Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition

 
This
Scrap Book
is personal property
of
John A. Wakefield
December 22nd 1896
to
August 18th 1897
 
1/1H 1897 -
Printed with compliments of
Omaha Printing Co.
for A. Sphit/Co. Esq.
Business & Industrial Department.
Reference Book, Omaha Public Library
 

Tombstone the Ghost Town Comes to Life Once More

The Can Can Restaurant Will Reopen, Bird Cage Theater Will Light Up and Tough Nut Street Will Again See Feuds, Holdups and Indian Raids in Celebration of 50 Years' History in a Once Rich Roarin' City.

A pile of silver nuggets between two
bleached skeletons . . .led Prospector
Ed Schieffelin to found roarin' Tomb-
stone on the spot.
 
Apache Chief Geronimo. . . .Old Tomb-
stoners, remembering his cruelties,
promise to destroy any monument erected
to his memory by Indian sentimentalists.
BY OREN ARNOLD.

TOMBSTONE, ARIZ., once the "livest" city between the Mississippi and the Pacific, is planning to live again.

Its citizenship, now dwindled to about 1,500, is preparing to revive for a week that extremely colorful period—around 1881—when every-day life was a hullabaloo of what we now call the wild west. When the noise recedes and the gun smoke clears away, the world at large will know emphatically that Tombstone is 50 years old. For it is to be a birthday celebration.

For a week the present will fade and the past reappear like a picture. Tombstone's streets will see lumber wagons coming in from the Chiricahua mountains; will clank and clatter with the noise of ore trains and mule skinners, of whips and pistols.

Arcaded sidewalks again will be crowded. Roistering throngs will be heard in laughter from brilliantly lighted bars, laughter measured by the click of faro and the rattle of roulette wheels.

Guests may see in vivid reincarnation many of the great names of yesteryear, the old buccaneers who have shot and galloped through innumerable pages of [?] and fiction. For Tombstone as a lusty [?]ant is to rise and live again.

From the start the town has been steeped in adventure of the most dramatic kind. To those who know its story, the very mention of the town's name brings to mind a rapid panorama of fighting and death, of gaiety and pleasure in wild abandon, of murderous Indians, of stagecoach robberies, of cowboy episodes, of honky tonks and dance halls, of gun battles, of all the tense excitement only a booming frontier mining town can know. Over all the colorful western towns in fact or fiction, Tombstone boasts the embodiment of everything interesting in the firm-chinned era just past.

Standing today as a drab, dust-covered collection of houses sprawled along a transcontinental highway, Tombstone is so unattractive as to make unknowing tourists wonder why it is there.

But Tombstone's glory is in its past, and that glory will be seen this fall again when time is jerked abruptly backward half a century.

All of Arizona will co-operate in the celebration, because the state is proud of Tombstone. Once it was the metropolis, with a population of 15 thousand, when the second city had only 1,800 or so. It gave to the state millions of dollars in silver ore, and billions in romantic history.

ED SCHIEFFELIN will be at the party, not in person, for Ed died years ago in Oregon, a lonely millionaire, but by proxy because he is the father of Tombstone. Ed was the gay dog who drifted west from Pennsylvania, discontent with life on a farm, and turned up in the 1870's in southern Arizona, a swanky, handsome fellow afraid of nothing under the sun. Romance lived within him, romance and the spirit to go and do, to search and see, to find and take. Exactly the type who would have named Tombstone.

Ed was about to start prospecting alone into the hills of southern Arizona one day when a friend questioned him.

Regilding the Bird Cage is now going on in
Tombstone. . .to restore this famous theater
of the old west to what it was when Eddie Foy
and other noted variety actors played there.

"Where you going, Ed?"

"Over there. Lookin' for stones," he replied, and mounted his mule to ride away. But as that country was infested by murderous Apaches, his friend gave him a parting fling:

"The stone you'll find'll be your tombstone."

That same day two skeletons, bleached on a hillside with a pile of nuggets between them, led Ed to trace a rich silver float to a ledge which he promptly christened Tombstone; and filed claim on the discovery under that name.

That was in 1879—50 years ago. Near the spot three years later stood a roaring helldo-

"Apache May"
hid in a flour sack
until the shooting was
over.
Ed Schieffelin. . . ."The stone you'll find will be
your tombstone," was the reply
". . .and another redskin bit the dust"
. . .a glimpse of a famed phase of
Tombstone's past that will be re-enacted
at the golden anniversary celebration.
(These two Will James Sketches are by
courtesy of Doubleday-Doran, publishers or
"Tombstone," by Walter Noble Burns.)
rado, the town Arizona is preparing to re-create this fall.

The job will not be difficult. Chiefly, it will be a simple renovation and re-opening, for nearly every one of the important buildings, the famed landmarks, still stand. They are, of course, in poor repair, but that will be remedied before the celebration begins.

AT ONE time the old Bird Cage theater was the most famous amusement place in the west. It is still to be seen in Tombstone, its glory somewhat dimmed by two decades of idleness. In it played the best vaudeville—Variety it was called them​—actors the country knew prior to 1900.

The Can Can cafe. . .where two-
gun men could pick a pea off a knife
across the room. . .where there
were many ladies who were known
as [?]

Eddie Foy did things for the entertainment of cowboys[?]he and miners, adventurers and gamble[?]aids, housewives and honky-tonk girls, in the old Bird Cage.   Lotta Crabtree graced its stage. They are two of several who once were great names in the amusement world, and whose memories [?] scarcely begun to fade.

The Bird Cage—so named because it was very small and intimate—will be open again, its bar in front will be tended by flabby, aproned barkeeps as of yore, while gentlemen and cowboys and miners and adventurers dressed in the fashions of 1881 lean with one foot on the bar rail, to drink and make merry.

No note of modernity will be allowed to creep in. The residents of Tombstone will see to it. Already they are growing whiskers, started back in July, as lush and luxurious as any Ed Schieffelin ever wore.

Already the newer buildings on Tough Nut street and other principal thoroughfares of Tombstone have been hidden behind false fronts, to make them "in character" with the thriving, seething municipality of the 80's. Hitching rails have reappeared, and horses will be tied there. Motor cars will be taboo, their honks replaced by pistol shots as the Clantons and the Earps again fight their murdersome duel in front of the assay office and the O.K. corral.

Over in Schieffelin hall, where more dignified stock companies presented drama of the period, where Theodore Roberts once acted, and Frederick Warde and Charles B. Hanford and others of their day, the big curtain will go up at regular intervals, and the same shows will be staged.

Modern merchandise will be removed from the show windows of the store. Modern signboards will be replaced with the original ones of their counterparts. Long-skirted women will stroll up the board sidewalks—covering modern cement—and all the men will be ornamented with forbidding pistols or knives.

DOWN in the front office of the Tombstone Epitaph, energetic newspaper of this extraordinary town, men and women will gather from time to time to chat with the editor as they used to do, or mayhap to cuss him and demand that he be less vitriolic in the expression of his opinions of them.

Incidentally, the very first editor and founder of the Epitaph, and the first mayor of Tombstone, John P. Clumb, is one of the few oldtimers who will attend the celebration in person. Not many of the major characters of Tombstone's heyday are still living, but some of them are, and will be at the party.

The Epitaph is still published in the original Epitaph building. The paper was named at a meeting in the Can Can restaurant by Charles B. Hanford, who pointed out that Tombstone's newspaper should have an appropriate name.

If Ed Schieffelin or Doc Holliday or Wyatt Earp should, by the grace of God, suddenly return to their old haunts, they would marvel, doubtless, at finding the world so unchanged after half a century. For faithful restoration of this hell-roaring mining camp, that sprung up like a mushroom when Ed began to spread news of his big silver mine, is the aim of Arizonans who are spending thousands of dollars to make the celebration an artistic event.

THE old Tombstone stagecoach, too, was held up with surprising regularity in the period when life in the west was raw. This stage carried passengers, and frequently money chests to and from the mines. Holdups were so frequent, and so often by the same robbers, that drivers said they could recognize individuals among the masked outlaws by their voices saying, "Hands up, and keep 'em thar!"

The old coach will be seen again this year, rolling into town with its crowd of nineteenth century passengers, welcomed down Tough Nut street with shouts and shots from the nineteenth century citizenry.

Doubtless, too, the driver frequently will pull to an abrupt halt in front of Sheriff Behan, and from his high seat tell with vivid gesticulation and excited voice of being stuck up again on Skeleton bend. That—the stark reality of the old days—will be the theme of Tombstone's birthday celebration.

The Indian's contribution to Tombstone's romance will not be overlooked in the birthday party. It couldn't be, because the Indian was ever a prominent figure, a danger constantly faced by every settler outside the protection of town or camp.

The Tombstone country was terrorized for a time by the redoubtable Geronimo, foremost leader of the Apaches, whose tribal enmity for white men has not yet ceased. Geronimo is the great god of Indian deviltry in the southwest. Fantastic stories and legends about him can scarcely by exaggerated, so active was he 50 years ago.

Modern students find him a fascinating subject. Modern sentimentalists, only vaguely familiar with his bloody career, attempt to idolize him at times. One group attempted to raise a monument to him, as champion of the red man's cause. But some of the white old-timers dared anybody to try it and promised immediate destruction to any monument raised.

Geronimo hated the whites, not entirely without reason, possibly, and he plundered and killed for sheer love of it until he was almost too old to ride, showing rare cunning in eluding capture or in escaping if trapped.

Under this monument, modeled after the markers used by prospectors in
staking out claims, is buried Founder Ed Schieffelin . . .on the spot where
he first camped when he struck silver.

WOVEN into the story of Tombstone is a tragic chapter which has become a classic in the western country. A party of braves had broken away from a reservation at San Carlos, and had left a black trail of burned homes and death as they moved southward, crossing the international line into Mexico, just south of Tombstone.

A troop of the Seventh cavalry was in pursuit. Their forces were increased by old settlers, among them John Slaughter, Tombstone's famed scout and guide.

Working like a hound on the scent of the braves, Slaughter located them encamped on a bench on a high mountain. As the next day was breaking, with the Indian camp still silent in sleep, the noise of army carbines sounded a terrible reveille. Bucks and squaws came tumbling from little groups of wickiups in the clearing. Those who were not shot down vanished in the hills. Pursuit was useless, so the soldiers returned to burn the village.

John Slaughter entered one crude dwelling and with his rifle pocked a sack of flour. The sack moved, and a black-haired baby girl, undisturbed by the shooting, awoke to stare at him.

Before slaughter picked her up a rifle cracked from up on the mountain side. Two soldiers promptly returned the fire, and went up to find a lone Apache buck lying dead behind a rock. He had slipped back to do what he could for his daughter.

Slaughter took her home to his cattle ranch near Tombstone and adopted her. She grew fast, proved to be exceptionally bright in adopting the way of civilization, once threatened in a fit of temper to kill her adopted mother, and herself was accidentally burned to death while still a child. She became known as Apache May, and later as "Patchy." She still lived in the memory of old Tombstone citizens.

Near the heat of Tombstone is a huge cone-shaped monument, made of rocks gathered from the vicinity, and modeled after the markers prospectors used to stake out mining claims. Under it is the grave of Ed Schieffelin, on the exact spot where he had camped when he made his first discovery.

(Copyright, 1929.)
 

"Martha"

"Martha" was produced in Vienna and was [?]y accepted, and it can be safely said that [?]Moore's "The Last Rose of Summer" [?]ed to carry this three-act opera to its successes.

(Copyright, 1929)

"We were very happy for over a year," sniffled the drab little plaintiff in the divorce case as she told her story to the court, "and then—then the baby came?"

Boy or girl?" inquired the judge kindly.

"Girl," replied the sobbing little woman. "She was a blonde and she moved in next door."

—Nebraska City News-Press.

Sick Sailor—Nurse, I love you. I don't want to get well.

Nurse—Don't worry, you won't. The doctor saw you kiss me this morning and he loves me, too.—California Club.

Tillie—And once you said you wouldn't marry him on my account.

Millie—Yes, but then I didn't know it was such a big one in the bank.—The Pathfinder.

Professor—Now I have given you only one question on your exams. Who discovered America? Football Star—Robinson Crusoe. Professor—Marvelous! You pass.—Newark News.

"When we reach that bend in the road I'm going to kiss you."

"Isn't that going a bit too far?"—Tulsa Times.

 
Page 7, 8, and 9 are one section of newspaper, cut in the middle
10/20/29

How They Brought Exposition to Omaha

Walter Jardine Tells Inside Story of Landing of Trans-Mississippi Fair, and Also of the Organization of Ak-Sar-Ben Some Years Before

 
Here we have a couple scenes of the
Trans-Mississippi exposition in Omaha,
back in the tail-end of the century. Inset
—Walter S. Jardine, who had more than
a little to do with bringing the exposi-
tion to Omaha, as a reading of the accom-
panying article will make plain.

WALTER SCOTT JARDINE is Scotch-English by descent. And many a pretty deal has he made in his life. Working for nothing a week up to $3.50 a day for Tom Murray in his local merchandising store at the northwest corner of Fourteenth and Harney streets, Walter Jardine, although a youngster not yet 15, bargained without restraint. Not only bargained but transacted deals on his own judgment that brought returns for his employer in goodly amounts.

Sometimes the profits on a deal would be just a few dollars. Many times it was more. His shrewd bargaining and foresight reached their peak in the employ of Mr. Murray when he bought and sold flour that had lain at the bottom of the Missouri River for three months at a $1,400 profit.

But one day when Walter had been alone in the office for some time save the comings and goings of Mr. Murray, the latter went to the cash drawer, and after looking in said, "Wait, there is a $2 bill missing from here."

Conservation​ ensued on the subject, and finally Walter said, "You don't think I took it, do you?"

Whereupon Mr. Murray answered, "Well, you are the only one who has been here outside of myself."

Walter drew his time. Mr. Murray paid him $2 short.

Walking down the street Walter met a man with a pair of ponies and wagon for sale. Having saved his money, Walter bargained for them. And the next day saw him preparing to go in business for himself.

Tom Murray also came to him the next day to get him to come back. He offered to buy the team and let Walter use them. He offered him $7 a day to return.

"I found that $2 bill in my pocket," informed Murray.

"Let's see it," said Walter.

Walter examined the bill and put it in his pocket. "That's the $2 you owe me. As for coming back, I wouldn't work for you again for the whole state of Nebraska. When you questioned my honesty, in fact, accused me of stealing, you did something to me I'll never forget."

So Walter Jardine become one of six draymen in Omaha at the time. A start which culminated in his becoming head of one of the largest express and transfer companies in the middle west.

BACK in the late 60's his folks boarded the ship's carpenters that came here to build the scows to put in the Union Pacific bridge. It was his job to buy vegetables for the table from an old woman who lived nearby. One day a bright idea struck him and he said to the old woman, "I'll give you $10 for all that you have in your garden, providing you let me come and get it when I want it."

The woman, eager to get her hands on so much money at once, agreed. So Walter got the vegetables, enough for the family table through the season, and sufficient for him to sell and make a net profit of $40.

When the Union Pacific bridge was building, Charles Hayes, in charge of the work, who liked the boy, said, "I'm going to let you launch[?] as the Ogden house. "Looking back from there, I could still see sleds coming across the river," recalled Mr. Jardine.

In 1888, when the Douglas street bridge was completed and people held a big celebration because Omaha had a fine big toll bridge at last, he was in charge of the parade, and as grand marshall supervised one of the biggest processions and assemblies of its kind ever held hereabout.

THEN came the organization of Ak-Sar-Ben, which Mr. Jardine says was in 1894, and grew out of a group of business men meeting to discuss arousing greater interest in the state fair and the affairs of Omaha.

At a meeting of business men the plans for Ak-Sar-Ben were made. Mr. Jardine had been custodian of exhibits and a director of the state fair and was one of the group. Others present he recalls included John E. Utt, Clement Chase, William Lyle Dickey, Dudley Smith, Elmer E. Bryson, H. J. Penfold, Judge E. M. Bartlett, Lewis M. Rheem, William R. Bennett, R. S. Wilcox, Mel Uhl and H. Vance Lane. This was followed by a trip to New Orleans and the purchase of Mardi Gras equipment. Later Mr. Jardine was delegated as a committee of one to purchase the Coliseum at Twentieth and Paul streets, which had been built at a cost of more than 25 thousand dollars. With those who had the power to sell the property he struck a bargain to purchase the same for 12 thousand dollars. Then they backed out.

Meanwhile Ak-Sar-Ben had been renting "The Den" or Coliseum for one hundred dollars a month. Mr. Jardine was determined that he would put through the deal. He consulted with Herman Kountze, president of the First National bank, and "secured" much property between Harney and St. Mary's avenue above Seventeenth. An architect was called in and drew striking plans for a brand new Ak-Sar-Ben to be "erected in the immediate future" on "this newly acquired central site."

Coliseum officials came clamoring to put through the original deal. "The price is now $11,500," declared Mr. Jardine, and the deal was made with him. Of this amount he traded in seven lots for seven thousand dollars that he owned at Thirty-third and Leavenworth streets, which had cost him four thousand dollars, and gave his check for the $4,500 difference. Then "by way of lark" the board of Ak-Sar-Ben[?] a formal invitation to the congress to meet in Omaha the following year. It was accepted. Late in November of 189[?] the congress assembled in Omaha.

Mr. Jardine had worked to get it here, but money, he says, for the entertainment was hard to get. He started the ball rolling with $20. L. M. Rheem gave $10, and from the rest of the city they got $25. But they persuaded John Markell of the Millard hotel to give a big banquet free. Other hotel men contributed in a like manner, from John A. Creighton they obtained rent free, both Creighton hall and theater, the Lininger art gallery helped, they used the Den, and out there gave a big dinner.

Despite the depressing effects of a financial panic throughout the country at this time [?] had been much talk of a western exposition[?] many cities west of Chicago. Mr. Jardine[?] that with Mr. Rheem he stood in a down[?] bar one day, and L.M. Rheem enthusing the congress in Omaha said, "Let's ask to locate an exposition here in 1898, in memoration of the fiftieth anniversary  

Suddenly
sixty-five negroes
appeared with
roast duck
[?]of his proposition on the outside. "They agreed, and kept their word," said he.

"And it may be news to you that Ak-Sar-Ben and Gus Renze had a whole lot to do with the success of holding the exposition," he added.

Well, anyway the first thing Mr. Jardine did was go out to the Den and order from Gus 285 paper mache mallard ducks, "roasted and browned to a turn." Then he went to the head[?] said nothing, and suddenly at a signal, 65 Negroes came in bearing mallard ducks steaming hot and covered with gravy. They were placed before those assembled. And when they all started to carve you may imagine the result.

Then they were informed that in the ducks were speeches which each had to read. They found them in the horse capsules that Mr. Jardine had bought. Each consisted of a short jingle which Mr. Jardine had written. Captain Palmer, rock-ribbed republican, was very much incensed when his verse told how he intended to support William Jennings Bryan. District Attorney W.J. Connell's read:

When I in politics first started out,
I don't think I knew what I was about,
[?]
 
No. 1064
B&I Locked Case
Omaha Public Library
Business & Industrial
Department
 

MANAGERS HARD AT WORK

PLAN TO MAKE THE EXPOSITION A SUCCESS

Getting Ready to Invite Exhibitors to Participate in the Great Show of 1898—Some Appointments Made.

The Department of Exhibits of the Transmississippi and International exposition is in active operation and prospective exhibitors in all parts of the United States and the civilized world will soon be in possession of the rules and conditions under which they may participate in the great fair of the western states. Manager E. E. Bruce completed temporary arrangements with the exposition expert to which reference has heretofore been made, and will ask the sanction of the executive committee at its next session and will request authority to enter into a permanent agreement with the gentleman. In the meantime Manager Bruce is proceeding with the work of his bureau as rapidly as possible, and will be prepared to submit to the executive committee a comprehensive outline of the work proposed for the Department of Exhibits. A form of blank application for space is being prepared, and also rules and regulations for the government of exhibitors. As soon as these are approved by the executive committee they will be sent out in order that those desiring to exhibit at the exposition may have as much time as possible to prepare their exhibits. It is also expected by Manager Bruce that this method will incite the inventive geniuses to prepare and exhibit some rare and wonderful inventions which will attract the attention of the thousands of visitors to the great fair.

BRUCE SECURES AN EXPERT.

The man whom Manager Bruce has retained to look after the detail of this work is H. B. Hardt. Mr. Hardt is a Belgian by birth, a cosmopolitan by choice and an exposition expert by profession. He has taken an active part in all of the important expositions which have been held in the world during the past twenty-three years. Commencing with the Vienna exposition in 1873, Mr. Hardt has been identified in a prominent manner with the following expositions: The Centennial exposition, held in Philadelphia in 1876; the London Crystal Palace exposition, held in 1884; the Alexandria exposition, held in London in 1885; the Colonial and Indian exposition, held in London in 1886; the Calcutta, India, exposition in 1887; the Adelaide, Australia, exposition in 1887; the Melbourne exposition in 1888; the Paris exposition in 1889; the Tasmania exposition in 1892; the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893; the California Midwinter fair in 1894; the Northwestern Fair, held in Portland, Ore., in 1895 and the Leadville fair, held in 1895. Mr. Hardt has an array of diplomas and medals in token of services rendered by him in connection with all of these events and is an encyclopedia of information respecting the conduct of expositions.

HUNTS ASSISTS HITCHCOCK.

Manager Hitchcock of the Department of Promotion announces the appointment of E. C. Hunt as chief clerk of the department. Mr. Hunt is a newspaper man of several years' active experience and has lately been the Omaha correspondent for a number of outside papers, both in this state and among the states of the east and west. Mr. Hitchcock stated this morning that the first work to be done by his department would be to open correspondence with the members of the all the legislatures in the transmississippi states for the purpose of lawing before them the plan and scope of the Transmississippi Exposition and securing their co-operation in support of the exposition. This will be followed by the formation of a local organization at each of the state capitals composed of prominent men in the several states with a view of furthering the interest of the exposition by securing appropriations for state exhibits. All work in this line will be done through these local organizations. Manager Hitchcock said the work of his department would be pushed with the greatest possible speed in order to accomplish as much as possible before the legislatures have adjourned.

Secretary Wakefield has received copies of Los Angeles Cal., papers from Vice President G. W. Parsons of California. These papers contain accounts of a public meeting held in Los Angeles the latter part of last week. At this meeting were present all of the members of the California legislature, representing the southern counties, together with a large number of the most prominent business men, members and officers of the Board of Trade and other commercial organizations. The meeting was called for the purpose of conferring with the legislators regarding necessary legislations to be enacted at the approaching session. Prominent among the subjects discussed was that of a large appropriation for a California exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition. Mr. Parsons advocated the appropriation of $75,000 for the purpose of making a creditable exhibit and explained in detail the way in which this amount should be expended. J. L. Filcher, secretary of the State Board of Trade, advocated a liberal appropriation, laying particular stress upon the advantage California had derived from the exhibit made at the Atlanta exposition, and specified the manner in which this good result had been felt. He urged the legislature to make a liberal appropriation, which would be an advertisement for the state and would bring the resources of the state prominently before the world.

NOW BEFORE THE SECRETARY

FINAL MOVES TO NATIONAL RECOGNITION

Dave Mercer Prepares a Bill to Remedy Some Technical Defects in the Law and Save the Appropriation.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 21—(Special Telegram.)—At last the articles of incorporation of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association have been received and have been presented to the treasury officials by Representative Mercer. Assistant Secretary Curtis received them and after examination stated that they appeared to cover all points and promised Mr. Mercer that the Treasury department would act at once. Until action is taken by this branch of government it has been impossible to move toward securing an appropriation, and this is what held up Senator Allen's resolution, which has been referred to Senator Thurston's committee on international expositions. Just as soon, however, as the Treasury department passes upon the articles of incorporation and certificates to stock subscription, the legislative branch of the government will proceed to make certain appropriations. Mercer will tomorrow introduce an amended bill to cover the technical objections made by the Treasury department to the bill in its present form. This is done that no possible slip may be made in having the exposition avail itself of the appropriation as contemplated in the bill as now a law. The course of recognition of the articles of incorporation will be very simple. After satisfying themselves of the validity of the same and passing upon the stock subscriptions, the same will be certified to the committee on appropriations and the sum made immediately available.

REVISED AT THE TREASURY

OMAHA DRAFT IS SLIGHTLY MODIFIED

Mercer Introduces the New Measure in the House, Where He Looks for Early and Favorable Action.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 22.—(Special Telegram.)—Representative Mercer today introduced his bill to amend an act entitled "An Act to Authorize and Encourage the Holding of a Transmississippi International Exposition in the City of Omaha, in the Year 1898, approved June 10, 1896." The bill, as introduced, upon suggestions from the Treasury department, changes in some particulars the draft as made by the directors in Omaha. When Representative Mercer called upon the treasury officials Monday with the bill and certified articles of incorporation from the Nebraska State department, he presented a new amendment to Secretary Curtis for revision and suggestion. The bill as introduced today makes the following changes in draft as made in Omaha:

Section 3.—After the word "museum," in the twelfth line, insert "and fish commission;' in the fifteenth line, same section, after the word "department," insert "institution," and after "museum" insert "and commission."

Section 5.—In the fourth line, after "expense of," insert "preparation;" after "transportation," in the same line, insert the word "installation." In the fourteenth line of the same section strike out after the word "exhibit" the words "to Omaha and from Omaha to Washington."

Section 6 is wholly new, and is as follows: "That members of the board of management of the government exhibit created by this act and all other employes detailed for duty under them, including officers of the army and navy, shall be entitled to receive actual expenses for travel and subsistence while necessarily absent from their homes engaged upon the business of said board. This allowance shall be in lieu of transportation and mileage now allowed by law to officers of the army and navy."

Section 9 is entirely eliminated, Mr. Mercer's idea being that the amount appropriated will have to be made available in an appropriation bill, and that the section as it was drafted in Omaha would greatly jeopardize the passage of the bill. Since the passage of the Nashville Exposition bill the treasury people have somewhat changed their idea as to the governmental cost of the Exposition at Omaha. They feel now certain that $300,000 would be ample to make an exhibit almost as complete as that of Chicago.

In view of the fact that Nashville will hold an exposition a year before Omaha and that the government is expected to make a small exhibit there, that exhibit upon the close of the exposition would be boxed and stored, ready to ship the following year to Omaha. In this case, therefore, Nashville would be paying somewhat for Omaha's exhibit. It was further contended by the Treasury department that to limit transportation from Washington to Omaha and return would deprive the Gate City of exhibits held not only in Boston, but on the Pacific coast, and, being in favor of Omaha, Acting Secretary Curtis suggested the changes as outlined above.

In this connection Senator Allen received a letter from Secretary Curtis today in reply to an inquiry of his regarding the proposed amendment to the urgency deficiency bill. The letter follows closely one directed to Mr. Mercer by the department some weeks ago. After reviewing certain sections of the former act, which seems to the department inadequate to accomplish a satisfactory governmental exhibit, the letter from Secretary Curtis continues: "This office is of the opinion that if the act authorizing the Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha were amended by the substitution of the provisions suggested, that the difficulties of administering the law would be materially reduced, because business would then be conducted along lines already somewhat settled by the practice of the department and opinions of the comptroller in connection with expositions heretofore held."

Mr. Mercer has no fear of the bill as amended passing the house, but doubts very much if $500,000 can be made available. He believes that $300,000, however, can be secured in one of the appropriation bills, and fixes that sum as the minimum which he will take.

BEGIN ACTIVE OPERATIONS

EXPOSITION MANAGERS HARD AT WORK

Department of Promotion Enters Upon the Task of Interesting Legislators of Transmississippi States in the Great Show.

The heads of departments of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association are daily impressed with the fact that the exposition is going to be a more extensive enterprise than they had conceived of. As the work of the several departments is being commenced, this fact stands out above all others and the magnitude of the affair is almost overwhelming. The managers are rising to the occasion, however, and have individually determined to put the best foot foremost and keep the thing moving. Since the information has gone forth to the world that the Transmississippi Exposition was to be a "go," there has been an influx of men with experience in the multiplicity of details which go to make up a successful exposition, and the several managers have been supplied with information which has not only been of material advantage to them in avoiding serious mistakes, but has impressed them most forcibly with the magnitude of the work in which they are engaged.

In addition to the H. B. Hardt, referred to yesterday as having been retained by Manager Bruce of the Department of Exhibits, there are several men with more or less experience in exposition work who are seeking engagements with one or another department.

The Department of Promotion commenced active work this morning. Six typewriters were installed in a room adjoining the office of Secretary Wakefield on the third floor of The Bee building and were started on the work of turning out personal letters to the state officers and members of the legislatures of the transmississippi states. These clerks are under the direction of Chief Clerk Hunt and will be kept hard at work for the next few weeks grinding out correspondence.

 

Manager Lindsey of the Department Ways and Means is sending out letters to all of the real estate dealers in the city asking for the names of all nonresident real estate owners in order that they may be solicited for subscriptions to the exposition. It is expected by this means to increase the subscription list very materially. Other steps are being taken to reach other individuals as well as a large number of wealthy corporations which have not subscribed.

AMUSEMENT FEATURES PROPOSED.

Manager A. L. Reed of the Department of Concessions is overwhelmed with applications of all kinds. A number of inventors have applied for space for engineering novelties, and this feature of the exposition gives promise of forming a most attractive portion of the great fair. Prominent among the applications is one by an Omaha inventor which has the merit of real novelty. The inventor proposes to construct a large lake which shall be at least thirty feet in depth. This is to be stocked with submarine foliage and fish of all kinds. In the center of this lake and the inventor intends to have erected a tower several hundred feet in height, forming a double elevator shaft, on which shall be two glass cars, each capable of containing a number of people. The passengers will be first treated to a bird's-eye view of the exposition and surrounding country by being carried to the top of the tower, and will then be lowered to the bottom of the lake, where electric illumination will enable them to make investigations into the everyday life of the finny tribe which will inhabit the depths of the lake, as well as of the beautiful foliage and plant life. The inventor of this novelty has taken steps to interest local capital in the enterprise, and is said to have his plans in very satisfactory shape.

Another engineering attraction for which space is requested is the invention of a Chicago engineer. He calls his contrivance a "soaring carousal," but whether it is a flying machine, a dirigible balloon or some other method of visiting the upper atmosphere he does not disclose. He says, however, that he can carry parties of 200 people to any desired height and can make three trips an hour. He also says that he intends erecting his machine at the Paris exposition in 1900, and desires to erect one in Omaha first.

Manager Reed is considering the advisability of establishing a branch office in Chicago for the purpose of better reaching the concessionaires whose presence is most desirable, especially those in the amusement line. He has been in correspondence with Chicago parties regarding this matter and says he will have a more definite idea when the executive committee meets next Saturday. The duty of looking after the affairs of the Department of Concessions has become so onerous that Manager Reed has appointed W. H. Crary as his assistant, and Mr. Crary is gradually assuming full charge of the immense amount of detail work connected with this important department. The advisability of sending a commissioner to Europe to secure novelties such as the "German village" at the World's fair and attractions of a like nature is also being considered by Manager Reed.

WHAT THE SITE IS DETERMINED.

Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Buildings and Grounds is making a thorough investigation into the best methods to be pursued to secure the most effective administration of his department. He says he will not commence active operations until the location of the exposition is determined. As soon as that is done the work of the department will be commenced in earnest. Manager Kirkendall stated this morning that the first step would probably be to employ an experienced engineer and an architect and he added that the selection of these officials would be made with the greatest care. A number of applications for these positions have been received by Mr. Kirkendall.

The members of the executive committee expressed themselves as being entirely satisfied with the amendments and alterations made in the exposition bill now in the hands of Congressman Mercer. The original draft was prepared in this city and was drawn in accordance with the result of the deliberate consideration given the matter by the executive committee at its first meeting. The alterations detailed in The Bee's Washington dispatches will have the effect of widening the scope of the bill in a few minor particulars, but does not change its general effect, as first drawn. It increases the size of the board to be in charge of the government exhibit by providing for two more members than was contemplated by the bill, as drawn, and also makes provision for installing the government exhibit, thereby providing for a large item of expense which might have been thrown onto the exposition managers. As the bill now stands, it provides for an appropriation of $200,000 for a government building and an additional sum of $300,000 for a government exhibit, but does not carry an appropriation.

APPROVES THE CERTIFICATES.

Treasury Department Acts Upon Exposition Matters.

"John A. Wakefield, Secretary Transmississippi and International Exposition, Omaha.—The Treasury Department has approved the certificates and has notified President Cleveland that the exposition management has complied with the act of congress.

Merry Christmas. D. H. Mercer."

The foregoing is a copy of a telegram received at noon today from Congressman Mercer. The certificates referred to are the documents forwarded last Saturday by the exposition officials to Congressman Mercer, containing the information requested by the Treasury Department regarding the total amount of subscriptions to the exposition, the legal evidence of the incorporation of the association and similar information.

While there is no legal requirement making it obligatory upon the president to make official proclamation to the world that Omaha is to hold an exposition in 1898, it is generally understood by the exposition officials that Congressman Mercer will use every effort to induce President Cleveland to immediately issue such a proclamation. The local officials were greatly pleased with the information contained in the telegram quoted heretofore, and say that this removes the last vestige of doubt regarding the support of the enterprise by the national government.

CONGRESSMAN MERCER.

New Honors Await Nebraska's Popular Hustler.

Washington Post.

There have been few men in the house in a decade who have enjoyed as much popularity among their associates as Representative Mercer of Nebraska. That is because he is sincerely good-natured, and large and athletic enough to inspire admiration. He is a tall, blue-eyed westerner, with a breezy something in his manner that appeals to men and draws at their heart-strings. Men who, like Mercer, combine great energy with a royal disposition, and no egotism, are somewhat exceptional. For he is known in the house as one of the greatest hustlers on the congressional pay roll. He seldom makes a speech, and therein vindicates the philosopher who observed that it is wrong to estimate a man's usefulness in congress by the length of his speeches. Omaha wanted a national exposition and asked for a couple of hundred thousand dollars from the government as an evidence of its interest and generosity. The circumstances under which Mercer obtained it would have discouraged any man of ordinary fiber, but, after having been balked at every turn for weeks, he rushed his bill through in the closing hours of the session, under difficulties that made the victory heroical. He was made secretary of the republican congressional committee in the late campaign and was one of the chief promoters of the admirable system under which the affairs of that committee were administered. There is much talk among members of giving him the chairmanship of the committee and thus practically the management of the congressional campaign which the republicans will wage in 1898. The choice could hardly fall upon a man better qualified to fill the place. He was for years an active factor in the successful campaigns which the republican party made in Nebraska, acting alternately as secretary and chairman of the state committee. He is a fine organizer and a shrewd adept at a political game of chess.

EXPOSITION YEAR CONVENTIONS.

Unusual effort should be made to secure a number of national conventions for Omaha during exposition year. Following are a few dates that may be of service to those having this feature in charge:

National Poultry association, January 12 to 16, 1897, Washington, D. C.

National board of trade, January 26, 1897, Washington, D. C.

National Good Roads congress, February 20, 1897, Orlando, Fla.

National Diary union, January 26, 1897, Chicago.

Master Painters and Decorators' convention, February 9, 1897, Chicago.

National American Woman's Suffrage association, January 27 to 30, Des Moines.

National conference charities and corrections, March 3 to 7, 1897, New Orleans.

National League of Commission Merchants, January 12 to 15, Boston.

Elks' national reunion, July, 1897, Minneapolis.

National Creamery Butter Makers' association, February 15 to 20, 1897, Owatonna, Minn.

National Sangerfest, June 21, 1897, Philadelphia.

MANAGERS MEET.

Heads of Exposition Departments Tell of Work Done.

The executive committee of the Trans-Mississippi exposition met yesterday afternoon, with President Wattles and all the members present.

Thomas H. Wells, vice president for South Dakota, was introduced, and stated what he considered to be the needs in his state to secure desirable legislation for an exhibit. His suggestions were turned over to the department of promotion for action.

Manager Lindsey reported that he had arranged with C. A. Starr to act as superintendent of the department of ways and means and the selection was approved.

Manager Rosewater gave an outline of the work done by the department of publicity to date, including his selection of J. B. Haynes as chief of the press bureau. He also requested a stenographer and typewriter, and the appointment and recommendation were approved. He mentioned the possible need of a German correspondent at a reasonable salary, but this matter was deferred for the present.

Manager Hitchcock made a report covering the doings of the department of promotion. His appointment of E. C. Hunt as chief clerk of the department was confirmed, as was also his temporary employment of six typewriters. He was authorized to send E. P. Roggen to Phoenix, Ariz., to push the interests of the exposition before the legislature of that territory.

F. D. Higbee of Chicago, an applicant for an important position with the exposition, was accorded a hearing to give his ideas of management to secure representation from other states, especially in Illinois.

Manager Bruce reported that the greatest task he had in the department of exhibits was to prepare suitable rules governing exhibits. He had drafted such rules and requested that a special meeting of the committee be held at an early date to consider these rules. He had employed H. B. Hardt as an assistant until the close of the exposition, and would want a stenographer in about ten days. He wanted authority to make a contract with an agent in every county in the United States and in foreign countries to work up exhibits. The appointment of Mr. Hardt was confirmed, and in place of a special meeting of the committee to consider rules the latter was referred to Mr. Bruce, Mr. Reed, Mr. Hardt and Mr. Wakefield.

Manager Reed from the department of concessions reported that W. H. Crary, whom he had selected as clerk, had declined to serve, but that no new appointment would be made at this time.

Manager Kirkendall reported that his time was occupied in trying to agree upon some suitable man for superintendent of construction, and the importance of the position made the selection all the more difficult.

The bids for exposition offices were taken up and referred to Lindsey, Kirkendall, Bruce and Reed to report at the next meeting. The meeting then adjourned.

ANOTHEE​DIRECTOR

A. T. Rector Appointed by Exposition Board to Fill a Vacancy.

The directors of the exposition met yesterday in a called session at 3 o'clock and were called to order by President Wattles, a roll call showing less than A dozen absentees.

The resignation of John A. Wakefield as secretary was read and accepted, and the board proceeded to fill the vacancy by ballot.

The names of George W. Lininger, A. T. Rector of Omaha, Thomas Hoctor of South Omaha and William Bell, representing organized labor of this city, were presented for the vacancy. A ballot was ordered, resulting in this vote: Lininger 4, Rector 21, Hoctor 11, Bell 2. Hart of Council Bluffs received one vote. Mr. Rector was then declared elected to fill the vacancy.

A communication was read from the secretary requesting that an auditing committee be appointed to check up the receipts and disbursements of this office up to December 1, he having handled upward of $18,000 during the temporary organization of the exposition. G. H. Payne, A. T. Rector and I. W. Carpenter were appointed as this committee.

Bids for permanent headquarters were opened and read as follows:

Third floor of Strang building, at Tenth and Farnam streets, at $50 per month, repairs to be made by exposition.

Ten office rooms and a directors' room on fifth floor of the Ware block, at $960 per annum.

Ten office rooms and a large directors' room, sixth floor of the Paxton block, at $1,200 per annum, heat and janitor service furnished.

Third floor of Brown block, sixteen.

 

Rooms at Mercer hotel, sufficient for use, for $300 per year.

Fourth floor of Bee building, seven rooms en suite, with three vaults and four other rooms, each two en suite, light and water furnished, at a total rental of $155 per month.

The bids were all referred to the executive committee.

The by-laws for the regulation of the directors, as prepared by the executive committee, were read and approved. They provide for regular meetings of the board on the first Friday after the first Saturday of each month.

A. T. Rector, the new director, was introduced and thanked the board for the honor conferred upon him and pledged his best effort to the success of the exposition.

John C. Wharton introduced a resolution to the effect that a committee composed of the president, secretary and chairman of the executive committee be appointed to devise a plan of extending the organization of this exposition throughout the Trans-Mississippi states and territories, and that this committee be requested to report its plan at the next meeting of this board. The resolution was adopted.

F. M. Youngs introduced a resolution calling for the submission of all large contracts in connection with the exposition to the directors before closing the contract. The resolution was defeated.

The meeting then adjourned till Saturday, January 9, at 2 o'clock p. m., when the question of location will be taken up.

FOR ACTIVE WORK

Exposition Managers Begin to Talk of the Details.

VACANCY IN THE DIRECTORY IS FILLED

Allen T. Rector Elected to Succeed John A. Wakefield.

BIDS FOR OFFICE ROOMS ARE SUBMITTED

All of the Tenders Are Referred to the Executive Committee.

CARLISLE APPROVES STOCK CERTIFICATE.

Plans Being Prepared for the $50,000 Building in Which the Government Exhibit Will Be Placed.

The managers of the Transmississippi and International Exposition begin to feel that the preliminary work of the exposition that is to be held in Omaha during 1898 is now well under way, and that unless some preventing providence intervenes, the display will be the greatest and the best that has ever been seen in the United States, barring the Columbian exposition, held in Chicago in 1893.

Members of the Board of Managers and also the members of the Board of Directors held meetings yesterday and accomplished considerable in the way of outlining plans for future work. They also started the work of getting the bureaus in active operation, besides receiving bids for permanent offices for the heads and working forces of the various departments. In addition to this the members of the two bodies devoted considerable time to the discussion of the promotion of the enterprise and the best way of giving it the greatest publicity.

Besides what was accomplished locally, last night The Bee received word from its Washington correspondent that the United States Treasury department had passed upon the articles of incorporation and that tomorrow President Cleveland will be notified of their approval. The same telegram brings the information that architects are preparing plans for a government building to cost not less than $50,000, in which structure the government exhibit will be placed.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING.

Bureau Chiefs Report on Some of Their Appointments.

The executive committee of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association held its regular weekly meeting at the Commercial club rooms at noon yesterday.

Thomas H. Wells of Hot Springs, S. D., vice president of the Exposition association for South Dakota, was introduced and interrogated regarding the situation in his state in relation to the exposition. He explained the situation from his point of view and detailed the things he considered necessary to be done in order to secure favorable action by the legislature on an appropriation. His suggestions were referred to the department of promotion and the department was later authorized to request Mr. Wells to co-operate with the Exposition association in the matter of state support.

Manager Lindsey of the department of ways and means reported that he had appointed C. A. Starr as superintendent of the department. His action was approved.

Manager Rosewater reported that he had appointed J. B. Haynes as superintendent of the press bureau. His action was approved after a very acrimonious debate between Mr. Rosewater and Mr. Hitchcock, in which the latter entered strenuous objections to the appointment for the reason that Mr. Haynes was "particularly obnoxious" to him. Mr. Hitchcock made his objection more on the ground of the salary to be paid Mr. Haynes, but when it was apparent that this objection did not have sufficient weight with the board he made his objections on personal grounds. Mr. Rosewater defended his appointment and the other members of the board supported him, the vote showing six for approval and Mr. Hitchcock's vote being the only recorded against it.

Mr. Rosewater was granted authority to employ one stenographer and one typewriter for his department.

MATTERS IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS.

The department of promotion was next called and Manager Hitchcock reported that he had appointed E. C. Hunt as chief clerk, and had employed six typewriters temporarily. He asked that his action be approved and this was done after some little discussion. Mr. Hitchcock then asked authority to send E. P. Roggen to Arizona for the purpose of trying to secure the passage of a bill through the legislature of that state, making an appropriation for a state exhibit, and to pay him $200 for his services. Mr. Rosewater took a hand in the discussion and said, addressing Mr. Hitchcock, "I did not raise any objection when you appointed Hunt, one of your witnesses in your libel suit against The Bee, but if you are going to bring in all of them to have this committee pay them for the work they have been doing for you, I raise an objection. Moreover, I don't believe this man can do anything with the legislature of Arizona."

This precipitated another wordy debate, which was settled by granting Mr. Hitchcock the authority to employ E. P. Roggen and send him to Arizona in the interest of the exposition, with certain restrictions as to payment for his services.

F. D. Higbee of Chicago, an expert in exposition matters, was introduced and gave the committee a number of valuable "pointers" on the management of an exposition with especial reference to securing appropriations from other states.

Manager Bruce of the department of exhibits submitted a report of the doings of his department up to date and stated that he had appointed H. B. Hardt to serve until the close of the exposition. Mr. Bruce also stated that he had prepared a set of rules and regulations governing exhibits which were very lengthy, and he asked that the committee hold a special session for considering these rules, stating that he regarded the matter as highly important and necessary to be acted on at once. The appointment of Mr. Hardt was approved, and Messrs. Bruce, Reed, Hardt and Wakefield were appointed a committee to examine and approve the rules.

Manager Reed of the department of concessions reported that W. H. Crary, whom he had appointed as his assistant, had declined to accept the appointment, and Mr. Reed announced that he would not make any other appointment for the present, but said he should require the services of an expert on concessions within the next thirty days.

The tenders of rooms for headquarters, which had been referred to the executive committee by the directors, were referred to a committee comprising Messrs. Lindsey, Kirkendall, Reed and Bruce to report at the next meeting of the executive committee.

MEETING OF DIRECTORS IS HELD.

Rector Suceeds​ Wakefield on the Board.

A meeting of the board of directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association was held at the Commercial club rooms at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. There were thirty-nine directors present.

The resignation of John A. Wakefield as a member of the board of directors was read and accepted, and the board proceeded to fill the vacancy by ballot. Nominations being in order, I. W. Carpenter nominated George W. Lininger. C. F. Weller nominated Allen T. Rector. W. N. Babcock presented the claim of South Omaha for representation on the board and placed Thomas Hoctor in nomination. F. M. Youngs made an appeal for further representation for the laboring interests and nominated William Bell, one of the three men selected by organized labor.

Messrs. Wharton and Bruce were appointed tellers and the balloting commenced.

The vote stood as follows: Lininger, 4; Rector, 21; Hoctor, 11; Bell, 2; J. W. Hartz, Council Bluffs, 1. Allen T. Rector was declared elected.

Secretary Wakefield requested that a committee be appointed to audit his books. One motion of J. C. Wharton the chair appointed a committee of three, G. H. Payne, A. T. Rector and I. W. Carpenter.

Tenders of rooms for the use of the exposition association were opened and read. These were as follows: Thomas L. Kimball, the third floor of the Strang building at Tenth and Farnam streets at $50 per month, the board to place the rooms in repair and make such alterations as may be necessary; W. A. Paxton, jr., ten rooms on the fifth floor of the Ware block at $960 per annum; W. A. Paxton, ten rooms on the sixth floor of the Paxton block at $1,200 per year, including heat and janitor service; J. J. Brown, the entire third floor of the Brown block, Sixteenth and Douglas streets, consisting of sixteen rooms, at $250 per month; Thomas Swobe, manager of the Mercer hotel, as many rooms in the Mercer hotel as may be necessary at $300 each per annum; N. P. Feil for The Bee Building company, seven rooms on the fourth floor of The Bee building at $90 per month, with the privilege of additional rooms at specified prices. The tenders were referred to the executive committee.

The by-laws prepared by the executive committee were read. They were amended to provide that regular meetings of the board of directors shall be held on the Friday following the first Saturday in each month and were then adopted.

Allen T. Rector, the newly elected director, was introduced and made a brief address, pledging his support of the exposition.

J. C. Wharton introduced a resolution providing that the president, secretary and chairman of the executive committee be made a committee to devise a plan for extending the exposition throughout the transmississippi states and report the same to the board at its next meeting. The resolution was adopted.

F. M. Youngs, the labor representative on the board, introduced a resolution providing that "all questions of paramount importance and the letting of all large contracts for buildings, grading, etc., shall be submitted to the board of directors before final action is taken by the executive committee. The resolution was generally discussed, the consensus of opinion being against it, on the ground that it was too sweeping and would simply serve to hamper the executive committee. A motion to defer action was voted down and the motion was lost by an overwhelming vote.

The board then adjourned until January 9, when tenders of an exposition site will be opened.

MEETS WITH CARLISLE'S APPROVAL

Exposition Subscriptions Satisfactory to Secretary of Interior.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 26.—(Special Telegram.)—President Cleveland will be formally notified on Monday by Secretary Carlisle that he has approved of the stock subscriptions made in favor of the Transmississippi and International Exposition, to be held in Omaha in 1898, and has passed favorably upon the articles of incorporation filed with the State department of Nebraska.

When Representative Mercer left the amended articles of incorporation and the required certification with the secretary, then acting Hon. W. E. Curtis, he was assured that immediate action would be taken. The Treasury department passed upon this matter today, and immediately recognized the gilt-edged character of the subscriptions, which amount to upwards of $350,000. To make immediately available the sum of $200,000, appropriated at the last session of congress, the sanction of the secretary of the treasury had to be had, therefore this action. Plans are being made in the architect's office for a building to cost about $50,000, and the president in consideration of the communication from the Treasury department will name the government commission to have charge of the government exhibit within a day or two. Should the amended bill, introduced by Mr. Mercer last Tuesday, be passed, he says it would in no wise interfere with the appointment of commissioners, but would give them extended powers and wider scope in which to form and make the government exhibit and also larger and more commodious building for the same. The president will appoint  

Page 3
representatives from the Treasury department, Bureau of Education, Interior department, Fish commission, Geological survey, Postoffice department, Department of Agriculture and other departments mentioned in the act. These commissioners will be empowered to employ labor and help necessary for preparing the exhibit and carpenters and day laborers to set it up in the government building in Omaha.

There was no question as to the character of the stock subscriptions as filed by directors of the Exposition company and there was no doubt as to action that would be taken by the secretary of the treasury. The fact, however, that the secretary passed upon the stock subscriptions favorably today and transmitted a formal letter of their acceptance and certifying the articles of incorporation makes it obligatory upon the president to appoint the commissioners within the next few days. This letter will reach the president on Monday and he will consult with heads of various bureaus, expecting to make exhibits in Omaha in 1898, for the purpose of appointing as commissioners the very best men who are in the departments. A number of them have gone through exposition work before at Atlanta, Philadelphia and Chicago, and it may be possible that some of these same men will have charge of the exhibit at Omaha.

Representative and Mrs. Mercer leave for the west on Sunday morning and will be in Omaha at the Millard hotel December 30 and 31. Before leaving Mr. Mercer stated that he had requested the president to issue his proclamation, but has not yet received his reply. The matter, therefore, will remain in abeyance until Monday or Tuesday, when a definite answer may be expected from the president.

IN LINE FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Central City Nonpareil: The Omaha exposition is gaining force each day. Over $400,000 worth of stock has been subscribed for.

Albion News: Nebraska's great world's fair, in other words, the Transmississippi Exposition of 1898, is now fully officered. The officers and directors are composed of the best business men of Omaha and there is no doubt that this will be the biggest thing for the great west that has ever been attempted.

Schuyler Sun: Now that the executive officers of the Transmississippi Exposition have been elected, the enterprise will be rapidly pushed. The incoming state legislature should not be slow in doing the proper thing in the way of an appropriation commensurate with the great benefit the exposition will be to the state.

Seward Reporter: The board of directors of the Transmississippi Exposition has been selected, chiefs of the various bureaus have been appointed and the work of pushing forward the enterprise will at once begin. The best men in Omaha have been enlisted in the work and the success of the great exposition will be assured beyond a doubt.

Schuyler Herald: No alse​ ideas of economy should stand in the way of a good sized appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition at the hands of the Nebraska legislature. There are numerous other ways in which they can show their regard for economy. It is a good virtue to cultivate, but they should not commence at the wrong end of the line.

Fullerton Post: The Transmississippi fair is getting into shape with rapidity and good order. That it will be a great success is an admitted fact. Nance county will be in it up to her ears. We have the best county in the state and it behooves our people to make this fact known. When the time comes for Nance county to grab hold of the towline you can bet all you are worth that it will not be done in a halfhearted manner.

Minden Gazette: Officers have been chosen for the Transmississippi Exposition and the active work of preparation will being at once. It should be made an object lesson of the resources and enterprise of the great west, and as such assist, in the further development of the greatest and best spot of ground on earth. The south doesn't begin to compare with the west, and this exposition should demonstrate the fact, and it will if all will take hold with such a purpose in view. The only speculation in it should be simply that which follows the settling up and development of a new country by a legitimate increase of business.

Hastings Tribune: It is very important that everybody in Nebraska should take a great interest in the Transmississippi Exposition, which will be held in Omaha in 1898. It's going to be a big thing for Nebraska. In fact it will be the best thing Nebraska ever had or will have for many years. The committee has already secured subscriptions amounting to over $400,000 to its capital stock, and congress has pledged not less than $200,00 for a government exhibit. Now, the thing for the Nebraska legislature to do is to make a like pledge and the exposition will be a grand and glorious success, of which all Nebraska will feel proud.

CLEVELAND AND THE EXPOSITION.

President's Views on the Issuance of a Proclamation.

Secretary Wakefield of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association received a letter this morning from Congressman D. H. Mercer, enclosing a letter received by him from President Cleveland's private secretary, stating that the president was of the opinion that he had no power to issue a proclamation announcing to the world that an exposition is to be held in Omaha in 1898, for the reason that the act providing for a government exhibit does not expressly authorize the president to take such action.

It is also stated that the only instance in which proclamations of this kind have been issued by presidents was in the case of the Cotton States exposition, when President Arthur issued a proclamation, and in the case of the World's fair, when President Harrison issued a similar proclamation. Secretary Thurber states that in both of these instances the president was authorized by act of congress to make such proclamation. Mr. Mercer informs Secretary Wakefield that he has made another application to the president for a proclamation and suggests that, whether the president issues a proclamation or not, the exposition association should notify the Department of State of the fact that an exposition is to be held, describing its character and requesting the secretary of state to issue an invitation to foreign governments to participate in the exposition. Mr. Mercer states that in the case of the Tennessee Centennial exposition to be held at Nashville next year the secretary of state transmitted to foreign governments, through the representatives of this government at the foreign capitals, invitations to participate in the exposition, and the congressman suggests that the same course might be followed by the transmississippi association. This letter will be presented to the executive committee at its next meeting for consideration. Mr. Mercer will be in Omaha about the middle of this week and the executive committee will endeavor to hold a conference with him on exposition matters.

The department of promotion is sending out letters to each member of each legislature of the transmississippi states, with a view of learning the drift of public opinion regarding active participation in the exposition by each of the states. These letters are being sent to the members at their homes.

Manager Reed of the department of concessions is being flooded with applications for space by manufacturers who desire to make an attractive display of their goods and sell their wares at the same time. Application has been made by one of the largest glass manufacturing establishments in this country and communications of a similar nature are received by every mail. Personal applications for concessions in the refreshment line are very numerous and Mr. Reed says his time is completely occupied in looking after these matters.

ANOTHER SLAP.

South Omaha is Again Given a Cold Face.

Hoctor only Gets Half the Necessary Votes,

What the Directors Did Saturday.

Bids on Exposition Site Soon to be Opened.

South Omaha got another vigorous slap from the transmississippi directory last Saturday. Ever since Wakefield announced his intention to resign his place on the directory Hoctor has been skating on the ice of expectancy, and all his neighbors were sure he would win the successorship prize. But the ice was not strong enough to stand the weight of the portly commissioner, and, slipping through, he could do no better than win second place in the contest, his successful competitor, Rector, winning by nearly two to one.

When the question of electing Wakefield's successor came before the board during its Saturday's deliberations W. N. Babcock nominated Tom as a representative South Omaha citizen, and strongly urged his election. The vote stood

Rector 21
Hoctor 11
Liniger 4
Bell 2

And Rector was elected.

A considerable portion of the meeting was used up by Hitchcock and Rosewater in ventilating the personal ill feeling they entertain for each other. Hitch was sore because Rose appointed Haynes as his clerk, and Rose was mad because Hitch gave Hunt and Roggen sinecure positions.

Both were turned down in their respective complaints.

The secretary was notified by Carlilse that the government's $200,000 donation was at the disposition of the board,

The supervising architect of the treasury has been ordered to draw plans for the government building which is to form a part of the exposition, and which will hold the government exhipit​. It is to cost $50,000.

At the next meeting bids on the site for the exposition will be opened and considered.

Once more the directors of the Trans-Mississippi congress gave it to South Omaha in the place where Katie wore the beads. In case another director should resign or die the chances are we would get another complimentary vote but that is all.

 
Tribune

MAY COMPROMISE.

Both Miller and River View Parks may be

Cast Aside and the Poor Farm Site Chosen.

The B. & M. Company said to be the Kickers

On the North Omaha Location from the Start.

Though the directors of the transmississippi congress kindly went through the formality of asking the people to submit bids on a site for the big show it believes among those who try to keep up with the inside procession of events, that the powers that be have long since decided where the exposition will be located, and the opening and consideration of the bids at the next meeting will be but a farce. When the B & M pricked its bump of generosity, and let loose that $30,000 subscription the outside boys and many others, winked the other eye and said they knew the show would be anchored among the beauties of River Park as it is contrary to the laws of modern nature for such a road to be so magnanimous unless there's something in it, and the park was exactly the location that would bring all the returns it wanted. The law of nature and location elements of this speculation are dead right, but the remainder will be found to be out of plumb. Were the B & M the only party in the deal the whole idea would be correct. But there are others. And these others are in it to an appreciable extent. To a man behind the footlights it looks as if the "others" were in it first. That they had arranged things so that the Burlington was forced to come in with a whopping donation as means of securing a compromise in the location of the site or rather to keep the show from going to Miller Park, where the others wanted it. And that before the B & M put in a cent it was agreed to have the show put where all interests would have an equal chance to fry the fat out of it. There are not over forty-five other places that would liberally suit the interests of these opposing elements, and the most promising one of all is the ground, a part of which is now occupied by the poor farm. And that is the site the professedly knowing ones say is the place compromised on and that will be the scene of the great fair. If it is the Magic City will do no kicking. It appears to be located about right to let in the railroads and motos in good shape, and is surely satisfactory in the matter of convenience to all parts of the county.

WITHIN LETTER OF THE LAW

WILL NOT NOTIFY FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS

Omission of Exact Instructions from the Bill Serves as a Reason for Failure to Issue the Proclamation.

WASHINGTON, Dec. 28.—(Special Telegram.)—President Cleveland will not issue a proclamation recognizing the Transmississippi and International Exposition. This fact was emphatically stated today by Private Secretary Thurber to The Bee correspondent.

Mr. Thurber said that he had indicated the president's action in a letter to Representative Mercer, who had been most importunate in asking for executive action in regard to the formal recognition of the Exposition. The reason given for this refusal on the part of the executive is that the law does not indicate in any way that such recognition should be made on the part of the government of the United States, nor does it refer in any way to governmental sanction except as to the appointment of a United States commission having charge of the government exhibit and recognition of exhibition by an appropriation..​ This is thought to be a vital defect in the bill as passed at the last session of congress. An effort will undoubtedly be made upon the reconvening of congress to include in the amended bill the provision for the formal recognition on the part of the United States of the international character of the exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898. Secretary Thurber, in speaking of this matter, said:

"We have had a desire to favor Mr. Mercer as much as possible in this matter, but the president after reading the law saw that it was absolutely useless to formally indicate the character of the exposition to foreign governments unless there was an absolute stipulation that he should do so in the bill. He read up on other proclamations issued in behalf of expositions of past years—that of New Orleans, Philadelphia, Atlanta and Chicago, and found that all acts creating these expositions and investing them with governmental character had stipulated that the president should issue a proclamation to foreign governments to participate with the United States in such exposition, but that the Omaha bill was silent as to extending an invitation to foreign countries to display their wares at Omaha, and therefore he would not go beyond the direct features of the act."

WILL NAME THE COMMISSION.

In all probability the president at the cabinet meeting tomorrow will call attention of the members of his official family to the act creating the Omaha Exposition and requiring each head of the executive department, the Smithsonian Institute and Fish commission to name a representative to the president, who will in turn appoint such representatives as members of the United States commission to have charge of the government exhibit at Omaha, and he will then name the chairman of the board. It was thought that the president would take his own good time to name this commission, but as he would like to have the whole matter cleared up before the expiration of his term of office, he will undoubtedly name the commission in the near future upon the suggestion of the cabinet officers interested in the various features, which, when assembled, will form the exhibit of the United States government.

Next Wednesday the ways and means committee will hear representatives of the sugar and molasses interests of the country for the purpose of aiding in the framing of a new tariff bill, which is intrusted​ to that body, and which will be introduced shortly after the extra session is called. In addition to the beet sugar interests of Nebraska, there will be present representatives from other states, who propose to go into the business of raising sugar beets for manufacturing purposes. Louisiana and the south will also have strong representatives present, who will champion the cause of sugar cane and molasses schedule, and, according to Mr. Oxnard, who is now in the city, a most interesting session of the committee is looked for.

Secretary Thurber is authority for the statement that the president has not decided upon any course of action in the matter of foreclosure of the Union Pacific, Central Pacific and Kansas Pacific mortgage. Under the Thurman act there must be a breach of mortgage first before the executive can be called upon to act, and, that the executive will allow congress suitable time in which to pass any funding bill that it may see fit, or provide for the payment of the indebtedness due the government in some way that will not necessitate absolute foreclosure. Should, however, congress fail to take action in regard to the matter, it may confidentially be expected that within a very short time after the 15th of January there will come from the executive department of the government with the sanction of the attorney general, secretary of interior and others, directly interested, a proclamation foreclosing the mortgages and the roads will be sold under the hammer to the lowest bidders.

CLEVELAND WILL MOVE SLOWLY.

"This is an exceedingly difficult question," said Mr. Thurber, "and the president means to move very slowly in the matter. He recognizes the absolute importance of the multiplicity of interests involved and he means to do nothing but what will be to the best interests of the government and to all parties concerned. There have been a number of conferences between the attorney general, secretary of war and others who have the matter in charge, but nothing definite, so far as I know, has come from these conferences, except that they will await a breach of mortgage, and this will not occur until after January 1, 1897."

Comptroller Eckels has approved the following reserve agents: Nebraska—First National bank, Omaha, for First National bank, O'Neill. Iowa—Union National bank, Omaha, for First National bank, Council Bluffs; Des Moines National bank, Des Moines, for Lemars National bank, Lemars; Metropolitan National bank, Chicago, for Ottumwa National bank, Ottumwa.

 
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RAILROADS ARE INTERESTED

EXPOSITION OFFICIALS MUCH ENCOURAGED

Officers of the Various Roads Promise to Urge it Upon the Directors of Their Companies at the Annual Meetings.

A delegation of directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition returned yesterday morning from Chicago, where they went to hold a conference with the officials of the Omaha-Chicago railways with a view of securing substantial support from those roads in the way of subscriptions to stock of the exposition. Those in the party were Chairman Z. T. Lindsey of the executive committee, manager of the Department of Ways and Means; Edward Rosewater, manager of the Department of Publicity; Directors A. T. Rector, Lucius Wells of Council Bluffs and George F. Bidwell, general manager of the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley railway.

The delegation met the railway officials in the Auditorium annex and felt entirely satisfied with the result of their interview, which lasted several hours. The Chicago officials present were: President Marvin Hughitt and Third Vice President H. G. Burt of the Northwestern; President R. R. Cable of the Rock Island, and General Manager A. J. Earling of the Milwaukee road, President Miller of the latter road being confined to his room by serious illness.

Edward Rosewater stated, after his return home, that the interview with the railway officials had been most amicable and that the committee felt the roads would give the exposition substantial support. Mr. Rosewater said that President Hughlitt had given it as his opinion that the exposition was the most extensive and effective advertising scheme for the transmississippi region that had ever been devised and he promised to do all in his power to assist in pushing the matter to a successful issue. The president said that the directors of the Northwestern would meet next week, and he promised to lay the matter before them in its most favorable light.

President Cable promised the support of the Rock Island to the exposition, and said his road would subscribe liberally. He stated that the directors would probably meet in March next, and promised to lay the matter before them with his endorsement.

General Manager Earling of the Milwaukee, speaking for President Miller, said the matter would be taken up by the Milwaukee at the earliest practicable moment and would undoubtedly be given most favorable consideration.

MANIFEST MUCH INTEREST

All of the Chicago officials manifested great interest in all of the details of the exposition so far as it has progressed, and asked innumerable questions which were satisfactorily answered by the committee. The officials were disposed to be noncommittal on the point whether the railroads would subscribe to the stock or make donations in aid of the exposition. They stated, however, that they had subscribed to stock in the World's fair and had received 42 per cent of their money in return when the affairs of the great exposition were settled.

While the committee of exposition officials was in Chicago a call was made upon Colonel Robert C. Clowry, vice president of the Western Union Telegraph company. Colonel Clowry is well known in Omaha, being a large holder of reality in this city, and he received the committee with great cordiality. He informed the committee that he had referred a letter from Mr. Rosewater to the officials of the telegraph company with his strongest endorsement and promised to do all in his power to secure a substantial subscription for exposition stock. Colonel Clowry was one of the active managers of the World's Fair, and told the committee that he had "been in the harness" for eighteen months. He gave his callers a number of most valuable points on the management of an exposition, and offered to supply any information in his power in that connection.

The committee returned to Omaha feeling greatly encouraged with the result of the trip and preparations are being made to secure interviews with the management of other great corporations which are expected to give the exposition substantial support in the way of liberal subscriptions.

Judge Neville of North Platte, vice president of the exposition for Nebraska, was in the city yesterday in conference with the Department of Promotion regarding the securing of a liberal appropriation from the legislature of this state. He was also in conference with officials of the exposition regarding a visit to other transmississippi states, where the judge has an extensive acquaintance.

ENTHUSIASTIC FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Schuyler Herald: A liberal appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition can confidently be expected at the hands of the Nebraska legislature. That will be a practical way of standing up for Nebraska.

Blair Pilot: The Transmississippi Exposition booked to open in Omaha in June, 1898, should be the pride of every Nebraska citizen, and every Nebraskan should take pride in promoting the objects of the exposition.

Lincoln New Republic: The Transmississippi Exposition is ably started with a board of strong, energetic men who will make it a success. Everybody lend a helping hand. Drop politics and push for results which will help the northwest.

North Platte Tribune: If the incoming legislature does the proper thing it will lend encouragement to the beet sugar industry and appropriate a reasonable sum for the Transmississippi Exposition. Both mean much to this commonwealth.

Burchard Times: Now is a good time to work up the Transmississippi Exposition, which will be held at Omaha, June-November, 1898. Congress has pledged not less than $200,000, and almost $300,000 additional is contemplated. In addition to this there have been subscriptions and other appropriations which makes the sum total which will reach about $2,000,000. An exposition of this sort will call attention more forcibly to the western states and show their excellence and wealth.

North Nebraska Eagle: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha, beginning in June and ending in November in the year 1898, is already being pushed by its promoters. Subscriptions amounting to over $400,000 to its capital stock have already been secured and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit. Nebraska will take great pride in this enterprise and nothing will be left undone by Nebraskans to make it a complete success.

Tobias Gazette: The Exposition will be a splendid advertisement for Nebraska and especially the city of Omaha. It is a worthy enterprise and every person that has the welfare of Nebraska at heart ought to aid it in every possible way. Congress has pledged not less than $200,000 and the state of Nebraska ought to aid it by a liberal appropriation. Let us not be penny wise and pound foolish in this matter, but stand up for Nebraska by lending aid. Success to the Transmississippi Exposition.

North Bend Argus: The committees appointed to make arrangements for the great Transmississippi Exposition are now hard at work and nothing will be left undone to make the exposition a great success. Subscriptions amounting to over $400,000 have already been secured and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 more. The exposition will be a great advertisement for the whole transmississippi region, and especially Nebraska, and all Nebraskans should be ready to push it along.

