it and arranging all the preliminaries for the greatest exhibit of resources and produces the west has ever attempted.

—Omaha Bee, May 24.

The exposition bill has been signed by the president, and upon Omaha now devolves the responsibility and the task to make the enterprise a success.

 
99

[?] bring them to British territory in the 10th degree of south latitude, in the rear of Mozambique and the French possessions.

One army marching northward and another south, both meeting near the great lakes on the equator, means the British conquest of the eastern half of Africa and control of the Mediterranean sea and the Indian ocean, while the French, German and Italian possessions will fall before her standards as easily as Charleston fell before the advance of Sherman on his march through the Carolinas.

ALLEN AND MERCER.

The people of Nebraska, regardless of political prejudice, are today very proud of Senator William V. Allen and Congressman David H. Mercer.

From the day the exposition measure was introduced in the senate by Senator Allen, that gentleman has been persistent in [?] advocacy. When it was returned from the house yesterday Senator Allen prevented an adjournment of the senate and the prompt concurrence of that body by threatening to deliver one of his famous fourteen-hour speeches. Senator Allen also did effective work in the house.

From the day that the measure first reached the house Congressman Mercer has devoted to it his best energies and his most watchful care. Many other men would have been discouraged, but Mr. Mercer has worked under great difficulties with a determination and fidelity that have been well-rewarded.

The World-Herald desires to assure Congressman Mercer and Senator Allen that their good efforts are thoroughly appreciated by the people of Nebraska and they will both receive a warm welcome on their return home.

Nor must we forget ex-Senator A. S. Paddock, who has devoted considerable time and effort in inducing the speaker to give recognition to the bill and in bringing it to the favorable attention of members of congress. Congressman Haines also is entitled to credit for his good efforts along the same line.

The people of Nebraska thank these gentlemen right cordially for their good work.

SENATOR THURSTON'S CANDOR.

Senator Thurston is a candid man, but his best friends were hardly prepared for such new evidence of candor as it found in his latest interview.

In an interview had with Senator Thurston at St. Louis and published in yesterday's Omaha Bee, the senator said that he believed the Indiana declaration would form the model upon which the money declaration in the national platform would be based.

"It is," he said, "brief and explicit and very skillfully avoids reference by terms to any of the mooted questions.[?] unmistakably a sound money utter-[?] At the same time it avoids all [?]ion of the gold standard, reference [?]hich by name would drive votes [?] from the ticket in some of the [?]s. It is better than the Ohio plat-[?] which, when anaylzed​, is just [?]early for sound money, but makes [?] prominent by name the silver ques-[?] The Indiana form of expression [?]e more acceptable in the east than [?]d that of the Ohio republicans."

Senator Thurston has let the cat out [?]e bag. To "skillfully avoid" refer-[?]to "mooted questions" and yet at [?]ame time to elect a gold standard [?]istration is the duty of the hour.

OPINIONS BY MEN WHO KNOW

A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY.

THE JOURNAL.

Editor of the World-Herald:

Replying to your letter asking my opinion of the proposition to hold an exposition of the trans-Mississippi states at Omaha in 1898 I beg to say:

I am a firm believer in expositions, national and international. They accomplish great good, and, so far as I have been able to find from a careful study, do no harm. The Cotton States and International exposition, which was held at Atlanta from September 18 to December 31, inclusive, was of vast benefit to the entire country. The people of the north, east, south and west came to understand each other better and nothing ever happened in this country to allay sectional feeling and overcome the bitterness engendered during the late war more than this.

As a means of exhibiting the growth and development, as shown by the splendid exhibt​ of the products of the south in field, mine and factory, nothing could have been more successful or accomplished better results. A trans-Mississippi exposition would be of corresponding benefit to that portion of our country and of great interest to the states this side of the river. It would afford a splendid opportunity for the people of the two great divisions of the United States to know, understand and appreciate each other.

I sincerely trust that a trans-Mississippi exposition will be held and that I may have the pleasure of being a visitor.

W. H. CABANISS.

STRONG WORDS FROM NEW JERSEY

STATE GAZETTE.

Editor of the World-Herald.

It seems to me that the proposition to hold an exposition of the trans-Mississippi states at Omaha in 1898 is a most excellent one. Such a fair would be a most valuable educator of the people, especially those living in the east, who have no fair conception of the vast and varied resources of the middle west and the sunset states. Unreasonable as it may seem to the man of travel and broad experience, the opinion prevails in the east that the west produces more real estate boomers and outlaws than anything else. The relations of the two sections have become closer as their interests have become more common and they will be materially strengthened by any enterprise that faithfully expresses and reveals the importance of the agricultural, mineral and lumber districts of the west.