Dodge Criterion: There seems to be a pretty general opinion among all classes of newspapers that the coming legislature should deal liberally with the Transmississippi Exposition and make an appropriation for an exhibition that will do justice to our growing state, and be in some measure commensurate with the great good the state will derive from the exposition. Nebraska cannot well afford to be parsimonious in this matter, and we hope to see her get to the front as she ought.

North Bend Republican: The committees appointed to make arrangements for the great Transmississippi Exposition are now hard at work and nothing will be left undone to make the exposition a great success. Subscriptions amounting to over $400,000 have already been secured, and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 more. The exposition will be a great advertisement for the whole Transmississippi region, and especially Nebraska and all Nebraskans should be ready to push it along.

Bradshaw Republican: That the Transmississippi and International Exposition will be a success there is no longer any doubt. The Omaha people, backed by the able newspapers of the city, are putting forth an exhibition of energy that can only be fraught with great results. E. Rosewater, the indefatigable and energetic editor of The Omaha Bee, has been chosen to fill the responsible position of manager of the department of publicity. Every newspaper in Nebraska should step in line and stand up for Nebraska by saying a good work for the exposition.

St. Paul Republican: The management of the Transmississippi Exposition announces that over $400,000 in subscriptions to the capital stock has been raised from private sources, which, together with the $200,000 pledged by congress for a government exhibit, makes a very respectable financial beginning for the big show of '98. It will not be to Nebraska's interest to act niggardly in this matter, which means so much to her in the advertising of her resources, and it will devolve upon the coming legislature to make a liberal appropriation in order that the state may be properly represented.

North Bend Argus: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held in Omaha June to November of 1898 is now under way for a successful end. Over $400,000 has been subscribed by Omaha people and Secretary Carlisle had made the congressional appropriation of $200,000 available. There is no question of the benefits of this international exhibition, and the projectors are entitled to due credit. Nebraska will take pride in joining with her sister states in making an exhibit that will at once prove beyond the question of doubt her resources as one of the best states in the union. Success to the exposition is hoped for and is already assured.

Osceola Democrat: The Transmississippi Exposition department of publicity and promotion is already at work and from reports receive the indications are that there will not be a single state west of the Missouri river that will not make the necessary provision to take part in the great Nebraska enterprise. It is the duty of the department referred to to see that every state is in line with the necessary exhibits and representation. One manner in which the people of this estate can assist in furthering the success of this great affair is by corresponding with their friends and sending out such advertising matter as may be prepared. Let all put a shoulder to the wheel.

Blair Courier: Since the first whisperings of a Transmississippi Exposition, to be held at Omaha, came to our ears, we have been heartily in favor of the project, and now when it is no longer a project, but an assured fact, with $400,000 subscribed by the citizens of Omaha and $200,000 pledged by congress, we wish to call the attention of the legislators from this county to the benefits accuring​ to the state from such an exposition and the necessity of an appropriation from the state legislature. Nebraska stands with noble mien in the center of the richest country in the world, and a successful exposition in 1898 will allow her radiance to shine grandly out over her sister states and to command the attention of the entire world.

Alma Reporter: The Transmississippi Exposition is now an assured fact, and everybody may begin to arrange for a visit to Omaha in 1898. The subscriptions to stock amount to over $400,000 and congress has already pledged $200,000 for a government exhibit, so the big exposition is assured. Of course the legislature will recognize the necessity for making an appropriation that our own state shall be credibly represented at home. Everything indicates an Exposition excelling any other ever held in the union, except indeed the great World's fair, and every loyal Nebraskan will lend a hand to make it the crowning success of this glorious nineteenth century of the wonderful development of western interests and resources.

Lincoln News: The Transmississippi Exposition has passed that stage where it was but a probability. It is now practically an assured enterprise. The citizens of Omaha have demonstrated their faith in the success and value of the exposition by subscribing for $400,000 stock, and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit. It now remains for the state, through its legislature, to make an appropriation as large as the financial condition of the people will permit, and not only that, but her business men outside of Omaha should help by stock subscriptions. This is an enterprise that is not for the exclusive benefit of Omaha. An exposition of the scope and character of the one projected by the management is sure to be of incalculable benefit to the state and the mid-west generally. It will be an exposition of the resources and capabilities of this great transmississippi region that will repay many times the cost. Although Inaugurated in the midst of a depression that has taken the winter will be asked for an appropriation necessary to make a suitable showing. We believe our representatives fully realize the advantages to be derived and look with favor on the proposed exposition. The action of Nebraska will have great influence with the other transmississippi states. Let every citizen of Nebraska take a personal interest in this matter and do all they can to assist this great enterprise that means so much to her people.

Hastings Tribune: The Transmississippi Exposition, to be held at Omaha in 1898, bids fair to be one of the best exhibits of its kind ever attempted. All of the transmississippi states should, and probably will, participate in this exposition; and as for Nebraska, nothing could be more beneficial to her various interests than a successful consummation of the contemplated exposition. The people of this state, especially those who are financially interested, will make no mistake if generous support is given toward the carrying on of this work; and no citizen of Nebraska who is proud of his state will refuse or neglect to give the undertaking at least his moral support. The press of the state will no doubt do its full share in keeping the matter before the world by giving it the widest publicity possible. Sketches and letters descriptive of the various features of the exposition will appear in the columns of this paper later on and no doubt will prove interesting reading to our patrons.

 

Kearney Hub: Edward Rosewater, editor of the Omaha Bee, having been appointed manager of the department of publicity of the Transmississsippi Exposition, issues a circular letter to the press inviting newspaper co-operation in making known the scope of the enterprise and the advantages that must accrue to the states west of the Mississippi through the holding of the exposition. Mr. Rosewater's request will have a hearty response. He is one of the best known men in the west, and one of the best fitted for the position, and the work that has been given over to his management and supervision will be well done in every particular. When it is understood that the country west of the Mississippi comprises about two-thirds of the area of the country, and that is possesses all the elements of wealth necessary to make it as nearly independent of any other section, as one country can be independent of another, it will be realized that there are great possibilities in the coming exposition, which will be more nearly national than any heretofore held in the United States, aside from the Centennial exposition and the World's fair.

O'Neill Frontier: Nebraska as a whole is justly proud of the efforts now being put forth in behalf of the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held at Omaha in 1898. The work of organization has been completed and perfected, congress has pledged a handsome government display to the amount of $200,000, the capital stock is being rapidly subscribed for, different states are making appropriations commensurate to the character of the exposition, and it now remains for the Nebraska legislature to make a handsome appropriation to help represent our great and varied industries, and the success of the show will be assured. What the World's Fair was to Chicago the Transmississippi Exposition will be to Omaha and Nebraska. A glance at the personnel of the men at the head of the enterprise alone guarantees its success, especially the department of publicity and promotion, which is presided over by Hon. E. Rosewater of The Bee. The success of The Omaha Bee is a striking example of the ability of Mr. Rosewater in this direction, which alone would insure the success of any enterprise with which he is associated.

York Times: Omaha people are making a great effort to make the Transmississippi Exposition a success. They are taking hold of the scheme with energy and great liberality. The entire west is concerned in the project, but Nebraska will be more immediately and directly benefited than any other state, and the people of the entire commonwealth should second the efforts of the metropolis with zeal and earnestness. Omaha should not hesitate to give the invitation to the state, and we believe the response will be all that could be asked. The impression should not be allowed to obtain that it is an Omaha project or that the entire management is to be in that city. Suitable men from all parts of the state should be at once called into assist and should be aroused in as many localities as possible. An appropriation should be made by the legislature, not for Omaha, but for Nebraska, and the enterprising people of the state should see to it that it is as liberal as the times and the financial condition of the state will allow. Omaha is doing all it can of itself, and it only remains now for the people of that city to enlist immediately as many influential men in other parts of Nebraska as they possibly can. It's a good thing. Push it along.

Pawnee Press: The Transmississippi and International Exposition, to be held in Omaha from June to November, 1898, is an event in which all Nebraskans feel a keen interest. The success of the enterprise is an assured fact. Omaha people have subscribed liberally to the undertaking—in amount over $400,000—and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit. Whatever tends to the upbuilding of Nebraska as a whole is worthy the undivided support of all our people. In this connection to know that all citizens of the state are enlisting their co-operation in the important event. The coming legislature should be as liberal as possible with an appropriation for a creditable exhibition of the resources of Nebraska, which will be returned tenfold through the judicious advertising that will result from such exhibition. Sketches and letters descriptive of the various features of the exhibition will be published in the Press from time to time, in order that our readers may acquaint themselves with the scope of the enterprise and the advantages that will ultimately accrue to the states west of the Mississippi, and especially to Nebraska.

Lincoln Call: Through various kinds of adversity, no state in the union has lost more than Nebraska. One of the most substantial measures of restoring confidence among the people and in the resources of this state is the Transmississippi Exposition. Subscriptions to the amount of $400,000 have already been secured and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for the government exhibit. In this connection it is urged that the coming session of the legislature do the proper thing so far as a state exhibit is concerned. It is well known that the several transmississippi states will vie with each other as to the exhibition of their resources, and that Nebraska, being the chief promoter and the present home of the exhibition, the center of all attractions during a considerable period of time, it becomes imperative that the Nebraska state exhibit be second to none, and that in every particular with legislature and the people be found wanting in nothing that will inspire all the west to make the Transmississippi Exposition one worthy of the genius and energy which has led the course of empire beyond the Father of Waters. It should be remembered that there are many owners of Nebraska property who no longer reside here who should, nevertheless, interest themselves in the successful representation of Nebraska and her interests at Omaha in '98. Besides, it is none too early for every traveler from this state and every social and business letter that leaves it to carry abroad some pleasurable information or solicitation relative to the exposition. No such opportunity has ever been given to stand by and to stand up for Nebraska. What are our people going to do about it?

Seward Reporter: The board of managers of the Transmississippi Exposition has been duly constituted, and efficient men have been put at the head of the various departments. These men have been selected from the leading business men of Omaha, men who have demonstrated their ability in business affairs requiring great capacity, and under such management there can be no doubt of the success of the exposition. Subscriptions have been received amounting to $400,000, and the government has pledged $200,000 to make a national exhibit. The great benefit which Nebraska will receive from this exposition can hardly be estimated. While it is not and will not be a Nebraska affair wholly, this state will be more largely benefited than any other part of the great northwest, which is interested in the exposition. It is much to be hoped that the Nebraska legislature will see this matter in its true light, and appreciate the importance of a liberal appropriation. Other states in the contiguous territory will be asked to participate, and in order to secure their hearty co-operation Nebraska must manifest her own interest in the matter. This is not a question of politics or partisanship, but a question of business for the state, and every member of the legislature should feel a personal interest in the exposition, and give his assistance in putting Nebraska in the right attitude. Beyond question every dollar spent by the state in the exposition will be returned many times, and a liberal appropriation will be a judicious investment. It is a matter in which every citizen of the state is interested. The success of the exposition will be of the greatest benefit to Nebraska, and Nebraska should ungrudgingly invest a sum of money sufficient, with the other guaranteed assistance, to make it a success.

Herman Review: Omaha, as the center of the coming Transmississippi Exposition, occupies a similar position which attended the building of the Columbian exposition. On the business men and people of that city the ultimate success of the Transmississippi Exposition depends and much depends in getting all sections of the United States interested in its behalf, so as to make Omaha worthy of the honor which she boldly aspires to, aided by the great Mississippi valley, in promoting so important an industrial exposition in which each and all may share a part in its history. A large amount of money has already been subscribed by the Omaha business men, and an appropriation has been made by congress for the purpose of helping to promote the affair. The name Transmississippi means more than a single state or two of three states; it means in reality not only the whole of the broad Mississippi valley, but likewise the far west, clear to the Pacific coast. To provide for the millions of people from such a vast scope of country who will visit the exposition in the season of 1898 must necessarily prompt the promoting at the start of wide special interest among exhibitors and concessionaires in order to make it attractive and of benefit to the public, as well as a financial success. Omaha is deserving of much credit for the effort it is thus early putting forth in this direction. In the election of its local board of directors, many of the strongest and most influential men have been chosen. The Transmississippi Exposition means a great deal in the near future for Omaha and its environments. In connection with the preliminary work which has just begun every laudable effort should also be made to impress the importance of the coming exposition on the mind of the public, and the incalculable benefit which must certainly accrue to the Mississippi valley and its tributaries in still further developing the richest agricultural and stock raising district on the North American continent. Splendid as have been the achievements of Omaha in the past in promoting enterprises of business and commercial value in this part of the west, the magnitude and conception of what the Transmississippi Exposition promises in the way of a display of the ingenuity of master minds is bound to surpass all former enterprises ever held in the United States, and in point of magnificent splendor take rank with the famed Columbian exposition of 1893.

O'Neill Sun: The Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898 will doubtless be second to the World's fair held at Chicago. Over $400,000 of capital stock has already been subscribed and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit. Every citizen of the state should take an interest as well as pride in having his county thoroughly advertised at the exposition with the best exhibits that can be had. Boards of supervisors should devise some means whereby their counties may make a proper showing, and the legislature should not be backward in making a fitting appropriation for a state display as well as to offer some inducements to county exhibits. Subcommittees in each county, to work in conjunction with the Board of Managers, might also prove of benefit.

Neligh Yeoman: The Transmississippi Exposition projected for 1898 at Omaha, Neb., must inspire a just pride in the people of the whole country, but particularly those of the great west, and especially the people of Nebraska. Four hundred thousand dollars have already been subscribed to its capital stock and congress has pledged $200,000 for a government exhibit. A large additional sum will be needed to carry out the program on the grand scale which is intended. This exhibition is designed to surpass in grandure​ and completeness anything of the kind yet undertaken in the country. It will be the grandest display of American skill and enterprise ever witnessed in America. Favored as we are by this first great Transmississippi Exposition, we are placed under weighty obligations to lend our best efforts to make the undertaking a brilliant success.

Tekamah Herald: Every Nebraskan will take great pride in the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha during the summer of 1898. It will be to Nebraska and the Transmississippi territory what the World's fair was to Chicago and Illinois. The preliminary work for the exposition is now under full headway. Local subscriptions have already been secured to the amount of $400,000 and congress has appropriated $200,000 with promises of more. Appropriations by the different states will swell the amount of money to be expended to fully $2,000,000. The benefits this great exposition will be to Nebraska cannot at this time be calculated, and Nebraska should show the interest it takes in it by appropriating, at the coming session of the legislature, a sum sufficient to make the Nebraska exhibit the pride of all Nebraskans. Let our own state do the handsome thing and neighboring states will fall in line with liberal appropriations.

Creighton News: The committee having charge of the Transmississippi Exposition is making rapid progress. Four hundred thousand dollars have been raised by donation from the citizens of Nebraska and the legislature will undoubtedly make an appropriation for the promotion of such a worthy cause. The citizens of Nebraska should feel proud of the fact that such a grand exhibition will be held within the state; Nebraska will be the center of attraction during the coming years. People who visit the exposition cannot help but look with pride as they pass over the state, at the fertile plains, beautiful valleys, magnificent churches and temples of learning dotted here and there, and when they gaze with admiration at the wonderful advancement Omaha has made within the past few years, which is only an index of the advancement of the state at large, they will feel like taking up their abode among us, and live in a state that is soon to be the pride of the nation.

RACE MEETINGS FOR THE SUMMER.

Events Arranged For, but Size of Purses Undecided.

The details of the race meetings of the coming summer at Omaha, St. Joe and Lincoln were partially arranged at a meeting held at the Millard hotel yesterday afternoon. Palmer L. Clark represented the St. Joe association and D. T. Mount the Omaha organization. Morris Jones of Red Oak, Ia., and representatives from Lincoln, were also present. After some discussion the following events were agreed on, for which purses will be offered: Trotting, 3:00, 2:40, 2:30, 2:22, 2:17, 2:12, and a free-for-all for 3-year-olds in the 2:25 class.

There was some discussion in regard to the amount of the purses to be offered. The St. Joe and Lincoln people wanted the purses fixed at $600 in each event, but the Omaha representatives favored a higher purse. The matter was left partially undecided, but the purses will be fixed at somewhere between $600 and $1,000

The date of the Omaha meeting was also left for future consideration. Omaha can have either the week beginning June 8, or that beginning June 29. The meetings at St. Joe and Lincoln will be held between the two dates mentioned.

 
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ENTHUSIASTIC FOR THE EXPOSITION

Ogalalla News: Every newspaper in Nebraska should lend all possible aid in support of the Transmississippi and International Exposition. It will be second only to the World's fair of any similar exposition ever held.

Gretna Reporter: Now for a Transmississippi Exposition. A long pull, a strong pull, and a pull all together will make it the greatest show ever held in America outside of Chicago in 1893. Put your shoulder to the wheel.

Nebraska's City Press: The state legislature will convene in regular session next Monday. The first thing the legislature should do after organization should be to make a splendid appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition.

Emerson Enterprise: The Transmississippi and International Exposition which will be held in Omaha next year will be a grand show and great thing for Nebraska. Subscriptions amounting to about $500,000 have already been secured and the national government will contribute $200,000 more. The state legislature should make liberal appropriations and all the people of the state assist in making it a success.

Burchard Times: Now is a good time to work up the Transmississippi Exposition which will be held at Omaha, June-November, 1898. Congress has pledged not less than $200,000, and almost $300,000 additional is contemplated. In addition to this there have been subscriptions and other appropriations which makes the sum total which it will reach about $2,000,000. An exposition of this sort will call attention more forcibly to the western states and show their excellence and wealth.

Platte Center Signal: The Transmississippi Exposition is being engineered forward by the most enterprising and successful business element of the state. Nebraska should come forward with a liberal appropriation for this grand scheme in order that we may look forward with pride to the year 1898, when our state will demonstrate to the world at large that its industrial development is only excelled by our wonderful natural resources for agricultural purposes, which makes Nebraska truly "The garden spot of America."

Dixon Tribune: The Transmississippi Exposition is an assured success. Omaha has raised its little $400,000 and congress will appropriate at least $200,000 for a government exhibit. Almost every state in the union will appropriate a nice sum and be represented and Nebraska should not be laggard in this matter. It is the one chance in a lifetime to advertise Nebraska. Let the legislature this winter not be "pennywise and pound foolish," but appropriate such a sum that will give Nebraska an exhibit such as has never been seen before. Nebraska is all right.

Fairfield Herald: The Transmississippi Exposition is already full-fledged, subscriptions to the amount of $400,000 having been already secured and a government appropriation of $200,000 already made. It now remains for the coming legislature of Nebraska to make a liberal appropriation to keep it moving and to show the implicit faith in the enterprise. A number of states have already made appropriations. It will certainly be of great benefit to the entire west, but to no state more than our own. Keep Nebraska to the front for a successful exposition at Omaha in 1898.

North Bend Argus: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held in Omaha, June to November of 1898, is now under way for a successful end. Over $400,000 has been subscribed by Omaha people, and Secretary Carlisle had made the congressional appropriation of $200,000 available. There is no question of the benefits of this international exposition, and the projectors are entitled to due credit. Nebraska will take pride in joining with her sister states in making an exhibit that will at once prove beyond the question of doubt her resources as one of the best states in the union. Success to the exposition is hoped for and is already assured.

Nebraska City Press: The Transmississippi Exposition is no longer a probability, but an assured fact. The citizens of Omaha have fulfilled every pledge made to congress and the board of managers is composed of Omaha's most prominent and worthy citizens. The various managers have been selected with a view of their special fitness or qualification for the department over which each will preside. The selection of Hon. Edward Rosewater as manager of the department of publicity heads the list of wise selections and the newspapers of Nebraska will rally to his support in making the exposition one of the grandest successes ever achieved in the exposition line.

Waterloo Gazette: The Board of Managers of the Transmississippi Exposition has got down to business and progress is being made every day to make a grand success of this exposition. Congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit, and Omaha has already secured $400,000 in subscriptions to its capital stock. We hope that our state legislature will add dignity to Nebraska's fame by granting a liberal donation for a magnificent display of the products of our great commonwealth at this time of abundance of crops and assured return of financial prosperity. Hur-[?] ran for the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha, 1898. Neighboring states are arranging to assist in this gigantic enterprise, and Omaha will be the site for a "world's fair" on a grand scale.

Lincoln State Journal: The prospects for the Transmississippi Exposition are brightening and though some local prejudice creeps out here and there the interest in the enterprise is growing and there is little doubt if the people of this state give the proper aid and encouragement the exposition will be a great success and will be of immense value to Nebraska and the states surrounding it in attracting the attention of capital and removing the temporary odium that sundry crop failures and political breaks in consequence have thrown upon the Transmississippi region. It behooves every Nebraskan to stir himself in behalf of the exposition and to see to it that a proper recognition be accorded it by the state authorities and a generous appropriation be granted by the legislature. It is one of those things that we cannot afford to ignore. It must not be permitted to fail.

Schuyler Sun: Every true Nebraska citizen should take an active interest in the Transmississippi Exposition of 1898, and in every way possible do that which will tend to insure success. The advantages to the state in general and the citizens as individuals can not be overestimated. Both directly and indirectly the benefits will be felt over the entire state. The other states represented will also come in for their share, but to Nebraska additional advantages are lent from the fact that it is to occur within our own borders, and on our own soil visitors from the east stop. It depends in a great measure upon the impression received whether or not there visitors will care to make any investigation. If a general debilitated aspect hangs over the exposition the effects will be more detrimental than though no exposition were held. Yet if an air of thrift, industry, wideawake business activity is maintained, if eastern visitors are given to understand that Nebraska is not the "great American desert," but a prosperous and active commonwealth, anxious and ready to do her part in the great economy of the nation, success will be assured and benefits will accrue in proportion. It then behooves every citizen of the state to constitute himself a committee of one to talk for the great interoceanic fair.

OLNEY WRITES OF THE EXPOSITION.

He Tells How Foreign Nations May Be Officially Notified.

Last night's mail from the east brought to President Wattles of the Transmississippi Exposition a letter from Secretary of State Olney, relative to the issuance of an official notice of the holding of the exposition in this city in 1898.

Some time ago when it was discovered that the bill authorizing the holding of the exposition did not contain any provision for the notification of foreign countries, President Wattles took the matter up with Secretary Olney and requested some information upon what he considered a proper course of procedure. In writing to President Wattles, Secretary Olney suggests that when the proper times comes, the officers of the exposition association shall notify the Department of State, which department in turn will formally invite all nations with which the United States has diplomatic relations to participate in the exposition and place exhibits. The secretary writes that by following this course, the exposition will be given as much publicity as though the notification came through the president of the United States or through congress.

President Wattles of the Transmississippi Exposition association and Manager Hitchcock of the Bureau of Promotion, attended the meeting of the Woman's club yesterday. called for the purpose of devising ways and means to secure representation upon the exposition board. Owing to the stormy condition of the weather, and the small attendance, the members of the club postponed action until the meeting that will be held on January 18. In an informal way, at the meeting held yesterday, Messrs. Wattles and Hitchcock advised the members of the club to formulate some plan indicating what they wanted, and submit it to the exposition directors, at which time it would receive consideration.

Omaha and the Exposition.

St. Louis Republic.

Omaha is vigorously preparing its Transmississippi and International Exposition for 1898. Since it is the first great exposition attempted beyond the Missouri, all the western states will lend their warm interest and best efforts in aid of the Omaha enterprise. The Nebraska legislature will appropriate $250,000, this winter. With the appropriation by congress, the funds will be ample for an elaborate affair. The Omaha exposition will be one of the marked features of next year.

EXPOSITION COMMITTEE MEETS.

Action on Bids for Rooms for Headquarters Postponed.

The executive committee of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association held a special meeting this noon at the Commercial club rooms for the purpose of acting on the bids for rooms for headquarters, which were opened at the last meeting and referred to a committee. On account of the absence of Mr. Bruce, one of the special committee, however, no action was taken on the bids, the matter being postponed until the regular meeting on Saturday of this week.

President Wattles was requested to confer with C. S. Montgomery, the leagl​ advisor of the board, regarding the powers of the state, county and city to make appropriations in support of the exposition.

A letter was read from the British vice consul at Kansas City, asking for full information regarding the exposition for incorporation in his regular annual report to his government. The matter was referred to the department of publicity.

Manager Hitchcock, for the Department of Promotion, reported favorable progress in the work of his department and asked authority to employ one additional typewriter. The request was granted.

President Wattles read a letter received from Secretary Olney of the Department of State, relating to an announcement through the State Department to foreign governments regarding the xposition​. The secretary expressed his willingness to do all in his power in the matter and enclosed a long list of the official titles of the various foreign potentates for use in addressing communications to their highnesses. President Wattles said he would follow up his correspondence with the secretary of state and get the facts of the xposition​ prominently before the nations of the world.

The form of blank application for space and the rules to govern exhibitors and concessionaires were referred to the Department of Publicity in conjunction with the Department of Exhibits and Concessions for revision.

The notifications of the action of the Park board and county commissioners tendering the use of parks and the poor farm additions, were read and placed on file, the chairman of the committee being instructed to acknowledge the thanks of the committee for the concessions.

Dream Brought Tears.

OMAHA, Jan. 4.—To the Editor of The Bee: As a subscriber to the Transmississippi fund I have a little interest in its location. And after reading a communication from the poor farm committee to locate it there, I went to bed and soon fell asleep and began to dream. I seemed to see a large crowd of people assembled in a large room discussing its location. Some wanted it in one place some in another. I thought of the miserable location of our fair grounds, way out of our city among the hills,and wondered if the committee would lose sight of the general interest of the city and the location of the grounds in order to grind somebody's axe. Just then I began to cry, and I did cry and sob as though my heart would break, knowing there were such good grounds right on the borders of the city which could be had, and buildings built for the government and all improvements made could be left for future use if desired. Here I woke up, comforting myself with the fact that it was a dream and the dreadful calamity of locating it elsewhere had not come upon us yet, nor would it whilst its location is in the hands of such wise men.

SUBSCRIBER.
 

EXPOSITION AND STATE'S NEEDS.

Dorchester Star: The board of directors of the Transmississippi Exposition has been selected, chiefs of the various bureaus have been appointed, and the work of pushing forward the enterprise will at once begin.

Bellwood Gazette: The Transmississippi Exposition to be held in our metropolis, June to November, 1898, promises to be a grand thing for Nebraska and all the states near her. No pains should be spared on the part of the citizens of our fair state to make the big show a phenomenal success.

Monroe Republican: Omaha's Transmississippi Exposition should be given a liberal appropriation by the legislature. Money put into an enterprise of this kind is not thrown away, but will in time bring a big return in the shape of new enterprises and a further development of the resources of the state.

Monroe Looking Glass: The Transmississippi Exposition is making good progress. They have already secured $400,000 in subscriptions to its capital stock, and E. Rosewater, manager of the department of publicity, states that congress has pledged not less than $200,000. No doubt this will be a large thing for Nebraska. Especially will this prove true should the new system of soil culture be so successful as to demonstrate the capabilities of our state to sustain a dense population in our western portion. At least it will help to acquaint the country with our advantages for the relocation of the national capitol upon our broad plains.

Plainview Gazette: The Transmississippi Exposition in Omaha in 1898 promises to be a fair on a truly magnificent scale. Subscriptions have been secured for its capital stock amounting to over $400,000. Congress has appropriated $200,000 for a government exhibit, and there is some prospect of this amount being increased. The fair will be one of the best possible advertisements of the resources of the west, and the states interested will doubtless take pains to make creditable displays. Nebraska should be second to no state in the list, and the legislature, as well as individuals, should extend the greatest possible encouragement to the enterprise.

Madison Chronicle: The Transmississippi Exposition which is to be held in Omaha in 1898 will be the grandest advertisement for Nebraska ever vouchsafed our people, and every citizen of the state should constitute himself a committee of one to further the efforts of the managers in bringing it to a grand and successful issue. Over $400,000 has already been subscribed, and the government has pledged $200,000 more for a government exhibit. Mr. E. Rosewater, editor of The Omaha Bee, has been appointed manager of the department of publicity, which is a guaranty that the details of thoroughly advertising the exposition will be carefully looked after.

Steele City Standard: The Transmississippi Exposition is just now attracting the attention of all who are interested in Nebraska. The subscriptions now amount to over $400,000, congress is pledged for not less than $200,000 more, and the exposition promises to be second in magnificence only to the World's Fair. Every Nebraskan should consider himself a committee of one to further the interests of the undertaking, as all will be benefited by the attracting of a large number of people to the state and their consequent knowledge of the advantage of settlement here. Information regarding the matter will appear in these columns from time to time in the future.

Brownell Mascot: Don't forget the Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held in Omaha from June to November, 1898. The date is a good ways in the future, to be sure, but there is a whole lot to do in getting ready to accommodate and entertain the vast number of people who will visit Nebraska during the exposition. The exposition asosciation​ has already secured subscriptions amounting to $400,000, and congress has promised not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit. It is now in order for the Nebraska legislature, as representing the wishes of the people of the state, to make a liberal appropriation to help make the exposition a success.

Pierce County Leader: The Transmississippi Exposition is now the leading topic for discussion among Nebraskans, and it should be, for the 1898 exhibition will be a great advertisement for Nebraska. Over $400,000 have already been subscribed, and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit. Concerted action on the part of citizens of Nebraska will advance the interests of the enterprise to a high degree, and by booming this project properly Nebraska will acquire a worldwide reputation for thrift and industry unparalleled in American history. Stand up and work for the exposition, and by so doing you stand up for the garden spot of the universe—Nebraska.

Fremont Herald: Long strides are being made by the officers in charge toward the ultimate success of the 1898 Transmississippi Exposition, which is to be held at Omaha. This enterprise will not alone prove of great benefit to Nebraska metropolis, but to the state and district at large. It will attract national attention to our resources, and every indication is that it will be the introducing of a reign of genuine prosperity, which will be duly appreciated. We are pleased to observe Editors Hitchcock and Rosewater working hand-in-hand in this cause, each being chairman of responsible committees, and will agree that any one who shirks his duty toward this 1898 fair is not worthy of Nebraska citizenship. Good progress is reported from headquarters.

Hildreth Telescope: The coming session of the Nebraska legislature will be called upon to make an appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898, and it is to be earnestly hoped that it will be a liberal one. Over $400,000 has already been secured in subscriptions to its capital stock, and congress has appropriated $200,000 to make a government exhibit, and now it remains for Nebraska to do the right thing. It will be the poorest kind of economy for our legislature to refuse to make a liberal appropriation. We may never again have such an opportunity to show to the world the vast resources of our great commonwealth. Every Nebraskan who loves his state and takes pride in her development will take off his coat and do everything in his power to make the Transmississippi Exposition in 1898 a grand success in every respect.

Crete Vidette: The exposition of 1898 promises to be to Omaha and Nebraska what the Columbian Exposition was to Chicago and Illinois. Located in the center of the greatest corn belt in the world, and upon the edge of what was once termed the American desert, thousands of people int he eastern states will take advantage of the low rates and visit our state next year. If properly advertised in the south more people from that section will visit Nebraska next year than have ever been upon her fertile soil. The enterprising citizens of Omaha have already contributed $400,000 to its capital stock and congress has pledged not less than $300,000 more. The various legislatures this winter will make liberal appropriations and an exhibit of western enterprise will be given commensurate with our great resources. This is a natural enterprise at our very door and should enlist the hearty co-operation of every citizen of the commonwealth. Let no effort be spared to make the Transmississippi Exposition a grand success.

Elmwood Leader-Echo: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha, beginning in June and ending in November, 1898, deserves the hearty support and co-operation of every resident of Nebraska; for, by our hearty support we will draw the other western states more closely into the project. There has been already subscribed over $400,000 of capital, and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit. Surely this will be a wonderful thing for Nebraska, and the results to our state financially would be inestimable. Nebraska is a glorious state and the more nearly the people of the cast are brought into contact with us the faster we will gain in population and capitalists to invest in the development of this grand state. We take pleasure in heartily endorsing this grand move and hope the people of the west will feel it their duty, as well as their pleasure, to aid in this project as much as is in their power. Nebraska and its citizens ought to, and we feel sure they will, take pride in this exposition and do all in their power to make it a grand success. Now, dear readers, let us put on our Sunday clothes and show the people of the east that we are a generous and hospital people. Let us all contribute what we can and do all that lies in our power toward forwarding this grand enterprise. Your farm products will be in demand and the value of your property and farms will be enhanced by this great gathering of people in our midst.

ASKED TO AID THE EXPOSITION

Delegation Meets the Union Pacific Receivers This Afternoon.

The receivers of the Union Pacific were in session again his morning and were busily engaged the entire morning with routine matters of the company. The union depot matter was not touched upon. Chairman Z. T. Lindsey of the Ways and Means bureau of the exposition appeared before them an requested a hearing for a delegation from the exposition directory. It was decided that the delegation should be met this afternoon at 3 o'clock. At that time the Union Pacific receivers will be formally asked to contribute their share toward the exposition.

President Clark, General Manager Dickinson and the receivers will go west to Salt Lake City tomorrow morning in a special train of three cars. There they will attend the foreclosure sale of the Oregon Short Line and Utah Northern. It was expected that Samuel Carr of the purchasing committee would spend the day in Omaha, and go west with the receivers tomorrow morning, but he passed through this morning without stopping.

ENTHUSIASTIC FOR THE EXPOSITION

Surprise Herald: The Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898 is fast getting into shape. The Omaha people have subscribed $400,000 to its capital stock, congress has donated $200,000 and in all probabilities our coming legislature will vote a liberal appropriation for the exhibition. This exposition will certainly be of great benefit to our state in general. It will bring people and money into our state and, indirectly, we will all be benefited. We think the exposition should receive the hearty co-operation of all Nebraska people and we believe it will.

Fairfield News-Herald: The Transmississippi Exposition is already full-fledged, subscriptions to the amount of $400,000 having been already secured, and a government appropriation of $200,000 already made. It now remains for the coming legislature of Nebraska to make a liberal appropriation to keep it moving and to show the implicit faith in the enterprise. A number of states have already made appropriations. It will certainly be of great benefit to the entire west, but to no state more than our own. Keep Nebraska to the front for a successful exposition at Omaha in 1898.

Hildreth Telescope: The coming session of the Nebraska legislature will be called upon to make an appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898, and it is to be earnestly hoped that it will be a liberal one. Over $400,000 has already been secured in subscriptions to its capital stock and congress has appropriated $200,000 to make a government exhibit, and now it remains for Nebraska to do the right thing. It will be the poorest kind of economy for our legislature to refuse to make a liberal appropriation. We may never again have such an opportunity to show to the world the vast resources of our great commonwealth. Every Nebraska who loves his state and takes pride in her development will take off his coat and do everything in his power to make the Transmississippi Exposition in 1898 a grand success in every respect.

Dawson Newsboy: Transmississippi Exposition, to be held at Omaha, Neb., in 1898, bids fair to be one of the beset exhibits of its kind ever attempted. All of the transmississippi states should, and probably will, participate in this exposition; and as for Nebraska nothing could be more beneficial to her various interests than a successful consummation of the contemplated exposition. The people of this state, especially such who are financially interested will make no mistake if generous support is given toward the carrying on of this work; and no citizen of Nebraska who is proud of his state will refuse or neglect to give the undertaking at least his moral support. The press of the state will no doubt do its full share in keeping the matter before the world by giving it the wildest publicity possible. Sketches and letters descriptive of the various features of the exposition will appear int he columns of this paper later on, and no doubt will prove interesting reading to our patrons.

Battle Creek Republican: The Transmississippi Exposition will mean much for Nebraska, as well as all the states in the transmississippi region. But as it is to be held in Omaha, it is particularly important that Nebraska should lead out with as liberal inducements as she can afford. Other states will follow her example when they become fully aware of the vast benefit that will inevitably follow an exposition of such broad environment. People from the east and south will be attracted to this country with their money. They will see the biggest and best field for investment on earth. They will invest, and likely kick themselves for not coming sooner and taking advantage of a good thing. Foreign countries will be invited to participate in the exposition, and it will be little less than a World's fair if the intentions of its promoters are successfully carried out. Subscriptions amounting to over $400,000 are already secured, and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit.

Bloomington Echo: It is with considerable pleasure that the Echo notes the great progress that is being made in the initiatory work of the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha. Already subscriptions of over $400,000 have been secured, together with the sum of $200,000 appropriated by the government, is a guaranty that it will be a success. This enterprise is one in which every citizen in the state should lend all of their aid and assistance, for its benefits to Nebraska will be of untold greatness. The state legislature should now do the handsome thing at its approaching session by appropriating a sufficient sum to enable the state to take a front rank in the manner of display. Among the officers at the heads of departments is Editor Rosewater of The Bee, as manager of the department of publicity, which fact is a guaranty that the public will at all times be fully cognizant of all that is happening during the preparatory work. Stand up for Nebraska by working for the Omaha exposition.

Central City Nonpareil: The Nonpareil is a thorough believer in the benefits of advertising. It advocates it on the part of local merchants, and when it comes to the broader scale of the state we adhere to the same policy. When the enterprising men of our western states conclude that a transmississippi exposition would be a good thing for the industrial interests of the west, the Nonpareil thinks they have done about the proper thing and stands ready to put its shoulder to the wheel. The fact is, Nebraska needs a good advertisement. Stories [?]her poverty have permeated the east until [?]ople have begun to believe that Nebraska [?]the very center of the great western Sa [?]ra, and nothing will so effectually dispel [?]is idea and open the way for immigration [?]d investment as a visit to the state where [?]y raise so much corn there isn't time enough to crib it between crops. By all means let the state legislature encourage the enterprise by an appropriate appropriation, and every loyal citizen lend his hearty cooperation, and Nebraska will leave behind her the memory of past discouragements and resume again her old position of industrial supremacy.

 
backside of article

some time and discussion was a Transmississippi exposition.

When the resolution proposing the Trans-Mississippi exposition was introduced, the speaker said there was a speech made in favor of locating it in Omaha by a man more eloquent than he, and, as it was appropriate, President Wattles read from the speech of W. J. Bryan before the Trans-Mississippi congress favoring the exposition at Omaha.

[?]tered today. There are about 1,400 entries, and some of the finest bird every shown at a Nebraska poultry exhibition. There is a great variety on exhibition, but the Leghorns, Brahmas, Cochins and Plymouth Rocks outnumbered all the others. The exhibition is being held in the Herpolsheimer block on N street. The award of prizes and election of officers will take place on Thursday.

IMPROVED STOCK BREEDE RS.

Meet and Form a State Organization—Banquet Given

 
Page 9

ASK STATE APPROVAL

Promoters of Trans-Mississippi Bill Appear Before Ways and Means Committee.

Legislative Hall Crowded With Members and Senators to Hear the Arguments.

Messrs. Wattles and Hitchcock Give Reasons for Asking the State for Liberal Appropriation.

Wooster of Merrick Represents Those Opposed to Giving a Cent to Aid the Cause.

History of the Exposition Movement Gone Into—What the West May Expect to Reap by the Enterprise.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Lincoln, Neb., Jan. 19.—There was an expression of the interest in the Trans-Mississippi exposition bill evidenced tonight by the crowds which filled the floor, lobby and galleries of representative hall to hear the discussion before the house committee on finance, ways and means.

This meeting had been arranged for several days ago by the committee. There is a rule of both house of the legislature which requires that the proposer of a bill shall be given an opportunity to appear before the committee to which it is referred and present his arguments in its favor.

On account of the public interest in the exposition appropriation bill the committee on finance, ways and mean, to whom it had been referred, concluded that it would be nothing more than proper to invite all the members of the house and senate to hear the discussion. President G. W. Wattles of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition company and G. M. Hitchcock, head of the bureau of promotion, and author of the appropriation bill, had been invited to present the arguments in favor of the measure. To accommodate all who were invited the committee had asked for and been granted the use of representative hall for the meeting. Representative Charles Wooster of Merrick applied for permission to present the side of the opponents of the bill and Chairman Clark of the ways and means committee made the division so as to permit both sides being heard.

LARGE HALL FILLED.

At 8 o'clock tonight representative hall was filled with members of both houses, hardly a representative or senator being absent. The lobbies and galleries were filled with spectators, many ladies being in the crowd. Promptly at the hour for opening, Chairman Ralph Clark ascended to the speaker's desk and called the meeting to order. The speakers of the evening were seated in the space between the speaker's stand and the clerk's desk. Chairman Clark announced that the arrangement of the order of the evening was for President Wattles to open briefly, G. M. Hitchcock to follow, then Representative Wooster would answer and Mr. Hitchcock would reply. This was the order in which the speeches came. The brunt of the battle for and against the exposition was borne by the two last named speakers, President Wattles merely outlining the history of the inception and growth of the exposition idea.

The interest already felt in the bill was vastly increased by public discussion and both sides had a full presentation. Wooster made several telling points and brought out applause. It was no one-sided audience, but one which was ready to pay a tribute to a deftly turned point or rounded period.

Mr. Hitchcock's appeal to the patriotism of Nebraskans and his declaration of confidence that permanent prosperity could only come from the restoration of bimetallism brought rounds of applause that showed that the sentiments were shared by the hearers. Chairman Clark introduced President Wattles and the latter said:

WATTLES' ADDRESS.

"I deem it an honor to appear before you tonight to explain in a businesslike manner the project in which the people of the states of the Trans-Mississippi region are interested."

Briefly he described the manner in which the Trans-Mississippi congress was made up, and the place where it had held its eighth annual session. He then gave the history of the discussion of the conditions of business at the congress held at Omaha. Among the many things to which this congress devoted some time and discussion was a Trans-Mississippi exposition.

When the resolution proposing the Trans-Mississippi exposition was introduced, the speaker said there was a speech made in favor of locating it in Omaha by a man more eloquent than he, and, as it was appropriate, President Wattles read from the speech of W. J. Bryan before the Trans-Mississippi congress favoring the exposition at Omaha. The subsequent action of that congress in voting to favor the location at Omaha, the ratification of that act by the citizens of Omaha, the action of congress in passing the Allen bill and the subscription of $425,000 by the citizens of Omaha to comply with the conditions of the congressional appropriation of $200,000, were recited.

This action of congress had made the Trans-Mississippi exposition a national affair. It was never an Omaha affair. The Trans-Mississippi congress had selected that city, and the city had undertaken the burden. Several states had bills pending by which appropriation are promised. Congress is being asked to make the national appropriation $500,000. The speaker said he did not come before the legislature as the representative of beggars, but as equal partners in the industrial movement.

NO MONEY MAKING SCHEME.

President Wattles was succeeded by G. M. Hitchcock, head of the bureau of promotion. The speaker was received with applause. He did not come as the representative of any city or any corporation or any person. The subscriptions by the people of Omaha were put in without the expectation of any return being received therefor. What had been subscribed had been put in knowing it would never return a cent. There was no money to pay to secure legislation. The money raised had been raised to hold an exposition. The representatives of the Trans-Mississippi exposition came not to ask favors. They had done their part and came to ask the legislature to do its part for the honor and credit of the state. If the legislature does not do its part the Trans-Mississippi exposition is dead.

Because the business of the state is stagnated, the state treasury strained to its utmost limits, is no reason why such an appropriation should not be made, but is a reason why it should be made. It will inaugurate a feeling that will result in higher values and increase the volume of revenue to the state. Business is stagnant because immigration has been turned away from the state. Make immigration return and prosperity will return.

The amount asked for had been cut down to the limit which it was considered safe. A small appropriation would be wrong. To make the exposition what it should be, it should be a great one. Ex-Governor Frunas had recommended that the bill ask for $500,000. It had been cut by the speaker to the smallest limit. The great expositions which have been held and attracted visitors were mentioned. He appealed to his hearers to make Nebraska the Mecca for the tourists of the world for one year.

SENTIMENT WELL RECEIVED.

As a bimetallist he believed that permanent prosperity could only come when bimetallism is re-established.

This sentiment elicited applause. The speaker referred to the newspaper men's axiom that when business is dull you must advertise, and appealed to Representative Wooster as a newspaper man to know if he did not indorse​ that.

The speaker then took up some of the points in the bill which had called out criticism. These matters were for the careful consideration of the members. What Nebraska did would vitally affect the action of other states. I have nothing further to say until my friend, Mr. Wooster, has given more occasion for further speech.

The chairman introduced Mr. Wooster as one who had been selected to present the opposition. Mr. Wooster was received with a round of applause. He said that this was a hearing in reality before a joint session of the two houses and the gentlemen were here to influence the two houses. He was not here by choice, he was invited to come and had been selected by those opposed to the Omaha Trans-Mississippi exposition.

NO BENEFIT TO FARMERS.

He described the Trans-Mississippi congress, in which the idea originated, as like similar congresses which he had attended, as composed of a job lot of politicians. He wanted to know if the Trans-Mississippi exposition was not an Omaha project for the benefit of Omaha why was it that out of fifty directors not one was from outside of the city, why was it that only one laboring man was on the list. The gentlemen who had spoken were here as the representatives of the capitalists of Omaha.

The speaker was here as the representative of the farmer. The exposition would not benefit the farmer, it would be a detriment to the whole state outside of Omaha. He cited the case of the Columbian exposition, which drained money out of this and other states and the money had stayed in Chicago, where the visitors left it. He thought his constituents had sent him here, not to make some capitalist buy his farm, but to pass such laws as would permit the farmers of the state to keep their farms. He declared that the legislature should not give one cent to the Trans-Mississippi exposition. This brought out applause and laughter from the galleries. The state is as a state, he declared, bankrupt; there are some $2,000,000 of delinquent taxes which are not paid, not because the people are dishonest, but because they could not raise the money.

EIGHT-CENT CORN.

"Talk about taking money out of the state treasury," said he, "why, they have been trying to get money into the treasury for some time, and with very poor success. You had as well talk about getting blood out of a turnip. Shall we put additional burdens on these people?"

There were cries of "no, no."

It is simply outrageous and an imposition on the people to ask that such an appropriation should be asked. If submitted to a vote of the people, a proposition to vote the sum of $100,000 would be voted down, unless the corn crop could be sold for more than 8 cents. The corn crops have been worthless for money raising purposes for several years, and we are asked to advertise ourselves. Are we not advertised sufficiently already? The best advertisement would be to try to get into shape to pay our debts, and we will be given credit for our good intentions. As we value our state's good name, our state pride, let not this thing be done. If, as the gentlemen have said, the failure to this bill will result in the Trans-Mississippi exposition not being held, then I say let it not be held."

He said that he was ready to act quickly, as requested, and as quickly as he could he would vote for no appropriation. An appropriation should only be made after all institutions had been provided for. Before that was done the legislature would find that it had exceeded its power to appropriate. If the remarks had not given Mr. Hitchcock something to answer, the speaker hoped Mr. Hitchcock would keep his seat.

MR. HITCHCOCK'S REPLY.

Mr. Hitchcock, in beginning his reply, said that the gentleman from Merrick was not all noise, but he was glad to have heard so able an exposition of the arguments of the opposition to this bill. All the statements of the stagnant condition of business and state finances were but in truth so many strong arguments for renewed effort to bring back prosperity. The success of Nebraska, her growth, depends on the growth of the states west of us. He did not believe that the people of the state are opposed to the exposition. Three hundred and fifty country papers have declared their advocacy of the exposition. The speaker appealed to Wooster to know if he did not believe these men reflected the sentiments and interests of their people.

Wooster said: "The gentleman would not like for me to express my opinion of newspaper men."

Mr. Hitchcock got [?] applause by his tribute to the country editor in his earnest, honest endeavors to benefit the people on whom he depended for a living. The speaker referred to the community of interest of all parts of the state in the exposition which caused him to go into a room every day and meet in a business way a man he would not speak to on the street. The bill is not an Omaha bill. It is a Nebraska bill. Omaha is a part of Nebraska. The state and the city are parts of the same body. Wealth in both are necessary. The speaker did not desire to lay additional burdens upon the people of the state. As a native born Nebraskan, he was in favor of bringing in more people to help bear the burdens. He referred to Wooster's comparison with the Chicago exposition, where the people took the money to Chicago and left it there, and said he thought it would be the proper thing to have the people bring all the money they wanted to Nebraska and leave it.

He did not believe, as a true Nebraskan, that any efforts should be spared to bring back to the people the small share of prosperity that will be possible under present conditions. There would be no general prosperity until in 1900 the new era was ushered in under new conditions.

After the close of Mr. Hitchcock's reply Chairman Clark announced that, according to the arrangement, that those who favored the bill should have the closing. The meeting would not stand adjourned.

 

EXPERTS ON THE MOVE.

Inspecting Competing Sites for the Exposition is Lively Work.

The Chicago experts, Messrs. Alexander and Schrader, who are here inspecting the sites offered for the exposition, are having no idle moments. They are continually, when not asleep, in the presence of one or more of the promoters of the sites, and the rivalry among the latter, while good natured, is lively.

It was 3 o'clock Monday afternoon, instead of 1 o'clock, when they returned from Miller park, which fact kept City Attorney Connell waiting for two hours to take them to the Hanscom park site. They did the second trip up nicely in an hour and a half.

You won't have to be driven all over the country and run the danger of being lost in some of Parker's cornfields to see the place we have to show you," said Mr. Connell, laughingly.

Yesterday forenoon they were taken to Riverview by Judge Estelle, Dr. Hanchett and John Rush, and in the afternoon expected to look over the state fair grounds.

AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION.

Secretary Makes an Itemized Statement—Exposition Anticipated.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Lincoln, Neb., Jan. 19.—The Nebraska State Agricultural association met this afternoon and listened to the report of the officers and adjourned until tomorrow. Secretary Furnas submitted his account of receipts and expenditures in an itemized form. From this it is learned that the receipts fell short of the expenditures to the amount of $2,015.88. Warrants were issued for this amount and the money with which to pay the warrants was borrowed by the board of managers.

Secretary Furnas takes occasion to make the following suggestion relative to the Trans-Mississippi exposition. He said: "As the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, to be held in 1898, is now on a basis warranting success, it is here suggested that it would be proper and advisable that this board take steps looking to representation at that exposition. As it is to be held at Omaha, the metropolis of our own state, there will not again be afforded such a favorable opportunity for Nebraska to advantageously present her products, resources and possibilities to the eye of the world."

THAT EXPOSITION RAISE.

Senators Allen and Thurston said today that they could with ease get the additional appropriation of $25,000 for the exposition through the senate as soon as the committee reports, but they both fear for its safety in the house. They think, however, that the addition, if passed by the senate to the house, would have a slight chance, which, if carefully watched, would be all that is necessary. Both claim that if they depend on the bill being passed through the house first, and then going to the senate, the exposition would get left, as far as the additional $25,000 is concerned.

The senators say that it would be impossible to get the house measure up in the house, but that Senator Allen's senate measure would receive recognition in the house without much effort being taken, therefore Allen and Thurston are keeping their eyes open, and expect things to come their way. The senate committee is liable to make the report inside of two days. There is no doubt whatever in the minds of those who know but that Representative Bailey of Texas will fight it vigorously. Mercer will either have to mesmerize him or else have him decoyed off the floor of the house, as it is said was done when the exposition bill went through the house last session. Mercer isn't saying a word.

 
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PUSHING THE EXPOSITION ALONG.

Liberal Appropriation in Its Aid Recommended to the Legislature.

During the summer and autumn of 1898, Nebraska will be visited by thousands and hundreds of thousands of citizens of other states. The Transmississippi Exposition will be held from June until November at Omaha and will undoubtedly attract people in great numbers from every section of the country. Various national organizations are arranging to hold their annual sessions at the Nebraska metropolis in 1898, so as to avail themselves of an opportunity of visiting the exposition while attending their meetings. I feel safe in predicting that the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha will be the greatest exposition of the products of the great west ever held.

This project had its origin more than a year ago at the Omaha session of the Transmississippi congress. Prominent men of that city promptly formed an association, with a capital stock of $1,000,000, of which more than $400,000 has been subscribed. The first assessment upon this stock has been paid and the affairs of the association are in good financial condition. The organizers and promoters are men of business ability, integrity and good financial standing; the organization is strong and the capital adequate. Congress recognized the importance of the exposition by an appropriation of $200,000, which, it is expected, will be increased to $500,000. The legislature of our sister state of Iowa has made a preliminary appropriation of $10,000, and the Iowa friends of the enterprise predict an additional appropriation of $65,000 at the next session. The legislatures of Utah and Louisiana have passed resolutions pledging the support of their states to the exposition, and liberal appropriations are expected from all the states and territories in the transmississippi country.

This exposition will unquestionably accomplish great good in bringing together the varied interests of the west and serve to cement the already friendly relations existing between the western people. It will do for the west what the Atlanta exposition has done for the south, but in a larger degree. Naturally Nebraska will profit largely by having this great exposition held on her soil. Interested visitors will learn of the great opportunities our state offers for investment and immigration.

You will be called upon by the management of the Transmississippi association to make an appropriation to aid the enterprise and I trust that the financial assistance given by you will be liberal and sufficient, so that our sister states and territories west of the Mississippi may be thereby encouraged to lend their substantial aid.

FOR THE TENNESSEE CENTENNIAL.

Exposition Committee Asked to Name Three Delegates.

Mayor Broatch has requested the executive committee of the Transmississippi and International Exposition to designate three suitable persons for appointment as commissioners from Omaha to the Tennessee Centennial, to be held at Nashville. There is no pay attached to these positions, but they are regarded as very desirable and honorable. It is requested that these persons who have the time and the inclination to visit Nashville as such commissioners make that fact known to members of the committee, and the request of the mayor will be complied with at the meeting of the committee tomorrow afternoon.

LOCATION BIDS REFERRED

Special Committee Appointed to Examine Sites Suggested.

NEW ASSESSMENT ON EXPOSITION STOCK

Exposition Directory Wrestles with the Location Problem—Paxton Block Selected for Official Headquarters.

The board of directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition met in special session at 2 p.m. yesterday at the Commercial club rooms for the purpose of opening bids for the location of the exposition.

There were forty-four of the fifty directors present and the first matter taken up was the opening of the bids in the hands of the secretary. There were five of these as follows: Riverview park, Miller park, the poor farm site, East Omaha and Elmwood park site.

Previous to the reading of the bids a resolution was offered by John C. Wharton, providing for the appointment of C. E. Yost, J. H. Millard and R. S. Wilcox as a committee of three, to which all bids for sites should be referred, the committee to be empowered to employ a competent engineer and a competent architect to carefully examine the proposed sites and report in writing to the committee their findings and conclusions, the committee to report such findings to the full board of directors at a meeting to be held January 23, without any recommendation on the part of the committee as to its conclusions regarding the desirability of any of the sites.

General Manderson suggested that the word "non-resident" be inserted before the words architect and engineer and urged the necessity for securing experts who would have no interest in the matter.

BIDS IN DETAIL READ.

In response to a strong sentiment the secretary proceeded to read the bids in detail. All except the East Omaha proposition were very lengthy and contained extended arguments in support of the propositions submitted. The advocates of each site were represented in a numerous lobby and the reading of the verbose propositions was listened to with close interest.

The propositions, in brief, were as follows:

The East Omaha proposition was submitted by John A. Creighton and offered about 170 acres lying north of Cut-Off lake, the only provision being that the ground should be left in the same condition when vacated as when taken possession of by the Exposition association.

The Elmwood park proposition was submitted for the Omaha Fair and Speed association by Oscar J. Pickard, G W. Kelly, A. Clemens, W. L. Kelby, Daniel L. Johnson and A. T. Klopp. The proposed sited included a tender of 240 acres adjoining Miller park, which contains an additional eighty acres, and near to Fort Omaha, which contains nearly eighty acres.

The Riverview park proposition was submitted by the South Side Improvement club and was signed by John Powers, president, and F. K. Darling, secretary. It comprised 240 acres of land adjoining Riverview park, which were offered free of rental. To the proposition were attached agreements by John Green, N. J. Smith. J. H. Dumont, John Rush and Frank and George Sautter, owners of the land offered, agreeing to its use free of all charge.

The "poor farm site" was submitted by W. J. Connell "on behalf of himself and other property owners." It offered the "absolute, exclusive and unrestricted use of the land west and northwest of Hanscom park, bounded on the south by Center street, on the north by Pacific street and extending westward from Thirty-third street to a suitable and satisfactory point west of the Belt Line railway, including, as may be desired, from 125 to 160 acres." This was offered free of all expense except such slight expense as might by​ entailed by the removal of a few cheap houses now located on the land.

The resolutions adopted by the Board of County Commissioners and the Park board were read for the information of the directors.

DEBATING THEIR DISPOSAL.

Mr. Wharton accepted the suggestion of General Manderson regarding changing the resolution offered by him to provide for employing a non-resident engineer and an architect and moved the adoption of the resolution.

Mr. Lindsey wanted the resolution amended to provide for having a representative of each proposed site on the committee.

Mr. Rosewater suggested that a landscape architect be employed instead of a building architect. Mr. Wharton changed the resolution to comply with this suggestion.

Mr. Hitchcock advocated increasing the committee by adding Mr. Kirkendall, the manager of the department of buildings and grounds, Mr. Lindsey, chairman of the executive committee, and President Wattles, for the reason that these gentlemen have given the matter of a site close consideration, and would be qualified to pass on such questions.

Governor Saunders opposed this suggestion, and advocated leaving the selection of the site almost entirely to experts who have no personal interest in the matter and could not be charged with bias or prejudice.

Mr. Wharton opposed any increase in the number of the committee, and made a strong talk in support of his position.

Mr. Kountze opposed throwing any responsibility for the selection of a site upon men who had any personal interest at stake.

Mr. Lindsey withdrew his amendment and a vote was taken upon the amendment of Mr. Hitchcock, providing that the committee should consist of six members, by adding Messrs. Kirkendall, Lindsey and Wattles. The roll was called and the amendment was lost, the vote standing: Yeas, 15; nays, 27.

The resolution was then adopted as originally introduced, except that it provides for a nonresident engineer and a nonresident landscape architect.

President Wattles reported that the committee appointed to report a plan for the enlargement of the plan and scope of the exposition, by the enlargement of the directory, had not completed its work, and asked further time, which was granted.

The executive committee reported regarding permanent headquarters that it had been unable to decide between two locations, the Paxton block and the Ramge block. The rental in each was the same, and the committee had no preference.

On motion of J. C. Wharton the Paxton block was selected for permanent headquarters.

On motion of C. S. Montgomery, a committee of three lawyers was provided for to examine into the question of the power of the city of Omaha, county of Douglas, and state of Nebraska, to make appropriations in aid of the exposition. The chair appointed Messrs. Montgomery, Manderson and Webster.

ANOTHER ASSESSMENT LEVIED.

Chairman Lindsey, for the executive committee, recommended an assessment of 15 per cent on the stock of the association, this assessment to be payable in three equal installments, and due February 1, March 1 and April 1, respectively. The recommendation of the committee met with favor, and the assessment was ordered.

At the request of General Manderson the secretary stated that $18,143 had been collected on the first assessment, and of this amount $4,216 had been expended, leaving a balance on hand of $13,927.

F. M. Youngs, the labor representative on the board, introduced the following resolution:

Resolved, That all contracts entered into by this board, its officers or agents, for work pertaining to the Transmississippi and International Exposition must stipulate therein that resident labor of Douglas county—skilled or unskilled—shall be given preference over all others, and that unskilled labor shall be paid no less than $1.50 per day; provided, that the said stipulation shall not apply to works prosecuted by other states or outside interests.

In support of this resolution Mr. Youngs made a brief speech, urging its adoption.

Mr. Lindsey said the exposition is not to be an Omaha show, and there should be no attempt made to bottle it up by restricting it in such a way.

General Manderson said he did not doubt that the exposition would be conducted, as far as possible, along the lines indicated in the resolution, but he was opposed to giving notice to the world to that effect. He moved to refer the resolution to the executive committee for consideration, and for such action as it thought best.

Director Wells of Council Bluffs said he had worked for the support of the exposition, and his principal argument had been that the laboring interests of the city over the river would be given recognition. He said if this resolution should pass he would be helpless. He also stated that he had intended to go to the state legislature to work for an appropriation for an Iowa exhibit, and had intended to lay particular stress upon the fact that the Exposition was to be a transmississippi affair, but he said if this resolution was adopted his hands would be tied and he would feel like dropping the matter.

Governor Saunders spoke very earnestly on the resolution. He warned the supporters of it that its adoption would be fatal to the success of the exposition. He predicted that such action would make the exposition an Omaha affair, and would take away the breadth of character which it was designed to have. He urged the introducer to withdraw the resolution.

Mr. Youngs said he was on the board as a representative of labor interests and was not acting on his own motion, entirely. He refused to withdraw the resolution or make any change in it. He said it did not in any way affect the work to be done by other   states or outside interests. He thought the effect of the resolution on the Nebraska legislature would be good rather than the reverse.

The motion to refer the resolution to the executive committee was then adopted, Youngs being the only one to vote against the reference.

The board then adjourned to meet in two weeks to receive the report of the special committee on sites.

Short Session of Executive Board.

The executive committee of the exposition held a session both before and after the meeting of the Board of Directors.

Acting upon the request of the mayor, the committee recommended the appointment of G. R. Williams, G. G. Wallace and T. S. Clarkson as commissioners for Omaha to the Tennessee Centennial exposition at Nashville.

A communication from C. S. Montgomery was read, in which he agreed to give his services free of charge as advisory counsel to the executive committee.

The rules and regulations governing exhibitors and concessionaires were reported back from the special committee, and were approved and ordered printed.

The committee adjourned until tomorrow noon.

DECIDES ON A HOME

Directory of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition Selects Headquarters.

Special Committee Reports Favorably on Rooms in the Paxton Block.

Five Bids on Location for the Big Show Are Opened and Referred for Investigation.

Question of Making Future Assessments on Stock Subscribed Is Discussed and Settled.

Matter of Employing Laborers from Douglas County in Preference to Outsiders—Montgomery's Services Free.

Both the executive committee and the directory of the Trans-Mississippi exposition held important meetings yesterday afternoon, permanent offices and headquarters for the exposition being selected, propositions for sites being selected, propositions for sites being opened and refereed, counsel engaged, the labor question discussed, future assessments on stock decided on and other matters of importance settled.

G. R. Williams, George G. Wallace and T. S. Clarkson were recommended by the executive committee to Mayor Broatch for appointment as commissioners from the city of Omaha to the Tennessee Centennial exposition at Nashville. The recommendation was requested by the mayor and the men named will be appointed.

C.S. Montgomery was selected as general counsel for the exposition, his offer, in reply to a letter regarding the matter, to serve without compensation except in case of litigation being accepted.

Managers Rosewater and Hitchcock of the departments of publicity and promotion submitted reports of work done since the last meeting, which were approved and arrangements were made to push the work of the departments. Reports and recommendations to the board of directors were discussed and adopted.

DIRECTORS' MEETING.

The directory met at 2:30 o'clock, forty-two of the fifty members being present. A large number of citizens, propers and friends of the different sites, were also present.

Under the special order for the meeting the opening of offers of sites for the exposition was ordered.

Mr. Wharton offered a resolution that all bids be referred to a committee composed of Casper E. Yost, J. H. Millard and R. S. Wilcox, the committee to employ a competent engineer and architect to report on sites, the committee to report back, without recommendations of its own, to a general meeting of the directory, to be held January 23 at 2 o'clock p.m., such meeting to decide on a site.

General Manderson moved that "nonresident" be placed before the words, engineer and architect. Amendment accepted.

The resolution was ruled out on a point of order, and the reading in full of the propositions were ordered. They were for Miller park, Riverview park, Elmwood park, East Omaha and Hanscom park sites. The substance of each bid is given below. Letters from the park commissioners offering the use of any park selected, and from the county commissioners offering the use of the poor farm lots, were read. The substance of each bid is given below.

Mr. Wharton again offered his resolution. Mr. Lindsey moved that each of the proposed sites be given a representative on the committee, but later withdrew the motion. Mr. Hitchcock moved that Manager Kirkendall of the buildings and grounds department, Manager Lindsey of the ways and means department, and President Wattles be added to the committee, and spoke in favor of the motion. After discussion by Messrs. Montgomery, Saunders, Wharton, Kountze and others the amendment was lost by a vote of twenty-seven to fifteen, and Mr. Wharton's original resolution, with amendments that the engineer and architect be from outside the city, and that it be a landscape architect, was then unanimously adopted.

PERMANENT OFFICES SELECTED.

Chairman Lindsey reported that of the bids for permanent offices those for the Paxton and Ramge blocks were the best, that they were about equal so far as both accommodations and expenditures were concerned. After further explanation and discussion the offices in the Paxton block were unanimously selected.

C. S. Montgomery reported having examined into the question of the appropriations by the city, county and state for the exposition. So far as the city and county were concerned they were serious and important questions involved, and he suggested that a committee of three lawyers, members of the directory, be appointed to make a further investigation and report. The president appointed Messrs. Montgomery, Manderson and Webster.

FIVE PER CENT ASSESSMENTS.

Chairman Lindsey of the executive committee reported it had been decided to recommend that three 5 per cent assessments be made on stock subscriptions, payable February 1, March 1 and April 1. Secretary Wakefield reported that of the first 5 per cent assessment $18,143 had been received and that there was a balance in the treasury January 1 of $13,927. The expenses from this time forward, and especially after the site was selected and work actually commenced, would increase rapidly. The $1,800 of the first assessment still unpaid was principally from subscribers of one or two shares, who could not afford to lose the time from work to call and pay the 50 cents or $1 due from them. When a collector was employed they would pay up promptly. R. S. Wilcox suggested that the assessments be 10, 5, and 10 per cent, but others favored the three 5 per cent assessments, and the recommendation of the executive committee was adopted.

LABOR RESOLUTIONS.

F. M. Young, representing the labor organizations on the directory, offered the following resolution:

Resolved, That all contracts entered into by this board, its officers or agents, for work pertaining to the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition must stipulate therein that resident labor of Douglas county, skilled and unskilled, shall be given preference to all others, and that skilled labor shall be paid not less than $1.50 per day; provided that the said stipulation shall not apply to work prosecuted by other states or outside interests.

Mr. Young spoke of the trouble caused at the Atlanta exposition by bringing in outside labor and by cheap labor, and said that while their subscriptions might not amount to so much in dollars, that over two-thirds of the 6,000 subscribers to exposition stock were from the ranks of labor, and advocated the employment and protection of home labor.

NOT AN OMAHA SHOW.

Mr. Lindsey said he was opposed to the resolution, and to any one like it. The exposition was not an Omaha show, but a Trans-Mississippi affair, in which all the western country was equally interested, and the adoption of resolutions like the one offered would be simply bottling up the exposition.

General Manderson doubted the advisability of passing such a resolution; it would tend to localize the exposition, when the whole effort of the directory should be to broaden it in every way. Without any such resolution being offered or adopted, the directory would, without doubt, do what was desired, that is, employ home labor as far as possible. Therefore, he moved the reference of the resolution to the executive committee.

Mr. Young declared that no argument for referring or defeating the resolution had been offered. It was not the intention of the resolution to apply to the appropriations of other states or of any outside appropriations; the resolution stated so plainly, and was simply offered for the purpose of having the board go on record as in favor of the protection of home labor and industry. He asked that it be adopted.

Mr. Wells of Council Bluffs said that he was the only member of the directory from outside Omaha; it was his intention to go before the Iowa legislature when it convened to ask for an additional appropriation, but if such a resolution, shutting out Iowa and the rest of the world, was adopted, he could not do it. If Mr. Young would reconsider the matter he would not want the directory to adopt such a resolution.

WOULD AFFECT LEGISLATION.

Ex-Governor Saunders said he saw something in the resolution decidedly worse than the little squabble which might come up over the selection of a site for the exposition. Strangers were already coming into the city inquiring about the exposition; if a stranger came into his office and asked about coming to Omaha, and if he could get work if he did so, and he should reply "No, sir," that only residents could be employed on exposition work, he, and others like him seeking a residence in Omaha, would stay away. The adoption of such a resolution would certainly have a bad effect on the legislatures of other states, which are being asked for appropriations, and it would be used as an argument against an appropriation by Nebraska if it was adopted. He advised and asked that it be withdrawn.

Mr. Young said that he was not acting for himself individually but for those he represented, the laboring element, in offering the resolution and he declined to withdraw it. He again stated that it only referred to Douglas county, and argued that money contributed by residents of Douglas county should go to the support of residents of it.

The motion to refer to the executive committee was then carried and the meeting adjourned.

MILLER PARK AND FORT OMAHA.

Dave H. Christie, secretary of the North End Improvement association, submitted a proposition for 400 acres, including Miller park, the 160 acres directly north of Miller park, the eighty acres extending south from the west half of Miller park, along Fort Omaha reserve, and the Fort Omaha reserve. More land on the north, south or west can be had, if desired. The Fort Omaha part of the site has not yet been obtained, but it is stated that the use of it can be had from the government without difficult.

The first point made is that the site is level and sightly; that it would cost very little to grade and put it in condition for the exposition. If permanent buildings are erected they will remain for the use of the city. It is accessible being reached from the city without grades by four or more street car lines out Twentieth, Twenty-Fourth, Thirtieth and other streets, and by the East Omaha bridge by all railroads from the east; the Florence boulevard, the handsomest in the city, passes and enters it. A thirty-six-inch water main, affording ample fire protection and water, already laid along one side of it. Visitors would pass through the city going to and from it. If located there F. W. Parker would donate his museum of curious, valued at $25,000, to the city, to be placed in one of the permanent buildings.

"POOR FARM" SITE.

W.J. Connell, for himself and other owners of the property, offered the lots and lands adjoining Griffen & Smith's addition, Oakhurst, and poor farm lots, west and northwest of Hanscom park, bounded by Center on the south, Hanscom park on the east, Thirtythird street on the north, and containing 160 acres. More land, if desired, can be had on the west.

Nearness to the city and elevation and beauty of the site are two of the principal points urged. The city would give use of streets and alleys in site, and several small houses on it could be removed at slight cost. All details could be satisfactorily arranged. Accessibility to street car lines and to railroad lines by the Belt line on the west, construction of a boulevard from Hanscom to Bemis park, water at the grounds, fire protection, and that visitors would always be near to the center of the city, are all dwelt upon.

NORTH OF EAST OMAHA.

John A. Creighton, for himself and other owners, offered 170 acres, with more if desired, between Cut-Off and Florence lakes. Accessibility to street car lines from all parts of the city without climbing any grades, and to all railroads entering the city, and beauty of site, including lakes, are urged in the proposition.

NEW STATE FAIR GROUNDS.

The Omaha Fair and Speed association and owners of property in vicinity offered Elmwood park, 205 acres, more or less, and the state fair grounds, 160 acres, with more land if desired. Beauty of Elmwood park and fair grounds  

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and improvements made on the latter, including mile track, laying out of boulevards, driveways and walks, and buildings, are urged. The state board of agriculture would agree not to hold a fair exposition year. Water from artesian wells, the supply capable of being enlarged to any extent, accessibility to street car lines already constructed and others which would be constructed, and to roads now built to the grounds are also urged.

RIVERVIEW PARK.

The South Side Improvement club offered Riverview park and adjoining grounds which it has leased from Tom Murray and others, for two years, comprising over 200 acres and extending from Bancroft to Dominion street, and from Thirteenth street to the river. Nearness to the city, the river frontage, the sightliness of the location, accessibility to street and steam railways, and to boats, city water and sewerage, and artesian well flowing 115,000 gallons of water every twenty-four hours through a four-inch pipe, natural forest trees, refreshing breezes and coolness in summer are among the arguments used in favor of the site.

VOTE FOR EXPOSITION SI[?]

Every Subscriber to the Wor[?] Herald is Entitled to Cast a Ballot.

Coupons Must Be Handed In at t[?] Offices in Council Bluffs, South Omaha and Main Office,

Votes Will Not Count Unless Turned In b[?] Tuesday Noon—Result to Be Published Next Thursday.

Five sites for the exposition have been offered free of charge. They are mo[?] fully described elsewhere in the World Herald today. They are known as follows:

First—MILLER PARK SITE.
Second—POOR FARM SITE.
Third—EAST OMAHA SITE.
Fourth—NEW FAIR GROUNDS SITE.
Fifth—RIVERVIEW PARK SITE.

To get an expression of opinion the World-Herald invites its readers to vote their preference today.

Each vote must be on a coupon cut from today's World-Herald. It will be found on the first page.

The name and address of the vote must be written on the coupon.

All coupons must be left at the World Herald office in Omaha, South Omaha or Council Bluffs before noon Tuesday next.

The result will be announced in Thursday's World-Herald.

TALKS OF THE EXPOSITION

VIEWS EXPRESSED BY PRESIDENT WATTLES

Holdings of the Great Show in Omaha Will Do Much Toward Developing the Great Transmississippi Country.

Asked if he noticed any increase in enthusiasm in support of the Transmississippi and International Exposition among the business men throughout the country, President Gurdon W. Wattles said:

"I think the friends of the exposition are becoming more numerous and determined every day, and with each step forward some of those who opposed the enterprise from the start are falling into line. The sentiment seems to be growing that we must do something to start this city and transmississippi country up the grade again, and that the first and best thing to do is, if possible, to attract capital and immigration in this direction. At the first mention of this exp[?] a few men saw in it a great advert[?]g scheme for Omaha and the entire west. Many said it could not be made a success on account of the times; that congress would do nothing for it, and when the proposition was made to raise $250,000 by subscriptions to stock, it was difficult to get our leading business men to undertake such a task. But when congress did pass an act, authorizing the expenditure of $200,000, some of those who had not seriously considered the proposition before, became its active supporters. When the committees secured over $400,000 in subscriptions, with numerous large interests yet to hear from, which should swell the amount to at least $600,000, many more doubters came over with the hopeful. But there are some yet who, while in favor of the exposition, doubt our ability to hold it. This has been true of every exposition or other great public enterprise. At Chicago there were many who opposed the World's hear against the exposition. They said the city was too poor; the streets were not in proper condition; there were not a sufficient number of hotels, and there was not time to get ready. At San Francisco all these arguments were urged with double force, and yet they did make a great success at both those places. At San Francisco they opened their gates eight months after the Midwinter fair was first mentioned. It was originated and carried out during the greatest panic this country has ever seen. Over 2,000,000 people passed through its gates, and over $60,000 remained in the treasury after all obligations were discharged."

OF OTHER EXPOSITIONS.

Asked as to his opinion as to the results of the exposition on the transmississippi country, Mr. Wattles said:

I can only judge by what similar expositions have done for other sections. The World's fair did not particularly advertise any locality. It was a great educational success. In architecture, science, mechanics, electricity, and even music and religion, it marked a new epoch in history. To Chicago and the lines of transportation centering there the greatest financial benefits were derived. The city of Chicago gave $5,000,000 in bonds to the exposition. The assessed valuation of the city increased nearly $200,000,000 in one year, and the taxes on this increase alone for two years would pay all the bonds they gave. Besides this direct benefit to the city, it is estimated that $1,000,000 daily was expended in the city by visitors during the entire exposition.

"At Atlanta the exposition did much to start the tide of immigration and capital south, and the good effects of the advertising of the resources can be readily seen by the increased prosperity which prevails in the southern states at this time. Speaking of the immediate benefits of their exposition, the editor of the Atlanta Constitution says they got back $100 for every $1 expended.

"At San Francisco the effect of the exposition was especially beneficial to the state of California. Its climate, its fruit and wines and other resources were brought to the attention of the world, and the influx of capital and increase of population has been phenomenal since. They have known little of the hard times and depression we have felt during the past three years.

"The further growth of Omaha depends upon the development of the country west of us. We are the natural commercial metropolis for a great and undeveloped country, reaching westward to the coast. This great transmississippi country has untold wealth in agricultural lands, that need but the developing agencies of civilization to furnish happy homes for millions who now live in poverty in crowded cities. There are mountains of gold and silver, subterranean lakes of oil, great deposits of coal, iron and minerals of every kind, that have never been heard of by but few of the people of even our own country. It is to advertise these natural advantages that we propose to hold this exposition. Marvin Hughitt well understood the advantages and appreciated the results of this enterprise when he said a few days ago that it offered the best means of advertising the west of anything that had ever been proposed."

ROOMS FOR EXPOSITION OFFICERS.

Selected on Sixth Floor of Paxton Block.

The executive committee of the Transmississippi Exposition held a meeting this noon at the Commercial club and adjourned to visit the rooms on the sixth floor of the Paxton block, which will be the permanent headquarters of the exposition as soon as they can be placed in condition for occupancy. The committee selected the rooms at the southwest corner of the floor and will add additional rooms as the needs of the various departments require.

The exact arrangement of the several departments of the exposition will be decided later, but it was determined that the Department of Publicity should remain in its present location in The Bee building. In this connection Manager Rosewater stated the department required so much of his time that unless it was close to his office it would be impossible for him to give it his attention. The Department of Ways and Means will be installed in the new quarters as soon as possible. This will carry the secretary's office with it, and the headquarters will be removed from the Bee building to the Paxton block within a few days.

James Sheakley, governor of Alaska, was appointed vice president for that territory to represent the exposition.

ALIVE TO THE EXPOSITION

EAST AND WEST BEGIN TO SHOW INTEREST

Plan to Exhibit a Fac-Simile of a Wonderful Gold Producing Valley—Eastern Papers Publishing Information.

That the enterprising people of the great west are fully alive to the bearing that the Transmississippi Exposition will have on their interests is indicated by the plans which are already in process of incubation for exhibiting the resources of the western states. A number of ideas are being worked out which promise to furnish the exposition with novel and attractive features, such as have not been seen at any of the great expositions in recent years. Some of the projects suggested are capable of being worked out in a manner which will give the big show attractions even more interesting to its visitors than those which amused hundreds of thousands of people at the World's fair. One of the most novel and promising of these enterprises comes from Utah, where the people are showing an enthusiastic interest in the exposition.

A movement is on foot in the Mercur mining district of Utah to exhibit a facsimile of the Mercur basin at the exposition. It is proposed that this facsimile shall be about one-fifteen-hundredth of the natural size of the district represented; that is, that the 1,500 or 2,000 acres included in what is known as the basin are to be in the facsimile reduced to the size of an acre.

The geology of the Mercur district is unlike that of any other mining district in the world. It is, however, simple and easily understood when once seen and studied. What is called the vein is simply a mineralized stratum of lime rock varying in thickness from eight to eighty feet. This vein is in its relation to the country rock identical with the coal measures throughout the world.

This vein or stratum has an angle of fifteen to thirty degrees. The mountains about the sag or crater are broken and sometimes [?]cipitous and are cut in every direction by deep gulches, and to the west are cleft by Lewiston canyon, exposing the gold-bearing stratum in numerous places and for long distances.

It is proposed that the exhibit shall be an exact facsimile, showing the mountains, canyons, gulches, strata, tunnels, ore dumps (with small representations of the great mills) just as they exist, only on a reduced scale. The beholder will be able to see Mercur basin and at a glance know more about it than could be obtained from any amount of reading.

Geologically, the Mercur basin is a place of great interest. The United States government survey devotes 200 pages to it, and a new survey has been ordered. Mercur is the youngest and the least advertised of the great mining camps of the world, and by 1808 it will be a matter of universal interest; and it is believed the exhibit will be one of the attractions of the exposition.

That the east is awakening to the fact that the exposition will be an affair of national interest is indicated by the prominence which it is receiving in the columns of eastern publications. Even the annual almanacs of the big New York papers devote considerable space to the history of the movement and to descriptions of what the enterprise is designed to be.

The recently published 1897 almanac of the New York Tribune gives a fairly complete synopsis of the plans for the exposition. It recites the fact that the $200,000 government appropriation is already supported by a subscription of $400,000 in Omaha, and liberal appropriations from the legislatures of the states most intimately interested. It calls attention to the fact that the census of 1890 shows a population of over 20,000,000 of peole​ within a radius of 500 miles of Omaha, with an aggregate wealth of $23,576,586,897. It tells something of the international scope on which the enterprise is designed, and gives the list of officers of the exposition association.

The almanac of the New York World covers substantially the same ground, in somewhat less space, and the Chicago News almanac gives a still more exhaustive review of the project. The news goes into the plan of organization of the exposition, and details the steps which have already been taken at some length. It speaks of the action of the legislatures of Iowa, Louisiana, California and other western states in pledging large exhibits, and gives the entire personnel of the officers and directory.

 
torn piece of blank paper with pencil marks
 

WOMAN'S CLUB AND EXPOSITION.

Mrs. Ford Tells Why the Club House Should Be Built.

"'Why in the world do the members of the Woman's club talk about erecting a club house at this time, when the promotion of the Transmississippi Exposition is engaging the attention of all Omahans?' is a query that is often addressed to me," said Mrs. Frances M. Ford the other day. I presume that the people who ask such questions think it utterly impossible for two such enterprises to be conducted simultaneously.

"In my mind there could be no greater mistake than such argument. I believe that the woman's department will be one of the most essential and valuable institutions connected with the Exposition. The exhibit of material objects is, as I understand it, only one of the purposes of the exposition. As was the case at the Columbian exposition, there will undoubtedly be a congress of religion, of philosophy, of art, of pedagogy, and of matters of vital interest to women. The Woman's club of Omaha hopes to be of real assistance to the exposition in promoting the success of such a department. Specialists on these subjects are to be brought here from all over the world. It will be the duty of some organization to secure them, bring them here, entertain them and give them a place to hold the congresses desired.

"Undoubtedly these congresses, if we are to get the greatest amount of good out of them, must be held apart from the exposition. They should be held down town, I think, where the scholars may be apart from the crowd. This was found to be the best method at Chicago. An auditorium, not of great dimensions, but well arranged and with a number of committee rooms conveniently located, must be provided. This is the reason why I say that the erection of a club house by the Woman's club before the opening of the exposition is of the greatest importance. There the congresses and the meetings of the woman's clubs may be conveniently held, and in this way the Omaha Woman's club may be of assistance to the exposition. At the next meeting of our club a committee will be appointed to confer with the exposition directory upon this and kindred matters. You must remember that what I've said represents merely my own views upon the matter and does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the other members of the Woman's club."

THE EXPOSITION BILL INTRODUCED.

Yesterday the bill providing for an appropriation of $350,000 by the state of Nebraska in aid of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition was introduced. In another column we publish it in full.

It is now before the people and before the legislature, and it should be fully, fairly and promptly considered and acted on.

The occasion which calls for this bill is a remarkable one in Nebraska's history.

Nineteen states and three territories propose to hold a great exposition of their resources and products. The west is to make a mighty effort to attract the attention of the world and turn the tide of investors and homeseekers once more toward the setting sun. Nebraska has been selected by a vote of all her western sisters as the state wherein all shall exhibit their offerings and display their attractions. Omaha has been selected as the place.

Congress has recognized the enterprise, and a splendid United States government exhibit in a government building will be one of the features of the show.

Foreign countries will be invited to participate, and for that purpose the department of state is now taking action to direct our ambassadors and consuls in foreign lands to bring the exposition to the attention of exhibitors.

Private enterprise will provide $500,000 or $600,000, and it is quite possible that before the gates of the great exposition are thrown open as much as $2,000,000 will have been expended.

Such an enterprise is one which affords to the state in which it is located a rare opportunity. All Nebraska will be on exhibition, not only while the great fair is in progress, but while it is in preparation.

The World-Herald lays this matter before the legislature of Nebraska with a full realization of the objections, doubts and difficulties.

Nebraska is hard up.
Taxes are high.
Times are hard.

Relief from depression must come through the development of the west. The exposition is one thing which we can depend on to renew public interest in the west and revive activity in western enterprises.

A small exposition would be a failure. The enterprise must be big to be successful. We must go in with courage and public spirit. It will be economical to be liberal. The cost of the enterprise is not an expense, but an investment. We cast out bread upon the waters, believing that it will return to us again.

Private individuals have done their part. It now remains for the state

article ends abruptly

MILLER'S PARK

Not Much Interest Taken in the Site for the Trans-Mississippi Exposition.

It is evident that the interest in the location of the exposition is not as great as has been supposed.

In the voting contest which the World-Herald advertised for Sunday, only about 200 persons voted. Undoubtedly there were many others who would have been glad to express their preference if they could have done so without trouble to themselves.

In order to vote, however, each person was required to cut a coupon from the Sunday World-Herald, fill in his name and bring it to the World-Herald office.

The result was as follows:

Miller Park Site95 votes
Riverview Park Site27 votes
Poor Farm site17 votes
East Omaha site12 votes
New Fair Grounds site 9 votes

THE EXPOSITION ABROAD.

Suggestion by a Foreign Commissioner as to Advertising It.

President Wattles of the exposition association has a letter from Prof. J. H. Gore of Columbia university, one of the United States commissioners to the Brussels exposition, in reply to one informing him of the acceptances of his offer to also represent the Trans-Mississippi exposition at Brussels. He says that as soon as he has received the details of the exposition at Omaha he thinks it would be well to have printed a circular in French for distribution at Brussels. He also suggests a stamp to be used on the back of envelopes by business men, they paying something for the privilege. He sends specimens of stamps which have been designed for the same purpose and he says that later he will send the design of a poster which he thinks could be used to advantage.

Workmen are busy fitting up the rooms on the sixth floor of the Paxton block, which are to be used for headquarters. Secretary Wakefield says that the departments of exhibits and concessions will probably be able to move in today or Saturday. "They will not move in Friday," said he with a little laugh. His own rooms will not be ready until the middle of next week.

The department of promotion is now sending off to the several western state legislatures copies of bills in aid of the exposition, which it expects to be submitted.

LABOR CIRCLES STIRRED UP.

Report of Director Youngs of the Exposition Received.

The meeting of the Central Labor union last evening was particularly exciting as a result of the report of Fred M. Youngs, the representative of organized labor on the board of directors of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition association.

The report was quite voluminous and contained the resolutions affecting the interests of labor which Youngs has vainly introduced at the meetings of the exposition board, and each of which has heretofore been published. In addition Youngs declared that organized labor must make the fight of its life to prevent the same conditions of life of the workingmen of Atlanta after the close of the southern exposition. This condition was described at length in a letter received by Youngs from Robert W. McGinly of the Atlanta Central Labor union, as being most disastrous to labor, the wages of common laborers being cut from $1.25 per day before the exposition to 60 cents per day after its close, and which is now the present wages. The report declares in substance that it is utterly impossible, from the present management of the exposition, for organized labor to obtain the slightest concession, and that it is more than probable that even Douglas county workmen, suffering as they are, will be set aside to give employment to outside, cheap labor.

The reading of the report brought a dozen men to their feet, and anathema followed anathema against the directors of the exposition, the anger of the delegates resulting in an adjournment until next Wednesday, when a plan will be discussed of calling a mass meeting of all Omaha workmen to protest against their exclusion from work on the exposition and to take steps to see that they do get work, or that the support of the workingmen of the entire Trans-Mississippi country be withdrawn from the exposition. This was the tone of the discussion as to the plans to be laid next Wednesday.

TO HAVE EVERY PRIVILEGE,

Exposition Will Be Given All Concessions Necessary.

Washington World-Herald Bureau.
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., Jan 13.

In reply to a letter from Secretary John A. Wakefield of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition for the care and custody of goods in bond, the customs division of the treasury department today addressed a communication to Mr. Mercer stating that the act is ample for all the purposes included in the enterprise, and will be extended and amplified in the regulations issued by the secretary of the treasury, to whom the supervision of the affair is confided by the bill. "Every privilege which has been enjoyed by previous expositions will be included in the arrangements to be made by this department for the exposition referred to," is the way the letter concludes.

TO CHICAGO TO SECURE POINTERS.

Exposition Committee Men Will Confer with World's Fair Officials.

The special committee appointed at the meeting of the directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition to consider the five proposals for the location of the exposition has been in consultation and two members have decided to go to Chicago for the purpose of selecting an engineer and architect to survey the proposed sites and make a comprehensive report as to the advantages and disadvantages of each. This committee is instructed to employ a non-resident engineer and a non-resident landscape architect to examine the sites and make a written report to the committee, which report the committee is instructed to submit to the full board without any recommendation or suggestion on the part of the committee.

The special committee has been in almost continuous session since its appointment, and was somewhat at a loss as to just how to proceed, and after consultation it was decided that the best and speediest results would be accomplished by going direct to Chicago and holding a consultation with the officers of the World's fair and gaining as much information as possible from them as to the best method of procedure. Acting on this decision, Messrs. Yost and Wilcox will go to Chicago tonight, if the storm does not prevent, and will at once take up matter in the most expeditious way. The committee is required to report to the Board of Directors on January 23.

The work of selecting rooms in the Paxton block by the various departments is progressing slowly. President Wattles has selected his room, and will occupy it as soon as it can be made ready. The Department of Ways and Means will decide very soon upon the rooms to be occupied by it, and will remove to them as soon as possible. All of the rooms to be occupied at the present time are on the west side of the sixth floor, near the elevator.

 
Page 13

EXPOSITION BILL INTRODUCED.

Nebraska Will Be Asked to Appropriate the Sum of Three Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollars for the Big Show.

The Share That the State Is Requested to Contribute Toward Making the International Exposition a Success.

Text of the Bill Introduced by Representative Dudley Smith of Douglas—-Twelve Directors on Part of State Provided With It.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.
Lincoln, Neb., Jan. 13.—This afternoon Representative Dudley Smith of Douglas county introduced the Trans-Mississippi exposition bill in the house.
The bill was read the first time, and tomorrow will be read a second time and referred, probably to the ways and means committee.
The bill is as follows:

A BILL FOR AN ACT TO APPROPRIATE $350,000 TO AID IN THE HOLDING OF THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION AT THE CITY OF OMAHA, NEBRASKA, IN THE YEAR 1898, AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE APPOINTMENT BY THE GOVERNOR OF TWELVE DIRECTORS TO REPRESENT THE STATE OF NEBRASKA UPON THE DIRECTORY OF SAID EXPOSITION.

Whereas, There is to be held at the city of Omaha in the state of Nebraska, in the year 1898, an exposition known as the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, participated in by many western states, and,

Whereas, The said exposition had its origin in a resolution unanimously adopted at a former session of the Trans-Mississippi congress participated in by all the states west of the Mississippi river, and was designed to advertise and develop western interests, and,

Whereas, The Congress of the United States has passed a bill authorizing and encouraging the holding of said exposition, and making an appropriation to provide for an exhibit by the Untied States government at said exposition, in a building to be constructed by the federal government, and,

Whereas, A corporation with a proper capital has been duly organized under the laws of the state of Nebraska to carry on the business affairs of said exposition and is now proceeding with the work of preparation so that said exposition may be held from June to November in the year 1898, and,

Whereas, The location of said exposition at the city of Omaha in the state of Nebraska has afforded to this state an auspicious opportunity to exhibit its own resources and products in said exposition, and also as a state to secure great and lasting benefits as a result of the coming of all the visitors from other states, and

Whereas, Homeseekers and investors can by means of this exposition be attracted in large numbers to Nebraska, and

Whereas, Private enterprise alone cannot adequately provide the necessary capital for this great public undertaking by which the whole state is to be largely benefited, therefore

Be it enacted by the legislature of the state of Nebraska:

Section 1. That the state of Nebraska take part in said exposition as hereinafter provided.

Section 2. That the governor of the state of Nebraska be, and he is hereby authorized and directed, to appoint twelve state directors, two being from each congressional district of Nebraska, said state directors to be authorized and empowered to represent the state of Nebraska upon the board of directors of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.

Section 3. That the governor be, and is hereby authorized, to fill any vacancy occurring among said twelve state directors.

Section 4. That the governor be, and is hereby authorized, to notify the said Trans-Mississippi and International exposition of the appointments when made as above provided.

Section 5. That if the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition shall, within thirty days after the receipt of said notification, cause the said state directors so appointed by the governor to be duly and legally elected directors of said corporation with full power as such, and at such compensation as is provided in section 8 of this act, then the appropriation hereinafter provided for shall be and become available as below provided for the use of said exposition.

Section 6. That for the purpose of assisting said Trans-Mississippi and International exposition to properly plan, carry on, develop and complete the said exposition, the sum of $350,000 be and the same is hereby appropriated from the state treasury out of any funds not otherwise appropriated.

Section 7. That said sum of money shall be and become available for said exposition in five equal installments during the period between July 1, 1897, and July 1, 1898, and shall be paid out by the state treasurer upon warrants drawn to the order of the treasurer of said Trans-Mississippi and International exposition by the auditor of Nebraska, who is hereby authorized and directed to draw the same upon requisitions authorized by the recorded vote of a majority of the directors of said exposition, and upon certificates of the president showing that said vote has been had and recorded.

Section 8. That at the time said twelve state directors are elected by the stockholders of said exposition, and before the above appropriation shall become available, the board of directors shall, by the proper action, provide and order that during his term of office each of said state directors on the board shall receive $75.00 per month compensation from said exposition, together with railway transportation so as to enable him to attend all meetings of the board of directors, when taken, shall be duly certified to the state auditor and kept on file in his office.

Section 9. The term of office of the twelve directors herein provided for shall begin with their appointment and end one month after the close of the exposition, at which time they shall make to the governor a report. Said directors shall draw no other salary or compensation for their services than that above provided for to be paid by the said exposition.

Sec. 10. Whereas, an emergency exists, this act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage.

LOCATING THE EXPOSITION.

OMAHA, Jan. 14.—To the Editor of The Bee: Your article of January 12 seems to me to strike square the point, to ignore all corporate and private interests in the selection of an exposition site. A central location should be preferable by long odds. We ought to consider South Omaha's and Council Bluffs' interests also in this matter, as being equal to ours.

I think any one who has attempted to walk from building to building at the World's fair will thoroughly agree with you that the closer these are without overcrowding the better. The grounds can be kept in order, the approaches and walks more economically constructed and the whole get a more finished appearance in the short space of time remaining between now and the opening. Then drainage and sewerage facilities should be considered; it must be preferable to have these lead away from and not into the grounds.

I shall not discuss the several sites proposed, for it would take some one outside of Omaha to give disinterested advice. But I will call your attention to a piece of property lying south of "and which might be used in connection with Hanscom park;" this is a plateau running in the direction of South Omaha, and bounded by three railroad lines, viaduct south from park, over Creighton avenue; also over Union Pacific and B. & M. tracks, making an entrance from Twenty-fourth street car line; there would be also the Thirty-second street car line on the west, and Twenty-second street car line on the west, and Twenty-ninth on the east. The permanent buildings could be put in Hanscom park, the water area increased, the viaducts afterward used for connecting by boulevard Hanscom, Springlake and Riverview parks, All this would enhance the value of this central, popular public resort in the future. This would give a central location, one easy of access to the general public as well as to those employed on the grounds.

A STOCKHOLDER.

INVITATION TO FOREIGNERS

ASKS THEM TO COME TO OMAHA NEXT YEAR

Only Waits the Promulgation of Rules for Admission of Exhibits and These Are Almost Ready.

WASHINGTON, Jan. 13.—(Special Telegram.)—A draft of the State department letter to foreign governments, calling their attention to the Transmississippi and International Exposition, and inviting exhibits has been prepared and is only waiting for the printed rules and regulations governing the reception of exhibits, which the Treasury department is preparing, when it will be issued. The regulations will be identical with those for Atlanta last year. Treasury people are rushing the rules governing the reception of exhibits, and the proof of same will probably be sent Representative Mercer the last of this week, or early next week.

Mr. Mercer has filed with the ways and means committee the brief of the American Chicory company of Fremont and Omaha, asking for a duty of 1 cent per pound on raw, burnt or manufactured chicory, and a letter of John Brady of Kearney, representing the cereal mills of that place, asking that half a cent per pound duty be placed on oatmeal.

J. N. H. Patrick appeared before the Board of Fortifications and Ordnance​ yesterday in reference to a torpedo in which he is interested. He occupied about one and one-half hours in explaining the merits of his torpedo and urging upon the government its adoption. General Miles, chairman of the board presided at the meeting.

B. A. McAllister, land commissioner of the Union Pacific, is here urging upon the Interior department to issue patents for lands now occupied by settlers along the line of the railway, and which have been held up by the secretary because of alleged discrepancies in the bill. Mr. McAllister proposes to bring senatorial and representative influence to bear to hasten the issuance of these patents.

The Eleventh street viaduct case, which by decision of the supreme court is to be argued on its merits, will probably be reached a year from next March, according to court officials, unless state authorities should move for an earlier argument, which might be granted.

Senator Pettigrew's bill providing for the remission of payment of $1.25 per acre by those who commute entries on ceded portions of the Sioux reservation in South Dakota came up for consideration before the public lands committee of the house yesterday. Meiklejohn secured the adoption of an amendment to include that portion of the reservation in Nebraska and as amended it was reported to the house.

Secretary Francis has approved for patent to the state of South Dakota the following land lists: List No. 4, on account of the grant to the Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, 800 acres in the Huron district; list No. 3, public buildings grant, 4,102 acres in the Huron district; list No. 6, educational and charitable institutions grant, 39,618 acres in the Aberdeen district.

J. D. Corder of South Dakota has been appointed carpenter at $900 per annum at the Pine Ridge Indian agency.

G. M. Lamberston of Lincoln is at the Arlington. Charles A. Webber and Samuel J. Long of Lincoln are at the Wellington.

F. A. Brogan of Omaha is in the city.

William I. Hill has been commissioned postmaster at Coppock, and William E. Sheppard at Genoa, Ia.

ILLINOIS AND THE EXPOSITION.

President Wattles Believes that Other States Will Get in Line.

The news of the introduction of a bill in the Illinois legislature appropriating $100,000 to be used for defraying the expenses of an Illinois exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition was received with a great deal of satisfaction by the officers and directors of the exposition.

President Wattles said it was very appropriate that Illinois should make an apparition for an exhibit in view of the promptness with which the transmississippi states responded to the request of Chicago and made liberal appropriations for exhibits at the World's fair. The appropriation provided for by the bill just introduced, Mr. Wattles regarded as a very moderate one. He said he had no doubt but that several of the states outside of the transmississippi region would follow the example of Illinois. This action of Illinois he thought was especially appropriate in view of the close[?] mercial relations existing between the[?] cipal city in that state and the w[?] states. Mr. Wattles also said tha[?] prompt passage of the Illinois bill, a[?] as the bill introduced in the Neb[?] legislature, would be of great assistan[?] the officers of the exposition in se[?] appropriations from other states.

As soon as the Illinois bill is referre[?] committee, a delegation will go from[?] to Springfield for the purpose of pres[?] the scope and importance of the exp[?] in the proper light before the commi[?]

 

LABOR DEMANDS A HEARING

IMAGINES THAT IT HAS BEEN SLIGHTED

Fred M. Youngs Submits a Report to Central Labor Union—Says Workingmen Are Not Fairly Treated.

Transmississippi Exposition matters occupied a small but a very important portion of the regular meeting of the Central Labor union last night. They were brought up just before adjournment in a report which was presented to the body by Fred M. Youngs, a member of the Transmississippi Exposition directory, who is looked upon as labor's representative on that body. The report was as follows:

At a meeting of the board held December 26 a vacancy occurred, causing by the recognition of John A. Wakefield. I placed in nomination William Bell of the Painters' union, who had been endorsed by labor, and strenuously urged his election. Out of thirty-nine votes cast Mr. Bell received two votes. At the same meeting the executive committee presented a set of by-laws, which were adopted, in which there was a clause giving the executive board full and unlimited power to transact all business of the corporation. Believing the board of directors should at once make such provisions as would prevent hasty action of a committee of seven letting contracts without first submitting them for the approval of the full board, I introduced the following resolution:

"Resolved, That all questions of paramount importance and the letting of all large contracts for buildings, grading, etc., shall be submitted to the board of directors for approval before final action is taken thereon."

This resolution was hotly attacked by members of the executive committee, and a motion to adopt was lost by a large majority. At a meeting of the directory held January 9 developments showed that all power was fast being relegated from the board of directors to the executive committee, or Board of Managers, as they are now self-styled, and that, after the location question is settled, this committee of seven will have full and unlimited powers; the other forth-three directors will be simply honorary members, or, in more suitable terms, "figure heads." I thought it advisable to bring the labor issue to a head, and put the board on record as to what disposition they would show toward the protection of home labor at living wages, believing that if we failed with the full board, it would be useless to expect anything from the executive committee, and your honorable body would then know the result in time to take the proper steps for the protection of labor, in the state legislature or by other means; therefore, I introduced the following resolution, and advocated its adoption to the best of my ability:

"Resolved, That all contracts entered into by this board, its officers or agents, for work pertaining to the Transmississippi and International Exposition, must stipulate therein that resident labor of Douglas county—skilled and unskilled—shall be given preference over all others, and that unskilled labor shall be paid no less than $1.50 per day; provided that the said stipulation shall not apply to works prosecuted by other states or outside interests."

The resolution had the same effect on some of the board as would the throwing of a bomb, and was bitterly opposed by some of the executive board and the capitalists, who could bring no better argument against it than the claim that it would frustrate the getting of appropriations from Nebraska and other state legislatures. I called their attention to the fact that the resolution provided that the stipulations should not affect appropriations outside of Douglas county. My efforts were of no avail, and the resolution was committed to the tender care of the executive committee, which was a polite way of killing it. Hearing rumors of the disastrous results to labor of the late Atlanta exposition, caused by lack of protection, and discrimination against home labor, I wrote to Robert W. McGinley of Atlanta, who was an active member of the Atlanta Central Labor union at the time of their exposition, and asked him for the facts as to the position of labor. I herewith attach a copy of his reply, which plainly shows that unless home labor is not properly protected by proper legislation an exposition will be a curse instead of a blessing to the labor classes, as it will bring them into competition with the idle, cheap labor of the country, which will lower wages to such an extent that it will take years to regain. Feeling that labor will be powerless to accomplish anything in the way of protective legislation in the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition I believe it my duty to place the Central Labor union in possession of the true state of affairs in time to enable it to use other means of self-protection.

INDIGNATION EXPRESSED.

Attached to this report was the copy of a letter from Robert W. McGinley of Atlanta, Ga., who was a member of the Central Labor union of that city, when the exposition was held.

The report gave rise to expressions of indignation from several members of the union. No debate, however, was held upon it on account of the lateness of the hour. The report will be made the special order of business for a special meeting next Wednesday evening. There was some objection at first to receiving the report from Youngs, because he was not a member of the union. It was finally accepted, however. After the reading a motion was unanimously passed making Youngs an honorary member of the body, and he was requested to furnish the body with future reports.

The union took no action on the proposed amendment to the exemption laws of the state, which is being advocated by the Retail Dealers' association. The amendment provides that only $50 of any person's salary shall be exempt from garnishment. The bill was referred to a committee to report at the next meeting.

No action was taken on a proposed amendment by which material men and laborers are given a lien upon material furnished and used by horseshoers, blacksmiths, wagon and carriage builders. This also was referred to a committee.

A bill, offered by the Horseshoers' union, was endorsed. It provided from the appointment of a state board of five, to be known as the Farrier's board, which shall examine horseshoers and blacksmiths and issue licenses to them.

A communication was received from the American Federation of Musicians, urging the establishment of a local musicians' union in this city. It was reported that the musicians are preparing to join the federation of labor.

The following delegates were received into the body: W. C. Turner, R. E. Shipley and C. C. Vaughn of Omaha Typographical union, No. 190; H. E. Easton, Robert Richelieu and William Hill of Omaha lodge No. 31, International Association of Machinists; William B. Austin, Frank Gotham and John L. Miller, Omaha Stationary Engineers' Protective association; William Grabach, B. B. Schmidt and Charles Porter, local lodge No. 42, National Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes.

It was announced that the local plumbers' union had been set on its feet again by the addition of seventeen members. The body will shortly be asked to send delegates to the Central Labor union.

James B. Wood of Chicago, general organizer of the International Cigarmakers' union, and David Heimerdinger of New York, general organizer of the Federation of Labor, made remarks on the use of the union label. The former will address a mass meeting of laboring men at the Temple Saturday night.

TRANSMISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION.

Hearty Commendation from a Southern Newspaper.

Atlanta Constitution.

While every movement which seeks to develop the resources of the country is a matter of national interest, regardless of the section in which it may be located, the Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha, Neb., next year is of more than ordinary significance.

Aside from illustrating the varied resources of the country along industrial, scientific and agricultural lines of progress, it will be the first exposition of this kind ever held west of the Mississippi river.

There is a marvelous record of growth condensed in this simple statement. Only a few years ago the great western half of the continent was a barren wilderness, occupied by tribes of savage Indians. Today, however, it belongs to civilization in the broadest and best meaning of that term. It is the home of a thrifty, progressive and enterprising people, who have put their energies into its soil and made it the imperial granary of the nation. It is also the abode of manufacturing industry, as the progress of the west during the past few years abundantly shows.

The movement to hold an exposition in Omaha was inaugurated several months ago. The enterprise has steadily grown in magnitude, however, until now the plan of the incorporators is to hold an exposition which will be colossal and world-wide in its character. That the exposition will be a pronounced success is evident not only from the varied and infinite resources of the west, but in a still higher degree, from the sleepless and unremitting activities of our transmississippi brethren.

The authorized capital of the Transmississippi and International Exposition company is fixed at $1,000,000. Of this sum $400,000 has already been subscribed, while the balance will be raised within the next six months. It is understood that the legislature of Nebraska has been asked to appropriate $250,000, and that indications point to a favorable consideration of this request. Last June a measure was adopted in congress appropriating $200,000 toward a government exhibit, and there is some likelihood that this appropriation will be increased during the present session.

It is needless to assure our western brethren that the sympathies of the south are most cordially enlisted in this great enterprise. Between the two sections there are many strong ties of natural interest and affection. Especially is this true in the relationship which exists between Georgia and Nebraska, and to say that Georgia wishes her sister state godspeed in her mammoth undertaking is, in a measure, superfluous.

There is nothing in the Omaha exposition which conflicts in the least with the great industrial enterprise to be held in Nashville this year. They occur at different times, and, while they are both international in scope, like our own exposition two years ago, their purpose is to advance the welfare of the country and to make it a still greater blessing to the world. The entire south therefore, cordially unites in wishing

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PRIVILEGES TO EXHIBITORS

FOREIGNERS GET MUCH ENCOURAGEMENT

All Advantages Enjoyed at Chicago and at Atlanta to Be Augmented by Experience There for Omaha.

WASHINGTON, Jan. 14.—(Special Telegram)—Lateyesterday​ afternoon a proofslip of the regulations as adopted by the customs division of the Treasury department was sent to Representative Mercer by Assistant Secretary Hamlin. The regulations do not differ materially from those in force at Atlanta and Chicago, but in some cases they are an improvement, in light of experience. They will be ready for issue in a few days. The customs division of the Treasury department in replying to a letter of Secretary John A. Wakefield, of the Transmississippi Exposition, relative to the bonding of the exposition for the care and custody of goods in bond, addressed a letter to Representative Mercer today, in which the department states that the act is ample for all purposes of the exposition, but if additional provisions are needed, they will be taken care of in the regulations of the Treasury department. "Every privilege which has been enjoyed by previous expositions will be included in the arrangements to be made by this department for the exposition referred to," is the concluding paragraph of the letter.

EXPOSITION GROWS IN FAVOR

LEGISLATORS TAKE UP WITH THE IDEA

Dudley Smith's Bill Has Many Warm Friends Already, but Will Meet Many Amendments on Its Way.

LINCOLN, Jan. 15.—(Special Telegram.)—Despite the frantic assertions of a few opponents of the proposal to appropriate a sufficient sum of money from the state treasury to enable the state of Nebraska to make a creditable showing at the Transmississippi Exposition, the fact yet remains that the preposition is growing in favor among the members of the legislature. The bill introduced by Representative Dudley Smith of Omaha, although not yet out of the printer's hands, is already the topic of the conversation in legislative circles in Lincoln. It is developing some warm friends among the populist members, although all do not agree with all the expressed terms of the bill. Many amendments will doubtless be offered, and already some practical suggestions are talked of.

Ex-Senator H. G. Stewart of Dawes county, one of the best known middle-of-the-road populists of the state, for two terms a senator from his district and assistant secretary of the senate at the present session, said this morning that, generally speaking, he was in favor of the appropriation. He believed that the provision making the twelve state directors members of the regular Board of Directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition company was a very wise one, and that it would enable the state to secure better returns for the money invested than if a commission were appointed to act independent of the Exposition company. Under the plan adopted in making the appropriation for the Nebraska exhibit at the World's fair, said Senator Stewart, a large proportion of the money was dissipated in the payment of the salaries and expense of a great many officials. Senator Stewart is of the opinion, however, that the state should secure some tangible return for the money voted to the exposition. He suggested that a provision be inserted in the bill requiring the Exposition company to donate to the state at the close of the fair some of the larger buildings, to be used for the benefit of the people of the state. In order to give his idea practical form he suggested that it might be a wise move to either locate the big fair on the State fair grounds or remove the fair grounds permanently to a point nearer the city of Omaha, and by locating the Exposition buildings upon the new site give to the state of Nebraska some permanent buildings for State fair purposes that would make the State fair the superior of any held in the United States. He also suggested that at least one of the  

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buildings, if constructed of structural iron, be removed to the city of Lincoln to be used as a part of the equipment of the University of Nebraska. One of the Exposition buildings, he thought, could be designed in such a manner that all of the permanent structural portion could be admirably used for one of the large buildings at the university.

Another suggestion made by Senator Stewart was that the bill should contain a provision requiring the Exposition management to devote a portion of the money appropriated to a model irrigation farm of at least forty acres. Upon this farm should be planted various crops, all to be placed in the hands of practical irrigation men who would show the immense advantages of irrigation through the entire season.

Senator Stewart is one of the leaders of the populist party and comes from a section of the state where the prevailing business depression pinches the hardest. He is, nevertheless, favorable to an appropriation commensurate with the importance and dignity of the state. But, he says, that, as far as his people are concerned, they feel that the state should have some tangible return for the money the state proposes to invest.

ILLINOIS IS DEEPLY INTERESTED.

Senator Crawford's Bill for Representation Has Strong Support.

CHICAGO, Jan. 15.—(Special Telegram.)—Senator Crawford yesterday introduced into the senate at Springfield a bill providing for the participation of the state of Illinois in the Transmississippi and International Exposition, and for the appropriation of $100,000 for that purpose. The bill contemplates the appointment by the governor of three commissioners, who are to receive not to exceed $2,000 each for their expenses, and for the appointment of a salaried secretary. It also provides for the erection of the proper state buildings.

Senator Crawford is one of the oldest Chicago members of the upper house and is usually a member of the steering committee, which practically controls the right-of-way of all bills on the calendar. As yet no committees have been appointed in either branch of the legislature, it being the understanding that the complete organization will be deferred until the senatorial fight is out of the way. This bill has been very fortunate in being introduced at this time, and in fact it is the only bill of general interest so far introduced in either house. The representative of the exposition having the matter in charge has enjoyed the friendship of all factions and avoided identification with any particular candidacy.

Before Senator Crawford would consent to introduce and champion the bill it was necessary to show him that influential commercial and railroad interests in Illinois were favorable thereto. The senator himself is strongly in favor of the bill and will guard its interests at every stage. It is understood that already the knowledge of this contemplated action on the part of Illinois has started a movement in St. Louis looking to similar action on the part of the Missouri legislature, as St. Louis has trade interests that cannot afford to stay out with Chicago in.

This action in Illinois should stir up all the western states, and surely Nebraska must, in comparison with this amount, grant all that is being asked in the way of an appropriation at this session in Lincoln.

PLANS OF THE COLORED PEOPLE.

Propose a Department at the Transmississippi Exposition.

The colored population of the city is desirous of having a department and exhibit of its own at the Transmississippi Exposition. The plans are as yet in embryo, but the first steps have been taken.

The negro exhibit at the Atlanta exposition is responsible for the idea. The matter was first proposed at a meeting of colored men which was held in the office of Dr. M. O. Ricketts last Wednesday night, although it had been quietly worked up for some time past. The meeting was attended by about twenty of the prominent colored men of the city. The evening was spent in talking over plans, but nothing definite was done. A committee, consisting of M. F. Singleton, A. W. Parker and Fred L. Smith, was appointed to obtain information of the exhibit that was held at Atlanta. Another committee, composed of T. P. Manhamitt, J. Tucker and W. B. Watson, was selected to secure similar information regarding the exhibit that is to be made at the Nashville exposition this year. A third committee consisting of A. D. White, Joseph Carr and George E. Collins, was appointed to gather statistics of the colored race resident in the transmississippi states. Another meeting will be held Thursday night, January 28.

It is the intention to have a separate building of some character on the exposition grounds. It is more than probable that the educational progress of the race will be made the principal feature of the exhibit. In addition, however, the department will show the present condition of the colored people of the west. It is believed that if such an exhibit can be arranged, a number of conventions of colored people can be induced to meet in this city during the exposition year. Among these are mentioned the supreme lodge of the Colored Branch of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Colored Women's Federated Clubs, the Colored Workers of the Episcopal church and the grand lodge of Colored Masons of this state, Kansas and Missouri.

The colored population in the northern part of the transmississippi section is comparatively small, but it is large in the

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VOICE OF TRANSMISSISSIPPI PRESS.

Sioux City Tribune: Mr. E. Rosewater, editor of The Omaha Bee, and manager of the Department of Publicity of the Transmississippi Exposition, has begun his work of publication of the exhibition, which is to be an exposition of the resources and products of the states west of the Mississippi, to be held in the City of Omaha in 1898. No doubt it will be a great thing for Omaha if it is a success, and pending its opening it will be a great source of encouragement to the people of that city.

So. Louis Republic: Omaha is vigorously preparing its Transmississippi and International Exposition for 1898. Since it is the first great exposition attempted beyond the Missouri, all the western states will lend their warm interest and best efforts in aid of the Omaha enterprise. The Nebraska legislature will appropriate $250,000 this winter. With the appropriation by congress the funds will be ample for an elaborate affair. The Omaha exposition will be one of the marked features of next year.

Cedar Rapids Republican: The Transmississippi and International Exposition association is putting forth its best efforts for an exposition in 1898, and Mr. Edward Rosewater of The Omaha Bee, who is manager of the Department of Publicity, states that the association proposes to focalize attention upon the marvelous resources and capabilities of the transmississippi states, as distinguished from the monopoly of the Columbian exposition by foreign exhibitors. There is every reason why the Omaha project should receive the co-operation and support of the entire country, and particularly of the part west of the great river. The fact that Nebraska has been captured politically by the populists has undoubtedly militated to decrease the interest which was first felt in the scheme, but it must be remembered that the populists are invariably better talkers than workers. If the Transmississippi Exposition becomes a reality and a success it will be through the efforts of men like Mr. Rosewater, who are business men in the highest and best sense of the term. The men who are behind this exposition in Nebraska should not be made to suffer for faults which are not their own. There is no question but such an exposition will be a great benefit to Iowa, as well as many other states. The government has made a small appropriation of $200,000 for an exhibit, and the legislature of Nebraska is expected to appropriate as much or more. Until the latter has pledged itself it is not likely any very positive steps will be taken elsewhere, but the Republican expects to see the exposition go forward to a profitable and successful culmination.

Los Angeles Herald: The proposed International Exposition to be held at Omaha may now hot only be put down as a fixed fact, but it gives promise of being one of the most complete and extensive exhibits of the resources and products of this country that was ever made. Let everybody give the enterprise a boost, and then when it opens in 1898 go and take it all in.

San Francisco Chronicle: The Transmississippi and International Exposition, which is to be held in Omaha in 1898, deserves the attention and encouragement of Californians. It will afford the producers of this state an excellent opportunity to introduce their specialities to the people of a large and rapidly growing section of the country, and whatever may be said by the unreflecting, such opportunities are not to be despised. It is not always easy to trace to their source the causes that contribute to the popularity of natural or artificial products in remote places, but there can be no doubt whatever that the chief of them is judicious advertisement, and no better method of advertising in distant places could be designed than an exposition which permits the products of different sections to be placed in competition. Such a competition Californians may enter upon with confidence. Their experience in the past has taught them that in most lines they need not fear rivalry, and in many they may court it.

Some idea of the scope of the proposed Transmississippi and International Exposition may be gained from the fact that those who are promoting the affair have paid California the compliment to inquire particularly into the management of the Midwinter International Exposition, with a view to profiting by our experience. In response to an inquiry for information the published history of the Midwinter fair was sent to the board of directors of the Transmississippi Exposition. Acknowledging the receipt of this, the secretary, John A. Wakefield remarked:

"We have the history of the Midwinter exposition, and I want to say, in this connection, that in all the histories of expositions which it has been my pleasure to inspect, there is only one which seems to be real, sure enough history, and that is the Midwinter. It is the only one which gives any clear financial showing whatever. Mr. Higinbotham of the World's Columbian exposition writes me that the financial history of the World's Columbian exposition will be issued from the press of Appleton's some time during the year 1897, or four years after the close of the exposition. The promptness of the financial statement contained in the Midwinter history is, by comparison, all the more complimentary."

That the compliment was not entirely undeserved may be gathered from the added statement that the history above referred to was in the hands of the printer within six weeks of the close of the fair, and that it was published in elaborate form before the end of the year 1894, the Midwinter exposition having terminated on the 4th of July of that year. Some one may suggest that the Midwinter fair should not be compared with the colossal Columbian World's fair, but it must be remembered that while the Chicago exposition was on a grander scale than California's show, it also had much larger corps of accountants and other attaches than the latter. But the most remarkable instance of dilatoriness is that furnished by the Centennial exposition, which did not complete its history until nearly nineteen years after the close of the fair. So on the whole it may be said if the projectors of the Transmississippi Exposition conduct their fair on the lines of the California Midwinter International exposition they will make no serious mistake.

Las Vegas (N. M.) Daily Optic: The Transmississippi Commercial congress, held in November, 1895, declared in favor of an exposition of the resources and products of the states west of the Mississippi, to be held in the city of Omaha in 1898. To carry out this project the Transmississippi and International Exposition association was incorporated, with an authorized capital of $1,000,000, of which over $400,000 has already been raised and the remainder will doubtless be secured in the next six months. In June last congress passed a bill granting recognition to the Transmississippi and International Exposition, pledging not less than $200,000 toward a government exhibit. It is confidently expected that the appropriation will be increased during the coming session to $500,000. The legislature of Nebraska, at its biennial session this month, will be asked to appropriate at least $250,000, and the management is assured by the governor and incoming members that this request will be complied with.

Salt Lake City News: An interesting topic for legislative consideration on the part of the Transmississippi states and territories now comes forward in the Transmississippi and International Exposition, to be held in Omaha, Neb., between June 1 and November 1, 1898. It is an outcome of the declaration of the Transmississippi congress, held in 1895, which recorded itself in favor of such an exposition. The project was taken hold of by an organization in which each of the states and territories west of the Mississippi is represented by a vice president. The national government and various legislatures were asked for an appropriation. Iowa contributed $10,000 for preliminary work; other states have pledged liberal aid, and congress appropriated $200,000 on certain conditions that have been complied with. This year Nebraska is asked to contribute $300,000, congress will be requested to donate a like sum, and all the Transmississippi states and territories are being urged to make appropriations to aid in the project.

Such an exposition for the section of country west of the Mississippi, which comprises two-thirds of the area of the United States with wonderful possibilities in the future development of its resources, cannot fail to be of vast benefit to the entire region that is to be given representation. When exhibitions are held by states locally, the advantages gained by mutual association and competition of various sections are readily discernible, and in no way more perfectly than by the increased activity which is awakened among the producers within the state, who are inspired to renewed efforts for better results, and find encouragement in the fact that their productions thus become known and appreciated throughout the state. The Omaha Exposition means the extension of the advantages to all the transmississippi region and they are of such importance to each individual state and territory that none can afford to be left out or to be represented in meager or niggardly fashion.

In this state the legislature this year may be asked to further consider the semi-centennial celebration of the state to be held in this city in July next. At the same time it will not do to ignore the projects of the succeeding year in the line of exhibitions, hence the event at Omaha may be looked to receive consideration of a favorable character. That much may be regarded as a certainty. As to the detail of what the state may be expected to do, it might be premature to discuss that in advance of Governor Wells' recommendations on the subject, which has been invited to his attention in his message to the legislature. But there is no reason to fear that executive and legislators will not give the Transmississippi Exposition of 1898 the consistent, friendly, effective attention which its importance to this state requires from that source.

 

Ottumwa Courier: Omaha is making great preparations for the Transmississippi and International Exposition that is to be held in that city from June 1 to November 1, 1898. It is propoesd​ at this exposition to focalize attention upon the marvelous resources and capabilities of the transmississippi states, something that was not done at the Columbian exposition because of the fact that the latter was largely monopolized by foreign exhibitors. The coruoration​ having the exposition in charge has elready​ subscribed $400,000 of the $1,000,000 capital. The state of Nebraska is expected to appropriate $250,000 toward a government exhibit. Iowa will be asked to participate and she will certainly do so in a liberal manner.

Dubuque Daily Times: An effort is being made to incite interest in the exposition which the Transmississippi Commercial congress, at its meeting in November, 1895, decided to hold in Omaha in 1898. The people of Omaha and Nebraska and all those interested in the development of the western country are lending the project their aid and exerting themselves to further it.

The plan is to have the exposition strictly what its name implies it should be, an exhibit of the marvelous resources and capabilities of the states west of the Mississippi.

It is true these states were represented at the Columbian exposition, but for the reason so many foreign exhibits were there those from the transmississippi states were merely incidental to the display. In the 1898 exposition at Omaha it is desired to give the products and advantages of the western states the prominence they deserve. It is desired to make the exposition a grand affair, in keeping with the great rich territory it is sought to exploit. In order to do this aid from the government and all the western states will be asked and it is expected their response will be speedy and cor-

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To carry out the project the Transmississippi and International Exposition association was incorporated last winter with a capital stock of $1,000,000, $400,000 of which has already been raised.

In June last congress recognized the importance of the project by passing a bill pledging not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit. This, it is confidently expected by the managemtn​, will be increased to $500,000. In Nebraska an appropriation has been vigorously agitated with the result that the governor and incoming members have given the assurance that a bill for the appropriation of $250,000 will be adopted at the session of the legislature which convenes this winter.

With this much accomplished those in charge of the exposition feel certain of its success and with the cordial co-operation there is every warrant to expect from the other states it should be all in magnificence that can be expected.

Iowa is interested in this project and it should awaken to its importance to this state. If the other states do manifest the interest it is expected and assured they will Iowa wants to be as well represented.

Such an exposition as is contemplated offers an exceptional opportunity for displaying the resources of the state and it is certain a liberal appropriation by the legislature, making an exhibit that would reflect credit on the state possible, would result in benefits many times the value of the money expended.

Milbank, S. D., Herald-Advance: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898 promises to be a most successful means of advertising the western states. Already great preparations are under way to make the exposition the most important ever instituted in the northwest.

Duluth News-Tribune: Omaha is looking forward with proper pride to the Transmississippi Commercial congress, which is to be held in that city in 1898, between June 1 and November 1. This exposition is designed to afford an opportunity for the states west of the Mississippi to make an exhibit of their resources and productive industries, and the showing should be remarkable. These states and territories cover an area of more than 2,500,000 square miles, and represent fully twenty billions of wealth. They are the great granary of America, and contain within their boundaries practically all the gold and silver mines of the United States, besides other deposits of incalculable volume and value. They embrace the greatest bodies of timber on the North American continent, as well as a large portion of the cotton belt, and all of the sugar-producing lands.

In the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893 the exhibits of the transmississippi states were overshadowed by the exhibits of foreign countries. Of the millions who passed through its gates, comparatively few carried away with them a distinct impression of the productive resources of that vast empire. The purpose of the projectors of the Transmississippi Exposition is to acquaint the nation and visitors from other countries with the fabulous wealth and stupendous possibilities of the great west. To carry out this project the Transmississippi and International Exposition association was incorporated last winter, with an authorized capital of $1,000,000, of which over $400,000 has already been raised and the remainder will doubtless be secured within the next six months. In June last congress passed a bill granting recognition to the Transmississippi and International Exposition, pledging not less than $200,000 toward a government exhibit. It is expected that the appropriation will be increased during the coming session to half a million dollars. The legislature of Nebraska, at its biennial session in January, will be asked to appropriate at least $250,000, and assurance has been received that the aid will be granted.

Oelrichs (S. D.) Times: T. F. Wells, who is on the Omaha Exposition board as a vice president from South Dakota, has been doing some good work for this state in preparing for the big exposition. He has been called to Omaha, to confer with the board and expects to be at the meetings there a few days this week. He is also hopeful of getting an appropriation through the legislature this winter to assist this state in making a good showing at the coming fair.

Denver Republican: A board of directors having been chosen for the Omaha Exposition, that enterprise many be considered as fairly launched. The prospect for its success is good in view of the improved outlook for better business in the far west. Colorado will be glad to take part in it and make an exhibit of its products and resources that will present a true picture of the industrial strength of this state.

St. Louis Star-Sayings: Arrangements for numerous expositions to be held between now and the close of the century are in progress, but in none of them is St. Louis and the entire west so greatly interested as in the Transmississippi and International Exposition, which will be held in Omaha in 1898, from June 1 to November 1.

The Exposition is designed to afford an opportunity for the states west of the Mississippi to make an exhibition of their resources and productive industries. Twenty states and territories are embraced as the Transmississippi region. These states and territories cover an area of more than 2,500,000 miles, with an aggregate population of nearly 25,000,000. They represent fully $20,000,000,000 of wealth. They are the great granaries of America, and contain within their boundary practically all the gold and silver mines in the United States. These states and territories embrace the greatest bodies of timber on the North American continent, as well as a large portion of the cotton belt and sugar producing lines within the Union. The railroads within the Transmississippi states aggregate 65,000 miles, an the navigable waterways include the greatest of the American rivers, the Mississippi, the Missouri and the Columbia.

During the World's Columbian exposition of 1893, the exhibits of the transmississippi states were overshadowed by the exhibits of foreign countries. Furthermore, of the millions who passed through its gates, comparatively few of them saw anything of the great transmississippi west, or carried away with them any distinct impression of the productive resources of this vast empire. The purpose of the projectors of the Transmississippi Exposition, therefore, is to acquaint the nations and visitors from other countries with the fabulous wealth and stupendous possibilities of the greater west.

To carry out the project of this great exposition an association has been incorporated with a capital of $1,000,000, of which over $400,000 has already been raised. The last congress passed a bill pledging not less than $200,000 toward a government exhibit, and it is hoped that the present session will raise this greatly. The legislature of Nebraska will probably donate $250,000, and it can readily be seen that the exposition will necessarily = be a stupendous affair.

While it is still early, comparatively, it behooves St. Louis and the state of Missouri, through its legislature, to take suitable action toward being represented in this great display, which we confidently believe will be second only, if at all, to the great Columbian exposition, which overshadowed anything of the kind previously held.

Daily Statesman, Boise, Idaho: Those in charge of the exposition proposed to be held in Omaha next year are conducting an active campaign for the purpose of enlisting public interest in the undertaking, and the prospects are that the west will give itself heartily to support of the enterprise. The status of the project is given in a letter to the Statesman from the manager of the Department of Publicity, in which he says:

"The Transmississippi Commercial comgress​, held in November, 1895, declared in favor of an exposition of the resources and products of the states west of the Mississippi, to be held in the city of Omaha in 1898.

"To carry out this project the Transmississippi and International Exposition association was incorporated last winter, with an authorized capital of $1,000,000, of which over $400,000 has already been raised and the remainder will doubtless be secured within the next six months. In June last congress passed a bill granting recognition to the Transmississippi and International Exposition, pleading not less than $200,000 toward a government exhibit. We confidently expect that the appropriation will be increased during the coming session to half a million dollars. The legislature of Nebraska at its biennial session in January will be asked to appropriate at least $250,000, and we are assured by the governor and

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FUNDS FOR STATE EXHIBITS

Bills Carrying Appropriations for the Exposition Now Before Legislative Bodies.

Favorable Replies Received by the Department of Promotion From the Thousands Sent Out.

Furniture and Supplies for the Several Departments Ordered to Be Purchased—Store-keeper Appointed.

At the meeting of the executive committee of the Trans-Mississippi directory yesterday afternoon the department of promotion, through Manager Hitchcock, reported that letters had been sent to 2,119 members of western legislatures, asking them to support the bills introduced and to be introduced in aid of the exposition. Replies have been received from about 150, and the majority of them express themselves as in favor of the project. The South Dakota bill calls for an appropriation of $20,000; the California bill, $70,000, and the Nebraska bill, $350,000. Bills that have been sent to the legislatures of other states call for appropriation each of $100,000. It was announced that no state appropriation could be expected from Texas, as there is a constitutional provisioin​ against it. The state made no appropriation for the World's fair, but was well done, and confidence was expressed that the same course would be taken with regard to the Trans-Mississippi exposition.

Letters had also been received from the governors of most of the western states, and all the replies were favorable. Some of them said they would recommend appropriations in their annual messages.

Twelve hundred copies of the prospectus of the exposition have been mailed.

Territorial bills call for an appropriation of $75,000.

The manager of the department was authorized to go to the necessary expense in putting exposition literature in the hands of the members of the western states' legislatures.

Authority was given to the chairman of the ways and means committee and the secretary to purchase the furniture and supplies required by the several departments.

O. H. Snyder of Plattsmouth was appointed storekeeper.

The department of publicity made a statement of the matter that has recently been sent out, and was given leave to enter into contracts with press clipping bureaus to furnish clippings.

Max Adler was employed to furnish exposition matter to the German papers of the country under the supervision of the department of publicity.

J. J. Burns was employed as a clerk in the department of concessions.

The exhibits and the concessions departments were given permission to employ a stenographer and a clerk.

HOUSE ADJOURNS TILL MONDAY.

Listens to Some New Bills and Takes a Recess.

LINCOLN, Jan. 16.—(Special.)—The attempt to shut off the reading of the journal this morning was a pronounced failure. Consequently it was after 11 o'clock before Wooster of Merrick moved that at the hearing of the Transmississippi Exposition matter next Thursday evening the opponents of the bill be given equal time by the finance, ways and means committee with those who favored the measure. On this motion Wooster made his longest speech of the session, plainly indicating that when the time came he would be found with the opponents of the measure. Hull of Harlan said that the hearing should be held for the benefit of those who favored the bill. Wimberley of Lancaster was of the opinion, however, that Wooster's motion was all right, and when a vote was taken it was found that a large majority were with him.

 
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WORK OF THE EXPOSITION.

Department Heads Report a Satisfactory Progress of Their Work.

The regular weekly meeting of the executive committee of the Transmississippi and International Exposition was held at the Commercial club rooms at noon yesterday, the new quarters of the exposition in the Paxton block not being ready for occupancy.

A general discussion of the needs of the several departments in the way of furniture in the new offices developed the fact that some of the local furniture houses have volunteered to fit up certain of the offices free of cost. A list of the furniture which will be required was made up by each of the managers, and the whole was referred to the chairman of the committee, and the secretary, with authority to buy such furniture as is needed, or to accept any offers which may be made by patriotic firms.

On the recommendation of Manager Lindsey of the ways and means department O. H. Snyder of Plattsmouth was appointed as storekeeper of supplies.

Manager Rosewater of the department of publicity submitted a report of the operations of his department, showing that the amount of space devoted to the exposition by papers, both in and out of the transmississippi region, is very much larger than was anticipated, and that the character of the notices was all that could be wished. The work of the department was reviewed and the committee was informed regarding contemplated plans.

On the recommendation of Mr. Rosewater, Max Adler was appointed to the press bureau to prepare articles for publication in German in the large German newspapers of the country.

Manager Hitchcock of the department of promotion reported that his department had been in correspondence with members of all the legislatures in the western states and had received replies of a more or less encouraging nature from all of the states, indicating that the feeling in those states toward the exposition is of a friendly nature. He also reported that bills have been introduced in the legislature of South Dakota, California and Nebraska making appropriations for an exhibit. Mr. Hitchcock said he had information from the other transmississippi states to the effect that similar bills would be introduced in each of them within the next few days.

Manager Bruce of the department of exhibits had no report to make except that his department is prepared to send out 100,000 blank forms of application for space for exhibits and would commence that work within a few days. For that purpose he asked authority to employ one stenographer and one junior clerk, both of whom would be employed jointly by the department of concessions. The authority was granted.

Manager Reed of the department of concessions reported that he would require the services of one clerk, as the correspondence of his department is becoming very heavy. He recommended that Jay Burns be appointed to that position and his recommendation was endorsed.

The committee then adjourned for one week.

ENGINEERS COME MONDAY.

Two Eminent Chicago Landscape Architects Look Over Sites.

C. E. Yost and Major R. S. Wilcox, who came back from Chicago yesterday, have, while there, engaged two eminent landscape architects to examine exposition sites offered and report upon them before a choice is made. They will come Monday.

The Chicagoans are Superintendent Alexander of Lincoln Park and A. C. Schrader, engineer of Garfield, Douglas, and in fact, all of the South side parks.

The Central Labor union will hold a special meeting Wednesday night at the Labor Temple to consider what plan of action is to be followed regarding the action of the directory of the Transmississippi exposition, in refusing to grant any concessions asked by Fred M. Youngs, labor's representative on the board. A hot time is expected.

LOCATING THE EXPOSITION.

OMAHA, Jan. 16.—To the Editor of The Bee: I wish to call the attention of those interested in selecting the site for the Transmississippi Exposition to a few figures, in regard to the transportation of the visitors from the exposition ground to the center of the city, if located in Miller or Elmwood park, or in Riverview park or the Hanscom park site. Taking as an average daily attendance of from 30,000 to 50,000 persons, and supposing the street car company would run fifty trains of one motor and one trailer, each train carrying 100 people, from the exposition ground to Farnam street, the run from either Miller or Elmwood park will take not less than one hour, whereas, from the Riverview or the Hanscom park site, eighteen to twenty minutes is the time required. The fifty trains do here the service requiring 150 on the distant sites, and it is not only the difference in the number of cars required, but being in the heated season, you know how disagreeable it is to be jammed in for one hours, when for twenty minutes one does not mind it so much. At 6 o'clock almost everybody would want to come home. From 6 to 7 o'clock only 5,000 could leave via street car, if located in the two distant sites, whereas, in the others 15,000 could be landed in the center of the city.

To double the attendance locate the exposition as convenient and centrally as possible. A CITIZEN.

OMAHA, Jan. 17.—To the Editor of The Bee: The merits of Miller park as a location for the Transmississippi Exposition have been thoroughly aired for several months, while so far, little or nothing has been said or written as to the advantages of the site adjoining Hanscom park. It is located right in the city, within walking distance of the business center,and also within easy walking distance of two-thirds of the population of Omaha and South Omaha. It is accessible on all sides over paved streets and good sidewalks. There is sufficient land available to accommodate all the necessities of the exposition; the ground in its natural condition is peculiarly adapted for the purpose and with reasonable expense can be made very attractive. A one and one-half mile circle, struck from Thirty-third and Pacific streets, takes in nearly all of Omaha, and part of South Omaha, while the same circle from Miller park as a center, hardly reaches the extreme northern residence portion of this city, and to all in the north part of Omaha, south of Kountze Place, the Hanscom park site is more convenient than Miller park. Locating the exposition at this place would certainly add enormously to the revenue, as so many people within walking distance would visit the fair many times, where once or twice would satisfy them were they compelled to make a street car or railway journey in order to reach it. Besides, all visitors to the exposition being right in the city, would spend some time in the business portions, and consequently, benefit the merchants. The people have subscribed liberally, expecting returns in the way of substantial benefits to Omaha, and a difference of a few thousand dollars in landscape work, water or sewer service, should not influence the directory in the selection of a site.