In my opinion no more favorable point could have been selected for the proposed exposition than Omaha, because of its central location and the ease with which it may be reached from all the populous sections of the north, east, south and west. The scheme, if carried forward, will undoubtedly be successful and the results must be of great benefit to the whole country. I have for it good and sincere wishes.

THOMAS HOLMES,
Editor of the State Gazette.

WILL BE A SUCCESS.

(Chicago Inter Ocean.)

The United States seems to have entered upon an era of expositions. The magnificent success of the World's fair was followed by the California Midwinter exposition, and that by the marvelous enterprise of the Cotton States exposition at Atlanta. The Pacific and southern states, having reaped a large harvest of honor, and having sown seed that must yield a large return as soon as the vexed question of tariff and currency are settled, the great west proposes a display of its resources.

At the last session of the trans-Mississippi congress it was unanimously determined that an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the states west of the Mississippi river be made at Omaha.

It is needless to expatiate on the advantage to be derived from an exhibition of the products and resources of the great states that lie between the Mississippi and the Rockies. There is not an industry in any part of the republic that will not be stimulated in some degree thereby.

The congressional appropriation should be followed by state appropriations. The new state of Utah and the older commonwealth of Iowa may be expected to be peculiarly zealous in a matter so intimately connected with their welfare.

DESERVES ENCOURAGEMENT.

CHICAGO JOURNAL OF COMMERCE AND METAL INDUSTRIES.

[?] west. At no time in the history of our country were the industrial and manufacturing conditions of more interest than today, and the rapid progress of the great west occupies the attention of the entire industrial world. Common interests demand strong organization of our business men, and a proper demonstration of our vast wealth and resources becomes a necessary in competition with countries.

A great industrial exposition held at Omaha would be representative. It would bring together the producer and consumer in close business relations, stimulating stronger concerted action and insure more economical and profitable results in material progress. It is a subject of vast importance, especially to every western manufacturer, and should receive financial support from all.

W. S. HEMBY, Editor.

COUNT ON THE TIMES-HERALD.

THE TIMES-HERALD.

Editor of the World-Herald:

Your favor is received asking my opinion of the proposition to hold an exposition of the trans-Mississippi states at Omaha in 1898.

I cannot think very favorably of it. No better or more convenient point could be selected for such an exposition.

Omaha is closely allied to the mining states of the west, to the grazing states of the south and to the great grain producing states north of it. It is the center of vast and diversified trade, embracing grain, cattle, smelting and manufacturing. All of the varied industries of the trans-Mississippi states are represented in that city.

It is, too, accessible from every quarter, having immense railroad facilities.

For these reasons such an exposition could not be otherwise than successful, in my opinion.

H. H. KOHLSAAT.

THE NEW YORK WORLD WILL HELP.

Editor of the World-Herald:

The New York World likes to do things, and to see things done, that have never been done before. Especially big things! It therefore welcomes and will do everything in its power to aid the proposition to hold an exposition of the trans-Mississippi states at Omaha in 1898. This portion of the country knows too little about that great domain, and Omaha is an accessible and appropriate point for an educative exposition.

THE WORLD,
W. H. MERRICK, Editor.

INDIANA IS WITH US.

THE SENTINEL.

Editor of the World-Herald:

The Sentinel is heartily in favor of the proposed exposition of the trans-Mississippi states, to be held at Omaha in 1898. Such expositions are productive of vast good in many ways and open new fields of industry and commerce. The west especially is blessed with untold possibilities, and such an exposition would be the means of attracting to it thousands of persons interested in its development. The Sentinel pledges its support to the effort.

INDIANAPOLIS SENTINEL.

A GREAT MOVEMENT.

THE EVENING NEWS, THE MORNING RECORD.

Editor of the World-Herald:

The proposition to hold an exposition of the trans-Mississippi states at Omaha in 1898 should commend itself favorably to all the people of the great northwest. The northwest is so vast in its area that the development of its integral parts must necessarily be greatly advanced by such a bringing together of the evidences of progress and of natural endowments as such expositions make predictable. It goes without saying that Omaha is peculiarly the proper place for such an exhibition.

VICTOR F. LAWSON.

ST. LOUIS IS WITH US.

POST-DISPATCH.

Editor of the World-Herald:

The idea of an exposition of the trans-Mississippi states at Omaha in 1898 is one that should appeal strongly to the people of the Mississippi valley and the great west. Such an exposition could not fail to show the unapproached fertility and productiveness of the greatest agricultural country of [?]

 

Pleases South Omaha People.

South Omaha people were greatly gratified yesterday afternoon at the news from Washington that the Exposition bill had passed and Congressman Mercer was being complimented on all sides. Citizens of the Magic City would very much like to see the exposition grounds located at Riverview park or on the large flat west of the city and near Seymour park. Some time ago the Municipal league appointed a committee to do what it could toward locating the grounds near this city, and now that the bill has passed, the committee will no doubt make a determined effort in that direction.