If we are to have an exposition at Omaha, let us have it in Omaha, and not five miles in the country, accessible only over unpaved country roads. JOHN M'DONALD.

ENDORSE THE EXPOSITION.

Litchfield Mirror: One of the important duties of the state legislature is to make a liberal appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition. Already subscriptions have been taken amounting to over $400,000, and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit. The various transmississippi state​ are looking for Nebraska to set the pace, and the participation of the former is assured if Nebraska comes to the front with a liberal appropriation. Kem's hostility to the proposition will have very little weight with the business body of our legislators, who will readily comprehend the advantage to Nebraska by having a successful exposition within her borders.

Perkins County Herald-Sentinel: When the legislature gets down to business one of the first things it should do is to make a suitable appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898. Congress has promised a donation of not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit, and private subscriptions to the amount of $400,000 have been subscribed toward pushing the exposition along. Now let Nebraska come forward with a suitable amount and it will be an assured success. The magnitude of the undertaking can scarcely be comprehended, but when the people of Omaha undertake anything they generally make a success of it, and with the assistance of every Nebraskan it will be one of the most wonderful developments of western progress of the time. By all means let us lend a helping hand and make the exposition a success.

Cedar Bluffs Standard: The Transmississippi Exposition must be made a success. Every citizen should stand up for Nebraska and lend his aid to make it a success. The present legislature would do a wise thing in making a reasonable appropriation to further this splendid enterprise. The state will receive it back many fold.

Platte County Times: Senator Allen introduced a bill Thursday to increase the amount appropriated for the government exhibit at the Omaha exposition from $150,000 to $200,000; also to increase the amount appropriaed​ for government buildings from $50,000 to $75,000. We hope the bill will pass. The government should set a commendable example for the states in the transmississippi country. And now let our own legislature come to the front handsomely. All Nebraska is interested.

Curtis Courier: Time makes all things even. The long array of adverse conditions that have for a series of years tended to cloud the natural and acquired advantages of the great commonwealth of Nebraska are slowly but surely being dissipated, and the light of a new era is already beginning to dawn upon our fair state. By reason of the quick, perceptive faculties of the strong commercial combine of our expanding cities, Omaha and Lincoln, coupled with the alert and active delegation in congress, at stupendous developing factor, which at first seemingly only existed as a mythical uncertainty, has finally assumed form and forceful dimensions which even today in its infantile days gives promise of becoming a second "Atlas," whose mission shall only cease when the state of Nebraska shall have gathered a garland of deserved honors such as any state in our proud galaxy of stars might well feel proud to secure. Local subscriptions amounting to $400,000 have already been pledged, while congress has signified its willingness to appropriate nearly $250,000 more to equip the governmental exhibit which is to stand with the interstate displays. The people of Nebraska should now be fully alive to the golden opportunity thus presented. Our people, one and all should by a universal consensus of action, by both word and deed, aim to make the present occasion the one great future developing impetus which shall bring men and money for years to come into the state to participate in the general prosperity sure to follow such a showing as Nebraska can, without boasting, make before the world. The state legislature, rising to the true dignity that such an unbounded opportunity presents to materially enhance all our commercial, industrial and agricultural interests, should stand ready to liberally endow the executive board with authority and a generous appropriation to assist the great work along. Westward the course of empire takes its way, and ere long the clanging bells of time shall proclaim that Nebraska is not only the geographical center of the United States, but the center as well of all that tends to make a nation great.

Exeter Democrat: The Transmississippi Exposition is the biggest advertisement that has ever been attempted for Nebraska, as well as for the states beyond the Rockies. It is not a visionary, skyrocket scheme, but a well planned and well matured effort to give the widest possible publicity to the advantages offered in this section to capitalists and homeseekers who have money with which to buy land and engage in industrial enterprises.

A moderate estimate places the number of people who will visit the fair at from 2,000,000 to 3,000,000. The lowest amount which these people will spend at the exposition is $10 per capita. That means from $20,000,000 to $30,000,000 passing into Nebraska through the gates of the exposition. But $10 each is a very low estimate. Thousands will remain throughout the fair, each of whom will spend from $2 to $5 a day, and thousands upon thousands will pass through Omaha to the Rockies and the Pacific coast. It is safe to compute that the fair will bring about the circulation of $100,000,000 in the transmississippi country, which will be expended for transportation, in the purchase of supplies and in permanent investments. Thousands of people who visit the exposition will not stop at Omaha, but, having traveled that far, will venture beyond and take in such parts of the country as afford the most attractive field, measured by the exhibits at the fair. Stand up for Nebraska by booming the Transmississippi Exposition.

Chappell Register: The Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha next to the Centennial exposition and the World's fair, will be the biggest and most important thing of the kind ever held in the United States, if not in the world. It means a whole lot to Nebraska and the west. Every state west of the Mississippi will be represented, the different states making appropriations for making exhibits and building suitable buildings. Nebraska cannot afford to be behind in the matter, and the present legislature will be asked to appropriate a suitable amount, in keeping with the state and the importance she will gain by being honored with the exposition. The legislature should be liberal in this respect and help make this the greatest exposition ever held. Other states will watch with interest what this state does in this respect, and their part in the fair will be governed by the action of Nebraska. Do the right thing by all means.

 

Holdrege Citizen: The Transmississippi Exposition project is now under full swing and every loyal Nebraskan should take hold and assist the people of Omaha in their effort to make it a success. Hurrah for the exhibition! If it is a big success, as it ought to be, it will result in being a big blessing for Nebraska. Let every Nebraskan do his part, and then those who live in the other western states will be willing to join in the procession and make the thing hum.

Ashland Gazette: The promoters of the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha in the summer of 1898, are at work with commendable energy to make it a success. It is announced that $400,000 of capital stock has already been subscribed, and congress has appropriated $200,000 toward the capitalization of the enterprise. Back of these auspicious beginnings, and more important than the money so far contributed, lies the fact that the exposition is to be a comprehensive exhibit of the natural resources of the most fertile agricultural region in the world, as well as of the inestimable mineral wealth that lies stored away in the deposits of the Rocky mountains. In this region lies an empire of wealth and human progress vaster than any that the world has ever known, and the pre-eminent service that the exposition will render will be set forth in a clearer light the possibilities of this empire, so far existing as it were in embryo. It ought to at once enlist the active co-operation of every citizen of the transmississippi region, and especially of every Nebraskan, and a united effort should be made to make this a fitting climax to the series of interstate exhibits that have in recent years given such a wonderful impetus to the progressive movements in the commercial and industrial world.

Wisner Chronicle: The legislature should not pursue a niggardly, penny-wise-and-pound-foolish policy in dealing with the Transmississippi Exposition appropriation question. It will do more than anything else that can possibly be conceived to place Nebraska and her wonderful progress and still more marvelous possibilities before the world, finally eliminating from the minds of the people the false ideas prevailing concerning the state. It is the opportunity of a century and every effort should be done by the state to make the exposition a revelation to every visitor that will far exceed his most sanguine expectations. It is for the benefit of the entire state to do this, and every dollar judiciously contributed and expended to make the enterprise a success will come back increased many fold.

Alma Record: The Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha between the 1st day of June and the 1st day of November, 1898, will be the nearest approach to the great World's fair that the people of this country will have an opportunity to see. Very few people realize this important, if not somewhat extraordinary, statement. Twenty states and four territories are embraced in what is known to be the transmississippi region, including every inch of land that lies west of the Mississippi river. This vast territory covers an area upwards of 2,500,000 acres of land and nearly 25,000,000 of people. It is an undeniable fact that the people of this western country possess more "get there" qualities than those of the eastern portion of the United States. What they lack in capital they make up in "push," but the big Omaha show is not going to lack in either of these prime necessities. It must be remembered that the western exhibits at Chicago attracted wider comment than the exhibits of the east, and this being primarily a western exhibit by western people, their efforts will be better directed, guided by the experience of their former attempt. Nebraskans in particular ought to be especially interested, because the Transmississippi Exposition will attract hundreds of thousands of people to this state, who will spend millions of money. This certain fact has been demonstrated by expositions everywhere and does not require argument at this time.

Hickman Republican: The Transmississippi Exposition, which is to be held at Omaha in 1898, promises to be one of the greatest expositions the United States ever had, at least the largest ever held in the west. Every exposition held in the United States has been a benefit to its surrounding country. Millions of dollars will be expended in the erection of buildings. The purchase of products from the farm will give to the producers of the soil an interest in the enterprise, and every citizen of Nebraska should work to the success of the great centennial of 1898.

Edgar Post: The next really great show will be the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha from June to November, 1898. It will not be confined to exhibits from the transmississippi states, although these of themselves would make a wonderful show, but it will be truly international in character and second only to the great World's fair of 1893.

Neligh Tribune: Omaha will undoubtedly ask the legislature to assist in making the Transmississippi Exposition a success. The Tribune believes the exposition will be of great benefit to the state as well as to Omaha, and, for this reason, will be glad to see our legislators extend to it every reasonable encouragement, and such pecuniary aid, not inconsistent with our financial condition, as the importance of the enterprise warrants.

Superior Daily Journal: And now that the Nebraska legislature is in session, one of the things by which that body can best serve the state in restoring confidence and giving an impetus to the state's growth and consequent prosperity, is to pass without any unnecessary delay a bill making a liberal appropriation for the holding of a Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha in 1898. Three hundred thousand dollars is the amount asked for, a sum of money which if judiciously used in connection with the aid granted by the general government and that subscribed by the citizens of Omaha, will bring a hundredfold in returns to the whole state. Nothing the state of Nebraska needs more than a good dose of elixir of life in the way of the present legislature getting a hump on itself in an effort to restore the confidence of the east in this great state, and in no way can they do it better than in a prompt passage of a bill converting the $300,000 asked for this exposition.

Fremont Tribune: Governor Holcomb has done the proper things in recommending a liberal appropriation to the state to help out the Transmississippi Exposition project. We hope the members of the legislature will not regard it as a wise economy to withhold such encouragement to this great enterprise. The governor should, perhaps, have specified how much. People's ideas differ as to what "liberal" means.

Schuyler Sun: In helping the Transmississippi Exposition no one should be more willing and ready to offer material aid than the railroads, and from the attitude taken by them they seem to appreciate the advantages to be derived.

Nehawka Register: The Transmississippi and International Exposition, which is to be held at Omaha from June 1 to November 1, 1898. will afford the states west of the Mississippi an opportunity to make an exhibit of their resources and productive industries. There are twenty states and four territories embraced in this region, and one object of this exposition is to acquaint the people of this and other countries with the wealth and great possibilities of this western country. It cannot help but benefit Nebraska as it will bring within her borders hundreds of thousands of visitors who will expend thousands of dollars for entertainment, to say nothing of the permanent investments that will be made when the possibilities of this great state are set forth by incontrovertible proofs.

Grant Herald-Sentinel: When the legislature gets down to business one of the first things it should do is to make a suitable appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898. Congress has promised a donation of not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit, and private subscriptions to the amount of $400,000 have been subscribed toward pushing the exposition along. Now let Nebraska come forward with a suitable amount and it will be an assured success. The magnitude of the undertaking can scarcely be comprehended, but when the people of Omaha undertake anything they generally make a success of it, and with the assistance of every Nebraskan it will be one of the most wonderful developments of western progress of the time. By all means let us all lend a helping hand and make the exposition a success.

Odell Wave: The effort being made by the managers to make the Transmississippi Exposition a success is receiving the hearty endorsement of the press. This is right, but it should also receive the support of every citizen who takes a pride in the great west and its limitless resources, for the benefits to be derived from it are beyond computation. The state legislature will no doubt set a good example for other states by granting a liberal appropriation.

Coleridge Blade: The government has pledged $200,000 for an exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in 1893 at Omaha. It now devolved upon the legislature to come forward with an appropriation in order that the transmississippi states may know that we are in earnest in the matter. The appropriation should be liberal and action should be taken early in the session. By so doing we may encourage some of our sister states to more favorably consider the project.

Brewster News: More than $400,000 has been subscribed to the capital stock of the Transmississippi Exposition association and $200,000 pledged by congress for a government exhibit. With this great affair in our own state, Nebraska is under special obligations in making an extraordinary effort to have it a great success and should be first in allowing a liberal appropriation for her own exhibits; the other Transmississippi states will then act likewise in amounts proportionately; the production of a sum sufficient to make the enterprise equal to the best of its kind every held in any country will be an assurance and the year 1898 will be the greates​ of all years in the history of our state. The News hopes our legislature will take a broad view of the situation and make hay while the sun shines.

O'Neill Sun: The legislature will be asked to make an appropriation of $300,000 for the erection of a suitable buildings and for a display at the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha from June 1 to November 1 next year. Whether this amount is needed or not, the Sun believes that the legislature will do what is right and that the state's interests will not be allowed to suffer by reason of any meager appropriation.

Arlington Times: Every Nebraska Citizen should do all in his power to help the great exposition along which is to be held in Omaha in 1898. That will be the best way to "stand up for Nebraska." Other states represented will also come in for their share, but to Nebraska additional advantages are lent from the fact that it is to occur within our own borders and that one our own soil visits from the east will stop. It then behooves every citizen of the state to constitute himself a committee of one to work for this great exposition.

Geneva Signal: One question of considerable importance that will confront the legislature now in session is, How much aid will it give the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha next year?

While fully realizing that the people of Nebraska are not in a financial condition to warrant lavish expenditures for any object that might be classed as a luxury, the Signal believes that the sound business judgment of the people will approve of an appropriation of about $250,000 in aid of this exposition, and that quite on the ground of its being a good investment.

Perhaps it would be a luxury for Chicago to have another exposition at this time, but the transmississippi country is subject to different conditions.

Nothing like the proposed exposition has ever been attempted in this region. It is a source of advantage that has never been used. The west had practically determined some time ago to have such an exposition at some central point. Omaha was the successful competitor, being almost without opposition. The exposition would have gone to some other town in the west if not to Omaha.

Now that we have the exposition, what are we going to do with it? Shall we take every proper step to get the greatest measure of value out of it, or shall we save at the spigot to lose at the bunghole by failing to appropriate a reasonable sum for making certain the success of the exposition and its benefit to the state of Nebraska.

Nebraska wants more people and more money, and a growth at our time of life as a state means the bringing in of more money. The exposition will familiarize thousands of people with Nebraska's products, resources, topography and climate who would perhaps otherwise never know much about the state. We believe it will be profitable to all of us for these people to make this acquaintance.

The members of the legislature represent the people, and it now lies with them to say what shall be done for the exposition.

Niobrara Tribune: One of the first things done by the Nebraska state legislature should be the passage of a bill in aid of the Transmississippi Exposition. The exposition will be a great benefit to Nebraska and the west and Nebraska should set a good, healthy pace for her western neighbors.

Sidney Telegraph: Active preparations for the great Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha from June 1 to November 1, 1898, have now begun. Uncle Sam is taking a most lively interest in everything pertaining to the exposition and will lose no opportunity to render it all the aid he possibly can. Subscriptions are pouring in from all sides and they now reach nearly $500,000. The state legislature will be asked to make a liberal appropriation for the exposition, and it certainly cannot refuse to grant the request. The enterprising citizens of Omaha have undertaken a big contract, but they can be depended upon to fulfill it with honor to themselves and credit to the state at large.

Valley Enterprise: The Transmississippi Exposition is now enjoying quite a boom, not only in Omaha, but in Nebraska and all over the transmississippi region. Let her boom. It will be a great thing for our whole state.

Hartington Herald: About $250,000 or $300,000 would be the proper recognition for the Transmississippi Exposition. All Nebraska would say amen to a liberal appropriation for this enterprise.

Kennard Enterprise: The managers of the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha are getting down to business. This is one of the grandest undertakings that has ever been inaugurated in the west, and every state if interested, more especially the people of Nebraska, should do their utmost to make this exposition a grand success and an event that will forever stand in the annals of history.

Elsie Leader: The exposition at Omaha in 1898 will be a great advertisement for Nebraska, and every man in the state should do everything in his power to assist in marking it a success.

Wayne Herald: The great Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha in 1898, in attracting widespread attention throughout not only the United States but foreign countries. The government will appropriate $300,000 for a government exhibit, and every state of the Mississippi valley will make an exhibit which will no doubt equal, if not excel, the exhibits at the World's Fair. It behooves every Nebraskan to take an interest in the Exposition, for it means everything to Nebraska. The great resources of the state will be made known to the world and it will bring capital to the state, resulting in the building of such industries as will bring prosperity to the state, Wayne county should begin to prepare for it. Procrastination never brings good results.

 
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Gift 606.73t w13s v.2 Ref. 7/19

Shelton Clipper: The management of Omaha's Transmississippi Exposition announces that private subscriptions to capital stock have already been received to the amount of $400,000. Congress has pledged $200,000 for a government exhibit, and now if the legislature will make a liberal appropriation the success of the exposition is assured. This will be, no doubt, the greatest advertisement Nebraska ever had and will bring the resources of the state prominently before the world. It behooves every citizen of the state to do everything in his power to assist in making the exposition a success. It's a good thing; push it along.

Shickley Herald: A liberal appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition at the hands of the Nebraska legislature will be the right thing. Every true hearted citizen of the state is bound to feel real interest in the exposition and will say amen to anything that goes to help it. This grand state of ours has a chance to show the people of the east, the west, the north and the south that she is wide awake and thrifty and that business activity is always with us. And the way is open through this exposition. Each and all of us can some little good talking for it.

VIEW THE EXPOSITION SITES

CHICAGO EXPERTS LOOK OVER THE LAND

Engineers Employed to Advise the Local Committee Arrange for an Inspection of the Probable Locations.

H. C. Alexander and A. C. Schrader, the Chicago engineers employed by the special committee of the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi Exposition association to inspect the five sites proposed as locations for the exposition, arrived in Omaha this morning. After engaging rooms at the Paxton the experts went at once to the office of C. E. Yost, chairman of the special committee. Here they met Messrs. Yost and Wilcox, the third member of the committee, J. H. Millard, being out of the city.

After a short conference it was decided that the most expeditious plan of examining the sites would be for each site to be shown to the experts by its friends without the intervention of any member of the special committee or of any adverse interest, after which the engineers might make such investigations as they wished. In accordance with this arrangement, Mr. Yost telephoned the advocates of each of the sites and asked them to come at once to his office. In a short time Lee Estelle, representing Miller park site; D. H. Christie, representing Miller park; City Attorney Connell, representing the Hanscom park site, and W. R. Bennett and George W. Kelley, representing Elmwood park site, were on hand. After consultation it was decided that Miller park should be visited this morning, Hanscom park this afternoon, Riverview park tomorrow morning and Elmwood park tomorrow afternoon. The representatives of East Omaha were not present, but it was informally decided that the site lying between Cut-Off and Florence lakes should be visited Wednesday morning.

Councilman Christie quickly secured a carriage, and, accomplished by R. W. Richardson, another ardent advocate of the advantages offered by Miller park, the start was made for the north side park. The party returned to the Paxton in time for the engineers to take the edge off an appetite whetted by the short outing, after which they were taken in hand by City Attorney Connell and driven out to Hanscom park.

In response to questions the experts said that in making their reports to the committee and Board of Directors they would include all matters which, in their judgement, had any bearing upon the desirability of the several sites for exposition purposes. To do this they said they should consult with the city engineer regarding the grades, sewer and water facilities and other engineering data necessary to be taken into consideration and should also make such examination of all the surrounding conditions as would enable them to make an intelligent and comprehensive report.

EARLY ACTION IS IMPORTANT.

Real Estate Men Urge the Necessity of Expedition.

The exposition was the principal subject of discussion at the meeting of the Real Estate exchange this afternoon. As a result the following resolution, offered by W. B. Taylor, was unanimously adopted:

"Resolved, That it is the sense of the exchange that it is of the greatest importance that the Nebraska legislature now in session should immediately proceed with the consideration of the bill now pending making an appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition, and that the said bill should be favorably considered without unnecessary delay. In view of the fact that the legislatures of other states are now in session and that they will be largely governed by the action of the Nebraska legislature on this very important measure, it should receive immediate consideration and prompt, final and favorable action on the part of our legislature."

In support of the resolution Mr. Taylor called attention to the fact that unless the Nebraska bill was passed before February 1 there would be only two or three weeks left in which to secure appropriations from the legislatures of the other western states. Naturally other states could not be expected to act until Nebraska had done its part. A committee expected to go to Springfield next week to urge the passage of the bill now before the Illinois legislature, and the first question asked would be how much the Nebraska legislature had appropriated. The legislatures of nearly all the western states were limited in time and it was imperative that action should be taken as early as possible. The Nebraska bill, Mr. Taylor said, should be passed at the earliest possible date in order that the committees might go before the legislatures of other states and secure adequate appropriations. The resolution was discussed along this line and passed. There will be another meeting of the exchange tomorrow to make arrangements for following up the resolution.

WOMAN'S WORK IN THE EXPOSITION.

Woman's Club Appoints a Committee of Nine to Prepare Plans.

The Woman's club took action yesterday afternoon upon the request of the executive committee of the exposition, asking the club to appoint a committee to formulate a plan for a woman's department of the exposition. A committee of nine members of the club was elected to formulate such a plan and submit it to the exposition executive committee for its approval.

The meeting of the club was held in the Creighton theater, and was attended by about 250 women. After the preliminary business of the meeting had been disposed of, the special order of the session was taken up, and Mrs. F. F. Ford moved the appointment of a committee to name a committee or five to prepare such a plan as had been requested.

Mrs. Sudborough moved to amend by making the committee consist of nine members, in order to give it a wider scope. The amendment was discussed by several of the members, and was then adopted.

President Harford suggested that the nominating committee should report eighteen names to be balloted for instead of selecting nine names, thus limiting the choice of the club. This suggestion was incorporated into the motion, which was then carried unanimously.

The chair appointed the following nominating committee: Mesdames W. W. Keysor, W. H. Wyman and E. B. Toll of South Omaha.

While the committee was preparing its report, the club took up the proposed amendments to the constitution, which had been laid over under the rules. The amendment changing the meeting days from Monday to Saturday was defeated by an overwhelming majority. The amendment providing for a library committee of five members, to have charge of a reference library to be established by the gradual purchase of desirable books, was carried without opposition.

The nominating committee presented its report, recommending the following eighteen women to be voted for in the election of a committee of nine: Mesdames Z. T. Lindsey, A. S. Stiger, T. K. Sudborough, Frank Heller, I. R. Andrews, W. S. Strawn, A. N. Ferguson, J. H. Dumont, S. R. Towne, C. E. Yost, C. W. Damon, John A. MacMurphy, Henry James, B. M. Webster, John Gordon, F. Broadwell, C. E. Squires and Miss S. J. Barrows.

Mrs. Broadwell declined to stand for election, and Mrs. F. F. Ford nominated the president, Mrs. Harford, to fill the vacancy thus occasioned. This motion carried unanimously and the balloting commenced.

The home committee was appointed to act as tellers, as the ballots were collected by the members of the committee, who then retired to the waiting room to count the vote.

The meeting was then turned over to Mrs. T. K. Sudborough, chairman of the educational department, who introduced Superintendent C. G. Pearse of the public schools, who talked for about twenty minutes upon the general condition of the public schools from a financial standpoint.

The counting of the ballots occupied some time, and the exercises of the meeting were prolonged in order to fill in the time. When the report was finally made it showed that the following women had been elected as the committee to formulate a plan for a woman's department: Mesdames Z. T. Lindsay, A. S. Stiger, T. K. Sudborough, F. Heller, I. R. Andrews, A. N. Ferguson, S. R. Towne and C. E. Squires.

The ostensible object of sending for non-resident engineers and landscape gardeners instead of choosing those equally competent at home was to avoid even the appearance of local bias int he selection of an exposition site. TO be sure, only one location can be chosen. But that one should be chosen strictly in the interest of a successful exposition and not to boom the real estate of any individual or set of individuals.

The resolution passed by the Real Estate exchange urging the necessity of all possible speed int he passing by the legislature of the Transmississippi appropriation bill is an expression of the desire of the whole people and should not be neglected by those most nearly concerned.

The chorus of promised loyalty and assistance to the Transmississippi Exposition continues to go up from the Nebraska press and is including in everwidening circles the newspapers of adjoining states and the great journals of the east.

The women are going into the work of preparing their department of the exposition with a zeal and enthusiasm which insures success and which cannot be surpassed even by the activity of the men who have the main enterprise in hand.

SOUTH SIDE IMPROVEMENT CLUB.

Committee Appointed to Escort Chicago Experts to Riverview Park.

The South Side Improvement club held its regular session at Tenth and Hickory streets last night, and the location of the Transmississippi Exposition was the main topic under discussion. John Powers acted as chairman, with F. K. Darling secretary.

Mr. Darling, as chairman of the committee appointed to confer with a committee of South Omaha men on the location of the exposition, made a report. He said the South Omaha contingent expressed themselves as being in favor of the Riverview park site and pledged their support in raising funds for the grading of the grounds, or for any other purpose which, as the plans matured, might be deemed necessary. The South Omaha men stated they would be present at last night's meeting of the club, but later sent word that it would be impossible to attend until the next meeting night.

Ernest Stuht was of the opinion that the south side should have the exposition located in its favorite park. He thought if all the property owners of the First and Second wards and those interested in the project in South Omaha would contribute fifty cents each, that $25,000 might easily be raised in improving the park for exposition purposes.

A committee composed of Ernest Stuht, W. W. Bingham, F. J. Kaspar, Frank Darling, Judge Gordon, John Powers and Dr. Hanchett was delegated to meet at the Paxton at 8 o'clock this morning and accompany the Chicago engineering experts, who intend to look over the Riverview park site today with a view to its selection for exposition purposes.

ENDORSE THE EXPOSITION.

Adams Globe: Governor Holcomb in his message recommended a liberal appropriation to the Transmississippi Exposition. Other states cannot be expected to give a vigorous support to an enterprise within our own state unless our state stands behind the enterprise in a substantial manner and the state legislature grants a liberal appropriation, as suggested by the governor. The Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898 is an enterprise that is being prosecuted with energy and promises to be a grand success and a great thing for Nebraska as well as the other transmississippi states. Four hundred thousand dollars has already been subscribed to the enterprise and congress has pledged $200,000 for a government exhibit. If the enterprise meets the expectation of its managers it will be a great advertisement for this western country and no doubt bring money and enterprise west that would not otherwise come. It will furnish eastern people a great opportunity to see the west and learn of its great possibilities.

Boyd County Register: The Transmississippi Exposition is now an assured fact. The amount subscribed to its capital stock is over $400,000, while congress gives $200,000 for the government exhibit. Other states have pledged generous amounts to the enterprise and no doubt the larger number of the states of the union will be represented at the great display of 1898. This exposition will be an incalculable benefit to Nebraska. While the newspaper would indeed be false to the interest of the state and that of its town did it not use its influence and its every energy to promote the success of this display of American skill and enterprise, in doing this it is but right that we urge upon our representatives in the legislature, now at Lincoln, to appropriate $200,000 at least, in order to make the undertaking a brilliant success and a pride to every citizen of Nebraska.

 

Valentine Republican Regarding the Transmississippi Exposition which is to be held at Omaha in 1898, it should be the aim of all sections to give the project impartial and undivided support, laying aside all prejudice in the matter. The exposition will redound to the benefit of Omaha and the state of Nebraska, as a matter of fact, from its location, but that will not distract from the manifold benefits that it will bring to the entire transmississippi region and for this reason there should be concert of action in making the exposition a pronounced success and a benefit to the large area it is contemplated to cover. Each state should be interested and vie with the other in carrying on this magnificent undertaking to a glorious triumph.

Bancroft Blade: Governor Holcomb in his message to the legislature advised a liberal appropriation for the benefit of the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898. It is hoped that the legislature of Nebraska will not fail to realize the necessity of this appropriation. Nebraska was very fortunate in securing the location of the exposition on its soil, and now that that point is settled every Nebraskan who desires to demonstrate to the world the true merits of our state should use every effort to make this enterprise a success.

Genoa Leader: Governor Holcomb recommends that the legislature make a liberal appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition. This will meet the approval of every fair-minded man in Nebraska. The exposition is destined to be a great thing for our state and no policy of false economy should stand in the way of giving it every possible assistance, individual or state.

Osceola Record: The Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898 is now being pushed by its promoters. The people of Omaha have made a careful, thorough organization to see that nothing is left undone which can possibly promote the interests of the big show, and we hope to see the howling success, which almost everything is which is backed by the "wild west." Every true Nebraskan will grab hold and push some.

Creighton Courier: The legislature should make a liberal appropriation of the Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898. This exposition will do more to turn the [?] westward than anything, and if done [?] in royal style will be the best advertisement Nebraska ever had.

Wisner Chronicle: Governor Holcomb in his message directed the attention of the legislature to the history of the Transmississippi Exposition movement, and urged a liberal policy toward it by the state. The legislature will certainly rise to the full measure of its duty in the encouragement of the exposition.

Norfolk Journal: A bill has been introduced in the legislature providing an appropriation of $350,000 for a Nebraska exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha next year. Whether or not the amount asked is too large, the Journal is not prepared to say. Nebraska should have an exhibit and a building in which the people of the state can take a rare degree of pride, and while the amount of money set aside for that purpose should not be extravagant, neither should it be niggardly. The thousands of visitors who will come to Omaha should be given an opportunity to see the vast resources of the state, and should have those resources placed before them in the most attractive and impressive manner. The experience of the state at Chicago is a warning against parsimony as well as against incompetence in the management of the state display, and the legislature should appropriate sufficient funds to not only secure the best possible exhibit, but the services of the right man to handle it.

Superior Journal: And now that the Nebraska legislature is in session, one of the things by which that body can best serve the state in restoring confidence and giving an impetus to the state's growth and consequent prosperity, is to pass without any unnecessary delay a bill making a liberal appropriation for the holding of the Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha in 1898. Three hundred thousand dollars is the amount asked for, a sum of money which, if judiciously used in connection with the aid granted by the general government and that subscribed by the citizens of Omaha, will bring a hundredfold in returns to the whole state. Nothing the state of Nebraska needs more than a good dose of elixir of life in the way of the present legislature getting a hump on itself in an effort to restore the confidence of the east in this great state, and in no way can they do it better than in a prompt passage of a bill conveying the $300,000 asked for this exposition. This we say, of course, with the understanding that Cracker-box Joe Garneau's are to have any finger in the running of this great show, as was the case at Chicago.

Schuyler Sun: The Transmississippi Exposition is bound to be a success as it should be. Governor Holcomb, in his message referred to it in a most favorable manner. Already $400,000 of the stock has been paid in. Congress has appropriated $200,000 which is confidently expected will be increased to $500,000. Iowa was appropriated $10,000 and will no doubt make it at least [?]5,000. Other states also pledge their sup- [?]In our own legislature a bill has been [?]d asking an appropriation of $250,- [?]ve below an extract from Gov-

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IT HELPS THE EXPOSITION

GAINS STRENGTH WITH THE LEGISLATORS

Public Presentation of the Matter and the Objections to the Appropriation Encourage Friends of the Enterprise.

LINCOLN, Jan. 20.—(Special Telegram.)—Friends of the Transmississippi and International Exposition feel much encouraged over the result of the first public presentation of the claims of that enterprise upon the people of the state. At the joint convention of the two houses last night the opposition to the enterprise was voiced by Representative Charles Wooster of Merrick county. He had been selected, according to his own admission, to give expression to the sentiment which, he asserted, existed against the proposition to make an appropriation from the state treasury to assist in the undertaking. Summed up, the opposition may be stated as follows:

1. The exposition is to be purely a local affair, from which Omaha alone will reap the benefits.

2. The people of Nebraska are opposed to the idea of the exposition.

3. The exposition would be a damage to the state rather than a benefit, because the people would exhaust their available money in paying their expenses in visiting it.

4. The exposition would be a bad advertisement for Nebraska, for it would show to the people of the east a disposition to waste money for a useless show instead of using it to pay state debts with.

5. The farmers of Nebraska do not want to sell their farms.

6. Because the state treasury is empty, taxes are too high and property depreciating in value.

7. Because all of the directors of the exposition are Omaha men.

8. Because the directors refused to adopt a resolution demanded by the laboring men.

9. Because it was a scheme gotten up for the benefit of Omaha bankers.

These are the objections urged against the bill and against the opposition. It is within the truth to say that the friends of the exposition feel more confident of success after the full force of the opposition has been felt. Every objection was answered in so convincing a manner that every point was vigorously applauded. If Mr. Wooster's remarks revealed the opposition to the bill, the marked demonstration of approval with which the legislators received the answers to the objection revealed a stronger sentiment in favor of the enterprise.

ARGUMENTS FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Hon. G. W. Wattles of Omaha, president of the Transmississippi and International Exposition company, was the first speaker to address the assemblage. He reviewed in detail the history of the exposition from its very inception at the meeting of the Transmississippi Congress at St. Louis down to the present time; laying especial stress upon the fact that the exposition was not a local enterprise, but one undertaken by the states and territories west of the Mississippi river. He closed his arguments by expressing his belief that the temporary benefits that would accrue to Nebraska from the exposition would be the least of the advantages to be secured by the state by the incursion of new people, new enterprises, new capital and new blood.

G. M. Hitchcock, chief of the Bureau of Promotion, was next introduced, and he announced that he would divide his time with Charles Wooster, representative from Merrick county, and that he would reply to that gentleman's arguments. Mr. Hitchcock asserted that Omaha has done its part and now asked the state to do its share. He asserted that there would be no lobby at Lincoln to work for the passage of the bill making a state appropriation for the exposition.

He also said that the exposition depended upon the action of the legislature. If the pending bill was passed the men at the head of the enterprise would push forward. If the appropriation was not made, the exposition project was dead. He closed the first part of his argument by saying that if it was wise to have an exposition, it was the part of wisdom to have a great one. He believed that the time had come for the west to arouse itself and attract the tide of immigration and investment to the west. "We cannot," he said, "carry Nebraska around and exhibit her to the people of the east, but we can bring millions of the people from the east to Nebraska by means of the exposition."

Representative Charles Wooster then spoke in opposition to the exposition. He asserted that the exposition was solely for the benefit of Omaha; that it would do Nebraska more harm than good, and that the people of the state were opposed to the whole scheme. The joint convention seemed to enjoy his remarks as an entertainment, for the points he made elicited frequent bursts of hearty laughter.

Mr. Hitchcock replied to the objections urged by Mr. Wooster and his replies brought out round after round of vigorous applause. The joint convention was then adjourned at 9:35 o'clock, in pursuance of the rule adopted by the committee on ways and means.

A number of selfish interests have already taken advantage of the situation to advance themselves at the expense of the exposition. Men with private bills to push are already using their influence to advance them by threats to hold off the exposition bill unless their own pet measures are guaranteed the support of the friends of the exposition. The friends of the enterprise, and the members of the Douglas county delegation especially, are very properly holding aloof from selfish considerations and are working with a single purpose in view, and that purpose is to secure the passage of the exposition bill. In the judgment of the friends of the enterprise the chances of success were improved by last night's meeting, and the undertaking is winning friends every hour.

SETTLE IN THEIR QUARTERS

EXPOSITION OFFICERS KEEP OPEN HOUSE

Managers of the Several Departments Installed in the New Rooms on the Sixth Floor of the Paxton Block.

Headquarters of the Transmississippi and International Exposition are now located in the Paxton block, the rooms on the sixth floor of that block having been formally taken possession of this morning. The rooms now occupied are confined to the west wing of the block with the exception of the president's room and that to be occupied by the Department of Transportation, both of which are in the center of the building, facing Farnam street.

Stepping from the elevator and turning sharply to the right the visitor finds himself at the entrance to the suite of three rooms occupied jointly by the Departments of Exhibits and Concessions. These consist of a main office and two smaller rooms opening from it, which are used as the private offices of the two departments. The hall leading to the front of the west wing is closed by a door. Passing through this, the two rooms occupied by the Department of Promotion are next, south of those occupied by Exhibits and Concessions. Next to these is the office of Manager Lindsey of the Department of Ways and Means. Secretary Wakefield occupies the room next to Manager Lindsey, being the corner room, fronting both Farnam and Sixteenth streets. The clerical force of the Ways and Means department occupies two rooms fronting on Farnam street and one room immediately in the rear facing the east. Next on the north of this comes the room of the storekeeper, and the large room north of this is to be used as a meeting room for the directors. This includes all the rooms in the west wing on this floor and the office of President Wattles is in the center of the building. This office consists of a small waiting room and the main office, a pleasant room facing Farnam street. A similar suite a little further east has been selected by Manager Babcock for the Department of Transportation. Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Buildings and Grounds has not selected his offices, as the work of his department will not commence until after the site has been selected. The Department of Publicity will remain in The Bee building.

All of the offices heretofore have been handsomely papered and the woodwork repainted, and such alterations made in the rooms as were desired by the occupants. Some of the new furniture was placed in position this morning and additions will be made from time to time. The rooms occupied by the president are the only ones in the entire lot which are carpeted. A local furniture firm donated a carpet for the floor of the main room, linoleum for the other room and tables, chairs, a couch and other suitable furniture for the suite. Up to date no other firm has followed this example.

St. Paul Press: The Transmississippi Exposition, which is to be held in Omaha in 1898 is receiving considerable attention from the press and people of the western states. Over $400,000 has already been secured by the association, and congress has pledged $200,000 more, which begins to look as though there would be no lack of funds to assure the exposition a grand success. This spirit of western enterprise should receive all the encouragement possible, as it will be on instance where the people will not be compelled to go east to spend their money, which has heretofore been the case and constantly drained the west of its available cash. The general feeling is one of great interest in the coming exposition, and we are pleased to see that sort of disposition manifest among the people of the west, and especially those of Nebraska. Later on we shall make our readers more familiar with the objects and features of the exposition.

Valparaiso Visitor: Our legislature should make ample appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in 1898. This will be one of the best advertisements the state ever had, and will bring thousands of people to our state.

 
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READY TO PREPARE THEIR REPORT

Engineers Conclude the Work of Viewing Exposition Sites.

The viewing of the proposed exposition sites by the Chicago engineers employed to report upon the advantages and disadvantages of each was completed this morning. Accompanied by John Daugherty the engineers drove to the locality which has been designed the "East Omaha site," and inspected the land lying between Cutoff and Florence lakes which has been offered for a site. The points of vantage were pointed out by Mr. Daugherty and the surroundings were carefully examined by the experts. The party returned to the city about noon and the time before Saturday afternoon will be spent by the engineers in preparing their report to the directors, which will be presented at the meeting Saturday afternoon.

Yesterday morning the engineers were taken in charge at 8:30 o'clock by the committee appointed by the South Side Improvement club and were shown the beauties of Riverview park. The committee comprised F. K. Darling, John Powers, E. Stuht, F. J. Kaspar, Lee Estelle and Dr. W. H. Hanchett. Four carriages were required to convey the party to the park. They proceeded by way of the boulevard entrance on Sixth street and entered the park at the north end. The party alighted and walked over the entire grounds which it is proposed to utilize as a site. The escort took good care that none of the arguments in favor of their site were overlooked, and they explained very fully just how they thought the grounds should be laid out. It was stated by some of the party that the South Side club would do whatever grading might be necessary to put the grounds in the required condition to commence building operations.

In the afternoon the experts were shown the Elmwood park site by W. R. Bennett. The party examined the advantages offered by the park and the adjacent fair grounds, the railroad facilities and other means of reaching the spot, the general character of the buildings already constructed on the fair grounds and all other points of advantage that its advocates claim for this site.

LOCATING THE EXPOSITION.

OMAHA, Jan. 20.—To the Editor of The Bee: The proper place for the exposition is where the most people can reach it with the least possible exertion and expense. That place would be on the corner of Sixteenth and Farnam, but as that cannot be done, the nearer one can get to that point the better it would be. Therefore I should recommend the Hanscom park site as most available. It is nearer to Council Bluffs and to South Omaha than any of the other sites mentioned. Half of Omaha can get to it without depending on any mode of transportation other than that which nature has provided, leaving the transit lines for the use of strangers and distant residents.

Omaha has made several grievous mistakes in locating public institutions. One is the State fair. I will venture to say that if you ask 5,000 residents of Omaha why they did not attend the State fair last fall they will say it was too far and that it was too hard to get there. And those who did go did not go but once, especially if the first trip was by the electric line. Three-fourths of our citizens, for this reason, have never seen our new fort, notwithstanding its beautiful buildings and charming band.

The fort was located in Sarpy county and the state fair grounds near Elkhorn. Now place the exposition near Florence, build up solid between these points, and have a city of magnificent distances.

Why cannot this city sell, trade or give away some of the outside farms commonly called parks, get a piece of land near the city—land is not nearly so valuable as we thought it a few years ago—and place the exposition in it. After that the state fair and race track. One well located, properly kept, central park would be cheaper and be worth more to our city than six scattered and neglected ones. Have a place that all can reach. Five or 10 cents is not much to some people, but to a great many it is a good deal, and often more than they can afford to pay for recreation or pleasure. Surely these people are entitled to some consideration. Therefore let us have an accessible central location.

ROBERT PURVIS.

ENDORSE THE EXPOSITION.

Pawnee Republican: The managers of the Transmississippi Exposition will apply to the legislature this winter for an appropriation in aid of the exposition. We believe the members of the legislature will have sufficient state pride in the immense benefit that will accrue to the state as an advertising medium to vote an appropriation that will reflect the sentiment of the progressive element of our population. We should not be niggardly in furthering an enterprise that will fetch us in return wealth and immigration immeasurable.

Blair Courier: The Transmississippi Exposition managers are active, and if they don't turn out a good exposition it won't be their fault. But the entire west has some work to do if it be a complete success. Let the Nebraska legislature that is now convened do its duty to the exposition state and then in 1898 each member can feel his bosom swell with pride as he beholds the eighth wonder of the world.

Blair Pilot: Those who have followed more closely the result of fairs and expositions are best prepared to realize the vast amount of good that will accrue to Nebraska first and the entire west second as a result of the Transmississippi Exposition. A conservative estimate places the number of people who will visit this exposition at from 2,000,000 to 3,000,000. These must be fed and sheltered. The food will come first from Nebraska farms and the help to build the exposition buildings will be furnished by Nebraska to a large extent. Millions of dollars will be spent and thousands of men given profitable employment. The World's fair increased the population of Chicago over 500,000 and increased the property value by nearly $200,000,000. A like result was felt in Philadelphia as a result of the Centennial exposition in 1876. New Orleans experienced a similar result in 1884. Every city that has been favored by the location of some exposition within its boundary testifies to the great good derived from that source. Not only should Omaha put forth her best efforts in behalf of the exposition so soon to be opened in her midst, but every patriotic Nebraskan should put forth united effort in promoting the enterprise. There are none so poor as to be able to escape some good in the way of an increase in property values, even though your property be a muscular arm.

Columbus Journal: The Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha in 1898 must not be lost sight of by Nebraskans.

From June to November, next year, we are to be less than 100 miles (a three hours' ride on the cars) from one of the greatest gatherings of modern civilization—an exhibit of the world's progress up to date; a little World's fair in Nebraska; a season of reunion for old friends; a rendezvous for people widely separated both by time and space—"meet me in Omaha in June, 1898;" an object school for the young folks who wish to get in a glimpse a view of the present age of wonderful achievement and more wonderful invention; an object school for the aged who wish to have some hint of an answer to the ever-recurring question, What next?

The general government's pledge of not less than $200,000 and the subscription of $400,000 besides is enough to indicate what the exhibit may mean for Nebraska if the proper steps are taken. The recommendation of Governor Holcomb is timely, when he says to the legislature: "I trust that the financial assistance given by you will be liberal and sufficient, so that our sister states and territories west of the Mississippi may be thereby encouraged to lend their substantial aid." Of course a meager, lean and cadaverous "recognition" by the legislature would be an ugly thing for them to do and is not to be thought of. Iowa has already made a considerable appropriation and promises more, while other states and territories will doubtless gauge their appropriations by what Nebraska does.

Omaha is not half way across the continent, and this, the first great exhibit for the western portion of our country, ought to receive ample appreciation every way from Nebraskans. It will tend to educate United States people to the facts of the abounding natural resources of these plains and mountains; the unexampled pace of settlement and the progress made long industrial, commercial and aesthetic lines. This education will result in benefit to this country more than ample to repay ten times the expenditure.

Wayne Herald: The great Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898 is attracting widespread attention throughout not only the United States but foreign countries. The government will appropriate $300,000 for a government exhibit and every state of the Mississippi valley will make an exhibit which will no doubt equal, if not excel, the exhibits at the World's fair. It behooves every Nebraskan to take an interest in the exposition, for it means everything to Nebraska. The great resources of the state will be made known to the world and it will bring capital to the state, resulting in the building of such industries as will bring prosperity to the state. Wayne county should begin to prepare for it. Procrastination never brings good results.

Aurora Republican: Let us all put a shoulder to the wheel and push the coming exposition so as to make it second only to the great World's fair of 1893. We hope that the legislature will make a liberal appropriation to the enterprise, as it will be a grand thing for our state, and as far as this paper is concerned, the Department of Publicity will find us ever ready and willing to help make it a grand affair.

Polk County Democrat: The governor leaves no uncertain tone in his message with regard to what he thinks of the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held at Omaha next year. We believe the governor is right and that Nebraska cannot afford to refuse a good appropriation for the great undertaking. Already other states are appropriating large sums with which to make a display of their resources. Certainly it would be a very poor policy to hold a great national gathering of the kind contemplated on Nebraska soil and have the state government refuse an appropriation. The exposition will be held, that part is a settled fact. Will the state derive all the benefit possible? This is an important question for the present legislature to decide.

Bloomfield Monitor: The officers of the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha are actively engaged in their work. This exposition will be a great thing for the state in general and Omaha in particular. Every Nebraskan, no matter who he may be, should do something to encourage the officers and help make this exposition one of the grandest the world has ever seen. The state legislature should not forget that they have also a duty to perform. Other states expect Nebraska to come to the front with a very liberal appropriation, and if it is not done they will put no confidence in it. Nebraska must do her part and do it well.

Norfolk News: The directors of the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha seem to be on the verge of making a very serious mistake. At a meeting of the committee held on Saturday a resolution was introduced providing that in the awarding of contracts for labor it shall be stipulated.

EXPOSITION SITES VISITED

EXPERT ENGINEERS VIEW THE GROUNDS

Advantages of the Several Proposed Locations Are Explained by Their Enthusiastic Advocates—Work is Progressing Rapidly.

The engineers from Chicago who were employed to investigate the several sites offered for the location of the Transmississippi Exposition are having a busy time of it. Yesterday morning they started for Miller park at 10:30 o'clock under the guidance of D. H. Christie and R. W. Richardson. They drove to the boulevard entrance on Twentyfourth street and then alighted from the carriage and walked over the entire grounds offered as a site. They surveyed the general situation, examined the character of the soil and visited old Fort Omaha, where they examined the grounds of the abandoned fort, and then drove to Florence, where they visited the plant of the Omaha Water company. The party remained in and about the water plant for about an hour, the visitors evincing great interest in all the details of the monster machinery. At 3:30 o'clock the party returned to the city and the engineers ate a hurried lunch before proceeding to the Hanscom park site.

Mr. Christie, who has been an enthusiastic supporter of the Miller park site, said this morning that he felt very confident since the exploring expedition with the engineers. He said the experts had been shown everything he could think of that had anything to do with the use of the proposed site, including the ditch which it is proposed to convert into a sewer, the railroad facilities and the water supply. In the latter connection Mr. Christie said that the engineer of the water works, Captain Reynolds, had told the engineering experts that his company would not undertake to supply water for lakes or in great quantities to any other site than Miller park, explaining that the large main in Thirtieth street, which is separate from the main system and which was formerly used to supply the old fort, would be used to supply water for the lakes and other purposes in Miller park, but that it would be necessary to increase the present water pressure in order to do this, and that the company could not undertake to lay an extra main to exposition grounds in any other location. Mr. Christie also stated that the engineers, while they were especially careful not to express any opinion regarding the site for exposition purposes, said they wished they had such beautifully rolling land in Chicago, as they could then make beautiful parks without excessive expense. They also laid particular stress upon the desirability of having some of the buildings of the exposition located upon public

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Bayard Transcript: The Nebraska legislature will have an opportunity to do a good thing for the state when it makes a suitable appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition for 1898. Private subscriptions for the enterprise to the amount of $400,000 have been already secured, and the general government has promised $200,000 for the exhibit. The legislature should make an appropriation liberal in its magnitude. If we hope to secure the co-operation of the transmississippi states Nebraska should set an example worthy of her people. Stand up for Nebraska.

Lincoln New Republic: Editor Rosewater of The Omaha Bee is in charge of the department of publicity of the Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha, June to November, 1898. H is the right man in the right place. The achievement of a quarter of a century, in which he has builded​ a lasting monument to his fame as an editor, a manager and a generally successful business man, by bringing The Bee to the forefront as a newspaper and the housing of it in one of the best equipped buildings in the country, is a sure sign that he will spread near and far the grand purpose of this immense undertaking, wherein twenty-two states and territories will mass the wealth gathered and garnered from 2,687,605 square miles of territory, and in which there will be a contemplated expenditure by the government and by the states of $2,000,000. The New Republic will lend a helping hand and will do all it can to shut out from that grand western aggregation of thrift, pluck and enterprise all sales of alcoholic beverages. Liquor has never added 1 cent to the wealth of the country, then why recognize this great waste?

Woman's Weekly: The Transmississippi Exposition is bound to receive favorable treatment at the hands of our legislature this winter. No man who pretends to have any interest in his fellow man or in the state can afford to oppose a thing so helpful and so far-reaching as this. It is getting into shape at the Omaha end of the line and all are glad that things are so peaceful on the surface, however much they may be seething on the inside. Winter is a good season for the seething and we know that as soon as the snow is gone and spring plowing begins the boiling will all be over and forgotten in the rush and bustle bound to come with the long days; everything will be laid aside but the idea that we must have the biggest show on earth and in order to do that every man, woman and child must be for it all the time and get everybody else to be for it.

Superior Journal: Long strides are being made by the officers in charge toward the ultimate success of the 1898 Transmississippi Exposition, which is to be held in Omaha. This enterprise will not alone prove of great benefit to Nebraska's metropolis, but to the state and district at large. It will attract national attention to our resources and every indication is that it will be the introducing of a reign of genuine prosperity, which will be duly appreciated.

Pawnee Republican: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898 will be the greatest event in the history of the sate. As the World's fair was to Chicago so will the international exhibition be to Nebraska and no patriotic citizen should fail to give his best efforts toward the success of an enterprise whose ramifications will extend to every nook and corner of the state.

Gering Courier: Nebraska is interested as a state in the success of the proposed Transmississippi Exposition. We believe nothing can be done which will more tend to offset the unfavorable influence which resulted from the repeated drought years than the holding of a monster show in the state. Unless our own legislature comes to the front with a liberal appropriation for the exposition we cannot with justice ask other western states to participate, and inasmuch as the great preponderance of benefit will accrue to Nebraska the Courier is most heartily in favor of an appropriation of not less than $200,000. This is a minimum, and we believe still more would be warranted by the increase in the taxable property which will follow here as in every other state where such exhibitions have been carried on.

Niobrara Pioneer: The legislature should be very liberal in its aid of the Transmississippi Exposition. A good sized appropriation will be a cheaper advertisement for Nebraska lands and Nebraska people than the same amount expended otherwise. A return of prosperity for Nebraska means an increase in her population, and what better plan than for the legislature to incorporate in the appropriation bill authority for each county to appropriate an amount for the same good end? A reduction from the appropriations to county fairs for that season could well be made and transferred to the exposition appropriation.

Juniata Herald: The subject of greatest general interest for the coming year to Nebraskans will be the success of the proposed Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898. Liberal subscriptions should be given to this great enterprise by our moneyed men and all business men generally. It will be a grand thing for our state and the western country generally, the scope of the exposition taking in not only our country, but practically the whole world and bringing to our very doors the men and means needed in the development of our great emprie​.

Nebraska City Press: The Press does not desire to harp on the question, yet it cannot refrain from calling the attention of the legislature to that portion of Governor Holcomb's message relating to the Transmississippi Exposition. All Nebraska is interested in the success of this mammoth undertaking and as this state will receive the greatest benefits it is necessary for Nebraskans to assume the leadership. Unfortunately the governor failed to mention any sum which in his estimation would be proper, but the legislature should not be stingy. By judicious management $100,000 can be saved to the state in the management of state institutions which can surely be run for two years on an economic basis when the reward in the end will be so great. Add to this $200,000 and you have a pretty fair start. Other states are appropriating $75,000 to $100,000 toward the enterprise and certainly Nebraska can judiciously afford to expend thrice the amount of any other commonwealth.

Randolph Times: The portion of the United States commonly called the "corn belt" is undoubtedly the richest in productiveness of any land or clime. Corn is synonymous with beef and pork, of the best quality on earth. This fact alone, however, only expressed in part the wonderful resources of the transmississippi country. The exposition at Omaha will reveal to the world the products of twenty-four of the greatest agricultural states in the union. By no other means could there be created such a world-wide interest in the middle west and particularly to Omaha as the exposition would. The star of empire is moving westward and the fact will be more fully recognized by the many thousands who will visit Omaha from far and near and witness for themselves what wonders western pluck and push can accomplish and has accomplished.

Alliance Guide: Our legislature will be asked to make a liberal appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha next year. The government has appropriated $200,000 for a national building and exhibit, and the citizens of our state metropolis are bestirring themselves most liberally and putting forth all the energy at their command to make the exposition a brilliant success. It goes without saying that every enterprising citizen in the state feels a deep interest in the Transmississippi Exposition, and the consensus of opinion throughout Nebraska is that the legislature should not be niggardly in this matter, since the state in general will be benefited according to the success of the enterprise. Hon. E. Rosewater of Omaha has been placed at the head of the Bureau of Publicity, which means that if the exposition is not the success it should be, no blame can attach to the advertising department.

Fulda (Minn.) Republican: The Transmississippi and International Exposition is to be held at Omaha from June 1 to November 1, 1898, which will be patronized by twenty of the western states and four territories. This exposition is to be made second to none save the great World's fair at Chicago. Minnesota will do her part.

Walcott (Ia.) News: E. Rosewater, editor of the Omaha Bee, has been appointed manager of the Department of Publicity of the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in 1898. It will undoubtedly be a grand success, as Mr. Rosewater is thoroughly capable of holding that position, and it certainly will

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TRANSMISSISSIPPI

Custom House Rules for Foreign Shipments.

Soliciting Additional Subscriptions.

Work of Inspecting Sites is Finished.

And the Report Will Be Made Today.

Secretary Wakefield of the exposition association has received from Congressman Mercer a copy of the rules of the treasury department that will govern the recipt​ and handling of exhibits coming from foreign countries. They are similar to the rules that have prevailed for preceding expositions. All exhibits will pass through the hands of the collector of customs, and the buildings of the exposition will constitute an immense government warehouse, under the charge of a customs agent specially appointed.

The department of ways and means is now devoting itself to the task of getting subscriptions from non-resident property holders. These include insurance companies and big investors in real estate and mortgage loans.

Messrs. Alexander and Schrader, the engineers who have been inspecting the sites, saw the last piece of ground proposed when they visited East Omaha. Yesterday they began the formulation of their report, which they will probably hand to Mr. Yost, sealed, today.

 
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BANQUET TO VISITING ENGINEERS.

Exposition Experts Entertained by Local Engineers Last Night.

A very enjoyable complimentary banquet was tendered last night to H. C. Alexander and A. C. Shrader, the Chicago engineers who have been spending the week in the examination of the exposition sites. The dinner was given by their friends among the local engineering fraternity, and with its incidentals of appropriate toasts and good fellowship, made the guests thoroughly acquainted with truly Omaha hospitality. The banquet was spread in the private dining room at the Millard hotel. The tables were occupied at 8 o'clock, and, besides the guests of the evening, Curtiss C. Turner, E. J. Cornish, George Smith, Prof. R. C. Richards of Lincoln, Rev. S. Wright Butler, R. B. Howell, A. J. Grover, F. W. Marsh, A. K. Sault, George H. Pegram, A. D. Schermerhorn, charles​ G. Carpenter, George W. Craig, P. A. Edquist, W. S. King, George McBride, J. E. House, W. J. McEachron, A. P. Wood, H. Beal of South Omaha, John Cowles, James O. Snowden, W. C. McLean, George T. Prince, J. Y. Craig, R. B. Owens of Lincoln, and E. F. Stimson of Council Bluffs were among those who gathered around them.

An excellent menu was disposed of, after which the remainder of the evening was occupied with the toasts and responses. Curtiss C. Turner acted as toastmaster, and he introduced E. J. Cornish, who delivered an address of welcome to the visitors. Mr. Alexander and Mr. Schrader responded briefly, and then George Smith entertained the banqueters with some very interesting reminiscences of early engineering. Prof. Richards spoke on "Present Needs of the Profession in Nebraska." Rev. Butler contributed a witty discussion of the union depot, and City Engineer Howell spoke at some length on the subject of irrigation.

REACH NO DECISION ON THE SITE

Exposition Directors Postpone Action on the Location.

The board of directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association are in session this afternoon.

At 3 o'clock a resolution was introduced providing that the report of the engineers on location be held until after the legislature has disposed of the bill that was introduced by Dudley Smith. At the hour of going to press the resolution is being discussed.

The report of the engineers is sealed and is in the custody of Caspar E. Yost.

At a late hour this afternoon it was decided to postpone all action on the engineers' report and hold the same unopened. No date for considering the report has been agreed upon.

AMENDMENT TO EXPOSITION BILL.

Labor Union Asks that Nebraska Workmen Be Employed.

The Omaha Central Labor union has agreed upon an amendment to the transmississippi bill now before the legislature. The proposed amendment is:

That for the purpose that Nebraska's labor shall be properly protected and receive just compensation the minimum of $1.50 per eight hour day be paid on all work prosecuted by the state of Nebraska through its commissioners."

A lobby from the Central Labor union will visit Lincoln Monday to work for the amendment.

There should be no star-chamber proceedings in connection with the engineers' report on the exposition site. The thousands of stockholders, whose right to know what is going on is in every way conceded, and the tens of thousands of citizens and property owners who may yet become stockholders, should receive all adequate assurance that the exposition will be located fairly and above board on the site honestly believed to be most suitable.

NEBRASKA FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Kearney Hub: There are a number of newspapers in this state that the Hub esteems very highly, that it is compelled to take issue with regarding the exposition appropriation. Some of these newspapers, and they are few, are disposed to saddle the whole enterprise onto Omaha and to make it appear as a private enterprise of that city. Again, a little of the Lincoln-Omaha antagonism appears, and this is just as senseless as the other. The state should make an out-and-out donation to the enterprise, with such provision as will give something in return when the exposition is concluded. If in addition the state desires to make a loan, that can be done also. In this matter Omaha stands for the state, the state stands for the Transmississippi country, and the section west of the Mississippi stands for the best that will be witnessed in the development of the country during the next twenty years. The person, the newspaper or the community that attempts to block the enterprise or to hinder or discourage it will cut just about as much figure as a fly on an elephant's trunk. The thing for a few kickers to do is to stop kicking, fall in with public sentiment and public spirit, assist in making the exposition one of the greatest ever held in the country, and then live happy ever after.

Ponca Journal: The proposed Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha is an immense undertaking, requiring a vast expenditure of money, but it will prove of invaluable benefit to Nebraska and the whole middle west and far more than compensate the energy devoted to it. The legislature should not lag in performing its part, but stand up for the state and promote its welfare by a liberal appropriation, with which to aid in carrying out the great enterprise. The exposition will open in the spring of 1898 and remain in full blast until fall, and to make it a successful rival of the splendid Chicago fair of '93 will be the aim and effort of the management.

Fremont Herald: The Transmississippi Exposition will be a greater success than was at first figured on. The co-operation of states west of the Mississippi river is all that was expected when the enterprise was first planned, but the benefits to be derived are so apparent that states east of the Father of Waters wants to come in and there is a bill now before the Illinois legislature asking for an appropriation for that purpose. The more the merrier. If necessary, let's make it a world affair. Omaha can handle it.

Grand Island Independent: There is no opposition whatever in the state against an appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition, but the requisite amount is what is difficult to determine upon. It should be borne in mind, however, that Nebraska must lead in this enterprise if it expects other states to subscribe towards state buildings and exhibits. But there should be such provisions made as will guard against any reckless expenditure, such as that which characterized the World's fair appropriation.

Lincoln News: The people of Omaha have preferred a request of the state legislature that it appropriate the sum of $350,000 to aid the proposed Transmississippi Exposition to be held in that city next year. There seems to be considerable opposition among the members of the legislature to the voting of such a sum. Some of the objectors base their action on the ground that the financial condition of the state is such that they deem it unwise to tax the people so large an amount. Others affect to believe it simply an Omaha enterprise and argue that it is only a case of Omaha greed. The plain facts are these: The people of Nebraska, the majority of them, we believe, are heartily in favor of giving state aid to the exposition. All who read and think know that an exposition of the character contemplated by the management will draw largely from all sections of the country, especially from the east, where the west gets it money supply. Omaha will be benefited primarily, but the advantage to the state is well worth the expenditure of a considerable sum to insure the success of the exposition. It is scarcely necessary for the News to enlarge upon the benefits that will accrue to the state generally; all will recognize these. But there is one thing the people of the state outside of Omaha wish to be assured of, and that is that Omaha will do her part. We have been informed by the committee sent down here that the citizens of Omaha have given stock subscriptions amounting to $425,000. That is an excellent showing, but will it be paid. If it is, then the people of Nebraska can afford to do almost as well themselves. The News believes that if the legislature will pass a bill appropriating, say $300,000, to aid the exposition contingent upon the people of Omaha raising in cash $400,000—or in other words, pay out $3 for every $4 that Omaha will lay down—that such action will meet with the approval of the taxpayers generally.

Woman's Weekly (Omaha): The transmississippi bill will be up for discussion soon and we hope the Nebraska legislature will not attempt to be original on a proposition which is for the good of all concerned and about which there can be no two opinions among Nebraska people however it may seem to those of other states. Horace Greeley, or some one, said, "nothing succeeds like success," and while the expression may be so old that it is entitled to rest, it tells a truth. If we make the exposition a success at this end, it will be a success on all sides. If we believe in it, it will be the object of other people's hopes and desires. None can help it along like the legislature. None will reap such benefits as the farmer and the farmer's family. There can be no possible good come to the newspapers, for instance, except what comes from general prosperity, but the farmer and the farmer's wife will reap decided and immediate benefits. For a district of 200 miles everything in the way of edibles will advance in price to a great degree and the demand be very brisk. These must all come from the farms, and besides this small consideration will be the far greater one of lasting benefit in the way of advertising. Men will visit the exposition and look at the country. It will be a revelation to many. Immigration will be increased and farms will rise in value. These are reasons enough for the populists who are supposed to be farmers, for favoring the appropriation.

It is said by many that the exposition will be an Omaha affair, that Omaha will receive all the benefits. She will also receive the effects of the reaction which always follows an increase of population of an unsettled or temporary character. The outside portion of the state will not feel this latter result at all. I believe the exposition will benefit Omaha, but I believe it will benefit the whole state far more and the greatest benefit to Omaha will be, in the years to come, from the boost given to values in real estate and farms. It is a pity that men should not be able to see that the benefit must be mutual, or not at all, and the responsibility must be mutual, so far as the citizens of our state are concerned, or the exposition will be a failure. Vote for the bill, gentlemen, and do it with more vigor and heartiness than you have voted for anything lately. This is your opportunity; Omaha met hers when it was presented and will all the way through.

Gretna Reporter: We will forgive the legislature for repealing the sugar bounty law if it will but make an adequate appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition, but if it fails to do this then it has established the fact it is opposed to progress of any nature. Governor Holcomb in his message recommends a liberal appropriation. The people all over the state expect it and it will be poor economy indeed to refuse to make a reasonable appropriation. Nebraska will be immeasurably benefited by a good showing at the exposition and any apparent parsimony on the part of our people will detract from the future prosperity of our great state in the same ratio that our parsimony is apparent. Let the appropriation be sufficient to display our resources and advantages better, or at least as well, as our neighbor states. Illinois has already appropriated $100,000 and provided for the payment of any deficiency that might occur above that amount, and Nebraska should at the very least appropriate twice that amount. Nothing less will do.

Wilber Democrat: The Transmississippi Exposition is the biggest advertisement that has ever been attempted for Nebraska, as well as for the state beyond the Rockies. It is not a visionary, skyrocket scheme, but a well-matured effort to give the widest possible publicity to the advantages offered in this section to capitalists and homeseekers who have money with which to buy land and engage in industrial enterprises. There can be no question that the great west, with its limitless energy and its resistless push, will in 1898 present an exposition to the world the success of which will more than justify the most liberal appropriations this and other western states may make. Similar enterprises have resulted in building up other cities and states and there is every reason to expect it to do the same in this case.

Nehawka Register: We are sorry to see a disposition on the part of some members of the legislature to fight an appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition, which they call an "Omaha concern." This exposition means a great deal for Nebraska and we trust that the financial assistance given by the legislature will be liberal and sufficient, so that all the states west of the Mississippi may be thereby encouraged to lend their substantial aid.

 
The Evening Bee Monday Jan. 25—1897.

WHY ALL THIS MYSTERY?

Why should the report of the consulting engineers employed to inspect the competing exposition sites be kept sealed like a verdict rendered by a jury? Was not the object of employing these engineers to get unbiased professional information that would enable the directors of the exposition to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the respective sites and come to a rational conclusion after mature and careful consideration? Why should this report be shrouded in mystery? These questions must force themselves upon the 6,000 stockholders in the exposition association who have a vital concern in the selection of the site that offers the greatest promise of insuring success.

Does it stand to reason that the board of directors can pass upon the location of buildings involving an outlay of from $1,000,000 to $2,000,000 within thirty minutes after they have heard the engineers' report read? Why should not the report be printed in the daily press so that every one of the 6,000 stockholders may read and digest it and the directors act intelligently and to the best interests of the exposition? Will not the withholding of this report naturally create the subscription that there is a design to subserve private interests rather than the public interest, which should be paramount?

Nelson, Neb., Gazette: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898 is an enterprise the success of which depends upon the united labors of every Nebraskan in particular and the entire northwest in general. It will afford such an opportunity as has never been give the people of the midwest to encourage capital to invest here and assist in the development of our state. It will be the chance of a lifetime. The national congress will do its share; let the state legislature make as a liberal an appropriation as our finances will permit. Then with the energy of true western grit backing it up, the exposition will be equal to anything of the kind ever attempted.

Blair Pilot: Inasmuch as the Transmississippi Exposition will bring its first great good to Nebraska, our legislature should make a generous appropriation for the Nebraska display and to further the home interests in the undertaking Nebraska should be the center of attraction in the entire affair.

BUSINESS MEN DISCUSS THE SITES.

Fraternity Association Gives Its Time to an All-Absorbing Topic.

The meeting of the Business Men's Fraternity association held last night was devoted largely to a discussion of the proposed sites for holding the Transmississippi and International Exposition, after disposing of the routine matters. All of the proposed sites had their advocates and much time was consumed in detailing the particular advantages of the tracts proposed. In a most eloquent manner H. K. Burket explained why the exposition should go to Miller park, while Messrs. Bartlett and Mulford urged that there was no place like the East Omaha site. J. M. Welshans declared for the Elmwood park site and F. K. Darling raised his voice in praise of the beauties offered by the Riverview park site. H. H. Harder advocated the Hanscom park location and then proceeded to urge that if the exposition was located there it would result in great advantage to every portion of the city.

Exposition Endorsements BY THE Transmississippi Press

Fort Worth (Tex.) Register: The Transmississippi country is feeling the effects of the turning tide of immigration. So long as the stream of new settles poured its flood of thousands of settlers and millions of investing capital into the fertile and undeveloped regions between the Rockies and the Father of Waters, so long the business of that vast section lying between the British possessions and the Indian territory went forward with ever-increasing strides under the stimulus of new population and increasing capital. But with the slack in the tide came stagnation. The country there is at a standstill in development. In western Kansas it is even retrograding in population and farms have turned to the primal wildness of the prairie and towns have become pictures of desolation. All that country feels the slackening of the tension which men and money keyed to the note of business success. Its business men would bring back the old-time conditions—would welcome the inflow of willing hands and plethoric pockets. So they have planned a great exposition. The exhibitions previously held at Philadelphia, Chicago, New Orleans and Atlanta brought large additions of population and capital to those cities and surrounding country. It is hoped that the same effect will be produced upon Omaha and the whole transmississippi region by the exposition now projected. As an advertisement of the resources and possibilities of a region nothing exceeds an exposition founded upon a scale commensurate with its possibilities of a region nothing exceeds an exposition founded upon a scale commensurate with its possibilities. And it may be said with equal truth that any section of the country can advance its interests by taking part in such an exposition. The possibilities of the south Atlantic states as fruit raising and truck farming localities were made known at the Columbian exposition in a manner that made possible the Atlanta exposition of last year and the consequent betterment of all the south Atlantic coast country. When the Transmississippi Exposition shall have materialized Texas should be represented there with all her wealth of mines, forests, fields and quarries. She should demonstrate to the business centers of the teeming northwest that her wheat is the best, her cotton staple the best, her coal fields the greatest and her forests the largest in all the land. She should be prepared on the spot to prove that her climate is the most salubrious, her range of agricultural products the widest, her opportunities for men of small means the most expansive, her markets the quickest and surest. Texas will wish godspeed to the Transmississippi Exposition, of which she will be a part.

Shelby (Ia.) News: The state legislature at its session this winter should see that an appropriation is made that will give Iowa a good showing at the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha in 1898. The state's advertisement at the World's fair went a great way toward showing up this state's resources and now that we have a fair right at home we should not let this opportunity pass. We have one of the best states in the union and we should take advantage of this opportunity to show off its good qualities. The state will undoubtedly see to it that a good appropriation is made.

Portland Oregonian: The promotion of world expositions has not been flourishing of late. The Nashville affair had to be postponed, and the Switzerland exposition closed untimely. This part of the world was so surfeited with the Midwinter fair at San Francisco, and the last feeble echo at Tacoma of the world's fair that the very name "exposition" became a byword and reproach. But time passes quickly and memory is short-lived. Perhaps an exposition in 1898 will be far enough away from Chicago's eighth wonder of the world for the faculty of sight-seeing to be rested, and for the "Transmississippi and International Exposition" announced for June of that year at Omaha to achieve success and usefulness.

Its prospectus, at any rate, is prepossessing. The preliminaries have been attended to. Congress passed and President Cleveland signed the act recognizing the enterprise, pledging the government to spend $200,000 for its building, and remitting duties on imported exhibits. Of the $1,000,000 stock $400,000 has been subscribed and the rest is almost assured. The directors include the first citizens of Nebraska, including ex-Senator Saunders, ex-Senator Manderson, railroad men like Holdrege of the Burlington and Kimball of the Union Pacific, and business men like Paxton, Millard, Creighton, Kountze and Korty. The further sum of $300,000 is expected from the general government and at least $250,000 from the state of Nebraska. The Department of Publicity is directed by so able a man as Editor Rosewater of The Omaha Bee.

These are promises of success that should materialize in achievement in time for exhibits of magnitude to be gathered in the whole transmississippi country. As this prospectus says, the Columbian exposition was practically monopolized by foreign exhibits, while the products of the transmississippi region—cismississippi, we ought to say—were merely an incident to the great aggregation. In the Omaha exposition it is proposed to "focalize attention upon the marvelous resources and capabilities of the transmississippi states." If the enterprise attains its now contemplated measure of success Oregon should be represented in it, and doubtless will be. The state legislature now in session will hardly set aside state money for the purpose and should not do so unless discretion to forego its expenditure were lodged in the governor or some such repository of authority. But as soon as the Omaha exposition has demonstrated its success the citizens of Oregon will bestir themselves and make as good a showing, relatively, as they did at Chicago in 1893.

Renwick (Ia.) Times: The Transmississippi Exposition is the biggest advertisement that has ever been attempted for the Mississippi valley and the states beyond the Rockies. It is not a visionary skyrocket scheme, but a well planned and well matured effort to give the widest possible publicity to the advantages offered in this section to capitalists and homeseekers who have money with which to buy land and engage in agricultural enterprises. The Atlanta Cotton State exposition turned the tide of immigration and capital from the west to the south. The aim of the exposition of 1898 is to set forth the advantages and limitless resources of states west of the Mississippi and thus attract homeseekers and investors.

Minneapolis Improvement Bulletin: Omaha is evidently thoroughly in earnest in its efforts to make the Transmississippi and International Exposition a notable success. It is true that in no previous exposition have the resources and products and possibilities of the great transmississippi section been given an adequate setting forth. To do this is the distinctive purpose of the exposition of 1898, and the Improvement Bulletin bespeaks for the enterprise general and generous co-operation.

Decatur (Tex.) News: That which should meet the instant approval of the people of the western states, and especially Texas, is the Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held in Omaha, Neb., from June until November in 1898. Texas should be represented with an abundant display of its wondrous resources, as this is a central locality and will be visited by a vast number of the people of the United States and foreign countries.

Blue Rapids (Kan.) Motor: The Transmississippi and International Exposition, which will be held at Omaha next year, means much for the prosperity of the west, and it is not now too early to commence laying plans for its success. What the World's fair was to Illinois, the Centennial to Pennsylvania, the New Orleans exposition to Louisiana, the Atlanta exposition to Georgia and the San Francisco Midwinter fair to California, so will this exposition be to Nebraska and Kansas. It will bring thousands of visitors to the west who will leave millions of dollars on this side of the Missouri river. The resources and the possibilities of the two states will be advertised as never before. The benefits will be permanent. It is to the interest of every Kansan to use his influence for the success of this exposition.

Phoenix (Ariz.) Gazette: There will be held in the city of Omaha, Neb., in 1898 an exposition to display the resources of states and territories west of the Mississippi river. The Transmississippi Commercial congress, held in 1895, declared in favor of the same and congress has appropriated $200,000 towards a government exhibit. There will be an effort made during the present session to have the amount increased to $500,000. The state of Nebraska will probably appropriate $250,000 and an association has been formed with an authorized capital of $1,000,000, with $400,000 already paid. When the time comes no doubt Arizona will be represented, as the display is intended to show the marvellous resources of the west beyond the Father of Waters.

 
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Wadena, (Minn.) Journal: There is to be a Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha, Neb., in 1898. The purpose is to focalize attention upon the marvelous resources and capabilities of the transmississippi states. Careful preparations are being made to push the enterprise, and there is promise of success. It is expected that the several states will make liberal appropriations for exhibits.

Lyons (Kan.) Republican: The Transmississippi Exposition is the biggest advertisement that has ever been attempted for the Mississippi valley and the states beyond the Rockies. It is not a visionary, skyrocket scheme, but a well-planned and well-matured effort to give the widest possible publicity to the advantages offered in this section to capitalists and homeseekers who have money with which to buy land and engage in instrumental enterprises. The Atlantic Cotton States exposition turned the tide of immigration and capital from the west to the south. The aim of the exposition of 1898 is to set forth the advantages and limitless resources of states west of the Mississippi and thus attract homeseekers and investors.

Pineville (Mo.) Democrat: The campaign is now on for a Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha, Neb., during the summer of 1898. The history of all the great expositions held anywhere in this country since the Centennial at Philadelphia has been that of great good to the whole country. If the one now being gotten under way at Omaha is pushed on to successful opening it will be of untold advantage to the entire country west of the Mississippi river, and Missouri would receive its full share. In all probability our state legislature will be called upon for an appropriation for the proper representation of our interests at that exposition, and nothing niggardly should be done. In fact, imperial Missouri should be at the head of the column.

Minneapolis Chronicle: The project of holding a Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha next year is being agitated. It is proposed to open in June, 1898, and continue till November. Minnesota is expected to take part in the work of helping to make the exposition a success, on the ground that it will prove a benefit in a material way to this state, by a full exhibit showing its mineral wealth, its agricultural products and its resources in all the varied lines.

Fessenden, (N. D.) News: We have received from E. Rosewater, editor of The Omaha Bee, a prospectus of the Transmississippi and International Exposition, to be held at Omaha, Neb., from June 1 to November 1, 1898. In the World's Columbian exposition of 1893 the exhibits of the transmississippi states were overshadowed by the exhibits of foreign countries. Of the millions who passed through its gates, comparatively few carried away with them a distinct impression of the productive resources of that vast empire. The purpose of the projectors of the Transmississippi Exposition is to acquaint the nation and visitors from other countries with the fabulous wealth and stupendous possibilities of the greater west. This enterprise should have the hearty support of all North Dakotans, and we would suggest that the present legislature take some action toward creating a commission and making an appropriation that our state may be properly represented in this great exposition. It is of vital importance that the matter be given careful consideration and that prompt and ardent action be taken. This will be a great display and North Dakota should not be a laggard in the procession.

Mankota (Minn.) Free Press: Next year the west will have a big exposition of its own in what will be known as the Transmississippi Exposition that is to be held in Omaha from June 1 to November 1. The main object of this exposition is to give the states west of the Mississippi a chance to make an exhibit to the world of their resources and productive industries, and that the showing will be a great one cannot be questioned and ought to prove of great benefit to the west. The state of Minnesota ought to take steps this winter to see that it is properly represented at the said exposition in 1898.

LOCATING THE EXPOSITION.

OMAHA, Jan. 19.—To the Editor of The Bee: I see you invite discussion on sites for the location of the exposition. I have read letters from Mr. McDonald and others advocating the Hanscom park site. It seems to me that we have enough in the park now, so the "permanent buildings" are a myth.

It is too hilly and rough with the adjoining ground for such purposes, making it altogether too wearing on the pedestrian and an extra unnecessary and unreasonable tax on the patience and muscle of the poor "chair wheeler." The streets to and from are entirely too hilly, making double the pull on all teams and over which the hack and carryalls all claim they must charge double, besides killing their teams, thus giving the Humane society so much extra labor. The most important objection is the matter of transportation of the immense crowds anticipated.

We all know there is but one line of street railway to the park. The Thirty-second street line spoken of is misleading and so unfair, as it is only a spur of the one line, every other car on the line running around that way. So far as half or two-thirds of the people of Omaha and South Omaha walking, there is little doubt of that if they went, for there would be nothing to ride on. We have a sad experience of this great question and the hilly streets with the two years of the state fair. It has cost the society in those two years $25,000 and has cost the city of Omaha many a kick from people who will never visit it again. Now, let us not make this error in this, the crowning event of our city. We have plenty of level ground, reached by level, paved streets, reached by the largest water main, the largest sewer, four separate lines of street railway via Sherman avenue, North Twentieth street, Hanscom park and North Twenty-fourth, besides the Belt Line Railway, over which all roads may bring in their trains; the Fremont, Elkhorn & Omaha railroad. I think any of your readers can guess the location from the foregoing. It is Miller park. I have been among the ranch people of Colorado and Wyoming during the past six months, a great many of whom come to Omaha with stock and are well acquainted with the city and its streets. These men say should the exposition location be among the hills, as the fair is, it will kill it among a great many. I have also visited a great many farmers in western Nebraska and western Iowa, where I am at work now, and the same feeling exists among them.

I can give you the names and postoffice addresses of at least 500 of them and each will write you if asked to locate the exposition on level ground.

One thing I neglected to say in relation to the street railway service. All but the Hanscom park line starts from the union depot at its present site. Now, taking the opinion of hundreds of people who will have to be relied on for patronage, and to ignore the lack of water for lakes, etc., and it seems to me that no other location has the advantages which Miller park presents.

Let us make no mistakes. L. V. CRUM

OMAHA, Jan. 20.—To the Editor of The Bee: There seems to be a preconceived plan to have regular installments of communications through the channel of your paper to create sentiment in favor of the "Poor Farm site," designated under the more popular name, but misleading as to location, as the "Hanscom Park site." The basis of the appeal for this site is, in my opinion, a flagrant and gross violation of the original intention and declaration that this Exposition should be, first, for the great transmississippi region; that it should be upon the broadest and most liberal conception, and under no consideration should it be narrowed to the local interests of Omaha, or be made to subserve the selfish interests of any class of her citizens. Now, here, at the initial step of the first active work, the selection of a site, comes the talk of "near in," "Omaha's interest," "gate receipts," "permanent buildings," etc. I would not deprecate Omaha's interest, or the welfare of its citizens. I would bring to Omaha every blessing and advantage, and open to Omaha every avenue to wealth and advancement, but would remind our people that the greater benefits and advantages from the exposition is not to be measured by "trade and traffic," "gate receipts," etc. Therefore, we cannot afford to circumscribe the exposition by selecting for it a site inadequate to its demands in order to satisfy local self-interests. These thing​ are important, and should be in their measure subserved. The location will be best for the highest interest of the exposition, the states and territories of the transmississippi region, our own state and city, which meets to the fullest degree the broadest gauge requirements and demands of the exposition, and be most easily accessibly by every class of vehicle, and furnish easy, cheap and rapid transit. Distance is measured by time and ease and cheapness of access to the objective point. It is practically but half as far on the level as it is climbing up hill and down, even though the actual distance be twice as great. The wide and boundless transmississippi region, with its demand for space, is compared to the compact tenements of Paris and New York, and we are asked to hold an exposition adequate to the wants of this great region in a prescribed area of 125 acres, hardly one-half of which is suitable for buildings.

The World's fair at Chicago required more than 600 acres and our exposition will represent more than one-half of the biggest broadest part of the United States, being the transmississippi end, and the international contingent, embracing the world at large. The Nashville exposition covers more than 200 acres and it does not rise to the shadow of our ambition for this great enterprise. The interest of irrigation, so important to the people of the western states at this time, should demand that we set apart at least 100 acres to this feature alone and make it one of the special attractions.

The field we cover has great agricultural and stock raising resources, requiring outdoor space to make proper and practical displays,and the site selected should comprehend these wants, affording all the ground necessary upon the proper level nearest to the center of the city, considering its ease of accessibility, cheapness and rapidity of transit to and from.

If it is the purpose and design to direct this exposition to the local interests of Omaha, let us proceed to do this on a practical plan that means something. Let us use the money subscribed and appropriated for the purchase of several blocks of ground near the business center of the city and for the erection thereon of suitable and permanent buildings, containing convention halls, museums, art galleries, permanent exposition quarters, etc., that the states and territories comprising the transmississippi country may not be restricted to the few central months of 1898, but may maintain at the gateway of this great region an exhibition of their wonderful resources at all times.

I would appeal for the greater and paramount interest of the exposition in considering the selection of the site, conceiving that therein lies the glory and greater achievement for Omaha. Let us say to the transmississippi section and to the world that Omaha is for the exposition, and not the exposition for Omaha. Our people will, I believe, be loyal to the enterprise, whether it is dumped into the ravines of Riverview or hidden away in the valley of the "Little Pappio;" but I fear they will not be content if it is taken "over the hills to the poor house." Therefore, what is the matter with the Miller park site, with its 500 or more beautiful acres? R. W. RICHARDSON.

 

FARRELL ASKS FLOOR SPACE.

loose clip found between pages.

The first application for floor space at the exposition was received yesterday. It came from Dan Farrell, and was for 1,500 square feet. Mr. Farrell was congratulated, and every manager was gratified.

The department of promotion has prepared 50,000 circular letters which it is designed shall be sent out by business men in their correspondence with outside customers. These letters urge the recipients to write their representatives in the legislature to further the exposition measure. Business men who have not been personally solicited to make use of these letters are requested to call at the department office for them.

The customs office has received from the treasury department a circular containing the rules for the reception of exhibits from foreign countries.

Locating the Exposition

OMAHA, Jan. 21.—To the Editor of The Bee: I present herewith a few of the reasons why Miller park should be the preference of the board of directors for the exposition site:

1. Because it is a Transmississippi and International exposition and comprises the twenty-four states of the transmississippi country, whose principal resources are agricultural, grazing and mining pursuits and can only be shown by placing the exposition on a large tract, such as is offered in the Miller park proposition, making it possible to show all the advantages of a thoroughly equipped irrigated farm. If the exposition were to be held in a manufacturing district, 200 acres might be sufficient; but, as is stated, it is in part the exposition of an agricultural district, which will require sufficient room to make a creditable showing.

2. Because it is accessible by all railroads running into Council Bluffs via the new bridge of the Bridge and Terminal company, bringing us into immediate relation with Iowa, one of the first states to recognize the importance of the great enterprise. It is also reached by the Missouri Pacific, the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha and the Fremont, Elkhorn and Missouri Valley on all sides. The Belt Line under its charter must give to all roads desirous of entering the city the right of way over that line, which makes it possible for every road in the state to reach the grounds. Four lines of street railway are within a short distance of all sides. The beautiful and only boulevard reaches the main entrance, while paved streets favor the proposed site to the gates, all being on a straight level and direct route from the center and business portion of the city.

3. Because it is the only place where water can be had without great cost to the exposition company. The great water main, thirty-six inches in diameter, on Twenty-fourth street; also the thirty-inch main on Thirtieth street, which originally furnished water to the abandoned Fort Omaha, could be used without materially affecting the present pressure of the water works, which would be furnished free to the exposition company only on this site. This advantage will make it almost impossible for the destruction of the buildings and contents by fire and furnish water for a series of proposed lakes and fountains which will beautify the grounds.

4. Because leases for 400 acres are ready for delivery free of cost to the exposition company. Also 100 feet bounding the entire site on all sides to be used as directed by the board of directors. The above mentioned 400 acres will require no grading and is of a rolling nature so every building could be shown to great advantage, while the complete water system already in Fort Omaha will save a great deal of expense and the general distribution of beautiful trees.

5. Because it is desired by most of our citizens to make some of the buildings permanent and that can only be done on public property. If this is done an offer is made in the original proposition by which F. W. Parker will donate to the city his collection of curiosities, which has been collected all over the world and is estimated to be worth $30,000. By locating on this site on of our best park tracts will be improved and beautified without additional cost to the city.

6. Because I believe the sentiment of the people is in favor of this site and believe that it should be placed on a broader scale, governed by a broader mind than is being done by some of the directory, remembering it is not only to benefit a few Omaha business men, but the entire transmississippi section. DAVE H. CHRISTIE.

OMAHA, Jan. 21.—To the Editor of The Bee: If it is true, as Mr. Richardson asserts, that your paper is a medium through which the friends of the Hanscom park site may create sentiment in favor of this site, then we think it time that those in favor of this location begin to make use of the opportunity and utilize at least half as much space in The Bee as has been found necessary to give expression to the Miller park advocates.

The "spreading out idea" of our Miller park friends is their argument in chief. This same lunacy of certain real estate men has not only brought ruin to themselves, but to hundreds of other people in Omaha, and now those who were caught out in the rain with their real estate, near Florence and the Washington county line, seek to avert the result of their own folly at the expense of the masses of the people now in Omaha and of those who will be in Omaha in 1898 from other states. Those who advocate the Hanscom park site have no corporate or selfish individual interests at stake. They are for this site because it is pre-eminently the logical site, if not the only site, where the exposition can be located to the complete advantage and convenience of every man, woman and child who attends the exposition, whether from San Francisco, New York, Chicago, New Orleans or Omaha, or from rural communities in the different states. They will all be in Omaha when they attend the exposition.

It certainly will be to the delight and approval of those from abroad to find the exposition located near the principal hotels of the city, lying between the two most beautiful residence portions of Omaha, the grounds flower gardened and beautified in Parisian glory overlooking the transmississippi metropolis. W. A. C.

OMAHA, Jan. 21.—To the Editor of The Bee: I am a laboring man, and in behalf of the laboring men I would like to see the exposition site located as convenient to the homes of the laboring men of Omaha as it can be. If it goes to Elmwood or Miller park, the men who live in Omaha, and many of them who are trying to pay taxes and pay for their homes, have got to deduct car fare from their already small wages, as well as put in so much extra time in going and coming, while outside labor will flock in and stop at the cheap boarding houses which will be built where the fair is located and will have the best of Omaha labor. Car fare might seem like a small thing to most of your readers, but if this show is as big as they are planning it will take a great many men to put it in shape for 1898, and the car fare altogether will amount to something like $15,000 or $20,000. I do not see why this amount cannot be saved to the laboring men as well as given to the street car of railway companies.

GUS PETERSON.

OMAHA, JAN. 22.—To the Editor of The Bee: Elmwood park site has everything to recommend it to the directors as the only logical site for the exposition. It contains 385 acres of public land located just three and one-half miles west from the postoffice. Elmwood park is Omaha's largest park; it contains 215 acres of land; it has shade trees and plenty of them; it has excellent water in abundance; it is a beautiful tract of land and should be improved; it is only a twenty-minute ride from the business center of the city by the electric car line but if the Omaha Street Railway company would do the right thing for the western part of this city it could make the run in much less time and give satisfaction to its patrons.

Elmwood park site would be a permanent benefit to the public, a saving to the taxpayers, a profitable income for the transportation companies for all time. It is the only site that can be conveniently reached by all the people of Omaha, South Omaha and Council Bluffs. The Nebraska legislature might demand that this exposition be located on public property.

W. WEBSTER.

OMAHA, Jan. 21.—To the Editor of The Bee: The friends of Riverview park, in advocacy of that site for the exposition, desire through your columns to state to the public the following facts:

Treating the Paxton hotel as the central point of the street cars, hotels and population of Omaha and South Omaha, measured by the blocks necessarily traveled and not by an air line, the Riverview park site is five blocks nearer to the Paxton hotel than any other site suggested. To make this more fully appear we give distances measured in blocks of the ordinary size: Riverview Park site, or poor farm site, thirty-two; fair ground site, seventy; East Omaha site, sixty-five; Miller park site, seventy blocks.

If Sixteenth and Farnam streets is chosen as the center, then the Riverview park site is but one block nearer town than the poor farm site, but we submit that taking Council Bluffs into consideration the Paxton hotel is the fairer point from which to measure.

As to water: The Riverview park site has an artesian well. The springs in Syndicate park, three blocks west, which formerly supplied all South Omaha and the packing houses with water, can be piped into the ground, dispensing with the necessity of ice and giving cool drinking water at all points. In addition to that the city water now at Sixth and Bancroft, Eleventh and Bancroft, on Tenth street to the south line of the park, Thirteenth street along the side of the park, and on Twentieth street, the South Omaha thirty-six inch main can be made available. If the Nebraska legislature, as seems probable, attaches to the conditions of its appropriation, the provision that a sample irrigated farm shall be one of the features, the land adjoining Riverview park and between it and the Missouri river is the only land in any of the sites available for such purpose in its general contour, and is the only land in which the water for irrigating purposes could be obtained at slight cost either from the Missouri river or from the artesian well without the great cost to the water works company.

In addition to the foregoing, which has not been called to the attention of the public, we may add the following reasons why the exposition should be located at Riverview park:

It is the only site that presents a view of the Missouri river and the bottom lands, bluffs, woods, cornfields and lakes that line its banks, making the one unique, distinctive Omaha landscape.

It is the only site that possesses forest trees in abundance.

It is the only site that possesses pure, healthy, cold mineral water and artesian water.

It is the only site where the Missouri river can be made available for excursion boats and as a means of transportation to and from the grounds.

It has perfect sewerage.

It is accessible by the Thirteenth street car line, and by the proposed street car extension down Tenth and Sixth streets, and from South Omaha, and also by B. & M. railway and river steamers.

On the road hither is presented the broadest and most imposing view possible of the city of Omaha.

The grounds are susceptible of great ornamentation at slight expense.

It is not confined and shut out from refreshing breezes and inspiring views in a hollow or on the bottom.

It is the coolest place in summer.

The odors from the packing houses are not wafted to it on the south wind, the prevailing wind in the heated season.

It is the most healthy location and less subject to contagious disease by reason of low, marshy grounds or bad sewerage.

It is the only site upon which the buildings would be in plain view of every train coming into Council Bluffs and Omaha.

ERNEST STUHT.

   
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OMAHA, Jan. 22.—To the Editor of The Bee: The letters of L. V. Crum and R. W. Richardson in last night's Bee demand an answer, as they have not clearly stated the facts in the case. I am an advocate of the site that is selected, but in all fairness each site should be properly represented before a selection is made by the Board of Directors.

1. Mr. Crum says "permanent buildings are a myth." It is generally conceded that if we do not succeed in getting some permanent improvement as a result of the Exposition that it will not be the success that it should be. Level-headed Chicago men will tell you today that their greatest mistake was that they received no permanent improvements on the grounds as a result of the great fair.

2. He says "it is too hilly and rough." This is not so. A great majority of the site is level, or can be made enough so by a very little work, and engineers say that a site that is somewhat uneven can be made much more attractive and beautiful than a level tract at the same expense.

3. The streets to and from the site are not hilly. There is only one small hill on Leavenworth street, from Sixteenth to Twentieth. In fact, there is more driving on the streets leading to and surrounding Hanscom park than any other portion of the city.

4. Mr. Crum says, "Hacks and carryalls claim they must charge double." What rot. There is not a hack or carryall driver in Omaha today but will take you from the center of town to Thirty-fourth and Leavenworth streets, or Thirty-second and Woolworth avenue, the proposed entrance to the Hanscom park site, for one-half the price he will take you to Miller park, and take you there in one-third of the time.

5. The statement that there is only one motor line to the Hanscom park site is refreshing, considering the fact that Miller park has none. The nearest is equally close to the Hanscom park site, and is no closer to Miller park than the Farnam street line to Hanscom park site. While the Leavenworth street line, with its three branches runs to three proposed entrances, and other lines, the Farnam street for instance, can be connected fully as easy as any lines can be run to Miller park. Again, the Belt Line runs around the entire city, and to South Omaha, and passes the Hanscom park site on the west. In all probability the Thirty-second street line would be extended to South Omaha, which would make another

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PARKS AND EXPOSITION.

One Way the City Can Aid if a Park Is Used.

The park commission has decided to ask the city council for a levy of 2 mills​ The exposition was discussed by the commission, and it was also decided that should it be located in one of the parks, and the exposition management make a request to that effect, that the commission will amend its request to the council, making it 3 instead of 2 mills. Up to the present time the only practical method, in the opinion of the park commissioners, by which the city can officially aid the exposition is through the commission in the line of grading and preparing the grounds, providing, of course, that it is located in a park. The commission is divided as to the advisability of the city taking such action but will be governed wholly by public sentiment upon it.

The park commission expresses a willingness to do anything in reason in the matter of moving to other offices in order to allow the board of health to move into its present quarters, but as both the park commission and the board of health may be abolished within the next sixty days it takes the position that no expense should be incurred until the action of the legislature on the different charter revision bills is known.

EXPOSITION PROGRESS.

Foreign Exhibits, Non-Resident Subscriptions and Engineers' Report.

Secretary Wakefield of the exposition association has received from Congressman Mercer a copy of the rules of the treasury department that will govern the receipt and handling of exhibits coming from foreign countries. They are similar to, if not identical with, the rules that have prevailed for preceding expositions. All exhibits will pass through the hands of the collector of customs, and the buildings of the exposition will constitute an immense government bonded warehouse, under the charge of a customs agent specially appointed.

The department of ways and means is now devoting itself to the task of getting subscriptions from non-resident property holders. These include insurance companies and big investors in real estate and mortgage loans. The heads of the department say that they are not forgetting that there are several men of large property in Omaha who have not subscribed, and they will be solicited in good time and with vigor.

Messrs. Alexander and Schrader, the engineers who have been inspecting the sites, saw the last piece of ground proposed when they visited East Omaha. Yesterday they began the formulation

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LOCATING THE EXPOSITION

QUESTION TO BE CONSIDERED TOMORROW

Report of the Experts Will Contain a Recommendation of One of the Five Sites that Are Offered.

The meeting of the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition tomorrow afternoon to receive the report of the experts employed to examine the five sites offered promises to be an animated session. The report of the engineers will be presented to the board and it will contain a recommendation of one of the sites, with reasons why that particular one should be selected. The meeting will then be agitated over the question of whether the report shall be acted upon at once and the site selected, or whether the matter shall be made the subject of extended discussion and deliberation and the selection of the site deferred for a week longer. There are many indications going to show that both sides of this question will have warm supporters. Some of the directory are strongly in favor of having the question decided at once. The most vigorous of these are among those who are boldly proclaimed by the supporters of a certain site as being in favor of that site. The position which would be taken by these members in the event that the engineers should strongly recommend some other site is uncertain. The more conservative members of the board favor a deliberate course and say the question of location should be given the most careful consideration. They favor deferring action until the report of the engineers can be thoroughly digested and all the members of the board thoroughly posted on the qualifications of each of the sites.

The engineers have decided to include in their report a recommendation of what they regard as the best site. What site this will be they have vouchsafed no indication, and they say they will not indicate in any way, to any person, what this recommendation will be, but will submit their findings in a sealed communication to the committee authorized to employ them, and Chairman Yost of the special committee is authority for the statement that this report will be handed unopened to the full meeting of the directors.

CALLED ON THE ENGINEERS.

The promoters of the Riverview park site stole a march upon their rivals this morning and sent a delegation to interview the engineering experts, with additional arguments why the park down on the bluffs overlooking the Missouri should be selected as an exposition site. This delegation comprised E. J. Cornish, Ernest Stuht, Dr. Hanchett, John Powers and Police Judge Gordon. they had a talk with Mr. Alexander, one of the experts, and presented arguments in addition to those used when the site was visited by the engineers. They said the legislature would probably attach a provision to any appropriation which would require the establishment of an irrigated farm on the exposition grounds; they urged that the bottom lands forming a part of the proposed site on the south side was the only place suitable for such an exhibit. They also called attention to the springs in Syndicate park, three blocks west of Riverview park, and said the water from these could be piped to the Exposition grounds at slight expense. They also presented other reasons and wanted the engineers to visit the site again, but the invitation was declined, Mr. Alexander saying they had no further time to spare for that purpose.

FIRST APPLICATION FOR SPACE.

The first application for space for an exhibit at the Exposition was filed this morning. The applicant was Farrell & Co., the local manufacturers of syrup, jellies, etc. Application was made for 1,500 feet, and the jocose manager of the house laid claim in advance to the gold medal.

The Department of Promotion announces that it is now prepared to furnish business men with circular letters to be sent to their correspondents. These letters are designed to awaken an interest in this and adjoining states in legislature action, and will be supplied by the department to any business man who will send them out in his mail.

That the Exposition is attracting attention in every part of the United States is evident from the flood of communications that come to Mayor Broatch to inquire in regard to various facts connected with the enterprise. From a dozen to thirty such communications are received every day and they come from every state and territory in the union. They are from people who want to know about various matters pertaining to the Exposition proper and from others who inquire in regard to dry goods establishments, industrial enterprises and public improvements, evidently with a view to prospective possibilities of obtaining employment. Some of the letters are answered by Secretary Wertz and others are turned over to the managers of the Exposition.

REPORT WILL BE DEFINITE

Experts Will Recommend a Particular Location for Trans-Mississippi Expo.

Impression Is That They Will Express Preference for the Poor Farm Site.

Opinion That Choice Lies Between That and Riverview, but Miller Park People Say No.

Among those who are most interested, for personal and local reasons, in the selection of a site for the Trans-Mississippi exposition there has been a good deal of doubt as to just what sort of report the Chicago engineers, Messrs. Alexander and Schrader, who have been inspecting the sites proposed, will make. The engineers have been in some doubt on this point themselves, the question being whether to recommend a definite site or simply to describe from their standpoint the advantages and disadvantages of all the sites and express no preference.

They have come to the conclusion, however, that the resolution under which they were employed contemplates something more definite than a general discussion of the availability and suitability of the several locations, and they will, therefore, in submitting their findings, express their approval of a particular site. They agree with the suggestions made by others that if a statement simply of the features of each site was the only thing wanted, home engineers could readily and impartially have furnished it, while they might possibly not have been able to make an impartial recommendation of a particular location. Indeed that is was​ precisely for the purpose of avoiding any personal influence in the latter respect that the outside engineers were called for.

NO SIGNS GIVEN.

The promoters of the various locations have eagerly watched for any expressions on the part of Mr. Alexander or Mr. Schrader that might indicate how the subject was beginning to shape itself in their minds, but they have watched in vain. The two men have been, it is conceded, about as non-committal on the matter as two men could possibly be, but the impression with many is that they favor the poor farm location. A more general impression is that their preference lies between the poor farm site and Riverview park. At any rate, it is certain that promoters of these sites have doubled their efforts to have the experts see the subject just as they respectively see it.

A significant circumstance was the nature of the remarks made by a delegation of South Side people that called on Mr. Alexander yesterday morning. The delegation comprised Councilman Stuht, Attorney Cornish, John Powers, Police Judge Gordon and Dr. Hanchett. They confined themselves to correcting alleged false representations that had been made respecting their site by the poor farm champions. These points touched the distance of the site from the center of the city, its water supply and the facilities it might offer for an irrigation farm.

POOR FARM SITE.

If the report of the experts should be favorable to the poor farm site, there is one South Sider who believes that the report and the weight of sentiment in the directory will coincide, for he says that a poll of the directors now shows that the majority are in favor of the poor farm site. This is not admitted by the Miller park people, who claim enough support to determine the choice.

So persistent have the site advocates become that the experts have to suffer considerable interruption in formulating their report. They say, however, that it will be ready to hand to Mr. Yost, sealed, this morning. They do not expect to get away from the city until this evening, but will not be present at the meeting of the directors, unless pressed to attend.

As definite a statement as the experts have made was given by Mr. Alexander Saturday, when he said that there was more than one of the sites proposed which might be

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THE PUBLIC PULSE,

Riverview Park.

Omaha, Jan. 22.—To the Editor of the World-Herald: the friends of Riverview park, in advocacy of that site for the exposition, desire through your columns to state to the public the following facts:

Treating the Paxton hotel as the central point of the street cars, hotels, and population of Omaha and South Omaha, measured by the blocks necessarily traveled and not by an air line, the Riverview park site is five blocks nearer to the Paxton hotel than any other site suggested. To make this more fully appear we give distances measured in blocks of the ordinary size. Riverview park site, twentyeight blocks; the so-called Hanscom park site, or poor farm site, thirty-two blocks; fair grounds site, seventy blocks; East Omaha site, sixty-five blocks; Miller park site, seventy blocks.

If Sixteenth and Farnam streets is chosen as the center then the Riverview park site is but one block nearer town than the poor farm site, but we submit that taking Council Bluffs into consideration the Paxton hotel is the fairer point from which to measure.

As to water: The Riverview park site has an artesian well. The springs in Syndicate park, three blocks west, which formerly supplied all South Omaha and the packing houses with water, can be piped into the ground, dispensing with the necessity of ice and giving cool drinking water at all points. In addition to that the city water now at Sixth and Bancroft, Eleventh and Bancroft, on Tenth street to the south line of the park, Thirteenth street along the side of the park, and on Twentieth street the South Omaha thirty-six inch main can be made available.

If the Nebraska legislature, as seems probable, attaches to the conditions of its appropriation the provision that a sample irrigated farm shall be one of the features, the land adjoining Riverview park and between it and the Missouri river is the only land in any of the sites available for such purpose in its general contour, and is the only land in which the water for irrigating purposes could be obtained at slight cost either from the Missouri river or from the artesian well without the great cost to the water works company.

In addition to the foregoing, which has not been called to the attention of the public, we may add the following reasons why the exposition should be located at Riverview park:

It is the only site that presents a view of the Missouri river and the bottom lands, bluffs, woods, corn fields and lakes that line its banks, making the one unique, distinctive Omaha landscape.

It is the only site that possesses forest trees in abundance.

It is the only site that possesses pure, healthy, cold mineral and artesian water.

It is the only site where the Missouri river can be made available for excursion boats as a means of transportation to and from the grounds.

It has perfect sewerage.

It is accessible by the Thirteenth street car line, and by the proposed street car extension down Tenth and Sixth streets and from South Omaha, and also by Burlington & Missouri railway and river steamers.

On the road hither is presented the proadest​ and most imposing view possible of the city of Omaha.

The grounds are susceptible of great ornamentation at slight expense.

It is not confined and shut out from refreshing breezes and inspiring views in a hollow or on the bottom.

It is the coolest place in summer.

The odors from the packing houses are not wafted to it on the south wind, the prevailing wind in the heated season.

It is the most healthy location and less subject to contagious disease by reason of low marshy grounds or bad sewerage.

It is the only site upon which the building would be in plain view of every train coming into Council Bluffs and Omaha.

ERNEST STUHT.

Labor Interests and the Exposition Site.

Omaha, Jan. 19.—To the Editor of the World-Herald: it is currently reported that the labor representative on the board of directors of the Trans-Mississippi exposition favors Miller park. He has probably given the subject careful consideration and can give his constitutents​ good and sufficient reasons for his preference, but there is one item which should be taken into consideration by the laboring men in the location of this exposition, i. e., car fare. There should be no car fare when the work is within a mile and a half of the homes of the laborers. The one and a half mile limit from the main portion of the Hanscom park or poor farm site includes the northern boundary of South Omaha, takes in all of the city limits west of Thirteenth street and as far north as and including Hamilton street. This tract includes the thinly settled portion of our city and a very large proportion of the laboring men who would probably be employed in the construction of the building and the arrangement of the grounds, etc., while the mile and a half limit from the main body of the Miller park site still falls short of the northern part of the most northern of the improved additions to the city, Kountze place, which, even if included, would still embrace no laboring men.

It has been estimated that it will take 500 men one year to properly prepare the ground and erect the buildings incidental to the exposition. This means a payment to the laborers of at least $300,000, two-thirds of whom (a small estimate) by paying car fare would be assessed for the benefit of the street car companies $10,000. The well-known preferences of the Street Railway company can be easily understood, but the interests of the laboring classes and the Street Railway company in this instance are not identical. The extra labor employed in the extension of the street railway line will be counterbalanced one hundred fold by the difference in the character of the buildings erected for hotel purposes, etc., if an interior site is chosen.

H. H. H.

A Laborer's View.

Omaha, Jan. 21.—To the Editor of the World-Herald: Being a workingman, and seeing the location of the Trans-Mississippi exposition fair ground from a workingman's standpoint, I would, for one, very much like to see the grounds located right in or as near the city as possible. It was demonstrated to the entire satisfaction of everybody concerned in building the new state fair grounds that it is not practical to board and live in the city with the place of work so far off. But you say, "We will have one or two car lines running right up to the fair grounds gate this time." True, I'll admit, but when it comes to moving thousands of people every morning and evening to and from one point at so great a distance as most of the proposed sites are located, I am positive it will create delays and inconveniences without end. And I would like to say that hanging on to the outside of an overloaded street car four or five miles after working hard all day is not very desirable. For this reason I believe locating the fair at some place close at hand would confer a great favor on all laboring men of Omaha. GUS PETERSON

OMAHA, Jan. 22.—To the Editor of The Bee: The undersigned most respectfully beg to call the attention of all the citizens of Omaha to the only real, plausible, economical and advantageous site of all for the holding of the coming Transmississippi and International Exposition. First we wish to state plainly which site we are championing, so there will be no misunderstanding, and will, without any attempt at flowery oratory, deal entirely with facts regarding our site and point out a few positive objections to the other proposed sites which have not been brought out by their advocates. To our mind the location known as the "Elmwood park site," which includes 204 3/4 acres in the park, also 160 acres adjoining owned by the Omaha Fair and Speed association, is the only place in which all of our citizens should be interested and benefited alike from the permanent improvements which would necessarily have to be put on the ground, but especially the citizens (about 3,000 in number) who have subscribed to stock or donated cash for the upbuilding of the fair grounds and maintenance of same.

We see by an article written by our mutual friend, Robert Purvis, that he takes occasion to score Omaha as having made "several grievous mistakes in locating public institutions," and especially so in locating the state fair. We would like to ask "Robert" where he was at the time these locations were settled upon and why he did not lend us his valuable counsel in locating our public institutions. The fact of the matter is our site is not too far from the city of Omaha and is seven-eights of a mile nearer the postoffice than other sites suggested in the north part of the city. We venture the suggestion that the 5,000 residents spoken of by Robert who did not attend the fair would not have attended had it been located at Sixteenth and Farnam streets. Assuming, as he says, that the fort was located in Sarpy county, the state fair grounds near Elkhorn and the Exposition near Florence, and that we built up solid between these points, we would have not only a city of magnificent distances, but one of between 350,000 to 500,000 inhabitants as against 140,000. Using your hammer to knock public institutions in a city is bad for the general welfare of said city, and if all other sites contained sufficient area, which was owned by the city of Omaha, everything else being equal, we should not oppose them for a moment. One of the great features of the Elmwood park site is that all of the buildings that are to be erected and all of the permanent improvements that are to be placed upon said grounds will be put upon grounds belonging to all of the citizens of Omaha and therefore will benefit each one of us alike, and not any one or two individuals.

Another strong feature which should be considered well by the Board of Directors of the exposition is the fact that the Elmwood park site and fair grounds has already expended upon it $320,000 over and above the amount expended on any one of the other sites mentioned. In other words, the Elmwood park site offers as an inducement to locate the Exposition on its grounds $320,000 as a subscription to the fund. The site in itself is high and sightly. There is no possible seepage from the surrounding country that can possibly touch this area of ground, as there is in other sights offered. An adequate and inexhaustible water supply that is practically built, supplied and operated by Providence, and not by any worldly water works company, is certainly a very desirable feature. The gravel bed overlaying bed rock, which can be reached at an average depth of 100 feet, is a veritable underground river, much more reliable than the muddy Missouri, the water therein being of the purest and clearest nature. By having an independent water plant whose duty extends no further than supplying the wants of the exposition company would certainly be more preferable than a plant that has to supply both city and Exposition grounds. The danger of broken mains and other mishaps would be reduced to a minimum.

The sewerage of these grounds is one of nature's work; no distance to travel to find facilities to care for the same; no extensive provision to be made for outside surface drainage, nature having also provided for that. The entire tract is covered with grass. The street car facilities, while not of the best, will be compelled to be made adequate for all wants if the Exposition is located at Elmwood park. The railroad facilities at the present time are adequate for all wants and are now laid directly to the grounds, four different lines of roads making this point. Ample provision has been made for suitable tracts of land for showing in an intelligent way all matters pertaining to agriculture, such as irrigation, etc. The grounds are reached by four of our leading thoroughfares from the city due west, in which direction "Empire takes its way." We have always advocated, ever since the Exposition theory was advanced, a point which was brought out by our friend and citizen, R. W. Richardson. That is, the perpetuation of the Exposition theory for an indefinite length of time after the time allotted for the holding of the Transmississippi and International Exposition had expired. Many, if not all, of the buildings put up by the transmississippi states would be erected with a view to permanency and there is not a state scarcely in the transmississippi country but that would be more than pleased to perpetuate and maintain, at their own expense, a building showing their wonderful resources and possibilities, and, if they did not desire to stand that expense themselves, it would be money in Omaha's pocket to stand it for them. People traveling across the continent would be sure to stop over in Omaha from one or two or three days if a permanent Exposition of this kind was held in our city.

If we were in our friend Richardon's place, however, we would not say much about the site that is, as he claims, "hidden away in the valley of the Little Papio," as this site is nearly a mile nearer the postoffice than the one he is in favor of. We would also like to ask our mutual friend Richardson what portion of the 500 acres he is advocating belongs to the city of Omaha and whether or not his argument against the Hanscom park site does not equally apply to the Miller park site. Not one of the proposed sites states plainly what portion of their ground belongs to the city and what portion to the various individuals. Riverview park has only sixty-five acres belonging to the city; Miller park has only seventy-eight acres belonging to the city; Hanscom park has only eight acres, which belongs to the county. East Omaha belongs entirely to individuals. Elmwood park has 370 acres and all belongs to the city and 3,000 of our most liberal and public-spirited citizens.

The Hanscom park site has advantages, but also disadvantages. We venture to say that the citizens residing on the west and northwest side of Hanscom park have not been consulted in this matter, and if they have and have given their consent, have not considered the undesirable outside inhabitants that an exposition of this kind is sure to attract, such as miniature Ferris wheels, merry-go-grounds (with attendant discordant stands and wild west shows, all of which must necesarily​ be located very near if not quite in their back yards. The noise and din which would surely be made by these outside inhabitants would make life most miserable from early morning until late night for six months of the year at least.

 
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Riverview park, while it has some pretty features, (after you get to it), should not be considered because it has but one line of railroad running to it, and no street car facilities as yet completed to the grounds, and besides not being large enough to accommodate the buildings on ground that belongs solely and only to the city. The North Omaha sites suggested, if adopted, would be a detriment to the best business interest of the city, owning to the fact that many citizens from the east would be transported across the East Omaha bridge in the morning to the Exposition grounds and out in the evening. A large percentage of our patronage must come from the east. Omaha would never see a large number of them. The seepage and drainage from the hills surrounding this site settle here, and the present lake in Miller park is made by a stoppage of the sewer, which, if opened up, would show said lake to be a little ravine in reality. The above is substantiated by a thoroughly competent engineer.

Taking all things into consideration, we cannot see as there is but one location for the Exposition, and in this conclusion we voice the sentiments of thousands of citizens who have not electioneered for the site, believing that when the true and natural merits of Elmwood park were brought to the attention of those who were to be selected for this purpose that this site would stand preeminently above all others that might be offered.

W. R. BENNETT,
A. CLEMENS.

LOCATING THE EXPOSITION.

OMAHA, Jan. 22.—To the Editor of The Bee: I was amused at reading the two communications in The Bee of last evening—one from Mr. Crum and the other from Attorney Richardson, both favoring Miller park and opposing Hanscom park, and from diametrically different standpoints. Mr. Crum objects to the Hanscom park site for the reason that it would be "altogether too wearing on the pedestrian and an extra, unnecessary and unreasonable tax on the patience and muscle of the poor chair wheeler." Attorney Richardson advocates the "Miller park site with its 500 or more beautiful acres" as the only suitable location for the exposition.

In the name of common sense what does the exposition want with "500 or more beautiful acres?" Is it going into the corn raising business, with corn at 10 cents a bushel, or does it propose to establish a grazing or stock ranch? If it were necessary to have so large a tract of land scatter the exposition buildings all over the same, would it not be far more tough on the "poor chair wheeler" and 'more wearing on the pedestrian" than if only 150 acres centrally located were improved? Would it not be far better to improve and beautify 150 acres, or possibly 100 acres, near the center of the city than to expand the money of the exposition in attempting to improve "500 or more beautiful acres" extending from the north line of the old government reservation to the south line of Florence? It is true that Florence is a beautiful city, and if it has not the waterways of its ancient namesake, it has within its corporate limits the Omaha water works. It is also true that the surroundings of Florence represent many hundred "beautiful acres," but the distance to these beautiful acres, like the distance to the beautiful acres surrounding Bellevue, is altogether too great for the majority of the residents of Omaha, Council Bluffs and South Omaha, and far too remote from the cities named for visitors who may desire to see and know something of these cities as well as see the wonders of the exposition. It is an undoubted fact that not one in a hundred of the citizens of Omaha or South Omaha have seen the extensive improvements and beautiful grounds comprising the government reservation at Bellevue. It is also a fact that cannot be fairly questioned or disputed that there is not one in a hundred of the people of Omaha or South Omaha who have not visited Hanscom park many times. What is true of near and remote locations in the past will be true of the exposition in the future. A fair consideration of the advantages of all the proposed sites for the exposition will demonstrate the correctness of the contention of the advocates of the Hanscom park location that for accessibility, elevation, water supply, drainage and sewerage, and the preservation for the future use of the public of the permanent and desirable buildings, it stands without an equal or a rival. A great deal has been said and done in the past in favor of the Miller park site, but notwithstanding this, the Hanscom park site has rapidly been growing in public favor.

Permit me briefly to enumerate the special advantages of the Hanscom park site:

The Hanscom park site is the most central of all the locations proposed. This is demonstrated by a reference to the maps of the city. No unbiased person will question the great advantage of a central location. The direct result of a central location would be to double the gate receipts, largely increase the street railway traffic and greatly benefit the business interests of our city. The nearest possible location to the business center of the city should be favored by every one having the interest of the city at heart and desiring to see the exposition a complete success. As recently stated by one of our business men, the best location would be Farnam and Sixteenth streets, but, as the adjacent improvements are of such a character as to render the selection of this location impossible, the next suitable and nearest location should be selected. If the maps of the city are examined it will be observed that if a line is drawn midway between the Hanscom park and Miller park locations it will cross the city east and west at a point some distance north of Prospect Hill cemetery and about in the vicinity of Lake street. If a two-mile circle is drawn from the proposed entrance to the Hanscom park site it will include within its limits the northern portion of South Omaha and also the southeastern portion of the city, including Mr. Kountze's residence and Brownell hall. It will also include the entire business portion of the city. It will also include Dundee and Walnut Hill in the northwest portion of the city, and also include the greatest portion of the residence property in the northern part of the city south of Lake street. If a two-mile circle is drawn from the proposed entrance of the Miller park site it will extend almost to the northern boundary line of the city of Florence, would include Cut-Off lake and would extend southward a sufficient distance to take in Kountze Place. The Hanscom park two-mile circle would include only about one-tenth of the population of the city. The Hanscom park site could most easily be reached by five-sixths of the population of the cities of Omaha and South Omaha, while the Miller park site could perhaps be most easily reached by one-sixth of the population. It is fair to estimate that the great bulk of the visitors to the exposition, if they are to stop in the city, will locate near the central portion of the city, and, therefore, could reach the Hanscom park site far more easily and quickly than they could reach the Miller park site.

Mr. Crum urges as a reason for favoring Miller park that the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley railway and the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha railroad, as well as the Belt Line railway, would all bring their trains into the exposition grounds. This may seem to Mr. Crum a thing greatly to be desired. As I view the matter, it would be a great misfortune to have visitors taken by the railway trains directly to and from the exposition grounds. It is manifestly for the benefit of Omaha and the business interests of the city, as well as for the street railway company, that visitors should reach the exposition grounds from some part of the city of Omaha rather than by railway trains coming into or passing through the city.

Mr. Crum claims that there is but one line of street railway leading to the Hanscom park site. In this he is mistaken. The Sixteenth and Leavenworth street line, which is the most completely equipped double-track line in the city, would take passengers to both the east entrance at the northwest corner of Hanscom park and the south entrance on Center street. The double track Farnam street line has a double track connection with the Leavenworth street line on Twenty-eighth street. With an extension of two or three blocks southward from Farnam street on Thirty-fifth street the main north entrance of the Hanscom park site would also be reached. During the rush hours it would be sufficient to merely run two or three trains to the Fifteenth or Sixteenth street switches, the same being sufficiently near to the hotels and centrally located boarding houses, thereby enabling the cars to at once return to the Exposition grounds. The trips could be made in less than one-third of the time that would be required to go to the Miller park site.

It must be admitted by every one that the Hanscom park site is the most elevated as well as the most centrally located. When it is considered that the exposition will be held during the hot summer months, a slightly elevated location is greatly to be desired. The view from the Hanscom park site is extended and beautiful in every direction.

While it is true that the Hanscom park site is not as near the water works as the Miller park site, it is not true that the Hanscom park site has not an adequate and sufficient water supply. The fact is that along Poppleton avenue, extending through the center of the grounds, is a large twenty-four-inch main, with fire hydrants at short distances apart. A water main also extends along Center street with fire hydrants. As a result, sufficient water supply and ample fire protection can be secured.

An examination of the records in the office of the city engineer will demonstrate that the Hanscom park site has drainage and equalled by any other proposed location. A large sewer main exists within a short distance of the north line of the Hanscom park site and several pipe lines extend up to and through the grounds offered to the exposition. No sewer whatever exists in Miller park. Its so-called beautiful lake is made from water contaminated with sewage, and unless a large expenditure of from $50,000 to $100,000 is made for the construction of sewer lines the proposed "beautiful lake" would be a disease-breeding pestilence.

Another strong point in favor of the Hanscom park location is the permanent redemption of the unsightly ravine which extends north and south through the central portion of the city, crossing Farnam near Thirty-first street. As a part of the plan for locating the exposition near Hanscom park, it is proposed to convert the unsightly ravine referred to into a beautiful park and boulevard, which for all future time, like Hanscom park, would be more generally used and enjoyed than any other park or boulevard in the city. As the result of turning this present eyesore into a beauty spot in the very heart of the city, some of the desirable buildings of the exposition could be permanently located and would remain after the exposition for the use and enjoyment of the people. Another advantage by taking a portion of the county farm would be that a number of permanently constructed buildings could also remain for future public use.

I respectfully submit that the advantages in favor of the Hanscom park site far exceed and outweigh any advantage that can possibly exist in favor of any other location.

JOHN STEEL.

Notice of Indebtedness of Transmississippi and International Exposition.

Notice is hereby given that the amount of all the existing debts of the Transmississippi and International Exposition on this 18th day of January, 1897, is the aggregate sum of $1,000.

TRANSMISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION
(Signed) GURDON W. WATTLES.
President.

C. S. Montgomery, Z. T. Lindsey, Ce. E. Yost, G. H. Payne, John C. Wharton, H. A. Thompson, Charles M. Willhelm, H. Kountze, A. C. Smith, Charles Metz, Charles F. Weller, E. E. Bruce, Dan Farrell, jr., F. P. Kirkendall, G. M. Hitchcock, A. L. Reed, C. W. Lyman, John A. Johnson, Thomas Kilpatrick, J. H. Millard, R. S. Wilcox, J. E. Markel, A. T. Rector, J. L. Brandeis, W. A. Paxton, E. W. Lee, E. Rosewater.

J23d1t M. & E.

SITE IS NOT YET SETTLED

Directors Postpone Further Action to Await the Legislative Appropriation.

ENGINEERS' REPORT REMAINS UNOPENED

Friends of the Different Locations Were Out in Force at the Directors' Meeting, but Were Unable to Force the Issue.

The Board of Directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition held a special meeting yesterday afternoon to receive the report of the expert engineers employed to examine the five sites tendered as locations for the Exposition, and report on the most valuable site for Exposition purposes. Every member of the board was present, with the exception of General C. F. Manderson. The session was short but decidedly animated, although nothing was done in the way of opening the report of the engineers, or voting upon a site, all action in this direction being postponed for two weeks.

The meeting was held in the new quarters of the Exposition, in the Paxton block. The room where the directors will hold all their meetings is barely large enough for all the directors to be seated, consequently the lobby was compelled to occupy the hall adjoining the room. The lobby was very numerous, the supporters of all the sites being present in force. The hall and doorways were crowded and every point of vantage was filled.

After the usual preliminaries, the business of the meeting opened with the introduction of a resolution by G. M. Hitchcock providing that after reading and discussing the report of the engineers, further consideration of the report and the vote upon a site be postponed until after the legislature of Nebraska has acted upon the bill now pending, which provides for a state appropriation. In explaining the resolution, Mr. Hitchcock said that unless the legislature of Nebraska makes a liberal appropriation there is no use in attempting to carry on the Exposition, as the legislature of other states would refuse to support an exposition in Nebraska that was not supported by the legislature of that state. For this reason Mr. Hitchcock said he was opposed to taking any further action until it is determined what the legislature will do.

 

DISCUSSION OF RESOLUTION.

This resolution formed the subject of an animated discussion in which nearly every director took part. The resolution was opposed by several of the directors on the ground that no harm would result from choosing a site, and that it would look more businesslike to go ahead as far as possible without incurring large expense. These directors were in favor of opening the report of the engineers and voting at once upon the location. This course was warmly supported by J. C. Wharton, Dr. E. W. Lee, C. E. Yost, Alvin Saunders, J. L. Webster and others.

The resolution was supported by all the members of the executive committee, and a large number of others. C. S. Montgomery said it would be an insult to the people of the community to open the reports and vote upon a site without allowing the report of the engineers to be made public and give the citizens an opportunity to be heard in the matter.

Herman Kountze said the resolution should be adopted, but it should first be amended to provide that the report should not be opened at this time. In support of this Mr. Kountze made a short but earnest talk which had a very perceptible effect.

G. H. Payne demanded that the report should be opened and made public some time before a vote is taken, that members of the board, as well as the general public, might have an opportunity of learning what the report contains.

This idea did not meet with favor and the amendment was adopted.

GOES OVER FOR TWO WEEKS.

J. L. Webster then offered a substitute providing that the special committee appointed to employ engineers to examine the sites be given two weeks longer in which to report. After a brief discussion the substitute was adopted.

C. S. Montgomery, of the special committee of lawyers appointed to investigate the legal right of the city of Omaha and Douglas county to make appropriations for the support of the Exposition, reported that the authorities of the city or county have no such power. He said it would be necessary for the legislature to enact laws giving the city and county such power before such action could be taken.

The executive committee reported that it had not yet taken any action upon the resolution of Director Youngs regarding the employment of Douglas county labor on the Exposition, and asked that it be given further time. The request was granted and the board then adjourned for two weeks.

NO CHOICE OF SITE IS MADE

Exposition Directors Deem it Inadvisable To Take Any Definite Action.

Report of the Engineers on the Various Plots Considered to Remain Closely Sealed.

Decision Will Not Be Known Until the State Legislature Acts on the Bill for Appropriation Asked.

No one will know for two weeks in what part of the city the exposition will be held. It was expected that the matter would be settled yesterday afternoon at the meeting of the board of directors, which was held for the first time in the room at headquarters. The public was admitted as far as space would allow and the doors left open so that those who crowded the hall might witness the proceedings.

The question of selecting the site had been discussed at a meeting of the executive committee that was held at noon, and the members of the committee had come unanimously to the agreement that it would be better to defer a choice until action should be taken by the legislature. They therefore prepared a resolution which was offered as soon as the meeting of the directory opened. This was to the effect that the report of the experts who had been inspecting the site be opened and read, but that the selection of a site by a vote of the directory be deferred until after action was taken by the legislature.

TO AWAIT STATE APPROVAL.

It was suggested that the choice of a site would further bind the association to go ahead with expensive preparations for the exposition, and it was urged that this was not advisable until it was known what the legislature would do, for unless the appropriation should approximately be what was asked the exposition could not be carreid​ out. In short it was contended that no step of so important a character as this should be taken until the approval of the state, through the legislature, had been given to the scheme. This was set forth by Manager Hitchcock of the department of promotion and he was followed in support of the resolution by Dudley Smith, J. H. Evans, Z. T. Lindsey, Mr Bruce, E. Rosewater, C. S. Montgomery, G. H. Payne, I. W. Carpenter and Herman Kountze.

OPPOSE FURTHER DELAY.

Remarks opposing the resolution were made by John H. Hussie, J. C. Wharton, Dr. Lee, John L. Webster and Alvin Saunders. These were of the opinion that it would be against the interests of the exposition to delay further the selection of a site. To select one would show to all the world that the association was going ahead as fast as it could and would cause the legislature of Nebraska and of all the western states to vote appropriations more freely.

Many of those who were opposed to the resolution were opposed only to that part which provided that the findings of the engineers should be read. They held that if no action was to be taken the report should not be read for then it would only be the means of sowing discord and wrangling from one end of the town to the other and intensifying and prolonging the controversy, already spirited enough, over the site question.

REPORT REMAINS SEALED.

Mr. Kountze moved to amend the resolution to the effect that the report of the engineers should remain sealed until time for definite action arrived, and this amendment was carried, but finally Mr. Webster moved a substitute to the effect that the special committee to which the propositions for site were referred be given two weeks longer in which to report, and this prevailed by a large majority.

Other business was then taken up. Mr. Montgomery, for the special committee named to report on the powers of the city and county to make appropriations or donations, reported that it had no such power and recommended that a bill be passed by the legislature conferring it upon it.

The executive committee asked and was granted more time in which to report on the labor resolution referred to it at the last meeting of the directory.

Messrs. Alexander and Schrader, the inspecting engineers, left for Chicago last evening.

RULES TO GOVERN EXHIBITS

AN INTERNATIONAL JURY OF AWARDS

Rules Set Out the Price for Space to Exhibitors, and Mention the Character of the Awards to Be Made.

The Departments of Exhibits and Concessions of the exposition have issued a blank which all prospective exhibitors at the exposition must use in making their applications for space for either exhibits or concessions. These will be mailed at once to manufacturers and inventors all over the world, being in the nature of an invitation to exhibit as well as an application blank.

This form is 22x17 inches in size, and is printed in attractive form. Under a tastily arranged heading, stating briefly the name of the exposition and the names of the officers and heads of departments, is a brief summary of the plan and scope of the exposition, with a concise statement of some of the regulations which will govern exhibitors and concessionaires. In this it is stated that charge for space will be made on the following basis: In buildings, floor space, $1 per square foot; wall space .​ 50 cents per square foot; and grounds, all space 50 cents per square foot. It is also stated that governments and large exhibitors, as well as exhibitors operating processes of manufacture, will be given special advantages.

The rules which will govern exhibitors and concessionaires are printed on the back of the application. There are forty-eight of these rules and they are very complete, having been taken from the best rules prepared for the government of other expositions in all parts of the world. They provide explicit directions for the shipment of exhibits and for the installing of the same, as well as the rules which will govern exhibitors during the progress of the exposition.

CLASSIFYING THE EXHIBITS

For the purpose of classifying exhibits the following six heads are provided, with the provision that the Jury of Awards shall classify all exhibits not therein mentioned. These classifications are as follows:

A—Agriculture, food and its accessories, forestry and forest products, irrigation, its modern system and appliances, agricultural machinery, horticulture, viticulture, apiary products, pomology, fish and fisheries, fish products and apparatus for fishing, beet root industry of all description.

B—Mechanical arts, mines, mining, metallurgy transportation, railways, vessels, cycles, vehicles, electricity and electrical appliances.

C—Manufacturers in general, liberal arts education, engineering, public works, constructive architecture, music and drama, ethnology, archaeology, progress of labor and inventions.

D—Fine arts, painting, sculpture, architecture and decoration.

E—Woman's work.

F—Isolated and collective exhibits.

The rules provide for an international jury of awards to pass upon the merits of the exhibits, and awards are provided for as follows:

1. Special diploma of honor.
2. Diploma for gold medal.
3. Diploma for silver medal.
4. Diploma for bronze medal.
5. Diploma for honorable mention.

Every diploma for medal will be accompanied by an official medal of bronze, prepared by act of congress at the United States mint. In addition to the above awards, special prizes consisting of six gold trophies, six silver cups, and six gold medals, will be offered to competitors in each of the following classes:

One gold trophy, one silver cup and one gold medal, as first, second and third prize, for best display of working irrigating system.

One gold trophy, one silver cup and one gold medal, as first, second and third prize, for best display illustrating the process of the manufacture of beet root sugar.

Old gold trophy, one silver cup and one gold medal, as first, second and third prize, for best display of manufacturing plan in operation, as well as two more lots of similar prizes for other high-class exhibits, to be designed by the exposition authorities.

The rules also contain the following clause:

"In giving the special prizes, preference will be given to those inventions proving the most suitable to the requirements of the west. All awards will be apportioned on the reports of the international juries to every exhibitor whose contributions are pronounced to be of incontestable superiority. The jury work will be completed at least one month prior to the close of the exposition, so as to give successful exhibitors the opportunity to advertise their awards in the exposition."

TRANSMISSISSIPPI.

WHAT THE WEST IS DOING FOR THE COMING EXPOSITION.

California Urged to Come to the Front with a Suitable Appropriation for Exhibits—A Bill Now Before the Legislature.

In every part of California the greatest interest is felt in a bill now pending in the Legislature for the appropriation of $70,000, to be used in making a creditable State display at the coming Transmississippi and International Exposition.​ to be held at Omaha next year, from June to November. The exposition is intended to exhibit particularly the products, resources. industries and civilization of the States and Territories west of the Mississippi River, embracing two-thirds of the era. one-third of the population and one-half the wealth of the United States, and, incidentally, the products, resources and industries of the other States lying east of the Mississippi River, and of foreign countries.

The Transmississippi and International Exposition is a corporation organized under the laws of Nebraska, with an authorized capital stock of  

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$1,000,000. The articles of incorporation require a board of fifty directors, by whom the enterprise will be conducted. It is also provided that there shall be a vice-president for the exposition in each of the Transmississippi States and Territories, who will have a share in the management and direction of the interests of the exposition; each vice-president to have particularly under his charge the interests and representation of his own State.

Of the capital stock of the exposition company there has already been subscribed $405,200. There are over sixty-three hundred stockholders, most of whom are residents of Nebraska, although five or six other States are also represented on the list. Congress, at its last session, appropriated $200,000 for a national exhibit, and an amended bill calling for an appropriation of $300,000 has already been prepared and introduced at the present session.

At its last session the Iowa Legislature made a preliminary appropriation of $10,000, but the development of the exposition project since that time has given the enterprise an altogether different standing, and at the special session of the Legislature of that State, which convened January 19, a supplemental bill was introduced for the purpose of increasing the appropriation of Iowa for the exposition to $75,000.

Nebraska has risen to the occasion in noble fashion, for the Legislature is to be asked to appropriate $300,000, with a local subsidy of $200,000 by Douglas county and the city of Omaha.

The State of Louisiana, at its session closing July 9, 1896, passed a concurrent resolution instructing the State Board of Agriculture to arrange for and provide fitting, ample and adequate representation of the State at the exposition, and pledging the State to pay the expenses thereof.

Utah, Wyoming and Colorado have pledged their States to large and full representation, and it is practically assured that twenty, at least, of the twenty-four States and Territories will be fittingly and largely represented.

States east of the Mississippi River, and foreign countries and nations, have been invited and requested to participate to an unlimited extent, and every facility will be granted for their exhibits.

It is the general feeling throughout the State that California should be well to the front in taking advantage of this opportunity to advertise its resources, products and capabilities to the world. It is not a matter for Southern California alone to take up, any more than for the north, but the whole State must combine its resources and pull well together if the Golden State is to take its proper position among its peers in the great West.

Hon. George W. Parsons was the delegate from the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce to the Commercial Congress last year, and in his hand has been put the matter of arranging for a suitable appropriation. After careful consideration and many consultations with Superintendent Frank Wiggins of the Chamber of Commerce, a man of national experience in expositions, Mr. Parsons drafted the bill for the appropriation, which is now in the hands of Senator Robert M. Bulla.