 

CONNECTICUT DEMOCRATS MEET.

Delegates Adopt a Strong Sound Money Platform.

HARTFORD, Conn., June 10.—The democratic state convention to select delegates to the national convention at Chicago and presidential electors met here today with a full attendance of delegates. M. B. Cary was made temporary chairman, and other temporary officers were elected.

In his speech on assuming the chair Mr. Carey claimed consideration for the independent voters, to whom several recent victories of the democratic party were due. He scouted the proposition to reopen the fight on the tariff issue, and declared that the fight now is, and must be, on the currency question. He asked that the convention's platform be made to contain an unequivocal declaration for the single standard and that bimetallism in all its forms be disavowed.

He spoke in praise of President Cleveland and ex-Governor Russell as uncompromising opponents of a debasement of the currency, whose leadership the democracy could safely follow. Relative to presidential nominees, Mr. Cary said he hoped that the convention at Chicago would select a man whose lips were not sealed on the question of the day, or one whose attitude could be a matter of doubt.

Ex-Governor Waller, who was made permanent chairman, spoke briefly on assuming the gavel and the report of the committee on resolutions was adopted.

On the subject of the currency the platform says:

It is a necessary requirement of the honest payment of public debts and the preservation of the public credit that the gold standard of money as a measure of value shall be maintained.

While we favor the most liberal use of silver consistent with the enforcement of a gold standard we are unalterably opposed to the free coinage of silver, deeming it a device for the debasement of our currency and compulsory purchase of silver of the government. Under existing circumstances to pay public debts in silver coin is repudiation, to pay provisional debts in coins to the wage earners and to provide for the free coinage of silver means the destruction of legitimate business and great suffering among the laboring classes. We believe that the safety of sound banking by which a bank note currency ample to supply the needs of the whole country shall be created, safely secured and always and everywhere redeemable in gold.

The platform also endorses the administration of President Cleveland, and especially approves his firm support of the public credit and his exemplification of the Monroe doctrine.

The selections made at the caucuses last night for delegates to Chicago were ratified by the convention as follows: Delegates-at-large—First district, Miles B. Preston of Hartford; Second district, Lynde Harrison of Guilford; Third district, Thomas L. Waller of New London; Fourth district, James M. Alldis of Torrington. County Delegates—Hartford, Edward D. Coogan of Windsor Locks; Tolland, Lyman T. Tingler of Vernon; New Haven, William A. Kennedy of Nauguatuck; Middlesex, Horace R. Butler of Middletown; New London, William H. Shields of Norwich; Windham, Fred A. Morrill of Putnam; Litchfield, Charles K. Lyman of Washington; Fairfield, Michael J. Houlihan of Newton.

In deference to the wishes of ex-Governor W. E. Russell of Massachusetts, expressed in a letter to Lynde Harrison, the delegates were not instructed on the subject of presidential candidates.

PLEDGES OF SUPPORT TO MERCER.

German Republican Club Sends Him Its Congratulations.

A meeting of the German American Republican club was held last night for the purpose of getting in shape for the campaign. Resolutions were passed, copies of which are to be sent to the national convention, favoring a protective tariff and opposing the free and unlimited coinage of silver.

A resolution was also adopted expressing appreciation of the work of Congressman Mercer in securing the passage of the Transmississippi exposition bill and pledging him support for re-election.

A congratulatory telegram was sent Mr. Mercer as follows:

German Republican club congratulates you on your successful efforts in behalf of exposition bill.

A committee was appointed to devise plans for the organization of the German American republicans of the county.

Officers will be chosen in a month.

Nevada Democrats Are for Silver.

RENO, Nev., June 10.—The convention of the "regular" democratic party of Nevada met today. The platform declares for the free and unlimited coinage of silver, is against taking religion into politics, favors the amendment of the naturalization laws, and endorses Cleveland in everything except his policy on the money question.

Delegates to Chicago were elected as follows: Theodore Winters of Washoe, Major [?]. H. Dennes of Reno, D. L. Wertheimer of [?]   W[?] Ely and Allen Fisher of Wells. Alternates: F. Lemmon, S. M. Henley, A. E. Boucher, J. H. Crum, C. H. E. Hardin and Harry McDuffie. Presidential electors: J. R. Ryan, R. M. Clarke and George Russel. Alternates: J. F. Angelle, W. G. Thompson and Matt Reim. The convention adjourned sine die.

They Will Support Filley.