When the legislators met in Los Angeles Mr. Parsons placed the whole matter before them, and all gave it hearty indorsement​ and approval. It is felt that the grand State of California cannot afford to be niggardly in this appropriation. Every item of expense has been carefully worked out by Mr. Parsons and Mr. Wiggins, and the thing cannot be handsomely done for less. According to the closest calculation, it will take at least $2000 to complete the necessary preliminary work. The building and grounds will cost $25,000; the freight, $2000; the fixtures, $2000; collection of a suitable exhibit, $3000, its installment at Omaha, $5000; its maintenance there for five months, $10,000; suitable decorations, $1000; lights, $1000; miscellaneous printing, $2000; pamphlets, $7000; taking down and packing the exhibits, $1000, and returning them to California, $1000.

Other Western States have come to the front with heavy appropriations, and the first suggestion that California should devote $75,000 to making a proper showing at this exhibition of western products and resources has

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GATHERS IN THE CONSULS

IMPORTANT EXPOSITION PRELIMINARIES

Seeks to Have Governments of the World Ready to Receive Their Subjects at Omaha in 1898.

WASHINGTON, Jan. 25.—(Special telegram.)—Representative Mercer, with an eye to the success of the Transmississippi Exposition, has commenced to project the coming exposition among the representatives of foreign countries having ambassadors, ministers plenipotentiary, consuls general, diplomatic agents and attaches represented at the national capital, with a view of inducing these countries to locate in Omaha at an early date as possible resident consuls, in order that foreign governments may be in a position, through their accredited representatives, to lend advice to those desiring to make exhibits. This movement is already most promising. Representatives of Mexico, Central and South American states and several Europeans countries have been seen by Mr. Mercer, with decided encouragement. The people of Atlanta tried the same plan, but found it necessary to send an accredited representative into the South American countries in order to secure exhibits from those states. The mission of the Atlanta representative resulted most satisfactorily and he secured exhibits that could not otherwise have been had. While representatives of foreign governments may take an active interest in expositions of this character, the results so far as exhibits are concerned, do not turn out as satisfactorily as might be wished for. Mr. Mercer stated, however, that he was cordially received at the several legations and he believed good would come from the efforts made to locate resident consuls in Omaha at least six months before the exposition opens.

ARE INQUIRING FOR SPACE

Manufacturers Laying Their Plans to Bring Exhibits to the Exposition.

Interest In the Project Constantly Growing in All the Surrounding States.

Merchants of the City Doing Good Work in Pushing the Big Show Along—-In the Departments.

President Wattles of the exposition association announces that a resolution will be introduced into the Nebraska senate today, authorizing the governor of the state to announce by proclamation the holding of the exposition, and inviting the people of other states to take part. It will also authorize the governor to deliver to the secretary of state of the United States invitations to foreign countries to participate. These invitations, it is contemplated, will be finally delivered through the diplomatic agents abroad.

In President Wattles' mail Tuesday morning was a letter from Congressman Mercer, stating that he was paying constant attention to the amended exposition bill, and would get it called up as soon as possible.

It is stated by the department of exhibits that G. W. Sues has arranged to take charge of a section in which various patents and inventions will be shown in motion.

The correspondence of the department of exhibits is beginning to show something of the interest that is being taken in the exposition by the people of other states. A large agricultural machinery manufacturing company of Illinois has written with regard to an extensive exhibit which it intends to make. It asks whether the managers would prefer that it take space in one of the buildings or erect a pavilion of its own. This is a point which the manufacturers will themselves probably be left to decide. If the pavilion is put up it will be at an expense of several thousand dollars.

One of the most prominent of the brewers of Milwaukee has written asking for full particulars as to the putting up of a plant designed to show all the processes of brewing in operation. His inquiry is chiefly with regard to power. He says that if it is at all practicable to have an exhibit of this kind he is anxious to enter it.

The local merchants, in their correspondence, are giving a good deal of aid to the department of exhibits, as to other departments. They are calling the attention of the large houses and manufacturers from whom they buy to the exposition, and are already getting replies that indicate business. One merchant says that he has been told by one of the concerns with which he trades that it expects to have an exhibit here that will cost at least $6,000, and this merchant has asked for 300 application blanks to send out in his mail.

The department of promotion is urging all the merchants, big and little, to aid it in scattering the literature that has been prepared, with a view to bringing about favorable action by the various state legislatures. It asks that the merchants call for these circulars.

Finishing touches are being put on the work of fitting up the rooms in the Paxton block, into which the departments of the exposition have recently moved.

The mail of the association has now reached such proportions that one carrier cannot handle it, and arrangements have been made for special mail boxes in the corridor adjoining the rooms—one box for first-class and another for the inferior mail matter.

EXPOSITION PROCLAMATION.

Senator Howell of Douglas introduced the following joint resolution:

Whereas, The congress of the United States did, by an act approved by the president June 10, 1896, pledge the government to participate in a Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, to be held at Omaha, Neb., between June 1 and November 1, 1898, and did by said act grant to said exposition all the rights and privileges heretofore granted to internationaal​ expositions, therefore be it

Resolved, By the senate and house of representatives of the state of Nebraska, that his excellency, the governor of the state of Nebraska, be and is hereby authorized and requested to announce by proclamation that said exposition is to be held at the time and place aforesaid, and to extend to the people of the several states and territories of the United States, through the respective governors of such states and territories, a cordial invitation on the part of the state of Nebraska to participate in said exposition, and be it further

Resolved, That his excellency, the governor of the state of Nebraska, be and he is hereby requested to issue and deliver to the secretary of state of the United States invitations to foreign nations and governments having representatives accredited to them in Washington, inviting and requesting such foreign nations and governments to participate in said Trans-Mississippi exposition, with a request to the secretary of state that he deliver such invitations to such representatives of foreign nations and governments represented at Washington.

LOCATING THE EXPOSITION

VIEWS OF MEMBERS OF THE DIRECTORY

Discussion Upon the Subject of Keeping from the Public the Report of the Experts Who Viewed the Proposed Sites.

Public interest continues to center in the question of where the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association will locate the great show that will be held in this city during the summer of 1898. Expert engineers were brought from Chicago for the purpose of viewing the five sites that have been proposed. These men looked over the grounds and reduced their findings to writing, the same, it is said, containing a statement with definite recommendation of one of the proposed locations. This report, sealed, was handed in to a committee last Saturday and its consideration was postponed for two weeks. Since the date of the meeting there has been an animated discussion over the question of the advisability of making the report public, that directors and subscribers to exposition stock might be informed of the nature of the contents. In order to learn the sentiment prevailing among the directors upon this subject, The Bee has secured the following interviews:

 

President Wattles—I am opposed to opening the report and making it public in advance of the meeting at which it is to be discussed and voted upon. To do so would be to stir up strife in the community and give an opportunity for the advocates of the sites which are not recommended to try all kinds of schemes to overcome the report. These engineers were employed as experts to pass upon the engineering questions involved and unless their report is glaringly unfair upon its face I am in favor of following their recommendation.

Z. T. Lindsey—I believe that the idea of keeping the report of the engineers a secret was a mistake. The people who have subscribed stock have a right to know what we are doing. Up to this time nothing has been concealed. The reporters for the daily papers have been admitted to all the meetings of the executive committee, and I can see no reason why, at this late day, a matter of this kind should be concealed. I think that the report of the experts should have been published at once.

WOULD ADMIT DISCUSSION.

A. L. Reed—I believe that it would be best to open the report of the engineers. The directors would then have an opportunity to investigate the report and discuss it before they were called upon to decide the question. Furthermore, it would give an opportunity to the public to discuss the report. I should also advocate the opening of the columns of the press to the people after the report has been made public. Let the people talk it over and say what they think of the report. All of us are greenhorns on the matter of exposition sites, and we can afford to discuss this report pretty thoroughly before deciding the matter. There is none of us who cannot learn something about the matter by a full and free discussion of it. I should say that the report should be made public at least one week before the question is to be finally decided.

F. P. Kirkendall—I certainly believe that the committee took the right course. I think that we could do nothing else than to support the resolution as good policy under the circumstances.

E. E. Bruce—I have nothing to say. The directors have taken this action, and as a director and citizen I will support them.

G. M. Hitchcock—I do not think that any harm and considerable good might have been done by making the report of the experts public. If the report is a reasonable one, I should consider that I was in great measure bound to vote for a site in line with its recommendations.

Herman Kountze—I do not wish to discuss the matter at this time. I entirely approve of the action of the committee in postponing the opening of the engineers' report.

H. A. Thompson—We should wait at least a week after opening the report in order to give the directors time to digest the recommendation of the engineers. The directors doubtless have a fair knowledge of the several sites, but none of them are engineers and have no technical knowledge on the availability of the sites from an engineering standpoint, therefore they should be guided largely by the report, but they should be given time to consider the report in all its bearings.

John A. Johnson—I think the report should have been published. I do not think it was ever contemplated by the original resolution that the report should be opened and voted on at the same meeting. The report should have been made public when it was received and then the directors could have had an opportunity to look up any questions raised in the report and vote intelligently on them.

C. S. Montgomery—It is an outrage that the report of the engineers should be kept from the public, and that the Board of Directors should be compelled to decide upon a location at once without having time to consider that report. If I were not on the board I would say that the whole thing indicated that the advocates of the favored site, whichever it may be, were afraid to have it considered. At any rate the report should have been given to the directors in order that they might have had a week or more to investigate its recommendations before deciding on a site. I certainly shall make a fight in the meeting two weeks hence if any attempt is made to force the board to vote on a site immediately after the report is opened. I will do this even if my favored site is the one recommended. I do not think that the recommendations of the experts were ever intended to settle the site, but were simply for the purpose of assisting the board in making the selection.

W. A. Paxton, Sr.—I believe that the action of the last meeting was proper. I will vote in line with the recommendations of the experts, whether they favor my first, second or third choice of site or not. I think that the experts were brought here for the sole purpose of choosing the location.

ENDORSES THE EDITORIAL.

Daniel Farrell, Jr.—I heartily endorse The Bee's editorial urging the publication of the engineers' report at this time. It reflects my sentiments in the matter exactly. The directors certainly have a right to know what the report contains before they are called upon to decide the location. At Saturday's meeting it was quite evident that most of those directors who preferred to keep the report sealed are those who have already made up their minds as to which is the best site suggested for the exposition, and to my mind such men are not qualified to serve on a jury that is to decide so important a matter. I say it would be to the best interests of the exposition to have the reports opened and published at once.

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public would be to cause the advocates of sites which are not recommended to lose their interest in the matter and they would not work for an appropriation from the legislature. After the report is read the board should use its best judgment as to whether the recommendation of the engineers should be followed or not.

Edward Dickinson—I agree with The Bee on the matter of publishing the report of the engineers and heartily endorse its editorial on this subject. There is no question but that the report should be opened and the directors given more than thirty minutes' time to consider it before voting on the location. How much time they should have I am not now prepared to state, but the report should certainly be opened before the meeting which is to decide the location.

J. C. Wharton—If the report is opened in advance it will be found that four sites are left out and the supporters of those sites will form combinations to defeat the endorsement of the report if they are given time. If the report canvasses the advantages of each site in a fair and imperial spirit I shall be in favor of voting in accordance with the recommendation of the experts. I believe that the site question should be settled at once and was in favor of settling it last Saturday. The sooner it is settled the better, as that will settle the bickering that is now going on.

INVOLVES TWO POINTS.

Dr. E. W. Lee—There are two considerations involved in this matter. One is the fear that if the report of the experts was published, the question of site might become involved with the legislative appropriation. The other is the fact that the people should know what the report contains. The managers of the exposition have proceeded regularly up to this point. They have given the exposition a name. They have advertised it to a considerable extent, have opened offices and collected a considerable amount of money. But now they stop short and say that they can proceed no further until the bill now before the legislature is acted upon. I think the last consideration outweighs the former. All things considered, the report of the experts should have been opened and published, and then the directors would have had an opportunity to consider it before they were called on to vote on the question of site.

John L. Webster—If the report is opened in advance it will simply stir up dissension and the supporters of the sites which are not recommended will try every means to tear down the report and to pick it to pieces. I don't know what the report contains, but if it includes a recommendation of one of the places offered, and if it states good and sound reasons for making such recommendation, I shall consider that in the light of expert testimony and follow the judgment of the engineers, but if the report shows on its face that the makers are unfair and prejudiced, I shall feel justified in using my own judgment.

John H. Evans—The report should have been made public at once in order that the recommendations of the experts might have been fully discussed before the selection of a site was made. I consider the report only a recommendation, anyway. The experts were brought here to view the different sites and point out their advantages. The board of directors is to select a site after considering the recommendations and suggestions.

G. H. Payne—I believe the report of the engineers should be opened and directors given an opportunity to investigate and discuss the report before being called upon to decide on the location. As you may have heard I took this position at Saturday's meeting, and am still of the same opinion. I think the directors should carefully investigate the report and inspect the grounds recommended before passing judgment on the matter.

A T. Rector—I think that a special meeting ought to be called at once, the report read and the site selected. It seems to me that the whole action is a scheme in order that influence might be brought on the legislature to tack onto the appropriation a clause fixing the exposition on some certain site. The state board of agriculture might possibly have something to do in such case in putting in on the state fair grounds. I do not see how the report could otherwise have any effect on the legislature in making an appropriation. The experts were brought here, in my opinion, simply for the purpose of showing what site would require the least grading, sewering and other improvements for the exposition. They simply recommend the most economical site. If the site is not selected, however, it is a good plan to keep the report sealed, or otherwise more feeling would be aroused over the question of site.

R. S. Wilcox—If the report is made public in advance of the vote upon the site it will cause a fight from one end of town to the other. I think the matter should have been settled last Saturday, and I am opposed to making the report public in advance. I believe the report of the engineers will have great weight; those men were employed as experts to give an unbiased opinion and I think their advice should be followed. Personally, I am in favor of Miller park, but if the engineers recommend Riverview park or Hanscom park that recommendation will have great weight with me.

C. F. Weller—The report should have been opened Saturday and the question settled there and then. If the report is made public in advance it will stir up feeling and make a fight and the directors will be chased after by those opposed to the recommendation and by its friends. I am in favor of endorsing the report of the experts. They were employed as experts and are supposed to be competent, therefore their recommendation should have great weight and I believe we should defer to their judgment.

SHOULD HAVE BEEN OPENED.

J. J. Brown—I think that the report should have been opened at once and the selection of the site made. In my opinion the report will practically decide the site, because I believe that it was the intention when the directors sent for the experts that their recommendation should be acted upon. Since the site question has been laid over for a couple of weeks, however, I believe it was a good plan to keep the report sealed. Otherwise the directors would have been petitioned to get other experts by those whose site was not selected. I fail to see, however, the benefit to be gained by putting off the selection of the site for a couple of weeks.

J. E. Markel—I have not studied the matter very fully chiefly owing to recent absence from town. So far as I am able to say, I think the report of the engineers should not be opened until the directors are ready to decide the question of location.

Casper E. Yost—As a member of the special committee to employ these engineers, I do not feel that it would be proper for me to express an opinion on this matter. The board has acted as it saw fit and I am content to leave the question to it for decision.

I. W. Carpenter—The main object of this action was to leave the matter unsettled in order that our legislators might be unhampered by site advocates in working for an appropriation. I believe that the report ought to have been printed and a copy given to each of the directors in order that they might have considered it before selecting a site. I do not believe that it would have been advisable, however, to give the report to the public. It would have aroused, in my opinion, such bitterness among those whose sites were not chosen that our legislature might have been influenced in the matter of an appropriation.

John A. Creighton—Since the selection of a site was put over for a couple of weeks I favor the action in keeping the report sealed. If it had been made public and the selection been postponed for two weeks the city would have been at loggerheads and bitter feelings would have been created.

Arthur C. Smith—On general principles, the selection of the site should be a matter of general publicity and considerable discussion. But under the existing circumstances I am convinced that the interests of the exposition will be best served by holding the matter back until after the legislature has acted.

L. H. Korty—The action of the committee was emphatically correct. It would be very poor policy in my opinion to make the location just at present.

Charles Metz—I think the report of the engineers should be opened. The directors and the people at large should be given an opportunity to discuss it. Regarding the time that the report should be opened before the meeting called to decide the location, I cannot say, because I've not fully considered the matter. But I should think that the report should be open for discussion at least one week before the question of location is

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Exposition Endorsements

BY THE TRANSMISSISSIPPI PRESS.

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tion of the resources and pr[?] states west of the Mississippi, to be [?] the city of Omaha in 1898. To carry out this project the Transmississippi and International Exposition association was incorporated last winter, with an authorized capital of $1,000,000, of which over $400,000 has already been raised and the remainder will doubtless be secured within the next six months. In June last congress passed a bill granting recognition to the Transmississippi and International Exposition, pledging not less than $200,000 towards a government exhibit. It is expected that the appropriation will be increased during the coming session to $500,000. The legislature of Nebraska at its biennial session in January will be asked to appropriate at least $250,000. There is no doubt but what such a display is so prominent a western city as Omaha will result in great good. As Montana has been asked to co-operate the different commercial clubs and chambers of commerce should look into the matter and if found advisable, such a display of mineral and other products should be gathered for the occasion that would show to the world that this state excels all others.

Medical Lake (Wash.) Ledger: This is an age of expositions, and just now the Transmississippi and International Exposition, to be held at Omaha in 1898, is attracting a good share of public attention. It is a laudable undertaking, worthy the generous support of the states west of the Mississippi, as its object is to specially set forth to the world the limitless resources and advantages of those states, and to bring to them the homeseeker and investor. Being strictly a western affair, people of the sunset slope will take particular interest in demonstrating their attractions and industries, and in proving to the thousands that will attend this exposition that western hospitality is boundless. Washington should take a front seat in this enterprise.

 
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Shelby (Ia.) Republican: The proposed Transmississippi Exposition, about which so much has been said in the papers of the west in the past couple of years, is now an assured event. It will be held at Omaha next year, opening in June and continuing through October. The chief preliminary work has now been done, the taking of the required subscriptions having been completed some time ago. A board of directors and an executive committee of seven members, who will have charge of the seven departments into which the work has been divided, have both been chosen and the active work of construction and preparation for the show has begun. The national government has appropriated $200,000 for its exhibit and $300,000 more is expected. The citizens of Omaha have subscribed for over $300,000 worth of stock. The legislature of Nebraska is expected to appropriate $250,000. Other states will make big appropriations. Altogether, from $3,000,000 up will be invested in the enterprise, which is sufficient to make quite a respectable exposition, as can be readily appreciated by any one. The state of Iowa should be, and is, largely interested in the success of this enterprise. It is the chief state of the transmississippi empire, and as such will receive the major part of the benefits. We think all of our people will approve of a liberal appropriation by the legislature at the special session now sitting at Des Moines. Our people will also take large individual interest in the exposition and work for its success in the matter of exhibits and in attendance when the exposition is open.

Davenport Democrat: The managers, officers, directors and all others connected with the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha are pushing things. It will be remembered that the last session of the Iowa general assembly appropriated $10,000 for an exhibit from this state, and it was intimated at the time that this amount would be probably increased. Since that time, however, the state treasurer has discovered a hole in the finances, and this may tend to discourage further appropriations. Of all the great fairs held in this country it can be safely said that the Omaha Exposition will be of more practical importance to the state than any of them.

Maxwell (ia.) Tribune: The managers of the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha in 1898, are diligently at work to assure the success of the fair. It will be devoted exclusively to the transmississippi states, and will doubtless prove to be the best exhibition of their resources ever presented to the public. We trust the press and legislatures will render such assistance as lies in their power, and the success of the fair will be assured.

Lake City (Minn.) Graphic-Sentinel: When the great White City was built at Chicago and the exposition thrown open to the world, as it was claimed, the object was to bring out the advantages of all parts of the world, but American like, when Europe came here with her enormous show, the managers and the people of this country courteously gave way to their visitors and took what space there was left. Owing to this fact many of the leading advantages of this country, the Grand America, were left in the background, but in 1898 there will be one held at Omaha which will give all of America a chance to show what it contains. This exhibition is to be known as the Transmississippi and International Exposition, and while all nations will be given a chance, yet America this time will look out for America.

Anderson (Mo.) Advocate: Expositions seem to be the order of the day and somehow or another they are always made to pay. The Transmississippi and International Exposition, announced for 1898 at Omaha, will be no exception to the rule, if the western states will but do their part in helping to make it what it should be. Though some of the recent expositions have shown deficits as to receipts, yet the localities where they have been held have been vastly benefited by a healthy increase in population and development. The Atlanta cotton states exposition turned the tide of immigration and capital from the west to the south. The aim of the exposition of 1898 is to set forth the advantages and limitless resources of states west of the Mississippi and thus attract homeseekers and investors, and it should be liberally supported by every state in the west.

Blue Rapids (Kan.) Times: There are to be two expositions in the great Mississippi valley during the coming two years. One at Omaha, the Transmississippi Valley States Exposition, to be held during the summer of 1898, and for which the legislatures of the valley states will be asked to make appropriations for state exhibits. The Times has made arrangements for articles upon the progress being made upon the Omaha exposition, which we have no doubt will be of interest to our readers. Those who attended the World's fair will remember that a great part of the exhibits were from foreign countries, thus limiting the attention given to American manufactures, while the middle states received almost nothing in the way of advertisement. It is for the purpose of advertising the products and wonderful growth of our own valley states that the Omaha exposition will be held.

Casey (Ia.) Vindicator: Omaha is making strenuous efforts to make the Transmississippi and International Exposition a success. The object of the exposition is to present to the world the resources of the great west. While the exposition is held in a neighboring state, yet Iowa should take an active interest in the fair. An exposition of prod

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and will increase it to a half million at least. This exposition belongs to Iowa as much as Nebraska, and the same interest should be taken by our own people as by Nebraskans. Our legislature should duly consider the great benefit Iowa will derive from such an exposition and make an appropriation accordingly. Any amount of money appropriated for an Iowa exhibit will only be an investment that will bring back large returns. It is one of the things we cannot afford to deal sparingly with.

Le Mars (Ia.) Daily Sentinel: If there is one thing more than another that the people of Iowa ought to be interested in it is the Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha next summer. it is to be held on the border of our own state and what is better, it is on the western border, where all of the people from Europe and the rich and populous east will be obliged to traverse Iowa's peerless prairies in order to reach the exposition. The state of Iowa invites inspection rather than laudation, for the public is more deeply impressed by what is seen than by what is heard. For this reason alone, the people of Iowa can afford to give the great exposition at Omaha the most earnest support.

If the fair were to be held in Des Moines or any other Iowa city, the people of this state would at once start in with great enthusiasm to push the exposition. Owing to the fact that the great army of investors and citizens who seek new locations come from the east, it is more to the advantage of Iowa to have the exposition held in Omaha than in an Iowa city, because the visitors at the exposition will be obliged to travel over a larger part of Iowa and see more of it than if the fair were held in the central or eastern part of Iowa.

In northwest Iowa in particular we ought to comprehend the benefits of the exposition early and take action to reap as many of them as possible. While the fair will not be so large as the Chicago exposition of 1893, it is so much nearer to us that its effects will be more strongly felt.

Instead of being obliged to travel 500 miles and pay exorbitant hotel rates on arriving at their destination as was so often the case in Chicago, LeMars people can leave home on the early morning train for Omaha, put in a day at the exposition and return home in the evening after supper or they can stay and attend evening entertainments and reach home the next morning in time for business.

The people of Omaha have done a great work toward making the exposition a success. They have raised nearly a half million dollars capital and have begun active operations in all of the states that are expected to be tributary to the fair. The states of the Mississippi valley are organizing to give the world its first intelligent exposition of resources and advantages of the great central region.

Every county in western Iowa ought to be represented in some way at Omaha.

Keystone (S. D.) Miner: The Omaha papers are beginning to agitate the matter of the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in that city next year. An appropriation will be made by congress, commissioners are being appointed by the governors of the states interested and its promises to be a success. There is no question that the only sure road to success is in advertising and the best means of advertising is in displaying the products and resources of the country at some central point and offering inducements to all the people to come and see. This great inland region is as yet scarcely settled; it could easily support ten times the population it now has, and the way to fill up the country is to encourage immigration by every legitimate means and this exposition promises to become the best opportunity we have had for this purpose. The Black Hills cannot afford to fail to take every advantage of this change to advertise our resources, and in addition to the commissioner for the state at large we should have one of our own. We had a miserably meager show at the World's fair in '93 and failed to attract the attention of the world in exact ratio to the scantiness of our display, and this is our chance to redeem ourselves.

Sanborn (Ia.) Pioneer: Our readers, most of them, at least, are not aware of the fact that next year there is to be held at Omaha one of the greatest interstate and international expositions ever attempted in this country. It is based on the fact that advertising pays. In years gone by Philadelphia, New Orleans, Atlanta, San Francisco, and Chicago have all been built up, strengthened in every way and largely increased in population and the country for hundreds of miles in all directions greatly enriched by the expositions. These things are simply advertisements to attract and draw population and capital. New Orleans was a dead city after the war until resurrected by the great exposition of 1884. In a less degree, but still powerfully, the other expositions named enriched and built up not only the cities where held, but the adjacent country for hundreds of miles in all directions. The Omaha exposition is sure to do for the transmississippi regions what the other expositions did for the regions what the other expositions did for the regions in which held.

This is not simply an Omaha affair, but a great, grand interstate and international exposition, aided by state and national appropriations. The city of Omaha will be greatly benefited no doubt, but the advantages gained by the states adjacent to Omaha will be hundreds of times greater.

The Iowa legislature will appropriate something, of course, toward this exposition and we hope the appropriation will be in keeping with the benefits sure to be derived.

VOTES FOR HANSCOM PARK

CENTRAL LABOR UNION AND EXPOSITION

City Charter, Exemption Laws and School Tax Levy Considered, in Addition to Semi-Annual Election of Officers.

The Transmississippi Exposition again came up for considerations of the Central Labor union at its regular meeting last night. The matter culminated in the almost unanimous passage of a resolution instructing Director Youngs of the exposition board, who is labor's representative in that body, to cast his vote for the Hanscom park site when a vote is taken on the question of a location.

This action was taken because it was held that the Hanscom park site is the most advantageous to the laboringmen for various reasons. The principle one is that the site is the nearest to the heart of the city. It was also argued that the site was such that considerable work would be given laboring men in the way of grading. The matter was settled and the instructions were given after but little discussion.

William Grabach, who took to Lincoln the union's recommendation that the exposition appropriation bill contain provision for the employment of local labor on the exposition at certain wages, reported progress. He stated that there was great probability that the recommendations would be incorporated in the appropriation bill.

ASSESSMENT ON EXPOSITION STOCK.

Would-Be Exhibitors Make Application for Space.

Notices of assessment on exposition stock are being sent out from the secretary's office. At the meeting of the Board of Directors held January 9 an assessment of 15 per cent was ordered, payable in three installments of 5 per cent each. The first installment of this assessment will be due February 1, the second on or before March 1 and the third on or before April 1. The three notices are being mailed at the same time, with the idea that some of the stockholders may prefer to pay the entire assessment at one time instead of making three payments. A new system has been adopted whereby a rush of the stockholders to pay their assessments can be taken care of without delay, thus obviating the difficulty surrounding the payment of the first assessment.

The exposition is to have a beauty show, application for 1,000 feet of space for that purpose having been made to the Department of Concessions by two residents of Omaha. The application states that the show is to be an international affair.

The Department of Exhibits has received a lengthy letter of inquiry from a large brewing establishment in Munich, Germany, asking for information bearing upon the establishment of an exhibit showing a brewery in full operation. Particular inquiry is made regarding the power, facilities for constructing a large cooling cellar, etc., and the statement is made that it is the purpose of the brewing company to erect a plant for the purpose of showing the complete operation of a brewery, with a view of convincing the public that the product is pure and wholesome.

Hayden Bros. have been authorized by one firm, whose goods they handle, to expend $6,000 in making a creditable exhibit of the line of goods manufactured by that firm, and application has been made for space.

Governor Jones of Arkansas has notified the Department of Promotion that he has appointed W. G. Vinsonhaler of Little Rock as vice president for Arkansas. The appointee is a brother of D. M. Vinsonhaler, the attorney of this city.

IOWA WILL KEEP ITS PLEDGE

MONEY FOR THE EXPOSITION ASSURED

Legislators Not Inclined to Meddle with the Money Already Set Aside for the Hawkeye Representation at Omaha.

DES MOINES, Jan. 28.—(Special Telegram)—The Iowa legislature will stand by the Transmississippi Exposition. This may be set down as assured. There has been some effort to give the impression that the appropriation made a year ago might be   withdrawn, temporarily, on account of the state's embarrassment financially, but there is no real ground for it. The appropriation will not be interfered with at this time, and it will be increased to $60,000 to $75,000—probably the latter figure—later on.

When the legislature met it was faced by a deficit of nearly $500,000, and Governor Drake in his message recommended a review of all appropriations of the last session in order that, if possible, they might be pared down. The ways and means committees of both houses have named subcommittees and they have been at work in this direction; but they do not propose to forget the pledge of the state's good faith that was made when the first appropriation was made a year ago.

The appropriation was $10,000, conditioned on congress making a liberal donation and likewise the legislature of Nebraska. Congress has done its part, although of this fact there was no official notice till a few days ago. The Iowa bill provided that the state executive council should have the power, at any time after the official announcement was received of an appropriation by congress, to name a board of commissioners for the state to have charge of the expenditure of the money appropriated. By some mistake the executive council was not notified officially of this appropriation, and the appointment of the commissioners has been delayed, but it is announced that the board will now be named in a few days.

A number of prominent Iowa men who are interested in the proper representation of the state at Omaha, met here today and discussed the situation. They secured assurances from the appropriation committees that the first appropriation was safe; then they secured a pledge of assistance to get it increased later on, in ample time to make a good exhibit. The executive council was sounded, and found to be all right, and now it is expected the commission will be named very soon.

The Transmississippi Exposition is strong is the legislature, and in the state at large is just beginning to receive appreciative attention. it is conceded that Iowa ought to make the best exhibit that of Nebraska, and that there should be no niggardliness about it. And there will be none. The first appropriation of $10,000 was only preliminary, and was made with the understanding that, in ample time for its practical use, a much larger amount should be added.

FAVORS A LIBERAL APPROPRIATION

Senator Allen Expresses Himself on the Exposition.

WASHINGTON, Jan. 28.—(Special Telegram.)—Senator Allen, in an interview with The Bee regarding the Transmississippi and International Exposition, and replying to an inquiry as to what was his general view of the enterprise, said: "It is a gigantic enterprise. It will affect the future of Nebraska very materially. Our people are familiar with the history of the exposition as made in congress. The law authorizing it was the work of populists, to a very great extent. The bill was introduced by me in the senate a year ago this month, and the enterprise must be regarded largely as populistic. I do not doubt the holding of the exposition will be the greatest event of Nebraska's history thus far, and one of the greatest events in its entire history. It will take millions of people to Omaha, and distribute them through the state, cities, country towns and precincts—people who would otherwise never visit us or know anything of the state, and who will spend more or less money incident to their travels. Many of them will become permanent residents. They will purchase real estate, build homes and improve farms, and Nebraska will become infinitely richer in consequence thereof. When we take into consideration the great benefit to the middle western states produced by the World's fair, it will be readily seen that this is an enterprise, the great benefits of which Nebraska and western Iowa alone will receive."

"What do you think the legislature will do toward making the exposition a success?" was asked the senator.

"Of course, I regard it as important that Nebraska should do her full share for the success of the undertaking," he said. "Whatever the legislature does will be regarded as a precedent for legislatures of other states. I know that taxes rest heavily on our people; they are tax-ridden to a very great extent, but I feel confident the taxes that may be imposed to make an exhibit at the exposition will be more than compensated by corresponding benefits derived from the holding of the exposition. In other words, I think that property throughout Nebraska will be advanced, capital will be invested and new enterprises be started by reason thereof. In my judgment not less than from $12,000,000 to $15,000,000 will be spent by visitors and those intending to become residents, in one form or another, and this money will be scattered among the merchants, farmers, laborers and all other classes. I look upon the success of the exposition as the only real hope for relief our state will have in the immediate future. The legislature can be relied upon to do what is right and even what is generous."

"How will the populist members of the legislature stand on the appropriation for a state exhibit?" was asked.

"I can only speak in a general way," said Senator Allen, "for I am not in communication with any of the members of the legislature on the subject, but I have no doubt they will favor a bill making a reasonable appropriation. You will understand that the responsibility for defeat or injury of the exposition must not be laid at the door of the populist party. Our party will guard every avenue and protect every interest, and republicans and gold democrats must not be permitted to truthfully say the populists unreasonably obstructed a reasonable and proper appropriation to make the exposition successful. I do not doubt the wisdom of the populist members of the legislature They can be relied on to do what is right. I think the people of Nebraska have their hearts set on this exposition, and it would be regarded as a great misfortune for it to miscarry at his time. After it has been pushed along successfully thus far, we could not stand the chagrin that would be caused us by letting the enterprise lapse.

"I expect before the general government has gotten through, we will be able to get $500,000. We have $200,000 now, which will doubtless be increased to $275,000 by this congress. The government building will no doubt be donated to the state, and an additional appropriation of $225,000 be made as the exposition progresses to meet other necessary expenses. Such is usually the course pursued."

HELP FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Enterprise Commended to Liberal Treatment from Western States.

Chicago Chronicle.

At the last session of congress an act was passed to promote the objects of the Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held next year at Omaha. No direct subsidy is granted by the terms of the act, but the government gives material help in other ways.

A building will be erected by the United States in which exhibits from the various departments will be made similar to those in the government building at the Chicago World's fair in 1893. Exhibits will also be furnished by the Smithsonian institution, the United States Fish commission and the National museums. A board of United States commissioners will be appointed to prepare and manage the exhibits and the superintend the affairs of the government building.

An appropriation of $50,000 was made for the building and $150,000 was appropriated for the expense of preparing the United States exhibits, including transportation. The United States commissioners will not be paid a salary, but will be reimbursed for their actual expenses.

All articles intended for the foreign department of the exposition shall be admitted duty free, but the usual duty shall be paid if the exhibits are sold. A circular letter from the United States Treasury department gives instructions to all customs collectors and other officers as to their duties in regard to imported articles for exhibition. The instructions are complete and perspicuous and are as liberal for exhibitors as the state would warrant.

The Omaha Exposition ought to be very well supported by private enterprise throughout the country. Especially Chicago and Illinois should be represented. As much should be done for Omaha as was done for Atlanta in 1896. All the states that were liberal in their dealings with the Chicago World's fair should receive proper returns for similar minor enterprises which may be instituted.

The senate put in the forenoon in a red hot discussion on sugar bounty, the debate being precipitated by a motion to indefinitely postpone Senator Spencer's resolution pledging the senate to payment of sugar bounty voted by the last legislature. The sentiment of the senate was clearly in favor of postponing the resolution, but when the debate had lasted until 12:30, the senate adjourned until tomorrow morning, leaving Senator Ransom's speech in closing unfinished. When Senator Ransom was in the midst of his argument Senator Conaway of York asked him why the state of Nebraska should be taxed to pay for an exposition at Omaha. Ransom at once took advantage of the opening presented, and at once launched into a vigorous argument in favor of the exposition. When the senate adjourned it did so with the agreement that Senator Ransom should continue his remarks. He will, of course, complete his answer to the question of the senator from York county, and he promises to place the exposition before the senate in its proper light.

SPACE FOR THE VETERANS

Exposition to Have a Department for the Grand Army.

FOR MEMENTOES OF THE NATION'S WARS

Commander-in-Chief Clarkson Will Be Asked to Co-Operate in the Work, as He Has Signified His Interest in It.

The exposition is to have a special building devoted to the Grand Army of the Republic, and an exhibit of war relics such as has never been made before in this country. This was decided at the regular meeting of the executive committee of the Exposition association held yesterday afternoon at the Commercial Club. The matter came up in the shape of a resolution introduced by Mr. Hitchcock, providing for such an exhibit.

Major T. S. Clarkson, commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, has been consulted in the matter, and he felt confident that such an exhibit could be made a most attractive feature of the exposition by securing articles from the extensive collection of the government and from the valuable and extensive collections of private parties in various parts of the country. No exposition which has been given so far has made a feature of a Grand Army department, and Major Clarkson agreed that such a department would form a strong attraction for all old soldiers.

The idea met with favor with the other members of the committee and was discussed somewhat in detail. It was thought that a most extensive collection of war relics could be made, which would form a strong feature, and the resolution was adopted, it being provided that the commander-in-chief of the Grand Army be asked to co-operate in the matter and give it his endorsements.

TO ADVERTISE THE EXPOSITION.

A committee appeared before the executive committee from the Board of Commissioners appointed by the mayor to represent the interests of Omaha at the Tennessee Centennial exposition at Nashville. This committee consisted of Major Clarkson, George R. Williams and Secretary Howard. Major Clarkson acted as spokesman and said the committee had been deputized to appear before the executive committee and ask that body to appropriate $5,000 for the purpose of enabling the commission to advertise the Transmississippi Exposition at Nashville, and to secure exhibits from among the exhibitors at that place. The speaker explained that the commission has already opened negotiations with a number of leading manufacturers and commercial establishments of this section, and has memorialized the county commissioners and the city council to supply the commission with $1,500 and $3,500 respectively for the purpose of carrying out the work of the commission in making a creditable showing of the resources and conditions of this section. The request of the delegation was taken under advisement, and laid over until the next meeting of the executive committee, owing to the fact that Messrs. Kirkendall, Reed and Rosewater were absent, and a bare quorum of the committee was present.

The Department of Promotion reported the names of the several vice presidents recently appointed by the governors of different states, which have already been published, and the appointees were legally elected vice presidents.

A rule was adopted which fixes the hours of the various employes in the headquarters of the exposition. It was ordered that the offices should be open and business transacted between the hours of 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., with an hour's intermission at noon.

NEBRASKA FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Fairfield News-Herald: The part of Governor Holcomb's message that refers to the Transmississippi Exposition should be carefully read by each member of the legislature, morning, noon and night, until that body passes the appropriation bill for its support. Much depends upon what Nebraska will do in this matter. That other states will make appropriation is assured, but the amount they will give will be governed largely by what Nebraska does. If it is shown that Nebraska intends doing her part, others will respond likewise. The way for Nebraska to do this is for the legislature to respond liberally and do it quickly. The eyes of the world are upon the legislature of our states, watching what it will do in the matter.

Albion News: A a bill appropriating $350,000 for the Transmississippi Exposition has been introduced in the legislature. We think it is very generally conceded that there should be a generous appropriation for this, but just what amount would be "generous" is the question.

 
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Burchard Times: In Governor Holcomb's message to the legislature he spoke of the Transmississippi Exposition in glowing terms. He speaks of the many thousands of people who will visit the great west in that year. He says also: "It will do for the west what the Atlanta exposition has done for the south, but in a larger degree."

Tecumseh Chieftain: The members of the legislature are not taking very kindly to the proposed appropriation of $350,000 in aid of the Transmississippi Exposition. Some of them argue that Omaha would get all the benefit of the expenditure of the appropriation and that the money belonging to all the people should not be expended for the benefit of a few. Others take the ground that the state, being in straitened financial circumstances, ought to be just before she is generous, and they advocate the payment of the state's indebtedness before branching out into an expensive exposition project. A few of the strictly home-spun populists think there is some political scheme connected with the movement and they are as hostile as a band of Cuban insurgents. There is some foundation for the first two objections named, and yet we believe a little investigation will show that it is not substantial enough to thwart the exposition scheme. Omaha, being the seat of the exposition, will of course receive greater advantage from the project than any other equal area of the state. But it must be remembered that Omaha is a part of Nebraska, the business center of the state, and that whatever affects her material interests also reaches out and has an influence throughout all the country tributary to Omaha. The exposition will bring hundreds of thousands of people to Omaha from the eastern states, and many of them will not only view the exposition but will travel more or less about the state and thus come in personal contact with the resources of this important section of the transmississippi country. The intimate acquaintance thus formed will, in many instances, lead to investment. Again, the state is in need of a good advertisement. Many eastern people never think of Nebraska save as a drouth-stricken, wind-swept, famine-ridden country which no one lives in who can possibly get away. The exposition would be the means of effectually correcting that most erroneous idea and its removal from the eastern mind would be greatly to our advantage in many ways. The Transmississippi Exposition will certainly prove a powerful influence in the higher development of the state, and we regard as most foolish all opposition to the project that is based on the fact that it is to be located in Omaha. Regarding the amount which our legislature ought to appropriate for a state exhibit there are many different opinions. Perhaps $350,000 is more than our finances would justify, but at any rate the appropriation should be large enough to make a showing of which every Nebraskan can be proud and which will not thwart the object which the exposition is primarily intended to promote.

Pierce Call: While in Omaha last week we got enough insight into the Transmississippi Exposition to believe that it will be the greatest advertisement for our state that has yet been attempted. It will undoubtedly be next to the World's fair in its importance and results. It is not a visionary scheme, but is backed by the substantial and influential men of Omaha and the great west. It means much to Nebraska and the western states. Gurdon W. Wattles, who is well known in Pierce, is at the head of the exposition and has the ability to push it to a successful issue. Mr. Rosewater, editor of the foremost daily in the west, is in charge of the Department of Publicity and is the right man in the right place. The gentlemen at the head of the other departments are as well known as the two just mentioned. The exposition is bound to be a success and of untold benefit to our own state. Other states are looking toward Nebraska, therefore the state legislature should not be niggardly when it comes to an appropriation.

Fullerton News: The proposed Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha from June to November, 1898, is something which will help the state in many ways, and Governor Holcomb takes that view of it in his biennial message to the legislature. A practical way for the legislature to stand up for Nebraska will be for it to make a reasonable appropriation for a Nebraska exhibit. All the states of the Mississippi valley are preparing to make appropriations and the state which is going to reap the rewards of its being held on its own soil cannot afford to take a back seat. It is true that the state needs to practice economy, but the taxpayers can afford something which is going to bring them a return in the increased valuation of their property.

Exeter Democrat: The Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha during the summer and autumn of 1898 will attract great numbers of people from every section of the country. It will be the greatest exposition of western products ever held and will accomplish great good in bringing together the varied interests of the west and cementing the friendly relations already existing between the people of this wealth-producing region of the country. Naturaly​ Nebraska will profit to a great extent by having this exposition on her soil. Eastern people will not confine themselves to visiting Omaha alone, but will travel our state from one end to the other and doubtless many of them, after noting the advantages our state offers, will never return east with a view of remaining there any longer than will be necessary to close their business affairs. The push and enterprise of the west has an attraction about it that eastern people cannot resist and once they have been here they seldom return to the east to live. Millions of dollars will be brought into our state to be paid out for food and drink for man and beast, and as the people of Nebraska will have to supply all this, that vast amount of money will therefore be put into circulation in our state. The erection of numerous and costly buildings in Omaha will provide employment for many men who are now idle, and taking it all in all the Transmississippi Exposition will be a Godsend to the people of Nebraska and we trust our legislature will make an appropriation that the people of the state will not be ashamed of. Stand up for Nebraska by booming along the exposition.

Crete Vidette: Voting an appropriation for the exposition these hard times is like having one's teeth pulled. But if the appropriation will attract 3,000,000 visitors, as its friends assume, it will be casting bread upon the waters which will return after many days. Since the general government has made a liberal appropriation and the city of Omaha has responded nobly, the state should come to the rescue. The action of Nebraska will have much influence upon neighboring states. A good appropriation put into the hands of an honest, competent committee will place the state in a position that will warrant the vice presidents in making an earnest appeal for the hearty co-operation of sister states.

Grand Island Independent: The Nebraska legislature cannot afford to hesitate in its support of the Transmississippi Exposition. True, the state finances are not in such condition as to warrant any unusual expenditure of public funds, even for an exposition, but none will deny that a careful consideration of the same should be given, followed with such an appropriation that Nebraskans will be in a position to ask their neighbors to join with them in erecting a building and making an attractive exhibit at the exposition.

Already the transmississippi country is awakening to the importance of the show and the opportunity it will afford the great west to display to the world the wonderful and undeveloped resources of the country tributary to the Mississippi and Missouri valleys, with the special opportunities it will afford the east and west to unite in a great exposition midway across the continent. There is no denying the great amount of good it will accomplish. But, unfortunately, it comes at a time when Nebraska is like its people, just reviving from a period of financial depression and drouth such as the great west has never before known, and the state, like individuals, is in no condition for any lavish expenditures. However, the people will demand that the legislature handle this matter with a due regard to the circumstances. The exposition should receive an appropriation that will give the directory an opportunity to lead in the results to be accomplished, and at the same time not cripple the state for the next decade.

Burwell Mascot: Nebraska needs advertising of the right sort and the legislature will do well to act on the advice of the governor and make a liberal appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition.

Beatrice Democrat: The legislature should do a liberal thing for the Transmississippi Exposition. Nebraska must come to the front promptly and liberally if we expect other states to respond to the invitation and put their money into the exposition.

EXHIBITORS APPLY FOR SPACE.

Governor of Arkansas Favors Making a Showing at the Exposition.

The Department of Concessions of the exposition has received an application for 7,500 square feet of space for a Ferris wheel 150 feet in diameter, capable of carrying 500 passengers at one time. The application is made by W. H. Bongart of Cripple Creek, Colo.

A rival of Buffalo Bill has appeared in the person of "Pawnee Bill," who writes from Philadelphia for space for a wild west show. He depicts in glowing terms the merits of his show and wants to make terms with the management. "Pawnee Bill" is known in every day life as G. W. Lillie.

The owner of the wind cave, situated in the Black Hills, near Hot Springs, makes application for constructing a miniature wind cave on the exposition grounds. The writer, J. H. McDonald, proposes to reproduce his natural attraction on a small scale for the edification of the visitors to the exposition.

The Department of Promotion has received a letter from Governor Thornton of New Mexico, in which he states that he has recommended to the legislature, in his annual message, that a liberal appropriation be made for a state exhibit at the exposition.

Lieutenant Edgar F. Koehler of the Eleventh United States infantry, stationed at Little Rock, Ark., has been in correspondence with the Department of Promotion for some time and has made a number of suggestions which have been found of value by the department. In a letter received this morning he states that he has interviewed both the outgoing and the present governor and finds both of them favorable to the exposition project. Ex-Governor Clark recommended, in his message delivered a few days ago, that a liberal appropriation be made by Arkansas for exhibits at Omaha and at Nashville, and stated that there was $25,000 in the treasury available for that purpose and he recommended that the money be used in that way. Governor Jones told Lieutenant Koehler that he would favor an appropriation, and the lieutenant expresses the opinion that a bill carrying appropriations for both Omaha and Nashville will undoubtedly be passed in the near future.

Suggests a Little Haste.

OMAHA, Jan. 29.—To the Editor of The Bee: Regarding the location of the Transmississippi Exposition, there seems to be very much talk and no action, and if we are not awake we will lose it altogether.

Of course, I believe we should abide somewhat by the decision of the expert engineers, but then we are not doing the right thing by waiting for the action of the Nebraska legislature. We should go ahead and locate the exposition regardless of the legislature, as no doubt there are enough honest people in Nebraska and other states who, after being once assured of the location, would increase their stock subscription. If we do not take action soon it is rumored on good authority that there is a city a few hundred miles south that is dead anxious to secure it without a moment's delay. It is Kansas City, and it offered $1,000,000.

SUBSCRIBER.

ORGANIZED FOR ACTIVE WORK.

Omaha and Douglas County at Tennessee Centennial.

The commissioners appointed to represent Omaha and Douglas county at the Tennessee Centennial that opens at Nashville, May 1, 1897, and continuing for the period of six months, met in the parlors of the First National bank building yesterday afternoon and organized, after which the following officers were elected: President, Major T. S. Clarkson; vice president, G. R. Williams: secretary, W. B. Howard: treasurer, F. H. Davis.

After agreeing that it would be abvisable​ for the city of Omaha and the county of Douglas to make an exhibit at the Tennessee Centennial, it was decided to take steps looking toward the securing of funds for this purpose and by a unanimous vote, the officers of the commission were instructed to request the county commissioners to appropriate $1,500; the city of Omaha, $3,500 and the Transmississippi International and Exposition association, $5,000, this money to be used in defraying the expenses of making an exhibit and maintaining offices on the grounds in order that the plans and scope of the Transmississippi Exposition may be properly presented to the people of the southern states. President Clarkson and Vice President Williams will call the matter to the attention of the county commissioners. Howard M. Wallace and Treasurer Davis will meet the city council, while President Clarkson and Vice President Williams will lay the matter before the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi Exposition association.

Secretary Howard was instructed to visit or communicate with the manufacturers and probable exhibitors of the city and county for the purpose of ascertaining their ideas with relation to taking a part in the Tennessee Centennial.

Before adjournment the members of the commission decided to open permanent headquarters in room 503, First National bank building.

The following communication from the state board of agriculture was read and referred to the committee on agriculture:

Brownville, Neb., Jan. 29.—To the Honorable, the President of the Senate, Lincoln, Neb.—Sir: At a meeting of the Nebraska state board of agriculture, held at Lincoln, January 19, 1897, the following resolution was adopted, and the secretary directed to furnish you a certified copy thereof:

"Resolved, That the state legislature, now in session, be respectfully requested to appropriate a definite sum of money in such an amount as it may deem proper to enable the Nebraska state board of agriculture to make a creditable exhibit of the agricultural resources and advantages of the state at the coming Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, to be held in Omaha in the year 1898."

I certify the above to be a true copy.

ROBERT W. FURNAS, Secretary.
 

Exposition Endorsements

BY THE TRANSMISSISSIPPI PRESS.

Little Rock (Ark.) Gazette: Two expositions, which should create great interest in Arkansas on account of the opportunities which will be afforded for exhibition of the resources of the state, will be held within the next two years. The first is the Tennessee Centennial and International exposition, which will be held at Nashville from May 1 to October 30, 1897. The second is the Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha, commencing June 1, and continuing until November 1, 1898. In his message Governor Clarke recommended that the legislature make suitable provision for the representation of Arkansas at each of these expositions.

The scope of the Transmississippi Exposition of 1898 is much more extensive than any interstate or international exhibition, excepting the Columbian World's fair, but the underlying motive and objects are the same as those which called into being the expositions at New Orleans, Atlanta and San Francisco. The twenty states and territories embraced in the Transmississippi region cover an area of more than 2,500,000 square miles, with an aggregate population of 25,000,000. They represent fully twenty billions of wealth. They are the great granary of America, and contain within their boundaries practically all of the gold and silver mines besides iron, copper, zinc, lead and other minerals. They embrace the greatest bodies of timber on the North American continent, as well as a large portion of the cotton belt, and all the sugar-producing lands within the boundaries of the union. The railroads within the transmississippi states aggregate 65,000 miles, and the navigable waterways include the greatest of American rivers. The legislatures of Iowa and Louisiana have already made appropriations for preliminary works, and it is expected that all of the states will be represented.

Both of these enterprises merit the serious consideration of our legislators, as it is of the greatest importance that the products of Arkansas shall be exhibited. Expositions are conceded to be the most effective method of advertising a country's resources and the money expended through them comes back rapidly and returns are more profitable than by any other known medium or investment. Neither of these enterprises are instituted for benevolent purposes. They are purely matters of business, which clear-headed, progressive business men can endorse as safe and sound. It now devolved upon the Arkansas legislature to keep pace with our sister states, and prompt action is looked for.

Evans (Colo.) Courier: The Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha, Neb., in 1898 will undoubtedly be a fine thing, and being so close to Colorado we will all have a chance to take it in, unless the money question continues to grow worse. The state legislature of Nebraska has made an appropriation of $350,000 to start the work. Colorado, Kansas and the rest of the western states should call in line at once and help this cause along. It will be one of the finest advertisements of the west that has ever came up, as it will induce the eastern people to come west and see our country, that they think is only fit for the coyote and Indians to inhabit and not entitled to any legislation. Now is your time to make them change their minds by giving a display that will surpass anything heretofore produced. Now is the time for our legislature to take action on this matter, and we hope they will do so by making a liberal appropriation. We will get it all back tenfold in 1899.

Avoca (Minn.) Independent: The Transmississippi and International Exposition will be held at Omaha from June 1 to November, 1898. If carried out as planned it will be a great western enterprise, and judging from the prospectus already sent out the city of Omaha will be able to handle such a great exposition. That city has a public library containing 52,304 volumes.

Des Moines Farmers' Tribune: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898 promises to be a big affair and will no doubt attract worldwide attention to the Mississippi valley and western states and be the means of bringing in millions of dollars for our cheap land and undeveloped resources.

sentence begins abruptly
not "in it" except incidentally. The present exposition is to be on a large scale. The capital stock of the corporation is $1,000,000, and a permanent organization was effected December 1. The exposition will have the recognition of congress, a government building and exhibit, and the legislatures of all the transmississippi states are expected to appropriate sufficient amounts to make fitting displays. The project is one to be commended. The possibilities of this great west are unbounded. No better advertisement for this part of the country could be devised. It is time that those in the east who imagine this a wild and woolly land, full of deserts and overrun by Indians, come here and learn the contrary. The aggregation of products and of industries represented would soon show what we are and what possibilities for development and investment are to be found here. Minnesota, as one of the best states in this group, ought to occupy a prominent place in this exposition, and a proper amount of interest and appreciation of its value be shown by our people. It is left with the legislature to make the necessary appropriations, and the constituents of each member of that body ought to speak approvingly of the project.

Sibley (Ia.) Gazette: The great Transmississippi and International Exposition, to be held in Omaha in 1898, will more closely appeal to the people of this district than anything of that kind that has yet been held in the United States. There are live men at the head of the movement and it success is assured.

The Hills (Minn.) Crescent: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha between the first day of June and the first day of November, 1898, will prove to be a grand affair and will result in much benefit to the western states, as this exposition is designed to afford an opportunity for the states west of the Mississippi to make an exhibition of their resources and productive industries. This movement should receive the hearty co-operation of all the western states.

Corning (Ia.) Union: A letter from E. Rosewater, editor of The Omaha Bee, informs us that he has accepted the position of manager of the Department of Publicity of the 1898 Transmississippi Exposition. Mr. Rosewater writes: "You doubtless realize that the Columbian exposition was monopolized largely by foreign exhibitors, while the exhibit of the transmississippi region was merely an incident to the aggregation upon the marvelous resources of the Mississippi valley."

That is what Adams county farmers need and want. This is what interests southwest Iowa, for we are nearer Omaha than most Nebraska counties and infinitely better able to toot our horn and call attention to our resources.

The Blue Grass Palace idea added from $5 to $10 to every acre of Adams county land. Our land is still $20 an acre behind eastern Iowa land of the same inherent qualities. We can make money no faster than by inviting the development of our crude products, the manufacture of all our raw materials into some useful articles.

There is no reason why we should buy tons of paper of all kinds made in other states while the straw and wood are rotting all about us. There is no good reason why we should ship out hides by the carload and ship in leather and shoes from Indiana and Illinois. There is no good reason why we should not make here in southwest Iowa one-half the articles we ship in from long distances. All we need is the development of our natural resources. The Omaha exposition is calculated to help do this. Let us make it our exposition.

It will prove a slot machine, in which, if we drop pennies, we may catch Bryan dollars as they roll out.

A number of Corning citizens have signified their willingness to undertake a representation of Adams county's resources at the exposition. Among them are the gentlemen who helped make the Blue Grass Palace exhibit the prize winner—Messrs. A. M. Beymer, J. E. Bell and others. The old Corning Board of Trade should be revived to do this work and the farmers of all Adams county should volunteer help and supples.

Let Adams county, Iowa, take the leading place among the local exhibits at the Omaha exposition.

Blunt (S. D.) Advocate the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898 from June to November will no doubt be the greatest exposition of products of the great west ever held. Nearly half a million dollars have already been subscribed toward the capital stock. Congress has appropriated $200,000 in aid of the enterprise, Iowa has voted $10,000 for an exhibit, which it will probably increase, and appropriations and liberal support may be expected from all of the western and southern states, as well as from most of those farther east. Various national organizations are arranging to hold their annual sessions there that year in order to visit the exposition. Every state that participates will receive a benefit.

South Dakota should take a proper interest in so important an affair as this, to take place so near to her borders and so full of probable benefit for her in the way of attracting immigration. The legislature should be all means appropriate an amount sufficient to provide for a suitable representation and exhibit.

Argyle (Minn.) Banner: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha, Neb., June 1 to November 1, 1898, will be an affair almost as great as the World's fair of 1893. Preparations are now in progress in the different states for large appropriations, and the supervision of the exposition is in charge of able and prominent men. Omaha, located midway between New York and San Francisco, will be a central point for such an exposition, giving to the people an equal chance to reach the point of interest. Omaha has a population of 140,000 and covers an area of twenty-four square miles. Twenty states and territories are embraced as the transmississippi region.

Eatonville (Wash.) Eagle: Preliminary arrangements are being made for the exposition to be held at Omaha next year. A suitable place for an exposition is in a fertile region. The Mississippi and Missouri valleys, the garden of the world, with their vast resources, may well be considered as one of the best localities that could be selected. As an advertising proposition a successful exposition is found to be of prime importance. It has been estimated that from 2,000,000 to 3,000,000 people will visit the exposition, thousands of whom will find homes in the beautiful prairie country on this side of the Mississippi or on the Pacific coast.

Skidmore (Mo.) Standard: While the Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha may not be so great in having as large displays from foreign countries as the World's fair at Chicago, it is intended to show up the resources of the great country west of the Mississippi in a far better way that has ever been done before. But it is not only the great west that will be on exhibition, but every part of the United States will be represented as well as foreign countries.

There has never been an exposition of a national character held in the central part of the great west, and all the states west of the Mississippi should avail themselves of the opportunity of making a good display at Omaha next year.

We hope our legislators will consider the matter favorable and make our appropriation sufficient to show Missouri up in fine shape.

Now let us all do what we can to help make the Transmississippi and International Exposition a grand success, for it will help the whole western country.

Colutta (Texas) Isonomy: A successful fair or exposition is deservedly a pilot of the cars of progress. Turn the pages of history and see the truth of the above exemplified by the Centennial, the New Orleans, the Columbian, the Atlanta expositions and the San Francisco Midwinter fair. Heralding the advent of the great Paris exposition, to be in 1900, comes the Transmississippi and International Exposition to be at Omaha, Neb., from June to November, 1898.

Minneapolis Lumberman: It is proposed to hold a Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha for several months during next year. Judging from the editorials on the proposed expositions which have recently appeared in the press, it is evident that the people of Nebraska and the Missouri valley expect great things to result from it. It is proposed to make this exposition the biggest advertisement that has ever been attempted for Nebraska as well as the states beyond the Rockies. It will be remembered that the tidal wave began to turn westward in the early 70s. It was the result of organized effort on the part of the great railways, which had become possessed of millions of acres of land, worthless unless it could be cultivated by industrious settlers. Millions of dollars were expended in advertising homes for the people from the overcrowded districts of the eastern states. It is the idea of the promoters of the Transmississippi Exposition to have it bring into prominence the resources of the Transmis-  

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sissippi country and induce still further settlement of its unsettled lands. Another way in which the exposition will benefit Nebraska, and Omaha in particular, will be through the money expended by those who visit the exposition. It is estimated that from $20,000,000 to $30,000,000 will pass into Nebraska through the exposition, and many of the people who come that far will go still farther, and thus it will serve to advertise the country between the Mississippi river and the Pacific coast. Its promoters say that the great west, with its limitless energy and its resistless push, will in 1898 present an exposition to the world the success of which will more than justify very liberal appropriations from Nebraska and other western states. It is expected that the legislature of Nebraska now in session, will appropriate a large sum of money for carrying on the work. There is no doubt but what the western country, to which there went so many settlers between twenty and thirty years ago, needs something of a stimulus, such as the proposed exposition, to start another tide of western immigration. If the exposition is made a success it will be of great benefit to the Transmississippi territory.

PARK BOARD AND THE EXPOSITION

It Considers a Levy Large Enough to Improve the Site Selected.

President Wattlens​ of the Transmississippi Exposition association met the Board of Park Commissioners at their rooms in the city hall yesterday afternoon to urge the request for a 3 mill levy for park purposes, the balance over the cost of maintaining the parks to be used for the improvement of whatever park should be secured as the site of the exposition. Mr Wattles stated that a careful examination of the law had indicated that the only way in which the city could lend any assistance to the exposition was through the Board of Park Commissioners. The plan suggested was the only means by which the non-resident taxpayers and local property owners who had failed or refused to subscribe could be reached. He stated that the excess in the proposed fund would go a good ways toward beautifying whatever site might be selected, and the improvements made would be of a permanent character that would remain for the benefit of the park.

President Tukey of the board expressed himself as favoring the plan. He stated that at the most it would only be anticipating the improvements that would naturally be made at the park during the next few years. He thought the action of the board in that particular would be endorsed by the people.

The same ground was again gone over at the meeting this forenoon. Mr. Wharton, somewhat contrary to expectations, fell in with the proposition. After a long discussion the matter was settled by the adoption of a resolution which provided that the council should be asked for a 3-mill levy for park purposes, the residue to be used for the improvement of whatever park was selected as the site for the exposition. Thomas Kilpatrick was the only member who voted against the resolution. He said that he did not wish to be understood as being against the exposition. It would benefit him probably more than any other member of the board. But he believed that the board should be as economical as possible this year. The board and the exposition should each stand on its own bottom.

Colored Race and the Exposition.

Another meeting of colored men was held at the office of Dr. M. O. Ricketts last night to talk over the question of proper representation by their race at the Transmississippi Exposition. The committees appointed at a previous meeting to investigate the exhibits at the Atlanta and Nashville expositions reported, and these reports were referred to a committee, to be appointed later, to tabulate, preparatory to presenting to the exposition directory. The reports of the work of their race at these two expositions were very encouraging to the men present at the meeting last night and they feel that with proper financial help they will be able to make an exhibit which will be a credit to themselves and an attraction to the exposition to be held here in 1898.

GRAND ARMY HEADQUARTERS

Managers of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition Take Definite Action.

Will Encourage the Project Which Commander-in-Chief Clarkson Is Trying to Carry Out.

Employes of the Company Will Be Obliged to Work Early and Late—Latest on the Big Show.

The management of the Trans-Mississippi exposition will at once confer with Commander-in-Chief Clarkson of the Grand Army of the Republic with reference to a building and an exhibit of the Grand Army at the exposition. At the meeting yesterday of the executive committee the following resolutions, introduced by Mr. Hitchcock, were passed:

Resolved, That it is the sense of this committee that a desirable feature of the exposition would be a Grand Army of the Republic building to be erected upon the grounds and placed in charge of the commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, to be headquarters for all old soldiers and to contain an exhibit of war relics and other matters of interest to old soldiers and their families, and to be known as a war museum.

Resolved, That the president be authorized to address a letter to the commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, advising him that the exposition desires to encourage the construction of a Grand Army of the Republic building, and will furnish a desirable site and contribute such proportion of the cost of the building as may be found reasonable; also requesting the commander-in-chief to advise the board at an early date whether his organization would hake​ charge of the exhibit and what proportion of the cost of the building he could procure from the members of the Grand Army of the Republic, and how large a war museum he could collect.

EXHIBITION OF WAR RELICS.

Mr. Hitchcock spoke with a great deal of enthusiasm about this proposition, and his feeling was shared by the other members of the committee. He said he believed it was one of the best collateral ideas that had yet come to the promoters of the exposition.

It was suggested that it would be possible to collect one of the best exhibitions of war relics the country has ever seen, and that the Grand Army would see to it that a warm welcome would be extended to all confederate soldiers that might attend.

Major Clarkson, R. F. Williams and W. B. Howard, a committee of the commissioners appointed by the mayor for the Nashville exposition, met the executive committee to urge that the exposition association make an appropriation of $5,000 for an exhibit from Nebraska at the Nashville show and for keeping representatives there in the interests of the expositions here. It was stated that the county would be asked to appropriate $1,500 and the city $3,500.

Action on this matter was deferred because several members of the executive committee were not present at yesterday's meeting, and it was thought that nothing should be done without a full meeting.

Several of the members expressed to Major Clarkson, however, their doubts as to the advisability of making an outlay for the purpose suggested, and the major answered by declaring his conviction that for promoting the Trans-Mississippi exposition the same amount could not possibly be expended where it would do more good. A chance at Nashville to reach both exhibitors and patrons in the most effective way possible would be offered.

NO SNAP IN THIS.

Mr. Lindsey brought up the question of the hours per day that department employes should be required to keep at the offices, and it was decided that their hours should be from 8 in the morning to 6 in the evening.

The department of promotion made a favorable report of the results secured by sending out circular letters through the business men.

Vice presidents of the exposition recently appointed by the governors of several states were formally elected as such.

SNAP SHOTS AT LEGISLATORS.

Fremont Tribune: The legislature has already passed one bill, which makes an appropriation for the payment of the members. The members know a good thing of that kind when they see it.

O'Neill Frontier: Three weeks have now elapsed since the legislature met, and aside from drawing salaries and introducing bills, the good which it has accomplished could not be found with a microscope.

Tobias Gazette: What have the people of Nebraska got to show for the money spent during the first month of our legislature? We would like to be informed what has been done of value to us as a state.

West Point Republican: The appointees of the legislature have reached the limit set by statute. In this respect the populists are no improvement upon the much-abused republican legislature. The wave of reform has not yet begun to bear fruit.

APPROPRIATION MUST BE LARGE.

Nebraska People in Favor of Liberality for the Great Show.

OSCEOLA, Neb. Feb. 3.—(Special.)—Representative William Welch came up from Lincoln on Saturday and stayed two or three days to canvass among his constituents as to the amount of money they wanted appropriated for the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha. A petition will be circulated for signers as to the amount and it is pretty generally agreed that the amount ought to be not less than $200,000. Mr. Welch has said that he will vote for the amount his constituents want him to.

HEBRON, Neb., Feb. 3.—(Special.)—From what your correspondent can hear and learn the people, business men and farmers, are all in favor of a good appropriation in aid of the Transmississippi Exposition, as Nebraska must take the initial step.

WOMEN'S PLAN ADOPTED.

At yesterday's meeting of the committee the plan of the Woman's club was approved with two modifications. It was provided that the acts of the board of lady managers should be subject to the approval of the exposition board of directors by the following section added:

The powers of the board of lady managers shall be complete for the purpose outlined, subject, however, to the approval of the exposition board of directors by the following section added:

The powers of the board of lady managers shall be complete for the purpose outlined, subject, however, to the approval of the executive committee of the exposition, and to provide for the approval the secretary of the board of managers shall after each meeting transmit a report of the proceedings to the secretary of the exposition, who shall thereupon lay the same before the executive committee for approval.

It was also decided that the representatives on the board from South Omaha and Council Bluffs should be chosen at mass meetings in each of those cities.

KANSAS CITY AND THE EXPOSITION.

Agents of that Town Looking for a Chance to Grab the Show.

LINCOLN, Feb. 2.—(Special Telegram.)—Something in the nature of a flurry among friends of the Transmississippi Exposition was noticeable this morning. Agents of the Kansas City Commercial club are said to be in the city to learn the exact status of the exposition bill before the Nebraska legislature. It is given out here that these agents will report to the legislatures of Missouri, Arkansas, Kansas and other western states the true situation concerning the Nebraska bill and if there be any ground for such a report they will say that Nebraska lawmakers are not in favor of an exposition and refuse to vote an appropriation for it. This statement is to be taken as the basis for an announcement, it is said, that Kansas City stands ready to pledge $1,000,000 cash as a bonus to be paid on demand to the Transmississippi Commercial congress, on condition that the exposition be relocated at Kansas City, and that the money be devoted to exposition purposes.

 

WOMEN ARE READY TO CO-OPERATE

Present Their Plans to the Exposition Executive Committee.

Members of the executive committee of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association and Harriet C. Towne, president, and Elizabeth J. Lindsay, secretary of the Omaha Woman's club, met in the directors' room of the Transmississippi Exposition rooms this afternoon to receive the report of the committee elected by the Omaha Woman's club on January 18, to formulate a plan of work for co-operating with the exposition directory.

The report submitted was signed by Harriet C. Towne, Grace B. Sudborough, Mary T. Stiger, Harriet L. Heller, Lillian R. Halford, Delia L. Ferguson, Ella J. Squires and Elizabeth J. Lindsay, and was as follows:

Section 1. That the women ask to be given charge of the subdepartment of Education in its various branches, viz: The exhibits of the work of public schools, kindergartens, manual training and industrial schools, schools of the deaf, blind and feeble-minded, art schools, reform schools, and all schools of special instruction; and that they also have charge of a series of congresses on various scientific and philosophical lines, to be held in some central place, presumably the auditorium of the Woman's building, during the months from June until November, 1898.

Sec. 2. That this sub-department of education be in the hands and under control of a Board of Managers of twenty-seven, eleven of whom shall be chosen from Omaha, two from South Omaha, two from Council Bluffs and twelve from Nebraska, outside of Omaha and South Omaha.

Sec. 3. That the local members of the Board of Managers be elected at a mass-meeting of the women of Omaha, South Omaha and Council Bluffs, called for that purpose.

Sec. 4. That each congressional district in the state furnish two representatives on the Board of Managers, elected at a mass-meeting of women, called for the purpose in each district.

Sec. 5. That the congressman from each district designate where the mass-meeting shall be held, and, if desired by the women of said district, that the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi Exposition send a woman from Omaha to said district to fully explain the ends and aims of the exposition.

Sec. 6. That the Board of Managers elect its own officers and adopt rules governing its actions.

Sec. 7. That two women from each state outside of Nebraska be selected to form an advisory council, auxiliary to the Board of Managers.

n​ Sec. 8. That the advisory council be selected by the Board of Managers from names suggested to the board by the different State Federation of Clubs and other educational organizations.

Sec. 9. That the members of the Board of Managers and of the advisory council do not receive remuneration.

Sec. 10. That in the work of the various departments and committees of the Transmississippi Exposition, where the services of women would be valuable, that they be asked to render such service.

After being read consideration of the report was postponed until the meeting of the mittee​ will be held at 11 o'clock Wednesday forenoon.

REFORMS DELAYED TOO LONG

ENTIRELY THE DESIRE OF SPANIARDS

No Foreign Interference Has Had Any Influence in Shaping the Concessions to Be Granted to the West Indies.

(Copyright, 1897, by Press Publishing Company.)

MADRID, Feb. 1.—(New York World Cablegram—Special Telegram.)—El Liberal publishes lengthy statements from leading statesmen on the Cuban reforms. The most curious article is that of Castellar confessing that the present crisis in Cuba might have been averted if the Spanish liberal and democratic parties had devoted to colonial questions even a small part of the time their energies were absorbed in domestic affairs in Spain, and if they had not listened too long to those who always affected to believe every progressive democratic reform in the colonies implied a step toward secession. He admits if Spain had acted so after the peace of Zangon in 1878, or had followed the advice of Minister to the Colonies Maura in 1894, it would not have now to undertake them all at once under pressure of irresistible events and the demands of public opinion eager for peace. In Spain, after the colonial reforms of 1891, Castellar told the government: "You have sent to Cuba considerable forces, send them now a little of justice."

NEBRASKA FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Steele City Standard: From all over the world come reports of the interest taken in the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held at Omaha, June 1 to November 1, 1898. How much more, then, should every dweller in Nebraska be interested in it. Every business or social letter written should contain some mention of it; every visitor from another state should be given pointers as to its magnitude and magnificence; no visit to another state should be made without a pocketful of information concerning it. Enthusiasm is contagious, and no loyal Nebraskan will let this opportunity pass to show by his fervency and zeal in the exploiting of the exposition his abiding faith in the ability of his fellow citizens to make a brilliant success of a gigantic undertaking. Stand up for Nebraska by standing up for the exposition.

Gandy Pioneer: Governor Holcomb in his message to the state legislature, recommends a liberal appropriation to the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held at Omaha from June 1 to November 1, 1898. In the opinion of the Pioneer, the governor takes the proper stand on this question. It is expected that our sister states will appropriate funds for an exhibit, and it certainly would not do for Nebraska to set them an example of niggardliness. It is true that Nebraska is not in a position to throw money away, but it is also true that this exposition will benefit the state as a whole. Some of the legislators are taking the stand that this exposition will benefit Omaha only, and are therefore against any appropriation. We think they are wrong on this point; Nebraska needs immigration, and showing our products is the way to get it. We, therefore, hope the legislature will follow the recommendation of the governor.

Falls City Populist: A bill has been introduced into the Nebraska legislature asking for an appropriation of $350,000 for the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha in 1898. Many of our reform people are talking against making the appropriation, owing to the extreme poverty of our people, the heavy indebtedness of the state, and the reason that the exposition is an Omaha enterprise. If it is an Omaha enterprise, as many aver, and they have had the enterprise and financial self-denial to put $500,000 into an exposition that has already commanded over $200,000 from the United States government, and cannot prove a success without benefiting every farmer, mechanic, artisan, tradesman, laborer, and professional man—every man, woman and child—within the limits of this state, our legislature will surely not reflect credit upon themselves, their constituency or the great cause of monetary and industrial reform which we represent, one of the greatest objects of which is to get into circulation among the great masses of our people, who have labor, the product of labor and land to sell, the millions of dollars which would be brought to and expended in our state, on our railroad and transportation lines, hotels and restaurants, to say nothing of the hundreds of thousands of dollars that will be attracted to our state and invested in our cheap farms and deserted lands of the west and northwest that could never have been brought here by other means.

By the liberal and commendable action of our monetary reform legislature, which is looked upon with a jealous eye by our political enemies, we shall win to our party and the reform ideas we represent, honors which will stay with us and benefit us for years to come, while a reverse action will bring odium and disgrace to our party which will take years to overcome and result in serious loss to our God-given principles of monetary reform and true American independence. We hope every true reformer of our state, who seeks financial relief for our people in a liberal appropriation to the Transmississippi Exposition, will hasten to write to or otherwise inform our representatives and senators that they will surely do more for the immediate relief of the financial distress of our people in voting a liberal appropriation with proper safeguards for its expenditure than by any other measures that can now be devised by our people for their own relief, as over six million dollars will be brought to this state within the coming two years if the financial encouragement from all sources is what we now have every reason to believe it will be. Our representatives want to know the wishes of their constituency, and you should let them know your wishes, as an intelligent taxpayer, at once, that they may act intelligently and in accord, with the wishes of the majority.

The Populist will be found first, last and all the time, demanding and fighting for a liberal appropriation from our state legislature for this commendable enterprise for the millions of money that will result from the appropriation. This position is prompted by self-preservation, which is the first law of nature.

Nebraska Farmer: When the legislature comes to weight the proposed appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition in the balance it is not very apt to be found wanting, and still we think a good liberal appropriation by the state for the exposition would be one of the best possible investments from a purely business standpoint that could be made. It is Nebraska's chance to do the right thing before the world.

Platte County Times: The Transmississippi Exposition should receive prompt indorsement​ and a liberal appropriation from our legislature. Every citizen of this state who is a loyal Nebraskan, is personally interested in the success of this enterprise. It is a laudable undertaking. Omaha is bearing the brunt of the battle and expense. May her harvest be a hundred fold. The great metropolis is in Nebraska. We are proud of her vim, and push, and energy, and grit. They are Nebraskans. So are we. The entire state will reap untold benefits from the exposition. let our legislators set the pace. The other states will promptly fall in.

Minden Gazette: Every citizen of Nebraska who cares anything for his home or his business ought to be in favor of the Transmississippi Exposition, and if he has any influence with the legislature he ought to exert it for the appropriation asked. This will be Nebraska's opportunity, and the pessimists and growlers should be kicked to the rear and kept there.

Surprise Herald: The Transmississippi Exposition is receiving attention from all parts of our state, and well it should, for it is of more importance to our state than any other measure that is before the people. A good liberal appropriation and a hard pull and a pull all together by our people, and Nebraska will receive such a benefit from the exposition that when the year 1898 goes to sleep our whole people will say "God bless the exposition." It will bring life, people, money and prosperity to Nebraska and should be helped along by every one, regardless of politics, religions, sex or caste.

Omaha Trade Exhibit: The question is not so much "Can Nebraska afford to make a liberal appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition," but "Can Nebraska afford to not make a liberal appropriation." If we expect sister states to do the right thing by the Exposition our own state must set the example. More benefit will certainly accrue to Nebraska from the Exposition than to any other state, and it therefore behooves her to not be parsimonious. The general government has done well with an appropriation of $200,000 (which will probably be increased to $275,000) for a government exhibit, and Nebraska should do as well to properly show her resources to the world, especially when the money will all be put in circulation right at home and bring millions of more money here to be spent with it. Nothing will do as much to attract attention to our beet sugar, chicory and irrigation interests and bring capital to develop them as well the Exposition. Thousands of men with money and representing financial syndicates looking for opportunities to invest will visit the Exposition, and this will be Nebraska's opportunity to secure them. There are many

Article ends abruptly

PUSH NEBRASKA TO THE FRONT

WILL GET IT ALL BACK.

Ord, Neb., Jan. 30.—Your correspondent approached W. A. Anderson of this city with the question, "Should th legislature of Nebraska make a liberal appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition?" who answered by saying, "Yes I think the legislature should either make a liberal appropriation or none. I should say not less than $200,000 should be the amount if a creditable showing is to be made by our state. It we are parsimonious in this matter, other states of the Trans-Mississippi country will be the same. This is, or should be, a matter of pride to every citizen of the state. By all means let us make this exposition a grand success."

Mr. W. A. Anderson is a silver man, and was president of the bimetallic club of this city during the last campaign. He is a teacher and farmer, and has the best interests of his county and state at heart.

 
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G. W. Milford would have the state legislature make an appropriation of not less than $250,000 for the Omaha exposition. Mr. Milford says that much was sent out here in the dry years, and we got the benefit of it. He further says, "Omaha didn't kick, and now why should we go back on something which is sure to be a lasting benefit to us, simply because Omaha will get her share of the benefit?" Mr. Milford is a dry goods merchant, and does the largest business of that kind in the city. He says, "Suppose some people do go to Omaha and spend a few dollars. We can't expect to have the whole world with a fence around it, and we are sure to get our share of the benefit." L. D. Bailey, one of Ord's general merchants, and who does fully his share of the business, says, "By all means the state legislature should make a good liberal appropriation for this grand enterprise. It is something that will prove of benefit to us for years to come, and we should do all in our power to make it a success."

Peter Mortensen, president of the First National bank of this city, says an appropriation should be made which will uphold the dignity of our state. William McNutt, a prominent farmer and stock man of this county, says $200,000 is none too small an amount to give for the benefit of this exposition. When asked what he thought about the state making an appropriation for the exposition at Omaha in '98 Sheriff Smith said, "Well, I think they should by all means make an effort to make the exposition a success, and an enterprise of that kind requires money, and I think the state can well afford to do her share toward furnishing it." Ben Bridgford, our leading drug man, said, "If the state legislature doesn't make a sufficient appropriation to the exposition to uphold the pride of the state I shall be much disappointed in Nebraskans." In fact the consensus of public opinion in this city seems to be that an appropriation should be made, and that it should not be a stingy one, either. Opinion seems to be that it should range from $200,000 to $500,000. We only found one business man in town who would not approve a liberal appropriation. All seem to be united, populists and republicans alike, that the exposition should be made a success. We have talked with many farmers, and have not yet found one opposed to making an appropriation, and as a general thing, the heaviest taxpayers are the most enthusiastic about the matter. One business man said, "Why, I pay from $600 to $800 taxes a year, and I don't care if they appropriate $500,000. I will get the worth of my share of the money. We must make this thing a success."

MAKE IT LIBERAL.

Hemingford, Neb., Jan. 28.—The World-Herald correspondent interviewed a number of citizens today relative to an appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition. Without exception all favor an appropriation from $100,000 to $350,000. Some of the opinions are given below:

B. F. Gillman, rep., County Attorney—Nebraska should certainly be as liberal to the exposition as any state, and probably more so. I would favor an appropriation of at least $200,000.

Thomas J. O'Keefe, dem., Editor Hemingford Herald—Nebraska should certainly do herself proud in this matter. The exposition will be of untold benefit to us all. I sincerely trust that our legislature will pass the bill introduced for $350,000. The bill should be amended, however, to give representatives of the state full control of the appropriation.

Hon. J. W. Christy, rep., Capitalist—I am of the opinion that each Trans-Mississippi state should make an appropriation according to her wealth. Our state should give the exposition at least $100,000.

A. E. Neeland, County Superintendent—Nebraska should surely do her part in the matter of an exposition. Th people of Box Butte county favor a liberal appropriation and I do most certainly.

W. M. Copeland, Agent Burlington & Missouri—The general government has been liberal to the exposition, other states are coming to the front and Nebraska must not be niggardly. Omaha has done nobly and I think Nebraska as a state ought to make an appropriation of at least $250,000.

Henry Lichte, dem., Farmer—I think we ought to make a big appropriation for Omaha; it is for the whole state. I want to see the legislature do the proper thing.

Eli Gerber, Stockman—They ought to put up $300,000. Nebraska is the banner state of the union. I believe in advertising and we have the opportunity of our lives right now. Our cry in Box Butte county is, "On to the exposition!"

William Forket, Farmer—I suppose the legislature will do as they please. It seems to me that $350,000 is a big sum, still I favor a liberal appropriation, say $50,000 or $75,000.

I. E. Tash, rep., Attorney—I am in favor of a liberal appropriation. Nebraska needs advertising. I think the exposition will be the means of filling up our state with an intelligent class of emigrants, who, as a matter of course, will be republicans, and we will then rid ourselves of this d—d popocratic dynasty that is being built up in the state.

M. H. Goodenough, Merchant—I am certainly in favor of an appropriation, but it does not seem to me that it is necessary to raise any $300,000 or $400,000. It seems to me that we have already been pretty well advertised, but it has been along wrong lines. I would be glad to see the present legislature make a good decent showing for 1898.

G. M. Goodenough, Barber—It's whole hog or none with me. If the great state of Nebraska can't give $350,000 to such an enterprise as the exposition she ought not to give a cent. We ought to all go and bury ourselves alongside of "Wooster of Merrick" if we can't pass this exposition bill as drafted.

Frank Cheeney, Farmer—Of course this exposition will make a great thing for Omaha; I can't see for my part what good it will do the state. If I was in the legislature however, I should vote for a good, fair appropriation.

C. A. Burlew, Banker—Yes, I favor a good liberal appropriation to the exposition. It is a matter of grave importance to the state and should not be overlooked.

H. L. Bushnell, Butcher—I think $350,000 would be plenty."

H. R. Green, Hardware Merchant—The exposition will be a great thing for Nebraska, and I believe we ought to see to it that this bill for $350,000 passes. Push it along by all means.

W. J. Bean, Druggist—Nebraska should surely give $200,000 at least. The position in which Nebraska is placed makes it incumbent upon us to make a good showing. I want to see this exposition a big success.

E. L. Johnson, Jeweler—There ought to be an appropriation, but $350,000 is a big sum now-a-days.

Smith P. Tuttle, rep., Attorney—Yes, I favor a liberal appropriation to the Trans-Mississippi exposition. I believe it will attract people and get them better acquainted with Nebraska, her resources and opportunities, and will stimulate immigration and add to the wealth of Nebraska from this source. Enterprises may develop therefrom, and it will be an advertising medium.

Arlington, Neb., Jan. 20.—Following are interviews with citizens of Arlington on the question, "Should the Nebraska legislature make a liberal appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition?"

W. T. Stockdale, dem., professor of schools, No.

John Jackerott, rep., clerk. Yes.

E. H. Quesner, rep., cashier. No.

D. C. Weber, rep., druggist. Yes.

Fred Weber, rep., merchant. Yes.

Bruce Mansfield, rep., ice dealer. Yes.

C. D. Cole, rep., liveryman. Yes.

C. H. Linn, rep., merchant. Yes.

Dr. R. D. Davis, rep., physician. Yes.

O. K. Lewis, dem., lumberman. Yes.

Sam Adams, dem., laborer. Yes.

William Long, dem., laborer. Yes.

Herman Huermann, dem., clerk. No.

Andy Patrick, rep., farmer. No.

Frank Wolf, rep., farmer. No.

Dr. J. T. Wade, rep., physician. Yes.

Henry Block, rep., saloon. Yes.

James Birnie, rep., butcher. Yes.

George Franzenburg, dem., butcher. Yes.

P. Z. Wilson, dem., merchant. Yes.

W. B. Miller, dem., depot agent. Yes.

Fred Miller, dem,. operator. Yes.

Pearce Long, dem., laborer. Yes.

L. M. Ormsby, rep., stockman. Yes.

William Wassum, dem., drayman. Yes.

George H. Jewett, rep., government contractor. Yes.

Dr. S. J. Hadley, dem., physician. Yes.

O. C. Roberts, dem., farmer. Yes.

R. O. Willis, rep., editor. Yes.

O. E. Hazen, dem., state officer. Yes.

A. B. Batson, dem., postmaster. Yes.

W. E. Barber, rep., clerk. Yes.

J. H. Dorbecker, rep., baker. Yes.

Henry Beckmeyer, rep., merchant. Yes.

William Beckmeyer, rep., merchant. Yes.

Fred Lallman, dem., barber, Yes.

E. Tallman, rep, capitalist. Yes.

W. H. Baker, rep., coal dealer. Yes.

S. S. Dixon, rep., barber. Yes.

L. F. Gilfry, rep., marshal. Yes.

F. M. Mervin, rep., harnessmaker. Yes.

William Wilson, dem., merchant. No.

article starts abruptly
islature should make a liberal appropriation, as it would benefit the whole state.

County Clerk Van Camp (pop.) thinks an appropriation should be made.

Clerk of the Court R. H. Harris (rep.) is in favor of an appropriation, and a good one.

County Judge B. F. Chambers (rep.) thinks that an appropriation would be in order, but says: "Will the pops in power do any thing?"

Merchant J. C. Thomas (ind. dem.) favors an appropriation, but not a large one—thinks it will benefit Omaha only.

George Douglas (rep.) says: "Not one dollar."

Ex-Senator H. E. Bonesteel (dem.) thinks the exposition will be a great advertisement for Nebraska and the northwest. He does not look at in the light that some do, that it would be a boom for Omaha, but think it will give the state a big advertisement.

S. Draper, cashier Niobrara Valley bank (rep.) favors an appropriation and hopes to see one made.

Attorney L. C. Chapman (rep.) says yes, for if the exposition is a success it cannot fail to bring vast material benefit to the state as a whole, besides it is unjust to throw the whole burden on Omaha, even if that city can carry it successfully, which is extremely doubtful. Unless sufficient means are furnished to make the exposition a success the project had better be abandoned.

A GREAT THING FOR NEBRASKA.

Indianola, Neb., Jan. 30.—In interviews with the business men and farmers surrounding this city the following question was submitted to them, to-wit, "Should the legislature make a liberal appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition?" To which the following answers were received:

G. W. Short, grocer, rep. Yes. The legislature should appropriate $400,000. It will be the greatest thing for Nebraska that could be secured.

A. H. Reynolds, farmer, rep. Not in favor of appropriation anything. The state disgraced itself in last election, and the pop. legislature should be permitted to complete the ruin by withholding all appropriations.

E. D. Akers, farmer, rep. Legislature should make a fair appropriation.

M. G. Shackelton, druggiest, rep. Not in favor of any appropriation. It will only be a grab for a few.

W. O. Bond, ex-clerk district court, rep. Thinks it will be a great show, and thinks an appropriation creditable to the state should be made.

W. G. Sheppard, jeweler, pop. In favor of paying our debts first, then keeping out of debt.

J. V. Harrison, postmaster, dem. Nothing will do the state so much good or advertise it more, and favors a very liberal appropriation.

A. W. Hoyt, physician, rep. Noncommital.

F. B. Duckworth, druggist, dem. Good thing for Nebraska, and a good appropriation should be made.

C. S. Quick, ex-cashier State bank, pro. Am opposed to it now on general principles, but if we are going to have it let's have a good one, and in that case $250,000 is not too much.

John Peake, grocer and city marshal, dem. In favor of a creditable show.

John Welborn, jr., hardware and furniture, dem. Yes. Legislature should make a liberal donation.

sentence starts abruptly
dignity of the state should be held and the legislature make a liberal appropriation.

E. Keplinger, Stockman—The legislature should see that the exposition is a success and appropriate accordingly.

J. E. Brown, Clerk of the district court—The state cannot afford to withhold its assistance this time.

C. H. Bresee, County Judge—I am in favor of a liberal appropriation.

C. E. Woods, County Attorney—The legislature should assist and make the exposition a success.

H. Murphy—I would not be in favor of the legislature voting to [ceed?] $100,000.

M. D. Cravath, Cattleman—The legislature should be liberal in the matter, as the state's reputation is at stake.

A Modisett, Ranchman—I am not much concerned in the matter but am not opposed to state help in this case.

E. J. Baldwin, Editor—A liberal appropriation should be made.

M. Modisett, Ranchman—Other states having arranged to take part in the exposition, the legislature should make a liberal appropriation.

C. Patterson, Attorney—The state should be liberal in this matter.

It is the general opinion at this pl[?] that the legislature should contribute to make the exposition a success. The only controversy seems to hinge on the amount to be appropriated.

 

A GREAT PUBLIC INTEREST.

In the discussion in the Nebraska state senate on Thursday of last week Senator Ransom spoke against a beet sugar bounty. While Senator Ransom was speaking Senator Conaway (who, by the way, is a good friend of the exposition) asked Ransom what was the difference between making an appropriation for a sugar factory and for "an exposition at Omaha?"

At that time the senate had under consideration Senator Ransom's motion to indefinitely postpone the Spencer resolution relative to the payment of the bounty on sugar beets and Mr. Ransom was closing the debate on his motion when Senator Conaway asked Senator Ransom the following question: "If you are opposed to the taxation of the people for the payment of a bounty on beet sugar, how can you demand a tax upon the whole people for an exposition which will benefit the people of Omaha alone?" Answering this question, Senator Ransom said: "I am not surprised at the question of the senator from York. I am not surprised to receive a convert threat to oppose the exposition appropriation unless I shape my course here to meet every senator's ideas on some other measure. I want to say to the senator from York and to the other members of the senate in answer to this question that the Trans-Mississippi exposition is a gigantic enterprise and is more than a local affair. It is not an Omaha exposition nor is it a Nebraska exposition solely. That enterprise is designed not only to have represented in Nebraska the great resources of the Trans-Mississippi states but the resources of the different states and territories of the union, and more than this, the great nations of the world will, by their people and their resources, be represented at that exposition. This will all be done on Nebraska soil. This will be done at the metropolis of this state. At that exposition Nebraska must be fitly represented. She has been slandered and maligned by a venal press and by corrupt political motives.

"This exposition will afford not to Omaha but to the whole people of the state an opportunity to show the world what kind of people inhabit her borders. It will show them a great people in a state of great agricultural resources. It will show these people to be a sturdy, honest yeomanry, against whom no word of reproach can be said because of the political ideas that flourish here; it will be a great opportunity for Nebraska and her people. It will advertise her to the whole world. I t will most benefit her, it will place her in the right light before the people of the east. It will benefit the people of the farm and those who own land in this state. It will justify the statements of Senator Allen in reply to the speech of Senator Hoar relative to the people of this state. It will be the exposition of Nebraska. It will bring hundreds of thousands of people within our borders, and when they once see the plains of this state as fertile fields many of them will remain here and locate with us.

The Trans-Mississippi is the garden of the world. It contains the most enterprising people of the world. The mountain states contain the mineral of the world. This exposition will bring all the people of these states together on Nebraska soil. It will unite them as one in interest.

They will become more closely allied. They will become acquainted and join in many enterprises. Great things will come to this state and the Trans-Mississippi country from this enterprise and Nebraska—not Omaha—will be the cause of it, and all the people of the state and all who own property will be benefited by it. This enterprise, if encouraged by a proper appropriation, will show forth in a splendid manner the people of Nebraska, their energy, enterprise and character. It will forever refute the slander heaped upon her and upon her people and will give to the state a reputation of which we will be justly proud. It calls for patriotic action on the part of this legislature. Every citizen should take a pride in the exposition. This is no time for politics or for politicians. This is a time when selfishness should be laid aside and principle should be supported for the sake of principle. This is a Nebraska enterprise and to attempt to make it an Omaha affair, dependent wholly upon the people of that city, is unjust, is not patriotic and does not do justice to the people who seek to make such an insinuation against the exposition. It is far different to tax the people of this state to pay a bounty on sugar from what it is to tax them for this exposition, which will benefit to the whole state. Every year we tax all of the people of this state to maintaining the state university. There are only a few of the youths of this state who can attend the university. Why is it we tax the rich and poor of this state to maintain this university? The man who mixes mortar and owns a home is taxed, and though he has boys who would like to attend the university he is unable to send them. The rich man without children is likewise taxed for this institution, and I ask the senator from York why it is the case? He knows that such is the case because it is to the interest of the state that education should be encouraged. That it gives standing, character and firmness to our people. In our high schools of today there are many evidences of the skill of the youth of this state. There are many machines of the most intricate kind to be found there. In our university maybe found almost an exposition in itself. These are the results of taxing all the people to educate those who would strive for it. It is worth the tax, it is for the people. It would be so with this great exposition. It will show forth the arts and sciences of the people of the west, their enterprise, education and energy. It will show the product of her fields and her farms, her shops and her schools, and side by side will be exhibited the ingenuity of the great people of all the great Trans-Mississippi country, with exhibits from all the world to further educate the youth of this state and beckon them on to further knowledge and to yet unexplored fields.

"The sugar bounty is a private interest. The exposition is a public interest. Every person owning property in the state has an interest in the exposition. It had to be located somewhere, and the Trans-Mississippi congress decided to locate it in Nebraska. It had to be located in some city, and where, I ask, could it be better located than in Omaha, the metropolis of the state? The exposition did not originate in the mind of the senator from York. It was conceived in the mind of the greatest leader the American people ever had. That man was president of the Trans-Mississippi congress, and it was by his eloquence that the delegates in that congress from every state west of the Mississippi river were induced to indorse​ the exposition idea. That man was William J. Bryan.

"Now, I say it is our duty, since this great public enterprise has been inaugurated—an enterprise which will advertise Nebraska to the union and to the whole world—it is our duty, I repeat, to lend to it hearty support. I insist that I should not be threatened with the senator's opposition to the exposition because I do not favor a sugar bounty. this is not my exposition. It is not a populist exposition. It is an enterprise backed by the people of Nebraska and of the Trans-Mississippi region. The bill for its support is not to be logrolled through this senate, and if its fate depends upon my own treachery to the people who demand the repeal of the sugar bounty, then I will say that the exposition will have to take its chances.

"The exposition ought to stand on its own merits, and if it so stands, it will rise. The beet sugar bounty must also stand on its merits, and if it so stands it will fall."

WANTS SPACE FOR A PALM GARDEN.

Schlitz Brewing Company Will Exhibit at the Exposition.

Through its local agent, Otto Siemssen, the Joseph Schlitz Brewing company of Milwaukee has applied to the department of Concessions and Privileges of the Transmississippi Exposition association for space in which to make an exhibit. Mr. Siemssen says that the company that he represents will want at least 60x100 feet, and that in this space will be arranged a palm garden, in connection with which a restaurant will be operated. Plans for the exhibit are being prepared at the company's home office.

JUDGE MAXWELL ON THE EXPOSITION.

A few days ago the World-Herald asked Judge Samuel Maxwell for his opinion on the exposition. The request was made without any knowledge as to how the judge stood. It was made, however, in the confidence that the venerable jurist would in his reply represent the views and desire of the people of the state, or at least of the Third congressional district, which has so recently and overwhelmingly elected Judge Maxwell to represent it in congress.

Judge Maxwell's letter is so strong and clear, and so happily expresses an unanswerable argument, that it should be read by all:

Fremont, Neb., Jan. 30.—Gilbert M. Hitchcock, Manager Department of Promotion Trans-Mississippi Exposition, Omaha, Neb.—Dear Sir: In answer to your letter of last evening, I will say that I feel assured that the exposition will be a very great benefit to our whole state. I am sure the benefits that would result from a successful exposition would far exceed the most sanguine expectations of its friends. Nebraska possesses a soil and climate unsurpassed by any state in the union. It is comparatively a new state, with its resources but partially and very imperfectly developed. We are moving forward, however. The great packing houses at South Omaha are constantly being extended and already are able to consume at fair prices all the fat stock that can be obtained. The great sugar factories at Grand Island and Norfolk, built in part, at least, by the liberality of the citizens of those cities, show that the very best quality of sugar beets can be produced here, and that with sufficient factories distributed at available points in the state Nebraska could produce sufficient sugar to supply the nation and more and pay into the pockets of our farmers the vast sums that are now sent abroad to pay for sugar. This is but one item. Chicory does equally as well as sugar beets. A large amount of it was raised in this county during the last year and was found to be productive and profitable. Tobacco also has been successfully cultivated in the state; the cost of drying sheds, perhaps, has prevented its general cultivation. It is safe to say that almost every product which may be raised in the latitude of Nebraska may be raised here. The common school fund, if carefully guarded, as is provided in the constitution will equal if not exceed that of any state in the union, and even now school houses abound in all the ninety-two counties of the state. And yet real estate is low in price. This is true all over the state and is caused to a great extent by the want of publicity of the richness of our soil, its great productiveness, and salubrious air and the advantages of the state. The exposition will bring hundreds of thousands of people into the state, many of them seeking homes, who, upon investigation, will be attracted by the fertility of our soil, the agreeable climate, our splendid common school system and colleges and universities—not forgetting the churches and places of worships. I have no doubt the exposition would be the means of advancing the price of real estate all over the state at least one-half and bringing into our state many desirable citizens. The exposition is not a local affair, nor would its benefits be confined to this state, but being located here this state must show its appreciation for the advantages to be derived from it by liberal financial support. The state itself can only make an appropriation through its legislature. A refusal to make an appropriation would be equivalent to saying to the general government and the various states that we do not care for the exposition, and cast discredit upon us; and some other state would take advantage of our mistake and secure the exposition. I have no fear, however, of such a result, as I am confident the practical men who compose the great body of the members of the legislature, while anxious to cut down taxation to the lowest possible limit consistent with good government, will regard the exposition with favor as calculated to advance our prosperity. But a small appropriation would have a depressing effect upon the legislatures of other states who intend to contribute to the success of the exposition. I believe an appropriation of $300,000 would within two years be repaid to the citizens of the state more than [?] fold in increased values of every species of real estate. Like the aid granted a few years since in the purchase of grain for seed, it would be twice blessed. It would bless the giver and receiver. Yours, very respectfully, SAMUEL MAXWELL.

The close of the letter is particularly striking. Who doubts that Nebraska made a great investment when the legislature appropriated money to buy s[?] for farmers two years ago?

The exposition bill is an appropriation to buy and plant seed for a great [?] of prosperity for the people of Nebraska.

NEBRASKANS' DUTY TO NEBRASKA.

The World-Herald has requested its correspondents in all parts of the state to submit to the representative men of all parties this question: "Should the Nebraska legislature make a liberal appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition?"

MAKE IT LIBERAL.

Auburn, Neb., Jan. 29.—In answer to the question, "Should the Nebraska legislature make a liberal appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition":

"I am in favor of a liberal appropriation; think it will be a great advertisement for the state.

"S. P. GLASGOW, Sheriff."

"I think $250,000 would be liberal.

"R. M. GILLAN, City Clerk."

"I favor $100,000 appropriation for the exposition.

"S. L. CALDWELL, "Chairman Independent Central Committee."

"Think that under existing conditions, and in view of the low prices of the products of our state $150,000 would be a liberal appropriation.

"NEAL & QUACKENBUSH,

"Attorneys."

"I am in favor of a liberal appropriation, about $200,000.

"JARVIS S. CHURCH,

"President S. E. Nebraska Building and Loan Association."

"I believe the legislature should appropriate at least twenty cents (20) per capita for the present estimated population of Nebraska, to be liberal, and the people would consider it so if they could get the selfish [?]out of their heads that it is for the benefit of Omaha alone. I am proud that we have a large city capable of being honored with a large exposition, and I believe every dollar spent in Omaha will add to the taxable property of the state, to say nothing of the immigration we are sure to receive from the east, all of which will increase our source of revenues. THOMAS H GILLAN, "Abstracts, Real Estate, Loans and Insurance."

"$265,000.

 
Page 41

E. ERVIN, Mechanic." "$200,000.

"GEORGE FABLINGER,

"Insurance and Real Estate." $100,000.

"J. W. ARMSTRONG,

Hardware and Furniture." "75,000.

A. MOORE, Merchant."

"I am in favor of a liberal appropriation to aid the exposition and believe $150,000 would be liberal under existing low prices of products."

"J. M. BURRESS.

Secretary S. E. Nebraska Building and Loan association."

"I think it uncalled for, especially under the existing hard times.

"J. T. SWAN, Merchant."

"I think the appropriation should not be less than $100,000—that might be considered liberal, considering the scarcity of money and low prices. The exposition will do the state more good than it will Omaha.

"W. H. KILLIGAR, Attorney."

Should not exceed $100,000 on account of present financial conditions. Low prices, and further that the amount named under the existing gold standard represents twice what it would be under the promised times of untold prosperity that have thus far failed to materialize.

"GEORGE W. CONNELL,

"Attorney."

Fremont, Neb., Jan. 28.—The following answers were received to this question: "Should the Nebraska legislature make a liberal appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition?"

Judge Samuel Maxwell—I think the whole state will be greatly benefited by a liberal appropriation.

Mayor William Fried—That's my opinion.

Rev. F. M. Sisson, D. D., pastor First Methodist church—The eye of the nation has been and is on Nebraska as upon no other state in the union. By our legislature promptly appropriating a liberal sum for the "Trans-Mississippi exposition" it can best reflect the confidence of the majority of our citizens in our own resources as well we challenge the admiration and inspection of the entire country.

Rev. W. H. Buss, pastor Congregational church—In my judgment such an appropriation should certainly be made in the interest of the noblest development of the state.

Rev. N. Chesnut, pastor of the First Presbyterian church—Yes, anything that will awaken enthusiasm in the interest of the state will be very acceptable to the people.

Rev. C. Mugan, pastor Catholic church—I think such an appropriation advisable.

W. H. Clemmons, president of the Fremont Normal school—I think it would be advisable to do so for the future good of the state.

Dr. J. S. Devries—The exposition will afford an opportunity for Nebraska to let the world know something of the wonderful and as yet undeveloped resources, and for this reason the legislature should not hesitate to make a liberal appropriation.

Dr. L. B. Smith—I think so.

Dr. Nellie Bell, Fremont hospital—Yes.

Dr. N. H. Brown—One hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars for the benefit of the state, but not to go into the general fund.

Thomas Carroll, postmaster—Yes.

Miss Vesta Gray, attorney—The women all over the state are interested in the exposition, and I think the legislature should encourage it.

G. G. Martin, county attorney—Yes; a fair appropriation considering the present condition of state finances.

R. J. Stinson, attorney—Yes, a reasonable one.

F. Dolazel, attorney—Yes.

Fred W. Vaughan, attorney—The legislature should make an appropriation commensurate with the importance of the exposition, and I believe it will. It would be ridiculous not to.

Waldo Wintersteen, attorney—Yes.

E. F. Gray, attorney—Yes: I should say so.

R. D. Kelly, editor of the Leader—I am not in favor of any unnecessary appropriations at present from the state, but owing to the national importance this exposition has assumed, would favor $100,000.

Ross L. Hammond, editor Tribune—I favor an appropriation of about $150,000. Such an enterprise would, next to the encouragement of sugar production, be worth more than anything the legislature could do for the state.

W. R. Wilson, groceries—One hundred thousand dollars, and no more.

W. H. Turner, groceries—No.

F. L. Esmay, secretary Security Mutual Life Insurance company—Yes.

D. V. Stevens, ex-county superintendent—Yes.

Wilhelm Ruwe, farmer—Yes; $100,000.

George Wolz, fruits and candies—Yes; $100,000.

H. J. Lee, hardware—Of course it should.

Major Sowalter, constable—Most assuredly I do.

J. M. Kreader, sheriff—Yes.

George Ely, groceries—Yes, sir.

H. Blumenthal, dry goods and clothing—Yes; certainly.

C. C. Pollard, insurance—Yes, sir; I do.

J. A. Murrell, groceries—Yes.

Dr. Croll—Yes.

A. W. Atwood, real estate and loans—I believe it should, as it will benefit the entire state.

C. H. Bruner, druggist—Yes, sir.

James Peifenburg, pianos and organs—Sure; you bet your life.

J. C. Acton, organs and pianos—I think it would be to the advantage of the state.

F. I. Ellick, dry goods—Yes.

Wilson Reynolds, Capitalists—Yes, at least $150,000.

Charles Smith, Capitalist—Yes, as large as it can afford.

N. H. Hinman, Manager Fremont Creamery—Yes, $100,000.

Senator John Thomsen, Insurance—Yes, sir.

E. H. Barnard, President First National Bank—Yes, $200,000.

Dr. E. W. Martin—Yes, sir; very much in favor of it.

J. B. Scanlan, Agent Union Pacific—Yes, sir.

B. F. Stouffer, Secretary and General Manager of the Free Coinage and Milling Company—It should.

P. D. Denny, Architect and Builder—Yes, $100,000.

Attorney W. H. Monger—You bet.

Dr. W. J. Davies—Yes, sir.

A. E. Littlechild, dentist—Yes, $50,000.

M. H. Hunter, dentist—No.

L. M. Keene, president Fremont National bank—Yes; I think it will be a great benefit to the state.

W. E. Smails, cashier Farmers and Merchants National bank—Certainly I am in favor of it. Omaha, Fremont and the balance of our great state will stand inspection, and such an exposition cannot fail to be of great benefit to the state in which it is held.

E. Schurman, president Commercial National bank—I am certainly in favor of a liberal appropriation.

C. M. Williams, cashier of the First National bank—I favor a reasonable appropriation.

George F. Looschen, register of deeds—Yes.

Claus Plambeck, county judge—Yes, a very liberal one.

J. A. Collins, county superintendent—Yes.

L. C. Holmes, police judge-Yes; I think I should.

J. C. Cleland, city treasurer—Yes; $200,000.

C. D. Marr, manager Fremont foundry—Yes.

James P. Mallon, meat market—Yes, of course.

C. Christensen, grocer—Not to exceed $100,000.

A. Truesdell, flour—Yes; $100,000.

L. D. Richards, banker—Yes; say $150,000 to $200,000.

R. B. Schneier, Nye-Schneider company—I think so; yes, sir.

T. L. Mathews, loans—I think it should.

A. E. Patten, editor Fremont Daily Herald—It certainly should.

C. [?] Schaeffer, editor Platte

article ends abruptly

WILL HELP THE WHOLE STATE

Stanton, Neb., Jan. 28.—Interview with Levi Miller, president First National bank: Question—Do you think the legislature should make a liberal allowance for the Trans-Mississippi exposition? Would you vote for it? Answer—Yes. Question—Why? Answer—Because it would benefit the state of Nebraska.

Interview with Dr. E. C. Vanderburg: Question—Do you think the legislature should make a liberal allowance for the Trans-Mississippi exposition? Answer—Yes. Question—Why? Answer—Because it would benefit the people of the state of Nebraska.

Interview with W. S. Bordner, in grain and live stock business: Question—Do you think the legislature should make a liberal allowance for the Trans-Mississippi exposition? Answer—Yes, if they do not go to extremes. Question—Do you think it would benefit the people of Nebraska? Answer—Yes.

NEBRASKA FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Filmore County Democrat: There seems to be some little difference of opinion in the legislature in regard to an appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition, and we are indeed sorry to know it. This is not an "Omaha concern" as some of the members are trying to figure it out; neither is it a political venture to benefit any one party. It is a state matter and one that will affect the state from one end to the other, and the members who are fighting this appropriation should lay aside their narrow-minded ideas long enough at least to look at the matter in the right light. It is a question that Nebraskans, regardless of politics, religion or anything else, are mutually interested in and as such should receive the hearty support of every member of our legislature.

Hastings Tribune: We are disposed to think the legislature ought to do something to help along the Transmississippi Exposition, even if the times are hard. Possibly by the time the taxes are collected the situation may be greatly improved, and it may be the exposition may assist in the work of improvement.

Genoa Signal: Believing that the Transmississippi Exposition will be a good investment for Nebraska and the whole west the Signal hopes that the legislature will make a reasonable appropriation for a state exhibit and do it promptly. It will be foolish to expect the legislatures of other states to do anything if the legislature of the state in which the exposition is to be held denies it all encouragement.

Wayne Herald: The great Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha next year promises to be almost a second World's fair, although there will not be so much lake water used. Every state in the west will be represented, as the different legislatures are preparing to make liberal appropriations for state buildings. Wayne should have her beet sugar factory by that time. There will be thousands of people who will visit the exposition who will also visit northeast Nebraska. Wayne's business men should have an eye to the future. If 10,000 people should visit Wayne during the five months of the exposition it would do our city and county no harm.

Valentine Republican: Much depends upon the state legislature as regards the success or failure of the Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in 1898. As the exposition is sure to result in great benefits to Nebraska the legislature should give the enterprise substantial aid and the Republican believes that the legislature could not advance the interests of the state more than by passing the bill now before it giving financial assistance. Already Omaha has and is doing her full share in this direction and the entire state should not be slow in doing its portion. If the bill is passed much of this tax will come from Omaha and Douglas county in addition to what money they have already raised. In advocating this measure the Republican does not expect to be rewarded by a portion of the benefits that will accrue to the state generally as a direct result of the exposition. Don't throw stumbling blocks in the way, but help the enterprise along.

 

Hardy Herald: The Nebraska legislature will cut considerable ice in the way of a reputation for its party in the size of its appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition. While a prompt and liberal appropriation to the enterprise might not meet immediate approval in the interior of the state, it would no doubt in the end be greatly to their credit. Everybody is an immigration agent and glad of any effort that locates a new settler, and the exposition at Omaha in 1898 would no doubt be a factor in that line never before equaled in our state.

Chappell Register: It is to be hoped the legislature will not be small in regard to the Transmississippi Exposition. There seems to be considerable opposition to it among members of the legislature who are against appropriating anything toward the same. If they defeat a liberal appropriation it will cripple the exposition to such an extent that it will almost ruin it. Other states are waiting to see what Nebraska is going to do and their appropriation will be governed by that of this state. This is an non-partisan measure and the legislature will be going contrary tot he wishes of the people of the state if they do not appropriate a liberal sum, in keeping with a great state, as it is.

Fremont Herald: Should the legislature fail in making a liberal appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition it will have failed to grasp an opportunity to give this state in general a big boost. The exposition must be made a success and Nebraska must make it so.

Wood River Interests: There is a disposition on the part of a number of Nebraska's legislators to defeat the Transmississippi Exposition bill or to cut the amount down t a mere pittance. To fail to make a liberal appropriation for the exposition in our humble opinion would be nothing less than a discredit to our people and an injury to the credit and dignity of the state. Nebraska's metropolis has been honored by being selected as the site for the exposition. Sister states are making generous appropriations that they may make a creditable showing. The legislators of Nebraska owe it a duty to her people to not lag int he matter of this great enterprise, but be ready and willing to contribute its full share.

Winside Tribune: Governor Holcomb has approved the Transmississippi Exposition and recommends that the legislature make a liberal appropriation for a Nebraska exhibit. Governor Holcomb has a long head. He knows that the exposition is assuming a shape which will do wonders for this part of the country. He knows that they providing of a liberal appropriation by the assembly is an absolute necessity to the success of the exposition. The legislature will do well to heed the governor's wise advice.

LADY BOARD OF MANAGERS

WOMEN WILL HELP MAKE THE EXPOSITION

Executive Committee of the Association Approves of the Plans Already Suggested by the Omaha Woman's Club.

The plan for a Board of Lady Managers for the Transmississippi Exposition, as presented by the committee of the Woman's club appointed for that purpose, was approved at noon today by the executive committee of the exposition with some slight modifications, all members of the executive committee being present except Messrs. Rosewater and Babcock. The plan as presented by the women provides for a board of twenty-seven women, which is to have charge of all educational matters and all congresses on philosophical and scientific subjects. It also provides that the members of this board of managers shall consist of eleven women from Omaha, two from Council Bluffs, two from South Omaha and two from each congressional district in the state.

The executive committee amended the plan to provide that all acts of the board of managers shall be subject to review at the hands of the executive committee of the exposition, a section being inserted which provides that after each meeting of the board the secretary of the board shall transmit to the secretary of the exposition a concise report of the proceedings of the board for presentation to the executive committee for its approval. The provision in the plan as presented, to the effect that the congresses to be held under the supervision of the board of managers should be held "at some central point, presumably the Woman's building" was stricken from the report.

The section providing for the election of the members of the Board of Managers was amended to provide that the members from South Omaha, Council Bluffs and Omaha shall be elected at a mass meeting of the women of each of these cities, the members from South Omaha to be elected at a mass meeting held in that city, and the members from the [?]er two cities to be elected at meetings held in the respective towns, thereby giving the women of each town the privilege of electing their representatives. It was also provided that mass meetings for the purpose of electing these members of the Board of Managers shall be held Saturday, February 13, at 2 p.m., and Secretary Wakefield was instructed to secure a suitable place in each of the towns for holding such meetings, and also to issue a call for the meetings.

The manner in which nominations of candidates for election at these meetings should be made formed the subject of a prolonged discussion. Manager Hitchcock of the Department of Promotion suggested that unless some plan was formulated in advance the meeting would be in disorder and he suggested a plan whereby the name of any woman, endorsed by two other women, might be filed with the secretary of the exposition before the time fixed for the meeting, these names to be published and furnished to the meeting, forming a foundation on which to work, but not preventing the nomination of any woman in the meeting. This was thought to be objectionable and it was decided to defer action on this point until some future time. The appointment of a committee to formulate a plan was suggested, but no action was taken in this direction.

The plan submitted by the women and published in yesterday's Bee was then approved with the amendments referred to.

THE OPENING WEDGE.

Falls City, Neb., Feb. 1.—The importance of the measure now pending before the legislature touching the appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition is recognized by everyone, and it is interesting to observe the thoughtful expression of views that men are ready to make on the question, both favorable and unfavorable. Your correspondent has endeavored to touch the pulse of public sentiment here, and in so doing has obtained the following expressions from some af​ the leading men of the community:

Edwin Falloon, lawyer—By all means the Nebraska legislature should make a liberal appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition. Nebraska people will be the chief beneficiaries. If Nebraska is liberal other states will be liberal. A successful exposition will do much for Nebraska. It will thoroughly advertise its great resources and dispel, if necessary, the silly assertions of the eastern press derogatory to our people.

W. E. Dorrington, capitalist—I am in favor of a liberal appropriation for the exposition. It will be a benefit to Omaha, and the state of Nebraska will share in the benefits. Every man in the state should take an interest in making it a grand success. If it should fail it will be a disgrace to the state.

M. Sickafoose, lawyer—I am in favor of a liberal appropriation.

A. E. Gnatt, lawyer—I would favor a liberal and reasonable appropriation, still, I would not think it wise to be extravagant. The work has been started and it should be carried through successfully, reflecting credit upon the state, and I would not regard it as simply an Omaha affair. Regarding it as a state affair, I am in favor of a liberal appropriation.

Charles Leister—I favor a liberal appropriation, because it will advance the interests of the state. As an advertising project, the money would be wisely appropriated.

C. L. Mettz, clerk of district court—I am opposed to the appropriation. It would benefit no town in the state except Omaha. It would benefit no laborers outside of Omaha.

T. J. Gist, banker—I am in favor of a liberal appropriation, because it would be a great advertisement for the state of Nebraska.

D. V. Stephens, Exchange mills—I am in favor of a $100,000 appropriation, and under the circumstances regard this as a liberal appropriation. Anything more would be a burden.

Sheriff Williamson—I am in favor of a liberal appropriation, because it will benefit the state and the west.

L. A. Ryan, capitalist—I am in favor of a liberal appropriation, because it will benefit the state and the west.

L. A. Ryan, capitalist—I am in favor of an appropriation of at least $200,000. It is a state enterprise, and our state legislature is justified in encouraging enterprises of that nature. I never had any use for howling, stingy people, any way.

Judge E. W. Thomas, lawyer—I have no defined opinion upon the subject, and will abide by the decision of the legislature.

W. A. Greenwold, merchant—I am in favor of a liberal appropriation, say $150,000, because I believe it to be a benefit to the state in general and Omaha in particular. It is a good way to show up the merits of the state.

Ed F. King, traveling salesman for W. F. Dolan, Atchison—I in favor of a $150,000 appropriation as being the best means by which the state can refute the libelous utterances now prevalent in the east against this state.

Charles Loree, county clerk—It is a good thing, but at a very bad time. I shall not complain at the decision of the legislature, whatever it may be.

A. G. Warner, druggist—If matters had not gone so far I would not favor a dollar being appropriated. But state pride demands an appropriation, and in view of this I would favor $150,000 going for that purpose.

Jule Schoonheit, county attorney—After going as far as they have with the Trans-Mississippi exposition, it would be a hard blow to Nebraska if it should fall through, or prove a failure. If the legislature gives the enterprise the cold shoulder it will undoubtedly make a "frost" of the big show. A penny wise policy in the matter of an appropriation will be costly economy to the state.

A. F. Hollenbaugh, business manager of the Dr. Holback Medical and Surgical institute—I am in favor of as liberal an appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition as is consistent with the financial condition of the treasury and prosperous condition of the citizens of the state, thereby proving to the world that the adage "Stand up for Nebraska" meant more than a campaign cry for political effect; that the people of Nebraska are proud of their state and the beautiful city of Omaha, and that by a united effort of her people, backed by the legislature of the state, the Trans-Mississippi exposition will be made a grand success, which will redound to the lasting glory of one of the grandest commonwealths of the union—Nebraska.

L. P. Worth, merchant—I favor a liberal appropriation, as contemplated in the question, because the exposition will have a tendency to develop the west and show up the state to others, as we know it to be thereby counteracting the effects of the libelous reports now current.

Irving C. Marsh—I am in favor of an appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition to be held at Omaha. The exposition will bring into the state representatives from the north, south and east, as well as the west; it will bring many into our state and we want to make as good a showing as possible, and if the state funds are spent that way there will be less for the banks to gobble up.

C. F. Reavis—I favor a liberal appropriation for the reason that, while the amount thus used would undoubtedly return with interest, the exposition would have a tendency to broaden the views of the people of Nebraska, enabling them to conceive of the greatness of the state, and this knowledge would profit immeasurably the people of the west. As the great World's fair acquainted the people with the world's greatness, so would the exposition emphasize the important features of the Trans-Mississippi country.

G. W. Marsh—I favor a liberal appropriation.

E. F. Houston—I favor a liberal appropriation.

W. C. Abbot—The legislature should make a reasonable appropriation. The exposition would further the interests of the state.

E. E. Sanders, merchant—Liberal appropriation should be made. Many benefits will be realized by the state by reason of a fair appropriation; the money would return.

Samuel Wahl, merchant—Favors a fair appropriation; the money would return.

A. R. Kenn, county judge—Favors an appropriation not to exceed $100,000.

Fred Brecht—Favorable to a liberal appropriation, Nebraska should take the lead in the movement.

G. W. Luskup—Favors a fair appropriation—just to the enterprise and just to the people.

P. S. Heacock, grain dealer—I am favorable to as large an appropriation as is necessary to make the exposition a success.

B. F. Morgan, grain dealer—If any appropriation is made it should be a liberal one, but not extravagant.

P. R. Lawrence—Liberal appropriation should be made.

Dr. G. H. Neal—Most assuredly, an appropriation should be made.

W. P. Fergus—One of the most important things to be done for the state is that of making an appropriation for the exposition.

A. J. Weaver—I favor a liberal appropriation for an enterprise which makes Nebraska and her people the leading beneficiaries. Let Nebraska take the initiative, for upon her action depends largely the support of other states, as well as of the country generally. Considering the condition of the state's finances, and the general depression in business our legislature should be especially economical, and zealously oppose any wanton expenditures of money in needless and uncertain projects. However, to advertise Nebraska by substatially​ encouraging an exposition assuming national proportions, yet distinctly local because of its location, to induce capital to further develop our resources, and to promote a project that will imploy​ a part of our idle labor, is certainly an act of wisdom rather than folly. It should be done by all means.

T. L. Hall, Lawyer—I am opposed to any appropriation; the people cannot afford it.

 
Page 43

W. M. Hover, Photographer—Favorable to an appropriation; has no antipathy to Omaha and her interests—it will benefit the whole state.

A. A. Keller—Favors an appropriation. The exposition would be a direct benefit to all.

J. D. Spragins—The exposition should be reasonably encouraged.

W. H. Schock—I do not believe in going to extremes in this matter, but I am favorable to a fair appropriation. I think the exposition will be of incalculable benefit to the state.

G. W. Holland, Banker—There should be an appropriation, and I do not believe that the state would lose by being liberal in the matter. I believe that we need just what the exposition will do for us.

A. M. Priest, Manager of Creamery—There should be an appropriation.

W. D. Easley—If Nebraska wants the exposition there should be an appropriation.

M. W. Musselman—I am strongly in favor of a liberal appropriation.

W. W. Abbey—I am not certain that the exposition would be a permanent benefit to the people of the state. A limited appropriation should, therefore, in my judgment, be made.

H. C. Lopp—The benefit to the people generally to be derived from the exposition would not, in my judgment, justify an appropriation.

J. F. Clegg—Favors an appropriation.

Joe Miles, Banker—There should be $100,000 appropriated, or nothing, dependent upon thorough investigation of state treasury and condition thereof.

J. J. Tanner—The project is too far advanced to deny a liberal appropriation.

Al Resterer—I can see no benefits sufficient to justify an appropriation,

C. A. Hergisheimer—A liberal appropriation would be a good investment.

C. M. Wilson—Certainly, an appropriation should be made.

D. M. Watts—A reasonable appropriation would be a good thing.

J. W. Powell—I would like to see the legislature make a liberal appropriation. I wish to see nothing done unless it is sufficient to make the exposition a success.

George Gerhardt—Favors an appropriation.

T. P. Jones—An appropriation as proposed would be the best paying investment the state ever made.

Edwin G. Towle—In the midst of the hardest times that organized and civilized humanity have probably faced since the days of our Savior, it would be an act of inexcusable folly and extravagance to wring from a starving and bankrupt people any sum of money to gratify the vanity of the promoters of the exposition or to temporarily advance the material interests of the local city where it is to be held. If a "reform" legislature will not guard the state treasury then indeed the people are between the "devil and the deep sea."

W. F. Robinson, fair director—Yes, it is right to give all possible assistance.

M. F. Gamble, merchant—If Omaha wants an exposition, that is all right, let them put up for it. I can't see how it will help us any.

John Barker, barber—Yes, it's all O.K., and I hope to see it a success.

Francis & Son, coal and lumber—A reasonable amount is perfectly proper.

J. Hewitt, justice of the peace—I am in favor of a reasonable amount being allowed, yes sir.

S. P. Mikesell, merchant—Certainly. I do not wish to see them extravagant, but Nebraska deserves, and we insist, that a liberal appropriation be made for the purpose mentioned.

John Mohr, furniture—I know times are hard, but this very enterprise will help to turn the tide the other way, and I favor a liberal appropriation.

M. Richards, deputy sheriff—Yes, you can say I favor the movement.

Huse & Son, editors Journal—We are of the opinion that a reasonable appropriation is the proper thing.

B. De Sombre, jeweler—A reasonable amount should be appropriated.

S. Bittenbender, grain dealer—No, I think times are too hard for any such extravagance.

Dixon County Leader—Thousands in it. The state at large will not only be the center of attraction for the entire Trans-Mississippi reigon​, but thousands of dollars will be thrown into the channels of trade of Ak-Sar-Ben range.

A. Bauer, implements—You bet; anything up to $100,000.

T. C. Keefe, liquor dealer—I am in favor of it, of course, and think it perfectly right to appropriate a fair amount.

John Green, Grocer—You bet! Let them make Rome howl, we can't be hurt much, and I an​ in favor of taking all the chances.

Lester S. Logan, Meat Market—We favor all public enterprises and regard the Trans-Mississippi exposition as worthy of our best efforts.

Eames S. Learing, Grocer—We are right in the procession. While we object to extravagances, we favor a liberal appropriation and judicious application.

T. J. Welty, Attorney—Yes, certainly, they should expend $200,000.

Dr. J. W. Porter—I think it the best advertising scheme possible, and in line with the views of our best citizens.

G. Franz, Shoe Shop—Certainly, it is the proper caper.

C. Fields, Livery—I don't believe in being extravagant, but think a moderate appropriation perfectly proper.

P. Rush, Billiard Hall—Yes, sir; yes, we should not be niggardly. If we don't do the right thing it is our fault.

P. Morris, Merchant—I think it proper and right to give a reasonable amount.

E. E. Halstead, Bank of Dixon County—I think it a proper move, and our people should give it all possible encouragement.

J. J. McCarthy, Attorney—Yes, sir, it is all right to give a liberal amount, but the expenditure must be looked after.

G. L. Wood, Security Bank—In a broad sense it is of incalculable benefit to our state, and I am in favor of a liberal appropriation.

William Mahoney, Druggist—A reasonable appropriation is demanded, and I certainly favor the same.

J. D. Forbes, Druggist—Yes, sir; anything in reason, properly expended, is all right.

Wilson Bros, General Store—No; we regard it all right for Omaha, but fail to see how we are to be benefited, and times are too close.

E. J. Berry, Harness—I think it all right and favor a reasonable appropriation.

A. E. Barnes, Attorney—Yes, sir; I am in favor of the most liberal appropriation, and think it will be money cast on the waters to be immediately returned.

C. A. Kingsbury, Attorney—Yes, I do favor the appropriation, and think our state pride prompts liberality, and the benefits are innumerable.

WILL HELP NEBRASKA.

Central City, Neb., Jan. 30.—Our business men are taking considerable interst​ in the probable action of the legislature regarding an appropriation for the Trans-Mississippi exposition. I find the following as expression:

P. S. Heaton, county judge, $200,000.

J. H. Sutton, county sheriff, $100,000.

A. J. Harshbarger, county treasurer, $100,000.

George Bockes, county clerk, $50,000.

Charles Lind, deputy county clerk, $50,000.

S. F. Kennedy, clerk of court, $50,000.

L. H. Reynolds, hardware, $200,000.

N. R. Persinger, real estate, $250,000.

W. T. Thompson, attorney, $250,000.

J. W. Sparks, attorney, $100,000.

W. E. Letcher, cashier Platte Valley bank, $250,000.

S. G. Howe, editor Nonpareil, $100,000.

George Wells, editor Democrat, $50,000.

W. Wolcott, late editor Nonpareil, $50,000.

J. W. Vieregg, proprietor City mills, $100,000.

C. Larsen, implements, $100,000.

C. W. Lemaster, merchant, $100,000.

G. H. Gray, merchant, $100,000.

I. V. Traver, merchant, $100,000.

V. Gallogly, merchant, $100,000.

W. May, merchant, $100,000.

M. Chandler, merchant, $100,000.

G. C. Agnew, postmaster, $150,000.

C. Jacobson, merchant, $350,000.

F. C. Ratcliff, merchant, $35,000.

J. R. Ratcliff, merchant, $25,000.

S. B. Starrett, real estate, $50,000.

J. F. McRae, agent Burlington & Missouri, $50,000.

James Vieregg, proprietor City Mills, $50,000.

L. G. Comstock, city treasurer, $50,000.

J. A. Hayes, merchant, $50,000.

C. A. Stilzer, merchant, $50,000.

M. McDermott, merchant, $75,000.

W. G. Stutsman, restaurant, $25,000.

J. B. Whittaker, druggist, $5,000.

A. J. Bowle, real estate, $100,000.

N. H. Baldwin, water commissioner, $50,000.

J. E. Dorshimer, attorney, nothing.

D. T. Sullivon, tailor, nothing.

J. B. White, brick mason, nothing.

PUSH IT ALONG.

Ponca, Neb., Jan. 30.—The opinion of the people of this vicinity may be obtained from the following:

Dr. De Vare—Favors a liberal amount being appropriated.

D. F. A. Fisher—Am I? Certainly I favor it, and if the legislators are not chumps, and they are not, they will make a liberal appropriation.

B. W. Wood, Editor Gazette—In this as other public affairs, we are in favor of doing everything that will benefit Nebraska or Nebraskans, and will say we favor a reasonable appropriation.

J. D. Stough, County Treasurer—Yes, sir; I think it the proper thing to do.

A. W. Rose, County Judge—By all means, yes; only let it be reasonable.

W. W. Cooper, Clerk of Court—Yes, sir; but let them be careful to select honest and prudent men to handle the funds.

Judge Norris, Attorney—Certainly I favor the appropriation. Let it be neither too [?] nor yet too narrow.

William Groth, Cigar Maker—I favor a reasonable appropriation.

J. E. Dennis, Barber—I certainly am in favor of liberality in such an appropriation.

William Ange, Hardware—I think it right to appropriate a reasonable amount for such purpose.

J. V. Pearson, County Attorney, Certainly; we should appropriate a reasonable sum and then see to it that it was judiciously expended.

Dr. J. M. O'Connell—Yes, sir; I favor a reasonable appropriation for that purpose.

Drager Bros., General Merchandise—We are in favor of a reasonable amount being appropriate for the purpose named.

J. M. Davey, General Merchandise and Stock—Certainly, anything in reason. That's our way of looking at it.

E. W. Gray, Jeweler—Yes, anything in reason.

Conner & Kyas, Groceries—We are in favor of making it as large as the condition of public affairs will permit.

H. H. Hart, sheriff—I am in favor of it, and would say it was money will expended; but that's more than I care to say of the proposed cut in sheriff's fees.

R. P. Armstrong, grocer—I guess it's all right; haven't thought of it, but see no objections.

A. Beeson & Co., grocery—I am satisfied to leave the matter with the people and the legally authorized body.

James Bigley, hotel proprietor—Certainly, let the band play, and everybody come and take a look at the best state in the union.

WILL ADVERTISE NEBRASKA.

Clay Center, Neb., Jan. 30.—Your correspondent submitted the question, "Should the Nebraska legislature give a liberal appropriation to the Trans-Mississippi exposition?" to the following citizens of this place and received the following answers:

George Mittchell, loan and real estate dealer—Yes, sir; $100,000.

Joseph Burt, farmer—Yes.

O. P. Shoemaker, M. D.—I think they should; it will be a good thing for the west.

F. Troxel, retired farmer—Yes, sir.

Mark Spanoyle, attorney—Yes.

J. P. Skow, farmer—Yes, $100,000.

W. J. Gardiner, cashier State bank—Yes, sir.

H. E. Stein, merchant—Yes, $250,000.

David Scott, farmer—Yes, sir.

C. J. Hensley, Merchant—Yes.

S. M. Elder, Retired Farmer—Yes, about $100,000; $200,000 at the outside.

J. M. McFadden, Dry Goods—Yes, sir; $100,000 would be liberal.

H. E. McDowell, Banker—No, I am against an appropriation.

J. L. Campbell, Cashier Commercial State Bank—Yes, $150,000 should be appropriated.

F. Stanton, Hardware Dealer—Yes, sir.

C. S. Detweiler, Proprietor City Meat Market—Yes, $200,000.

W. Carney, Hardware—Yes, sir.

J. M. Jones, Deputy County Clerk—Yes, I am. Think it should be at least $200,000.

James Dellehaunty, County Clerk's Office—Yes, $150,000 would be liberal.

E. E. Wilber, Dentist—Yes, sir.

Peter Samuelson, Farmer—No, sir.

Frank Oxley, Farmer—No, sir.

A. Allison, Hardware—Yes, sir.

W. L. Palmer, Editor Clay Center Su[?]

 

Exposition Endorsements

BY THE TRANSMISSISSIPPI PRESS.

Glen Rose (Texas) Herald: While our state legislators are tinkering with the statutes and proposing constitutional amendments, it would be a good idea to pass a joint resolution repealing the section which prohibited a state appropriation for a Texas exhibit at the World's fair.

A Transmississippi Exposition is to be held at Omaha, Neb., during the summer of 1898, and Texas should be fittingly represented. This exposition is primarily for the states west of the Mississippi, and none of them have more to offer the home seeker or capitalist that​ Texas. Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri will lead all other states in visitors to this exhibition, and it is from these states that Texas is at present receiving the most new settlers. The Missouri, Kansas & Texas, the Rock Island and the Santa Fe give three direct through routes between Texas and Omaha, and the completion of the Kansas City, Pittsburg & Gulf will offer a fourth. With a proper representation of her field crops, live stock industry, garden and fruit products, lumber interests, mineral wealth, and the low priced land from which they all come. Texas would receive thousands of new homeseekers from the blizzard-swept northern prairies, whose coming would be the direct result of our exhibit. Let the legislature act at once and many valuable features can be saved from the coming season's crops. On with a Texas exhibit at Omaha!

Denver Press: The managers of the Transmississippi Exposition which is to be held in Omaha next year, after considering the facts that the Columbian exposition added to Chicago's permanent population about half a million people, the centennial about 200,000 to Philadelphia, and that the New Orleans exposition awoke that city from a death-like slumber and that it has been wide awake every since, they have come to the conclusion that their fair will be the means of benefiting this part of the country in a manner at once extensive and permanent.

We believe that this exposition will attract a large number of people, anxious to know the resources and advantages of the far west, and that as big an exhibit as possible should be sent to Omaha from this and every other state in the Mississippi valley, and each of them should strive to make its exhibit embrace all of its industries.

In such an exposition, Colorado, with a good exhibit of her facilities for producing anything, mineral, vegetable or animal, corn or cattle, would easily rank high above the agricultural states, and lead the rest in a walk. A stranger seeing a good exhibit of her resources would recognize at once that Colorado was the place to invest his capital or build his home.

We hope, therefore, that the legislature will not fail to make an ample appropriation for the purpose of giving this state a good representation at Omaha.

Gettysburg (S. D.) Courier: An organized effort is being made to secure an exposition at Omaha. If the enterprise succeeds, and there is every reason why it should, it will advance financial and property interests of all of these western states. But it will be necessary to do something more than sit down and wait for it. To draw the people west there must be an exhibit that will pay the visitors for the time and money spent in coming, and such an exhibit will bring good returns to the communities that assist in the work. The date set for the opening in 1898.

Pacific Christian Advocate (Portland, Ore.): Omaha is beginning to count the people who are to come to the Transmississippi Exposition in 1898. From 2,000,000 to 3,000,000 is regarded a moderate estimate, and figuring that the average expenditure in Omaha by the strangers will be $10, business men of that city are hugging themselves in anticipation of the good time coming. We contemplate their prospective good fortune with friendly complacency, not unmixed with anticipation that their large advantage will inure to our small benefit. Doubtless some eastern folks when they get to the plains of Nebraska and see in the exposition halls that marvels of production come from these remote fields will push on to the continent's real El Dorado. As a western display it will probably be felt in our Pacific states that we cannot afford to ignore it, or fail to do our best to make a just exhibit of our claims to public attention.