BEATRICE, Neb., June 10.—(Special Telegram.)—The Gage county delegation to the state republican convention is as follows, and is instructed for Elijah Filley for goveronr​: T. E. Hibbert, I. L. Fiske, D. E. Allen, S. C. Smith, Edgar Brown, P. H. James, James Saunders, E. E. Harden, G. H. Johnson, Harry W. Jackson, J. M. Kilpatrick, A. H. Sadler, E. G. Drake, Noah Ryan, C. E. Tibbetts, J. M. Wardlaw, J. W. Williams, C. T. Harrison, W. R. Laflin, R. H. Wilson, Joseph Ellis, E. B. Hinds, J. B. McLaughlin, L. W. Colby, C. W. McCullough, G. M. Steece, John A. Weaver, J. I. Shaw, C. B. Rogers, S. Seaman, Walter Smith, T. H. Burke, H. Glasgow, C. M. Rigg, Gus Graff, J. C. Burch.

Instructed for Adams.

SUPERIOR, Neb., June 10.—(Special.)—At the committee meeting held in Nelson today the following delegates were appointed to the republican state convention: G. L. Day, W. H. Dean, J. D. Stine, A. C. Felt, W. H. Leigh, S. T. Caldwell, S. A. Searle, E. D. Brown, J. Warren Keifer, jr., G. D. Follmer, S. T. Christy, C. H. Holmes and F. A. Sherzinger.

At the last republican county convention C. E. Adams was unanimously endorsed as a candidate for governor and the delegation is for him.

Delegates Instructed for Bland.

VINITA, I. T., June 10.—The Indian Territory democratic convention held in this city has elected four delegates from the respective nations in this territory, and two delegates-at-large. Free coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 to 1 was endorsed, and the delegates were instructed to vote for Bland for the presidential nomination.

Washington County Republicans.

BLAIR, Neb., June 10.—(Special.)—The Washington county republican central committee met yesterday and called the primaries for June 26 and the convention for June 27.

Movements of Ocean Vessels, June 10.

At New York—Arrived—Havel, from Bremen.

At Liverpool—Arrived—Majestic, from New York. Sailed—Britannic, for New York; Indiana, for Philadelphia.

At Sydney, N. S. W.—Sailed—Miowera, for Vancouver.

At Moville—Arrived—Ethiopia, from New York for Glasgow.

At Southampton—Arrived—St. Louis, from New York.

At Rotterdam—Arrived—Veendam, from New York.

At Queenstown—Arrived—Rhineland, from Philadelphia for Liverpool.

At San Francisco—Arrived—Australia, from Honolulu. Departed—Peru, for Hong Kong and Yokohama.

At Baltimore—Arrived—Hohenstaufen, from Bremen.

At Glasgow—Arrived—Ethiopia, from New York.

[?]

A story is told upon apparently trustworthy authority tonight that the Iowa delegation to St. Louis will follow the lead of Manley in admitting the nomination of McKinley on the first ballot and go further than the Maine leaders and not allow Allison's name to be presented to the convention. In this case it is said efforts will be made to secure the nomination for the vice presidency of Senator John H. Gear.

Gear's friends are now quietly at work among the delegates of other states, and feelers are being put out. Some ten days ago the Iowa delegation had about concluded to advise Allison to withdraw from the race, but friends of Allison in Washington objected. Now the story goes that Allison realizes that McKinley is bound to win and desires to help the republicans of Iowa by permitting them to climb into the band wagon without delay. The withdrawal of Allison is said to be assured if the prospects for Gear's nomination brighten.

PROCTOR DECLINES TO STAND.

Will Not Be Vice Presidential Candidate—Convention Gossip.

St. Louis, June 10.—Senator Proctor, who has been mentioned as a candidate for vice president, says: "I do not want to be vice president of the United States. My name shall not be presented for that office before the republican national convention. Whenever I am sure such a condition is probable I shall take steps to prevent it. I don't know a great deal of politics. I do know something about Vermont politics, however, and I know that republicanism of my state is five to one for McKinley. He will surely win on the first ballot." The Vermont senator says the republican platform should be so phrased that nobody the world over could mistake, distort or argue its meaning, and that meaning should be unqualifiedly for a single money standard.

Hull Men Claim an Advantage.

DES MOINES, Ia., June 10.—(Special Telegram.)—The republican county committee has prepared rules for the government of the primary election in this county, to be held June 26. At that time the county will vote on delegates to the county convention, which will name delegates to the congressional convention at which the fight will be between Berryhill and Hull, both of this county. There has been much dissension regarding the votes for the primaries, on which each side felt that a great deal depended. The Hull men claim a victory in the adoption of a rule which will not allow all persons who voted the republican ticket in the spring election to vote as republicans at this primary. They charge that the Berryhill men wanted such a rule, and that it would have let 500 democrats vote for Berryhill. The Berryhill men claim to be satisfied with the regulations adopted.

Dawes County Populists.

CHADRON, Neb., June 10.—(Special Telegram.)—The county committeemen of the populist party met here today, W. F. Hayward, chairman, presiding. The date of the county convention was fixed for July 2.

OMAHA BILL SIGNED