Lyons (Kan.) Republican: The Transmississippi Exposition is the biggest advertisement that has ever been attempted for the Mississippi valley and the states beyond the Rockies. It is not a visionary, skyrocket scheme, but a well-planned and well-matured effort to give the widest possible publicity to the advantages offered in this section to capitalists and home-seekers who have money with which to buy land and engage in instrumental enterprises. The Atlantic Cotton States exposition turned the tide of immigration and capital from the west to the south. The aim of the exposition of 1898 is to set forth the advantages and limitless resources of states west of the Mississippi, and thus attract home-seekers and investors.

Oberlin (Kan.) Times: The Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held in Omaha, Neb., from June to November, 1898, will be the best opportunity the west has ever had to advertise its wonderful resources. Kansas should be second to none in her appropriation and preparation to take proper advantage of this wonderful exposition to be held on our borders. The officers are from the best business men in the western states. Charles A. Fellows, mayor of Topeka, is the president for Kansas.

Maryville (Mo.) Tribune: The Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha in '98 will be second in splendor only to the World's fair of '93 if the dreams of its promoters are realized. The government has already responded with an appropriation of $200,000 and to this the citizens of Omaha have added the sum of $250,000. All the states west of the Mississippi will be asked to make liberal appropriations from state funds to aid in making the undertaking a success, and Missouri, the greatest of all states seeking representation to the exposition, and the one most to be benefited by such a rare opportunity to acquaint the world with her unparalleled resources, should lead her sister states in liberality and magnitude of her appropriation to this the greatest exposition ever held west of the Mississippi.

This exhibition of the products of the unrivalled Mississippi valley must prove of incalculable benefit to our own states, situated as we are right at the very door of the exposition, and on the route over which must pass thousands of visitors from all parts of the globe.

Let us do nothing by halves in this great undertaking, for without working upon a broad and liberal plan our state will not reap the rich reward which is surely hers if she but grasps this opportunity to direct the world's attention to her rich, varied and marvelous resources.

Tabor (Ia.,) Beacon: The Beacon recently give​ space to a circular letter from the Department of Publicity for the Transmississippi Exposition, the purpose of which is "to enlist the co-operation of the press in the effort to make known the scope of the enterprise and the advantages that must inevitably accrue to Nebraska and adjoining states" From the Omaha Daily Bee of January 16, in which the project is explained at some length we learn that the enterprise is in good hands, and that its consummation is assured beyond a peradventure. Subscriptions amounting to over $400,000 of the capital stock have been secured and congress has pledged not less than $200,000 for a government exhibit in 1898. Among the state exhibits Iowa should set the pace for her western sisters, and to this end the extra session of the legislature should make a liberal appropriation that Iowa may prove her faith by her good works.

Hoquiam (Wash.) Washingtonian: Perhaps the best method of advertising the great resources of our state, will be the Transmississippi Valley States International Exposition to be held at Omaha during the coming year, 1898. After the Chicago affair this will be the best ever held in the United States. Washington should be well represented there.

Gruady Center, (Ia.) Republican: The great Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha next year will be the most wonderful affair ever undertaken west of the Mississippi. All the states are taking an active interest in the exposition and will be represented by their respective products. Edward Rosewater of the Omaha Bee is manager of the Department of Publicity, and last week he gave a fine review of the plans and purposes of the exposition in his paper, The Bee, for a copy of which we are indebted to his office. Portraits of the officers and managers and a write-up of each state's resources are given in a minute and pleasing style that reflects great credit upon The Bee. The president of the exposition, G. W. Wattles, is an old resident of Carroll, Ia. where he spent most of his life in the profession of law and in the banking business. He went to Omaha in 1892 and is one of the most energetic and active business men in that city today. Iowa will do her part in the matter of exhibits at Omaha and will conduct herself in a manner that will reflect credit upon the state. Omaha seems to be the right place for the great affair and the enthusiasm and vim displayed by her citizens is just the kind of metal that will make a success of the exposition. We expect to be there, now that McKinley is going to give us good times again, and we hope to see all Iowa there.

WOMEN AND THE EXPOSITION

CALL FOR A MASS MEETING TO BE ISSUED

Election of Eleven Women as Members of the Board of Lady Managers is to Be the Issue.

The call for a mass meeting of the women of Omaha to elect eleven women as members of the Board of Lady Managers for the Transmississippi Exposition will be issued tomorrow by Secretary Wakefield. The date has been changed from Saturday of next week to Friday. The meeting will be held in Creighton theater, Messrs. Paxton & Burgess having donated the use of the house for the occasion. The meeting will be called to order at 2 o'clock and the business will be at once taken up. The executive committee of the exposition wishes it understood that this meeting is not to be held under the auspices of the Woman's club, but that every woman in Omaha who is interested in the success of the exposition is invited to be present and take part in the proceedings. It is also announced that the widest latitude will be given in the matter of nominating candidates for election by the meeting. Up to this time there have been no public announcements of the candidacy of any women for election as members of the board, but it is know that several candidates are being groomed for the race.

The meeting of the women of South Omaha will be held Saturday of next week, as originally arranged. Calls for these meetings will be issued by Secretary Wakefield tomorrow also. The meeting in south Omaha will be held in the Young Men's Christian association building at Twentyfifth and N streets at 2 p.m., February 13. The Council Bluffs meeting will be held in the Royal Arcanum hall in the Beno block Saturday, February 13, at 2 p.m. The rules governing the meetings in Omaha will govern the meetings in South Omaha and Council Bluffs.

The Board of Directors of the exposition will meet at the Commercial club rooms at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon to receive the report of the committee appointed to engage the services of two engineers to recommend a site. The report of the engineers is still in the hands of the special committee. It was decided to hold the meeting tomorrow in the Commercial club rooms in order that spectators may have an opportunity of being present. At the former meeting the advocates of the several sites were out in force, but were required to remain outside in the hall on account of the limited space within the directors' room.

The question of opening the report of the engineers will undoubtedly be a live issue at the meeting of the board tomorrow. The conditions which caused the determination of the board to leave the report unopened for two weeks are substantially the same as they were at the time this action was taken. The legislature has made no appropriation, and this fact formed almost the only basis for the postponement. The Department of Promotion intimates that it has information to the effect that decided action will be taken by the house of representatives at Lincoln either today or tomorrow, and it may be decided by the board that further delay is inadvisable.

 
Page 45

FAVOR MILLER PARK

The Chicago Engineers Believe It Best Suited to an Exposition Site.

Vote on the Adoption of the Report is Deferred Until Next Tuesday.

Title of Lands and the Securing of Fort Omaha From Uncle Sam to Be Considered.

Advocates of Other Locations Disappointed and Intimate a Prearranged Understanding.

Mr. Hitchcock's Suggestions Are Followed—Editor Rosewater Declares That the Engineers Have No Standing.

Messrs. Alexander and Schrader, the engineers from Chicago who were brought here to inspect the exposition sites and report their conclusions, have recommended the Miller park site. Their report, which had been lying in the hands of Mr. Yost, sealed, for two weeks, was opened and read at the meeting of the board of directors yesterday afternoon.

There was a disposition on the part of some to proceed with the vote on the site, but after a long discussion it was decided to defer this until next Tuesday afternoon. Final action may not be taken then, but it is expected that it will be. At any rate the selection of the site will be the special order for that time.

The meeting yesterday was held in the Commercial club rooms in anticipation of the large crowd of interested citizens who would want to witness the proceedings, the directors' room at headquarters in the Paxton block having been too small to accommodate the attendance at the last meeting, when it was expected that the question of a site would be settled.

The large banqueting room was filled. About forty of the fifty directors were present. When the reading of the report, which was the first thing brought up, had been concluded by Secretary Wakefield there was loud applause by the promoters of the Miller park site, and, as was expected, both during and after the meeting there was on the part of some of those who had been disappointed the severest criticism of the report, the charge being openly made that it was foreordained and that it was a put-up job from the very first.

The report of the engineers was in full as follows:

ENGINEERS REPORT.

In this recommendation for the selection of exposition grounds the following points were considered as far as it was possible within the limited time allowed: First—The topography and general availability of the ground for building purposes. Second—Transportation facilities by street cars, steam railways and other vehicles. Third—Sewerage and water supply. Fourth—Distance from postoffice.

In the examination of the grounds for topography, dependence was placed simply upon inspection, as no topographical charts were submitted which could cover the ground.

In our opinion the Miller park site is the most available location considering all points. It is understood that the Fort Omaha grounds are included in this site. In regard to the topography of the Miller park site, it can be prepared for exposition grounds at less expense and will allow of a better grouping of buildings than any other site. There is a sufficient variation in elevation of the ground to avoid monotony, and the Fort Omaha grounds have many grown trees that may be preserved and made to conform to a plan.

It would be desirable to have Thirtieth street closed as a public highway within the exposition ground limits if the grounds lying both east and west of this highway are used. Should Thirtieth street be retained as a public highway it would necessitate a double line of fencing, each one-half mile long, and a separation of grades of roadways at one crossing at least. It would also completely separate the grounds, which would be undesirable.

WATER COURSES.

In regard to the development of water areas, we may say it is possible to a limited extent. Areas varying from seventy-five feet to 300 feet in width may be found along the creek bottoms by construction of proper dams and overflow utilized for irrigation purposes.

It is intended that the natural flow of the creeks shall be utilized as far as possible as a feeder to maintain water levels, and during the dry months of the year this supply should be supplemented from the water service system if it is found necessary. Although the water areas will necessarily be comparatively small in extent, they should be introduced as far as practicable to vary the landscape. Bridges of artisitc​ design can be thrown across the narrower portions and suitable shrubbery, etc., line the edges of the water areas.

The site may be reached by at least three separate street car lines, the Sixteenth street, Twenty-fourth street and Thirtieth street, provided the proper extensions are made to the grounds. The steam railways available for transportation are the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley, the Belt railway and the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha, all of them passing close or can be extended to the grounds, and suitable arrangements can be made for the handling of both freight or passengers. Trackage facilities for other railways can probably be arranged via the Belt or other lines.

EASY OF ACCESS.

Although the distance to this site exceeds that to Hanscom park and is also greater than that to Riverview park from the city hall, we consider it as easy of access because of the greater number of transportation lines and the comparatively level roads over which the street cars, bicycles and other vehicles can pass at a higher speed and greater ease.

The carrying capacity of the several lines should be carefully estimated and efforts made to transport the visitors without unreasonable delay at either terminal.

Without a definite knowledge of the number and character of the buildings and grounds and the general scope of the exposition, and without a definite statement of the number of acres to be used for experimental or illustrative irrigation, it is impossible to estimate accurately the quantity of water required, but this may be determined later. This much may be said: That the Omaha Water company can supply a greater volume of water to the Miller park site under existing conditions than to any other site. Also, that any additional water service that may be required from the power station at Florence can be more cheaply brought to the Mill park site than to any other site, and all such expenditure will be directly in line for the future increase of the water supply of the city of Omaha. Any argument in favor of the sinking of wells to the water-bearing gravel connecting the wells and then pumping, will apply to all sites about equally.

DRAINAGE FACILITIES.

A large main sewer, eight feet three inches in diameter, is constructed along Twenty-seventh street and has its northern terminus and outfall a short distance north of Fort street. This sewer at the present time has but few house connections, about five in number, and carries the surface drainage of a considerable area. It is thought that sufficient water flows through this large sewer at all seasons to sufficiently dilute the small amount of sewerage which at present is connected of sewerage [?] with this line.

Is it intended that the sanitary sewers to be constructed in connection with the buildings, toilet rooms, etc., shall be located along the right and left banks of the creeks a short distance from water edges, say fifty feet, and carried in this manner through the grounds to a point outside the exposition grounds, and there emptying into the creek bottom. These sanitary sewers may be small in size, say from six inches to probably eighteen inches in diameter, and can be easily arranged to have sufficient grade and water for flushing purposes. The depth of cutting, etc., can be reduced to a minimum. This method will intercept all sanitary sewers and thus keep the water in the artificial lakes on the grounds, a desirable feature, and we believe it to be the cheapest and most effective method of caring for the sewage.

ACRES FOR USE.

The distance to the several sites as shown on the map upon street lines from the city hall is approximately as follows:

Miller park site, four miles; Elmwood park, four miles; East Omaha, three and one-half miles, Riverview park, two and a half miles; Hanscom park, two and a fourth miles.

Hanscom park site is probably the nearest to the center of population of the city of Omaha, and many residents could probably reach this site on foot, but the previous remarks on transportation we believe will hold good.

The Miller park site offers approximately 160 acres of public land upon which as many improvements of a permanent character can be placed as desired, and many of the improvements, such as roadways, paths, tree and shrubbery planting, water and sewer service, can be made of permanent use in the future development of the park system.

The Miller park site as offered contains approximately 400 acres, and will contain sufficient area upon which irrigation and all the varied industries may have full exhibit. There are some water service lines already constructed in the Fort Omaha grounds that may supplement any additional lines to be laid.

We hereby recommend for your consideration the Miller park site, and should this recommendation be approved it would be desirable to have a complete and accurate topographical survey made as early as possible.

SECOND CHOICE.

The Elmwood park site is comprised within the limits of Elmwood park and the grounds of the Omaha Fair and Speed association, and, in our opinion, is second in availability. While the acreage in this site is ample so far as mere area is concerned, a large portion of the ground in Elmwood park is unsuited for exposition purposes, and should irrigation farms be made a feature of this exhibition additional land would have to be acquired for this purpose. For stock exhibition purposes the speed track and the various sheds and barns could all be utilized. Many of the other improvements could be used for various purposes, and thus make a considerable saving on the cost of the building. The steam railways could be extended, the many heavy grades would necessitate a heavier equipment than now in use on the Leavenworth street line. In this respect all the other sites would have the advantage over the Elmwood park site. The system of sewers would have no outlet except that afforded by the Little Papillion creek; in all other respects the system would be simple. The question of a water supply from the city mains cannot be considered, as the system was not designed to furnish water outside the city limits, and the nearest supply being a six-inch main at Forty-sixth and Leavenworth streets. The water supply would depend on the number of wells bored and the uncertainty of both supply and cost of plant is a very serious objection to this location. The available portion of the site is entirely isolated from the improved portion of the city by reason of the high rolling ground toward the east. The steep grades on the lines of the streets increase the discomfort to travel and should be considered in the selection of exposition ground.

HANSCOM PARK SITE.

The topography of Hanscom park is such that only a very small part could be used for an exhibition building, and that only in the northwest corner of the park. This would not be a desirable location on account of the distance of the main part of the site, and would preclude the possibility of its use in this connection. We are thus forced to deal with that portion west of Thirty-third street, between Pacific and Center streets. Before buildings could be erected an immense amount of grading would be necessary, as the streets through this tract have been cut to grade and the tender of this site has been made subject to the condition that the grade of the streets remain unchanged. The cost of preliminary work would, in our opinion, be a sufficient reason for rejecting this site. No permanent buildings for the future use of the public could be erected, and this alone would be a serious loss to the city. The cost of preparing the grounds would be an absolute loss, as no money would have been expended on public property. Much can be saved to the citizens if the improvements, to a large extent, are made in the parks that now exist.

The street car facilities could be increased to properly care for the visitors from the business district, while its nearness to the residence portion would enable many to walk to the exposition. The steam railways would be unable to properly handle the freight business during the work of construction, as the tracks are located along the ravine which runs through the west part of the site, and would seriously retard the progress of construction. This is a very serious condition and would weight heavily against any site similarly situated.

The present water mains are probably large enough for ordinary exposition purposes, irrigation excepted.

The thirty-six-inch sewer in Thirty-fifth street would have to be extended southward from Leavenworth street to some point within the exposition grounds. Being within two and one-fourth miles from the city hall, the Hanscom park site is best located in only one particular, i. e., distance.

RIVERVIEW PARK.

The Riverview park site is not well adapted for an exposition ground because of the extreme irregularity of its topography. The northern portion is extremely irregular, having deep ravines and narrow, tortuous ridges, rendering building operations impossible unless an excessive amount of work be done in grading. Much clearing of timber would also be necessary. The rough topography very considerably reduces the available building area and precludes the possibility of desirable grouping of buildings. This site contains but sixty-five acres of public park grounds and, consequently, a much less area could be utilized for permanent improvements in this than in Miller or Elmwood park sites.

No adequate water supply can be furnished to this site by the Omaha Water company without great expenditure in laying a separate main from the pumping station to this location. As stated in the report on Miller park site, any argument in favor of sinking wells and connecting and pumping from the same applies with equal force to all of the sites. There is but one well in this park at present. It was stated that it was 1,080 feet deep   and six inches in diameter. It is needless to say that this would supply but a small portion of the water required and undoubtedly would have to be pumped to the higher levels.

This location is reached by but one steam railway, the Burlington, located in the very lowest portion of the site, and no tracks could be carried into these grounds for construction purposes. Two street car lines may be extended to this site but, in general, the transportation facilities are not equal to those offered by the Miller park site.

We do not regard the East Omaha site as a suitable location for the exposition for the following reasons:

First—It is the sewer bottom land and monotonously level, the elevation of the surface being dangerously close to the high water line of the Missouri river.

Second—With the average high stages of the river the sewage could not readily be disposed of on account of the backing up of the river water in the sewers.

Third—It is not satisfactorily located to illustrate irrigation.

Fourth—Sewage should not pollute Florence lake or Cut-Off lake, and therefore sewers would have to be carried nearly a mile northward to empty into the river.

Fifth—There are no water service mains of adequate capacity nearer than one mile.

It is thought that the above mentioned points furnish sufficient argument why this ground should not be selected.

In conclusion, we would say that, while Elmwood, Hanscom and Riverview park, topographically considered, are perfectly adapted for public pleasure grounds, they are entirely unsuited for the special purpose you have in view. To properly grade these parks and prepare the grounds for exhibition purposes would destroy forever all the beauty in them that now appeals so strongly to the eye of the landscape engineer. Diversity in contour in the different parks is desirable. That is now found when you compare the steep rolling grounds of Riverview and Hansom parks with the comparatively easy slopes of Elmwood and Miller parks.

MOVED TO ADOPT.

Superintendent Bidwell moved that the report be adopted and that the board proceed to vote on the site.

C. S. Montgomery thought that the adoption of the report would be the selection of the site, and so it was decided that the report should be simply accepted and placed on file.

Dan Farrell moved that the selection of a site should be put off one week, and this started a discussion and a debate that lasted for more than two hours. There were a few who wanted to go ahead at once with the selection, but the majority were in favor of deferring it, but they were divided as to whether the choice should be postponed until next Tuesday or until Saturday, and motions and amendments and substitutes were piled upon each other so rapidly that it kept President Wattles thinking to preserve a straight course.

Mr. Yost was the first to oppose any considerable delay. He said that the city council did not want to fix the park tax levy irrevocably at 3 mills until it was known where the location was to be, and the council was to bring the matter up next Tuesday night. He, therefore, thought that the site should be selected by that time. President Wattles also emphasized this point. A motion had been made to defer the selection until Saturday, and J. C. Wharton now moved to amend by inserting Tuesday.

MR. HITCHCOCK'S SUBSITUTE.

Mr. Lindsey cautioned the directors against being too precipitous and taking what the people might call a snap judgement, and Mr. Hitchcock introduced a substitute in the form of a resolution as follows:

Resolved, That when this board adjourns it be to next Tuesday at 2 p.m., to act on the selection of an exposition site, and that the supporters of all sites be requested to present at that time: First, proof of the legal title and possession of the grounds; second, proof and specifications of the sufficiency of approaches, including both public highways and railroad trackage, and maps of the grounds offered; third, a bond of $10,000 conditioned to furnish possession and approaches without expense to the exposition and to guarantee the possession and unobstructed use of the exposition site to the exposition without expense; and that the site so selected by the directors shall be at their disposal whenever it is asked for, to continue during the exposition and until such time thereafter as the exhibits and buildings shall be removed or not later than April 15, 1899.

Mr. Hitchcock thought it would be very unwise for the exposition association to bind itself to a site before it was known that possession, undisturbed use and good approaches were guaranteed.

Mr. Rosewater said there were other reasons for not taking decisive action for at least a week. The engineers had assumed that Fort Omaha was included in the Millar park site, but there was no certainty that it could be counted on. The exposition could not get Fort Omaha for its purpose except by an act of congress, and this brought into the question a formidable element of uncertainty. The fort was in the hands of the secretary of war and he had been directed to parcel the site into lots and sell them to the highest bidder, and would probably have done so by this time had it not been for the bill to give the fort to the state of Nebraska for a military school. It was possible that congressional action might not be had on the matter of allowing it for exposition purposes for a year yet.

CHIDED ROSEWATER.

Wharton chided Rosewater for dallying when he had only a few days ago published an editorial advising against delay and during the people of Omaha and the legislature to go ahead and show that they meant business. "Now let us go ahead and mean business," said Wharton.

Montgomery declared his opposition to the plan of deciding the site question Tuesday, thinking longer time should be taken, and as for deciding at this time he said that if it came to a vote he would not vote because he could not do so judiciously.

John L. Webster said he was confident that he was expressing the general sense of the community in saying that the site matter should be disposed of at the earliest possible moment and he was for going at it at once. Thomas Kilpatrick spoke in the same vein. He thought there was no good reason why it should be deferred longer.

Mr. Hitchcock again called attention to the substance of his substitute motion, and Mr. Webster challenged the essentiality of it. If the directors were not satisfied of title, possession and the like, he inquired, why were the experts asked to look at the sites at all.

Wharton here said that Councilman Christie, who was present, had leases for all the ground around Miller park that were good until 1900, and said they could be presented if they were wanted, and thereupon Christie marched forward and deposited the leases on the president's desk.

Montgomery observed that there were a good many Miller park people there and that they were making a good deal of noise, but that was no reason why a vote should be immediately taken.

DENIES HE IS AN OBSTRUCTOR.

Rosewater now got up to deny that he was an obstructor, and to say that he was clearly compelled to give another and a very important reason why action should not be taken at this meeting. He then attacked the integrity of the Chicago engineers and the committee of the directory that brought them here. He said the report was foreordained; that the report as it had been read sounded quite like another engineers's report that had been read in the city hall a few weeks ago. He had made a trip east to satisfy himself about these engineers. He found no on in Chicago who knew them. The city engineer of Chicago did not know Schrader. Prominent engineers of Chicago had told him that Alexander and Schrader had no standing as engineers. Their qualifications might be judged from the fact that they had advised that the sewage from the exposition grounds might be run off into the creeks in the bottoms. They were but ward politicians, who had caught on under one city administration and who would go out under another. Mr. Rosewater was, therefore, surprised that it should be contended that the site matter should be passed on in forty-eight hours. As for the city council, what was to hinder it from making the levy, and if it had once adjourned for a week it could adjourn for another week.

General Manderson states that Rosewater was right in regard to Fort Omaha, but he was sure that very speedy congressional authority for its use for the purpose of the exposition could be secured. He thought very soon after the 15th of March, at the extra session, but he was in favor of proceedingly​ carefully in the selection of a site. He said he had not yet made up his mind, but he thought that by Tuesday a vote might be taken. It was infinitely better to defer than to act in such an important matter without the calmest deliberation.

The resolution of Mr. Hitchcock was then adopted.

WOMEN'S ELECTIONS.

Meetings to Elect Managers From Three Cities.

In accordance with the provisions of the plan of organization for the bureau of education of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, a mass meeting of the women of Omaha has been called by Secretary Wakefield to meet Friday, February 12, at 2 o'clock p.m., in the Creighton theater, Fifteenth and Harney streets, the purpose of the meeting being to elect the two Omaha members of the board of managers provided for in the plan of organization.

The meetings in South Omaha and Council Bluffs will be held at 2 p.m. next Saturday.

All women interested in the exposition have the privilege of attending these meetings, and will be entitled to vote.

Replying to this criticism, it is declared, in behalf of the club, that the committee asked instructions of the directors, but received none, and was left to work out its own salvation. It had not time to await a general meeting of the club to approve its report, and so sent it direct to the exposition managers

Further, it is declared that the criticism threatened, as well as log-rolling for the presidency, are evidently in the interest of one candidate for head of the board of lady managers, for whom exposition directors' votes have been solicited.

ROSEWATER CRITICISES.

Thinks Task Given to Women Beyond Their Capacity.

The meeting of the exposition directory yesterday afternoon was preceded by a meeting of the executive committee, at which the usual weekly reports were made.

In referring to the plan adopted for the co-operation of women, Mr. Rosewater said that as it had been settled it was not worth while to say anything, but he wanted to say that the plan contained many impracticable features. He thought that the men in charge of the universities and higher educational institutions would not care to submit themselves to the direction of women. The women might very well handle the common school and kindergarten exhibits, but trouble would come in dealing with the exhibit of schools of higher education.

The other members of the committee said that Mr. Rosewater was laboring under a mistaken notion entirely.

Mr. Rosewater thought also that the selection of members of the board by mass meeting would prove a cumbersome arrangement. He believed it would have been better to leave the selection with the teachers in the city schools.

The committee then proceeded to suggest a plan by which the elections should be held at the mass meetings.

Mr. Hitchcock suggested that each woman on an informal ballot vote for eleven managers, and that on the formal ballot the election be from among the twenty-two getting the highest number of votes, and that the eleven then getting the highest number of votes be declared elected.

This was adopted.

The mass meeting in Omaha will be called to order by President Wattles of the exposition association.

It was decided that in response to invitations delegations should be sent to various states capital to personally lay the subject of the exposition before the legislature. Messrs. Wattles, Lindsey and Babcock will arrange for the sending of these delegations.

PLAN OF CO-OPERATION.

The plan of co-operation adopted is:

Section 1. That the women be given charge of the sub-department of education in its various branches, viz.: The exhibits of the work of public schools, kindergartens, manual training and industrial schools, schools for the deaf, blind and feeble-minded, art schools, reform schools and all schools of special instruction, and that they also have charge of a series of congresses on various scientific and philosophical lines during the months from June to November, 1898.

Sec. 2. That this sub-department of education be in the hands and under control of a board of managers of twenty-seven (27) in number, as more particularly specified in section 11, subject to the approval of the board of directors of the exposition; eleven (11) of said managers shall be chosen from Omaha, two (2) from South Omaha, two (2) from Council Bluffs and twelve (12) from Nebraska, outside of Omaha and South Omaha.

Sec. 3. That the local members of the board of managers be elected at a mass meetings of the women of Omaha; that the members from South Omaha and Council Bluffs shall be elected at a mass meeting of the women in each of said cities called for that purpose, each of said meetings to be called by the secretary of this board; the Omaha meeting to be held Friday, February 12; the South Omaha and Council Bluffs meetings to be held Saturday, February 13, 1897, at 2 o'clock p.m.

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS.

Sec. 4. That from each congressional district in the state two (2) members of the board of managers shall be elected at a mass meeting of the women of each district called for that purpose..

Sec. 5. That the congressmen from each congressional district shall designate where the said mass meetings shall be held, and, if desired by the women of said district, the board of directors of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition will send a woman from Omaha to said district, to fully explain the ends and aims of the exposition.

Sec. 6. That the said board of managers may elect its own officers and adopt rules governing its actions.

Sec. 7. That two (2) women from each state outside of Nebraska be selected to form an advisory council, auxiliary to the board of managers.

Sec. 8. That the advisory council be selected by the board of managers from names suggested to the board by the different state federations of clubs and other educational organizations.

The article on Page 62 continues onto Page 65. It has been transcribed for ease of reading and understanding.

Sec. 9 That the members of the board of managers and of the advisory council do not receive remuneration.

Sec. 10. That in the work of the various departments and committees of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, where the services of women would be valuable, that they be asked to render such service.

Sec. 11. The powers of the said board of manager shall be complete for the purposes above outlined, subject, however, to the approval of the executive committee of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, and to provide for this approval, the secretary of the said board of managers shall transmit a report of the proceedings of their meetings to the secretary of the exposition, who shall there upon lay the same before the executive committee for its approval.

The mass meeting at South Omaha will be held in the Y.M.C.A. building, Twenty-fifth and N streets, and that in Council Bluffs at Royal Arcanum hall, Beno block.

HANDSOME PROSPECTUS.

The department of promotion has brought out a prospectus of the exposition and will distribute about a thousand copies. The prospectus is a tasty pamphlet filled with information respecting the exposition and of the distinguishing commercial characteristics of the western states. The front cover is a beautifully executed half-tone representing the west allegorically.

A caller at headquarters yesterday was C. E. Wantland, general land agent of the Union Pacific at Denver and Salt Lake. He has from the very first been enthusiastic in his support of the exposition project, and is very anxious that the states of Colorado and Utah make liberal appropriations. He is doing everything that he can to push the enterprise along.

COLORED PEOPLE'S SHARE.

The colored people of the city are continuing their efforts for a department at the exposition. They will ask for space for a distinct exhibition. The following committee has been selected to confer with the directory as to plans and building: Rev. J. A. Williams, Rev. C. O. Owens, Dr. M. O. Ricketts, Dr. W. H. Stevenson, G. F. Franklin, Fred. L. Barnett, S. Cyrus D. Bell, George Collins, A. D. White, Fred S. Smith.

The action of the United States senate committee in reporting the amended exposition bill increasing the appropriation to $275,000 and enlarging the scope of the exposition, is the subject of much congratulatory comment among the promoters of the big show.

WOMAN'S CLUB COMMITTEE.

In speaking of the exposition plan of women, as submitted by the committee of the Woman's club, it was stated that "a number of the members of the Woman's club are offended because the committee appointed by the club to propose the plan of co-operation went straight ahead, agreed on what should be recommended, and presented their report to the exposition management without submitting it first to the club."

 

THE TRANSMISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION OF 1898.

G. W. WATTLES, PRESIDENT
HANSCOM PARK
EDWARD ROSEWATER, MANAGER DEPT OF PUBLICITY
COUNTY COURT HOUSE
NEW GOVERNMENT BUILDING
LOOKING DOWN FARNAM STREET

OMAHA, January [?]—Everybody in Omaha is taking the Transmississippi and International Exposition of [?]. Leading men of the city and state have taken hold of the project with a determination to push it to successful issue. Its scope is being gradually unfolded and the people of the Western States are beginning to see that it contemplates an exposition of the wealth, productiveness and resources of the great West, and that it is not to be a local affair. It was primarily designed to display the capabilities of Western States, but as plans developed and broadened, and international character was given the enterprise and as such it received recognition at the hands of the United States Congress. The art passed by Congress last June, which immediately received the approval of President Cleveland, pledged $200,000 for the purposes of a Government exhibit, buildings and proper supervision thereof.

The act provides that there shall be exhibited at the Transmississippi and International Exposition by the Government of the United States such articles and materials as illustrate the function and administrative faculty of the Government in time of peace and its resources as a war power, tending to demonstrate the nature of our institutions and their adaption is the wants of the people; that such exposition shall be national as well as international in its character, in which the people of the world shall be invited to participate. The act provides further that medals, with appropriate devices, emblems and inscriptions, commemorative of said Transmississippi and International Exposition and of the awards to be made to the exhibitors, shall be prepared at the some mint of the United States for the board of directors. Articles which shall be imported from foreign countries for the sole purpose of exhibition, upon which there shall be a tariff or customs duty, shall be admitted free of payment of duty, customs fees or charges. Regulations governing entries of foreign goods intended for exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition have been issued by Secretary Carlisle. The regulations are almost identical with those which were in force during the Atlanta Exposition.

A bill is pending before the Nebraska Legislature providing for an appropriation of $350,000 to cover the cost of a State building and exhibit. Governor Silas A. Holcomb, in his biennial message to the Legislature, emphasized the importance of the undertaking, and strongly urged the members of the Legislature to promptly vote a substantial appropriation in support of the exposition. Senators William V. Allen and John M. Thurston, Congressmen D. H. Mercer and his colleagues in the House, together with the new State officers, are all working zealously to promote the interest of the exposition, both at Washington and at Lincoln.

Bills carrying appropriations in greater or less amount have been introduced in many of the States and Territories west of the Mississippi river. A bill carrying $100,000 appropriation is pending in the Illinois Legislature. Iowa made a small preliminary appropriation and will increase it at a later session. The Louisiana Legislature authorized the State Board of Agriculture to proceed with steps looking to adequate representation, ample provision therefor​ to be made later by the Legislature. Bills are pending before the Legislature of South Dakota, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana and other Western States and Territories. The exposition vice-presidents for these States report that satisfactory progress is being made with these measures.

The people of Omaha and vicinity have subscribed to the exposition stock in the sum of $425,000 and are responding promptly to calls for assessments thereon. Stock subscriptions are constantly being made and the board of managers is confident that the citizens of Omaha will raise the total stock subscriptions to a sum exceeding $1,000,000 within the next few months. A bond subsidy to be voted by the taxpayers of Omaha and Douglas county of not less than $500,000 is in contemplation and will doubtless be accomplished within a few months.

The working forces of the exposition are thoroughly organized and are doing most effective service. The active management is in the hands of a president and an executive committee of seven members. Each member of the executive committee is the manager of one of the seven departments into which the work of the exposition is divided. There managers were chosen from among the fifty directors elected less than sixty days ago by the stockholders of the exposition. The bill before the Legislature, carrying an appropriation, provides for twelve State commissioners, who must be elected as members of the board of directors in order that the State may have a voice in the affairs of the exposition. The Congressional act, as a matter of course, provides for commissioners who will have charge of the Government exhibit and building. The articles of incorporation of the Exposition Association also provide for a vice-president for each of the twenty-four transmississippi States and Territories, to be appointed by the Governors of the respective States. Those who have been appointed vice-presidents are as follows.

From Iowa, George F. Wright, Council Bluffs; South Dakota, Thomas H. Wells, Hot Springs; Nebraska, William Neville, North Platte; Missouri, John Doniphan, St. Joseph; Kansas, C. A. Fellows, Topeka; Arizona, Charles R. Drake, Tucson; California, George W. Parsons, Los Angeles; Texas, Gustav Reymershoffer, Galveston; Oklahoma, Eugene Wallace, Oklahoma City; Idaho, B. P. Shawhan, Payette; Nevada, William J. Westerfield, Reno; Utah, Lewis W. Shurtliff, Ogden City; Colorado, Henry P. Steele, Denver; New Mexico, L. Bradford Prince, Santa Fe; Oregon, B. S. Cook, Salem; Alaska, Governor James Sheakley, Sitka. The officers of the exposition are: Gurdon W. Wattles, president; Alvin Saunders, resident vice-president; Herman Kountze, treasurer; John A. Wakefield, secretary. The executive committee is composed of the following: Zachary T. Lindsey, chairman and manager of the department of ways and means; Edward Rosewater, manager of the department of publicity; Gilbert M. Hitchcock, manager of the department of promotion; Freeman P. Kirkendall, manager of the department of buildings and grounds; Edward E. Bruce, manager of the department of exhibits; Abram L. Reed, managers of the department of concessions; W. N. Babcock, manager of the department of transportation.

A plan for a woman's department is under consideration by a special committee appointed for that purpose, and some method will be adopted by which the women will be given representation in the exposition.

The selection of a site for the exposition is engrossing the attention of the citizens of Omaha at this time. No less than five different sites are under consideration. There seems to be no division of opinion that one or the other of the public parks in and about the city shall be selected for the purposes of the exposition. Owners of property adjoining these parks have offered the use of their lands in conjunction with the park tracts. Miller Park on the north, Riverview Park on the south, Elmwood park on the west, and Hanscom Park in the southwestern part of the city, located nearer the center of population than the others, each has a strong party advocating its selection by the exposition management. Council Bluffs, whose citizens are no less enthusiastic in support of the exposition than the people of Omaha, offer a site at East Omaha, a manufacturing suburb half a mile up the river, where the East Omaha Bridge and Terminal Company has constructed a magnificent steel draw railroad and wagon bridge. The merits and demerits of the respective sites under discussion have been argued, publicly and privately, for more than a month. Partisans of each site have gone to considerable trouble and expense in the preparation of maps, descriptive matter, etc., exploiting their advantages and attractions.

[?]experts to view [nd?] report to the board its findings. This has been done and the report is now on file with the executive committee, along with the bids of the advocates of the several sites. The selection will be made immediately after the passage of the appropriation bill by the State Legislature. A landscape engineer will then be employed and the work of laying out the grounds will begin. It is said that active work on the exposition site will be commenced within thirty days.

Plans for a few unique and highly attractive features have already been favorably received by the promoters of the exposition, as well as the people at large. One which has attracted much attention is the proposed silver palace, which will be the central figure of the mineral exhibit. It is proposed for this exhibit, under the designation of "El Dorado." The building will be about 450 feet square. It will be constructed of metal and will be silver-plated.

It is proposed to house the various silver interests in this palace, fully illustrating the silver idea, from the mining and smelting to the illimitable ramifications of the arts, industries and finance.

Among other features proposed will be an ethnological exhibit. Representatives of every Indian tribe in the United States and Territories are to be assembled in great numbers.

In the mining section there will be reproductions of famous mines in miniature. The Mercur gold mines of Utah will be shown in this way, the exhibit to cover possibly an acre of ground.

Trophies and prizes are offered for the best exhibit illustrating an irrigating system. The people of the East have no conception of the extent to which the people of the Western States and Territories have carried the science of irrigation. This department alone will afford a marvelous exhibit. Inducements are also offered for beet sugar exhibits and to exhibits pertaining to the culture of the sugar beet. Trophies and prizes are also offered for the best electrical exhibits and for mechanical exhibits in operation, etc.

Omaha, the city of the exposition, was founded in 1854, and to-day​ has a population of 140,000. Within a radius of six miles from its Courthouse the population is about 180,000. Omaha is located midway between New York and San Francisco, at the initial point of the first great transcontinental railway. It is the business center of all that wealth producing country embraced in the Black Hills, for the coal, metal and oil regions of Wyoming, for the products of the great western ranges, for the rich agricultural plains of the Mis-[?] thriving towns and cities in the north half of Kansas, Eastern Colorado, Wyoming, the greater portion of Montana and South Dakota, Western Iowa and all of Nebraska. The aggregate population of Nebraska and the States touching her borders is nearly 10,000,000.

Omaha has eight national and one savings bank, with a combined capital of $3,800,000, undivided profits of nearly $500,000, and total deposits of from $12,000,000 to $15,000,000. The volume of commerce of the city for the year 1896, as shown by the clearing-house reports, was $210,141,334. It is the principal jobbing center west of Chicago. There are 180 firms doing a wholesale business, having an aggregate capital of $10,000,000. Their total annual sales approximate $40,000,000. The business of its Postoffice amounted last year to $2,575,729. The collections of its internal revenue office for 1896 amounted to nearly $1,000,000.

No city of equal population in the country has more or better public and commercial buildings. The United States custom-house and postoffice, costing $2,000,000, is rapidly nearing completion. The exterior of the building is finished. The superstructure is of Colorado pink granite. The interior is to be finished in marble and rich mosaic work. The grounds occupy an entire square in the heart of the city. The Government officials expect to occupy the building within the next six months. The Douglas county courthouse, another imposing structure, occupies an entire square fronting on Farnam street, the main business thoroughfare. It is built of cut stone, three stories high, 115x123 feet, surmounted by a massive dome. The City Hall is one of the handsomest municipal buildings in the United States and was erected at a cost of about $500,000. The basement and first story are of Dodlin granite, above which walls of rich Portage red sandstone rise. The tower at the corner rises 216 feet above the level of the street.

Some of the handsomest and most expensive buildings in the city are the New York Life building, erected at a cost of $750,000; the Bee building, costing $450,000; the Public Library, costing $200,000; the Paxton building, costing $300,000; the First National Bank building, the Merchants' National Bank building, Brownell Hall, the Young Men's Christian Association building, the High School building, and many others. There are more than 100 churches in the city.

While Omaha has an extensive system of public parks, the oldest resort of this nature is a most delightful retreat, covering more than sixty acres, lying in the southwestern part of the city. It was donated to the city twenty-five years ago by A. J. Hanscom, whose name it bears. It is a natural park in the strictest sense, and while the park commission has expended a great many thousand dollars in improving and beautifying it, yet it was a most enchanting place before the city attempted to improve it. Should this park be selected as a site for the exposition many acres of land adjoining will be used in connection therewith for the purposes of the exposition.

Omaha maintains the rank of the third largest live stock market in America, and its beef packing industry has within the last five years assumed enormous proportions. The total receipts in 1896 were: 570,515 cattle, 1,197,638 hogs, 233,332 sheep, and 9653 horses and mules. The value of the product of the South Omaha packing houses for 1896 exceeds $30,000,000. The average number of men employed each day of last year was 3209, who were paid $1,621,697 91 in wages. The Union Stock Yards Company employed 250 men in addition to these.

The manufacturing industries of Omaha are extensive and diversified. The largest silver and gold smelting and refining works in the United States are located in it. Their output last year was 10,900,000 ounces of silver, valued at $7,255,000; 273,000 ounce of gold, valued at $5,640,000; 32,000 tons of lead, valued at $1,656,000, and blue vitriol valued at $790,000. Thirteen railways converge here. Four great trunk lines furnish prompt and convenient access to all points [?] with the wonderful mining cities of the Rocky mountains and the unsurpassed fruit-raising valleys of California; another brings all the untold wealth of Montana to the gates of the city and furnishes a second Coast outlet in the Northwest at the very border of the British possessions. The wheat fields on the North and the cotton plantations of the South, with the Gulf ports, are in direct connection with Omaha through other great railroad systems.

The highest aim of the promoters of the Transmississippi and International Exposition of 1898 is to show to the world the vast extent of wealth and resources possessed by the States and Territories west of the Mississippi river. From this region comes nearly all the gold and silver produced in the United States, and nearly every mineral known to commerce is dug from its mountains. Between the Mississippi river and the Rocky mountains lies the granary of America. Cereals of almost every description are produced in great abundance. The production of sugar in the United States is confined almost exclusively to the States of Louisiana, Nebraska, Utah and California. The cotton of Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas and Indian Territory constitutes one-half of the cotton raised in the United States, and its annual value is computed to be $161,000,000. The timber of the Pacific Coast States, Missouri, Arkansas, Minnesota and Texas is almost limitless in extent and variety.

This magnificent empire, with its boundless resources, which have scarcely begun to be developed, already has 67,000,000 acres under cultivation, with agricultural products valued at $933,331,921 a year.

The States and Territories west of the Mississippi contain the great wheat and corn belts, which in 1895 are credited with raising 1,100,000,000 bushels of corn, valued at $235,000,000, and 300,000,000 bushels of wheat, valued at $135,000,000. The transmississippi hay crop for 1895 aggregated 27,000,000 tons, valued at $150,000,000. The transmississippi country is par excellence the great cattle-raising ground of America.

Perhaps the most striking proof of the wealth and resources of the country west of the Mississippi is afforded by the statistics of live stock. The number of horses and mules in the States and Territories west of the Mississippi was computed to be 8,458,809, and their value is estimated at $462,639,621. The number of cattle is computed at 30,970,616, and their value is estimated to be $461,993,266. The number of sheep and hogs is estimated at 50,811,500, and their value $168,158,075. In other words, the aggregate value of the live stock and horses west of the Mississippi, in round numbers, in $1,091,890,962.

The mineral wealth of the Western States includes practically all the precious metals and the bulk of other valuable minerals produced in the United States. The annual value of the gold and silver mined in the West exceeds $100,000,000. The production of copper and other minerals exceeds in value the gold and silver product. The vast coal beds, which for the most part are lying dormant, produce an aggregate of 20,000,000 tons a year, valued at from $25,000,000 to $30,000,000.

The country west of the Mississippi is rapidly extending its manufacturing capacity. According to the most conservative estimates, the number of operatives in mills and factories exceeds 200,000, earning in wages over $75,000,000 a year. The value of the product of these factories and mills is computed at $1,367,835,987.

With an assessed valuation of real and personal property aggregating over $6,000,000,000, which represents less than one-fourth of actual property values, the lowest estimate of the aggregate wealth of the transmississippi States and Territories is $20,000,000,000.

The marvelous strides made in the development of the transmississippi region are chiefly due to the construction of railroads. In 1869 there were only 2100 miles of railroad west of the Mississippi and only twenty-six and one-half west of the Missouri. In 1889 the railroad mileage west of the Mississippi was 62,612 miles. In 1896 it had reached 79,705 miles and before the close of the present year it will exceed 80, [?] has kept pace with the material growth is evident by the fact that in 1879 the population west of the Mississippi was 6,495,167, and by 1890 it had reached 15,170,215, a growth of 250 per cent in twenty years. At the close of 1896 the estimated population west of the Mississippi was 20,128,260. The basis of this estimate is the vote in the last two Presidential elections. In 1892 the total vote for President was 3,199,788, and in 1896 the total vote for President was 3,983,786.

As a factor in the educational exhibit in the exposition of 1898 the States west of the Mississippi will be able to furnish a striking object lesson. They have 121 universities and colleges, and the number of schoolhouses exceeds 62,000. The school population exceeds 5,7000,000.

 

A DAMASCUS NIGHT—BY CLINTON SCOLLARD.

(Copyright, 1897, by Clinton Scollard.)

Part I.

IT was the 9th of July, 1860. The declining afternoon was sultry, and there was scarcely a breath of air stirring in the poplar trees. I was sitting with my friend Vitelis in one of the Barada gardens, sipping sherbet and smoking a chibouk, when my attention was attracted by the uproar. A zither player, who was squatting upon one of the elevated [ands?] had just ceased playing.

"There must be a quarrel in one of the bazars​," said Vitelis lazily.

"I pray that it be none of our people," I answered.

"One of those troublesome Druses, more likely."

"I do not fancy the presence of those turbulent fellows in the city. They are ever bent upon making trouble."

Just then there was the report of a [an?] or pistol, followed by a series of piercing cries. Both of us started to our feet. Never in our previous experience had such a thing happened. What could it mean?

"We had best look into this," Vitelis said, and together we hastened toward the entrance to the garden. As we emerged upon the highway leading to [almyra?] we encountered a camel driver with his laden beast. The man was a denizen of the desert, lean and forbidding featured.

"Accursed Christians!" cried he, and he spat at us as we passed him.

We were not unaccustomed to such treatment from some of the more fanatical Mussulmans, and gave no heed to the insult.

"Are you armed?" I asked my friend, although we were not supposed to carry weapons. "There may be serious trouble."

"I have a dirk," he answered.

"I am no better off than you," I said.

As we crossed one of the branches of the Berada and drew within sight of St. Thomas' gateway, which those who speak Arabic call the Bab Tuma, there was not a soul in sight.

"Strange!" cried Vitellis. "I never knew the gateway to be deserted before. Even the guard has disappeared."

We broke into a brisk trot. Beneath our feet the thick dust rose in puffs like white powder. As we reached the decrepit outer archway we again heard the report of firearms and renewed shrieks.

"Great God! It is a massacre!" my friend exclaimed.

A massacre! I had not thought of that, though a month before dark threats had reached my ears. Not by nature inclined to look upon the gloomy side of things, I had allowed myself to beleive that there was no danger of such a crisis, and now—

As we sprang within the walls, out from the corner of an abutment where he had been concealed, leaped the sentry. Vitelis was a pace in advance, and did not see the murderous soldier, who stabbed him through the back with a bayonet before I could raise a hand in his defense. Forward on his face he fell and the wretch turned on me. The cowardly assault upon my friend filled me with a blind age, and I closed in with his assailant before he had an opportunity to use his weapon. To and fro we swayed, now slipping upon the uneven stones, now staggering against the wall. Suddenly my antagonist stumbled backward over a projecting point of pavement and down I came with my full weight upon him. He began to screech lustily for assistance, but I got my fingers upon his throat and choked his villainous life out as I would have choked a venomous reptile.

I scrambled to my feet, I discovered his cries had attracted attention, for down one of the streets leading to the gateway I saw several men hurrying, and they were Moslems. They shouted madly when they observed me, and came onward with double energy. I cast one glance at the prone body of my friend, whom I knew to be beyond all human help [?]was the last [?]ever looked u[?]and fled [?] toward the heart of the Christian quarter.

There was nothing to prevent me, had I had only my own safety in mind, from returning whither I had come, or seeking shelter in some one of the other numerous gardens within the walls. True, my own kin were in danger, for my uncle, with whom I had resided since my parents' death, had several weeks previous gone with his entire family to Beyrout​, where he had business interests, leaving me in charge of his Damascus bazar​. But there was one to whom it was quite possible that harm might come if, as seemed to be the case, a general massacre of the Christians had been precipitated—one in whom were bound up all my heart's hopes. Glauce Vlachos, who dwelt with her mother and brother hard by the class especially obnoxious to the Mohammedans, and hence it seemed likely that it was near to the home of my betrothed that the beginning of the outrage had occurred, a fact which filled me with the gravest apprehension the more I pondered upon it. I realized, now that blood had been shed, that the fanatical Moslems of the city, and the Druses who had recently come in from the Hauran and Lebanon, would pause at nothing. A crusade of murder and rapine throughout the whole Christian section was likely to ensue. I suspected that even tht​ soldiers would join in the pillage, and would not hesitate to avail themselves of an opportunity to plunder.

Chaos had indeed come. No tie, no spot would be held sacred. My only hope was that the disturbance was as yet confined to the streets, an that the furious Moslems had not begun to attack the Christian houses.

While these thoughts were chasing through my brain I strained every energy in eluding my pursuers. The street was tortuous, and I feared at each turn I might encounter others hostile to me, but I did not. I was now approaching a vicinity with which I was perfectly familiar, a quarter where I knew every dwelling, every lane and every blind alley. Suddenly I heard a disturbance directly ahead upon my left, whither the highway was leading me. Garbed as I was I knew that to advance was to run directly into the lion's jaw. On my right was a narrow lane which bent circuitously in the direction of the city walls. Into this I dashed. My pursuers were not in sight, and hope gave me renewed speed.

A change of clothing, a disguise, that was what I must obtain. But how? Ah, there was Kuria Evander. Mme. Evander, as the French would say. Why had I not thought of her before? Her house communicated with the very lane which I was following> This good woman, who had thus providentially come into my mind, was a widow with whose husband my uncle had had extensive dealings in years past. It was to Evander, a Greek who had lapsed from orthodoxy to Islamism, that many Palmyrenes, Druses and Bedouins disposed of whatever they had for sale. He acted as a kind of middleman, and not only purchased but bartered, going on trading expeditions into the outlying regions far and near. Although he had been several years dead, I knew that his widows, an old acquaintance of my aunt, must still have n her possession some of the garments worn by her husband in his many comings and goings, for Evander was wont to dress after the manner of the people among whom he traded.

At length I reached a doorway in the wall, communicating with a passage which, in turn, gave access to the house. I was aware that this entrance was quite as much in use as the more pretentious one, inasmuch as the laneway afforded a quicker means of gaining the large bazars​ than the wider thoroughfare which the dwelling properly faced.

I pulled a ringing summons upon the bell and waited in anxious suspense, listening for footsteps both without and within. Very soon I heard quick footfalls along the passage, and a voice which I recognized as Mme. Evander's called:

"Who is there?"

"'Tis I, Andreas Dorian," I answered. "There is a massacre of the Christians, and I am pursued."

Instantly she began to undo the fastenings, and in a few seconds I was by her side.

Part II.

"I suspected from the sounds what was happening," she said, as I followed her to the inner court. "I am not surprised."

Hurriedly I related to her my experience, and told her my wish. She knew of my betrothal to Glauce, and did not seriously attempt to dissuade me from again entering the streets.

"I can disguise you," she said, "But would it not be well to wait until night [?].

"But think what may happen in the meanwhile!" I cried.

"As you will," she said, and then continued: "Should you succeed in reaching your friends, bring them hither, if possible, for they will be safer here if the pillage of houses begins. The Moslems will respect my husband's memory, and leave me unmolested."

I thanked her most earnestly, and then hastily proceeded to array myself in the coarse garb of a Druse trader which she brought me. Having arranged my head dress, I presented byself before her for inspection.

"Good!" she exclaimed, "all save your color. That is too light and must be seen to."

She hastened to fetch some kind of a dark pigment with which she smeared my face and hands, thoroughly rubbing it into the skin.

"There!" she cried, standing off and surveying me. "I defy your best friend to recognize you."

"I had not the courage to go further."

"But it is not my friends that I would deceive."

"Your dearest enemies, then. And now, since doubtless it has slipped your mind, os long is it since you have used your name, I will mind you that you are called Abdul-Hamir, and that you hail from Dekir in the Hauran."

"Stay yet a moment!" she exclaimed, detaining me.

Leaving me hurriedly, she presently returned with a pair of excellent pistols and a scimitar.

"There," she said, "will complete your outfit," and then she pressed me to take some refreshments.

I disposed of the weapons, but assured her that eating was quite out of the question, so she accompanied me to the laneway entrance where she again bade me bring my friends to the shelter of her roof. Then she cut short my expressions of gratitude by closing the door.

Behind Lebanon, the sun was fast declining, red and round, and though there was no one in sight the uproar had increased during my brief tarry in the house of the good Mme. Evander. In half an hour, or three-quarters at the utmost, darkness would descend upon the city, and th[?] would add to the horrors of the gun and sword.

There were two routes by which I could reach the home of my betrothed, and I hesitated in regard to which one I should pursue. Finally I decided to take the more circuitous, as in that direction there seemed to be less tumult. Accordingly I emerged from the lane into the street on which the other entrance to the Evander house opened. Striking out at a brisk pace, I passed several narrow cross thoroughfares, where I caught sight of hurrying forms. Presently I met a band of five murderous-looking wretches, one of whom accosted me.

"Come with us," he said. "There is good game all about here."

"Nay," I answered, "I may not, for I have an account of my own to settle."

"May Allah speed you!" the villain exclaimed, and the five hastened in pursuit of a poor straggler whom they at that moment espied.

After this test I felt assured of my disguise, and hurried onward with a bolder air. I knew that at any moment I might be forced to view, if not to participate in, some awful scene, and nerved myself for the trail. I had not long to wait, for soon, out from a cul-de-sac, where they had been at their fiendish work, a crowd of Druses and dervishes and the scum of the city rushed, and I was swept forward by it. I saw that it was quite useless to endeavor to extricate myself from the press, so suffered myself to be borne along without resistance.

"Death to the Christian dogs! Death to them in Allah's name!" was the rallying cry.

Ere long, in the highway just ahead, three or four Christians were discovered defending themselves against half a dozen Moslems. When my companions saw this unequal combat a frenzied shout went up. There was a mad rush, in which I was compelled to join with the rest, and down upon the earth the poor unfortunates were dashed, to be hacked and hewn out of all human semblance. In the exultation which followed I was able to extricate myself from the assassin and to continue on my course.

I was not nearing the quarter where the home of Glauce was situated, and, thinking to reach the house by a little [?] the Greek church. [haps?] half the rem[?] I became aware [?] approaching footsteps, though an account of a sharp angel just ahead I could not tell who the runners were. Where I chanced to be the walls were bare and smooth and high. There was not even a doorway in which I could stand and allow the oncomers to pass. I halted, set my back against the wall and waited in suspense. Nearer the footsteps drew and then the figure of a tall, muscular Greek, whom I remembered to have noticed in the sadlers' bazar​, appeared. He was armed with a stout cudgel, while close upon his heels, with drawn blades, pressed five Mussulmans.

All saw me. The Greek, judging me from my apparel to be a foe, measured me with his eye as though calculating my strength, yet he did not pause. His pursuers set up a great shout, bidding me intercept him. This I realized, in order to carry out the part I was playing, I must make some show of doing. Accordingly I whipped out my scimitar. I had, however, no intention of making more than a pass at him, but he could not know this and smote at me with all his gathered strength and the fury of a desperate man. My weapon was of small avail in breaking the descent of the blow. Had I not realized my powerlessness and striven to avoid the sweeping billet my head must have been crushed to a jelly. As it was, even though I received but the glancing force of the stroke, I was hurled violently against the wall; I saw for an instant the eager face of the pursuing Moslems as through a bluish mist, then I felt my limbs falling and seemed to fall into a black void.

The next sensation of which I was conscious was a sound like a great murmuring of wind, and I fancied myself for a moment lying beneath the boughs of the cedars of Lebanon where I Had once encamped. Then a sharp pain pierced my temples, and in spite of the agony I sat upright, for I recalled what had happened. Hours must have elapsed since my unfortunate encounter, for there hung the moon above me. As I thought of what might have occurred during the interval, I staggered to my feet. There was a a great lump upon my head, but as I leaned against the wall I felt my strength gradually returning. After a little I began to [?] slowly at first then with [erable?] speed.

[?] reached the entrance to the Greek Church, and discovered that the doors had been battered in. The moonlight enabled me to see that the place had been sacked. motionless figures, some of them priests, lay stretched about on the floor. I shrank back in horror, and hastened with the direst apprehension on my way. Thus far I had encountered no living being. Should I find the same signs of death and desolation at my beloved's home? A few steps brought me to the house, and here my worst fears were realized. A breach had been made int he mud and mortar wall, and the odor of the outer passage was rent from its hinges. In the first court I came upon the body of the man servant, and at the opening of the inner court lay the maid. For a moment I had not the courage to go further. The fountain int he center of the inclosure was as musical as on the happiest night when I had listened to its murmur, side by side with my betrothed. Now the sound of it maddened me. All the living rooms of the family opened from this marble-paved space, and at length, with a resolution born of despair, I hurried from one apartment to another. Everywhere the direst confusion reigned. Divans were overturned, tapestries rent in shreds, ornaments shattered, the contents of chests and drawers strewn about and trampled upon.

Search as I would, no trace could I find of her whom I sought, nor of her mother and brother. Then a kind of frenzy seized me, and, regardless of who might be attracted by the sound of my voice, I began calling my beloved by name.

"Glauce! Glauce!" I cried, "For the love of God answer me! It is your Andreas who calls."

Again and again I repeated her name, and the walls of the court flung it back to me. As I paused to listen after a series of desperate appeals. I fancied I heard a stir in the direction of a room into which I had cast but a hasty glance, a sort of store-room. While I was striding thither, a figure appeared in the moonlight which slanted in at the doorway. It was Glauce.

Part III.

With a cry of joy I rushed forward to take her in my arms, but she sank upon her knees with a supplication for mercy, not recognizing me in my disguise. Raising her gently, I soon succeeded in assuring her that it was indeed I who had come to her rescue, whereat she clung to me with such loving trust that the pain in my head was suddenly gone, and I felt that I had been endowed with a giant's strength.

Then I learned how, half an hour before the outbreak, her mother had gone upon an errand to her brother's bazar​; how Glauce had listened in horror to the attack upon the church; how, one by one, the houses in the vicinity had been assailed, and the inmates butchered; how, when she had heard the murderers at the entrance to her own home, she had insisted on secreting herself behind some boxes in a closet in the storeroom, though her maid besought her to hide elsewhere; how she had remained there for hours in awful suspense, and finally how she had ventured out at the sound of some on shouting her name, although she had not recognized the voice.

"Oh, Andreas," she cried, when this recital was finished, "my mother! Can she have escaped?"

"Yes, if she is with your brother, I have little doubt but what she is safe." I answered, for how could I tell her that the Christian bazars​ would be attacked and looted and perhaps those dear to her pitilessly murdered?

She brightened visibly under this assurance, and for the first time began to look about her. Then I cursed my carelessness in not removing the bodies of the two servants. As I stood wondering how I could for a few moments engage her attention she suddenly tightened her grip upon my arms.

"See!" she whispered. "There is some one in the other court."

We were exactly opposite the passage connecting the two courts, and I looked in the direction indicated just in time to detect a shadow slowly moving across the open space. An instant's heistation might prove fatal to both of us, and I pushed Glauce gently within the storeroom.

"Quick!" I said. "Conceal yourself again."

Seeing that she was hastening to do as I bade, I slipped off my loose shoes, and with drawn scimitar in hand sped silently across the marble pavement to the passage by which the courts were joined. Along this I crept until I was within four or five feet of the further entrance, where hung a heavy piece of Bagdad drapery. Here I crouched and listened. The approaching footfalls told me that there was but one foe to be met, and I breathed a prayer of thanks-giving. Now the cautious steps were close at hand, and now I beheld, outlined clear against the moonlit background, the cruel and cunning face of a Druse. As he unsuspectingly advanced I swung my scimitar and clove his head to the chin. Down he sand in a limp heap, and I surveyed my bloody work without a shudder, such as the avenging fury that possessed me. Hastily dragging the body of the Druse to a shadowy corner, and having gently laid the maid and manservant side by side in one of the outer rooms, I summoned Glauce from her concealment.

"We are safe for the present," I said, to reassure her. She seemed to understand, and did not question me. Then I told her of Mme. Evander's offer.

"Oh, let us go to her at once," my betrothed cried.

"But you cannot venture into the streets dressed as you are," I exclaimed. "Even in my present array I could not protect you for a moment."

She glanced ruefully down at her soiled and tumbled gown.

"I suppose a suit of Constantine (Constantine as her brother) would not do? she said, with a charming look, forgetting for the instant the gravity of the situation.

"No," I replied, "but one belonging to Petros, you,

last column of story is folded under

"Part of them suspect us! We must make a dash for the Consulate. Now, before they move!" I cried, grasping Glauce's hand.

We sprang forward together, and for a few seconds they did not hear us, nor could they see us, for we kept within the shadow. Then the sound of our flying footsteps reached their ears, and a wild shout of rage went up.

"We are safe, Glauce, safe," I exclaimed, "if they are awake at the Consulate!"

I knew our pursuers were gaining rapidly, but our shelter was close at hand. We reached the door, and I struck upon it repeated blows with the hilt of my scimitar. There was an answering shout from within. We heard a chain fall, and the shooting back of bolts. Then the great iron-clenched barrier swung upon its hinges, and there stood the porter with his lantern. We leaped past him with a cry of joy, and the massive door clanged shut in the faces of the howling Druses.

 
Page 47
Article transcribed on page 62.

THE EXPOSITION IN EMBRYO

Few More Ideas Offered by the Many Readers of the World-Herald.

Flying Machine Made Practical and Amusing, Which Will Eclipse the Ferris Wheel.

A Mushroom Exhibit and Its Beneficial Results—Live Indians to Illustrate American History—Other Suggestions.

The World-Herald publishes this week another series of ideas for the Trans-Mississippi exposition to be held in Omaha during the summer of 1898.

W. W. Jenne, Falls City, Neb.—If the management could get an air ship or flying machine that could be operated safely it not only would be the greatest attraction, but it would be more thoroughly advertised and would more thoroughly advertise the exposition, and create a greater sensation than any once other attraction that could be produced, and I would submit the following plan for the management to think over. Get one of the parties that claim to have perfected their flying machines to build one that will carry five or six people, or more, and so constructed that a large balloon could be placed over and attached to it. This balloon would enable them to ascend as high as they wished to go. Then they could open the valve in the balloon and let out the gas or hot air (which ever they use), gradually, starting the engine in the airship and circle around and descend. I think there ought to be a space of about 200 feet in diameter, with railroads from circumference, all verging to the center. The ship could light any place on the 200 feet in diameter and be easily moved to the center, when the balloon could be refilled. There could be an excavation underneath the center sufficiently large for all the apparatus and all attachments sufficient to re-charge the balloon. I think the plan is feasible and could be accomplished. It would be one of the greatest attractions at the exposition.

CHAPTERS IN AMERICAN HISTORY

James M. Gillan—If the facilities which are to be provided include a large auditorium, suitable for an immense ground floor theater, I think a very attractive feature of the Trans-Mississippi exposition could be provided for in the form of historical plays, in which the genuine Indian would become the central figure and chief performer.

Let me simply suggest an outline of what I have in view, and the reader may fill in the details. I understand that, in all probability, there will be a real North American Indian exhibit in connection with the exposition, such as probably the world has never seen before. The location of Omaha and the name Omaha, by the way, suggests an effort in this direction that can easily be made to over-reach all former exhibits of Indian life and of the advancement of the red man along the lines of civilization. Taking it for granted that there will be a large number of Indians present for the purpose of making the Indian exhibit real and true to life, I have imagined that a series of historic plays might be introduced as night attractions that would be both interesting and instructive.

Take, for instance, the story of John Smith. With a little clever work the skeleton of a play could be constructed, and with a few intelligent Indians and some white men to take the parts, it appears to me a very interesting entertainment could be made out of that familiar old story. There would be ample opportunity in such a piece to work in a thousand and one little things characteristic of Indian life.

In the story of William Penn may be found the frame work for another evening of rare entertainment along the same line.

THE CUSTER MASSACRE, ILLUSTRATED.

A thrilling and realistic entertainment might be made out of a representation of the famous Custer massacre, and when one looks over the field it will be seen that the history of our country is thickly studded with events that might be portrayed in great living pictures of immense proportions and in a manner more real and thrilling than ever before. This is a field, I think, that will be very rich in possibilities if some man with the right brand of genius could and would enter upon the work of developing it. I would not advise a sort of pocket edition of Buffalo Bill's "Wild West" show, but something more gentle and historic, and not so rough and explosive in character. I hope this suggestion may be taken up by some one who can give it thought and attention.

A MUSHROOM STUDY.

Harriet S. MacMurphy—The department of household economics of the Woman's club has organized for the study of mycology. What has that to do with a plan for the exposition?

First, let me explain what mycology means, as there may be those who do not understand the term mycology, although they know the work which it signifies. Mycology is that branch of natural science which relates to fungi or mushrooms.

During the World's fair a Polish countess came to Chicago and almost at the feet of the exposition she picked up twenty-five varieties of mushrooms growing wild, which were allowed to fall uneaten beneath the feet of the multitude, when they contained as much nourishment as the richest porterhouse steak. She taught a few Americans how to distinguish them and to cook them.

The prairies of the western states are full of edible mushrooms, and the women of the west propose to know as much about the food products of the country as Polish countesses. Therefore, they will study these very nutritious food products, which have hitherto gone to waste. They will then suggest that in the food department of the Trans-Mississippi exposition the best display of western mushrooms that it is possible to obtain be made, that display to be daily renewed, and practical methods of preparing them be given, to the end that one of the most healthful and nutritious foods provided by nature shall be utilized.

We are said to be the most wasteful nation on the earth. We sent to France for the mushrooms that are growing at our very doors, and that a little cultivation would bring forth in almost endless quantities.

The most cultivated tastes are the ones that enjoy the mushroom. The wild fungus of the prairie far excels the cultivated product that comes from foreign lands.

A display of these various and curious growths, from the giant puff ball to the tiny cup that might shelter a fairy,

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RESPONSIBILITY AND RESPO[?]

During the present week the lower house of the Nebraska legislature consider the Trans-Mississippi exposition bill. The World-Herald ta[?] opportunity for a serious talk with the members of the legislature. I[?] not to be necessary to impress upon a body of intelligent men the grave importance of a liberal appropriation by the state within whose borders the exposition is to be held. But it cannot be denied that there is an ele[?] opposition to any appropriation by the state of Nebraska for this exposition. That this opposition is limited to a few persons is well demonstrated [?] interviews printed in the World-Herald during the past week, and the overwhelming sentiment among the taxpayers of the state is in favor of [?]appropriations.

So far as the bill is concerned, this is not a political question. [?]involved the best interests of all Nebraska and the dignity of this s[?] home and abroad. The most difficult thing of accomplishment is a [?] appropriation, but already the congress has pledged $200,000 to this exposition and the members of congress have become so impressed with the importance of the enterprise that it is very likely that this appropriation will [?]creased to $275,000. Nebraska has been the recipient of very gene[?]gratulations upon the fact that so liberal an appropriation has been by the federal government to an enterprise that is to be located w[?] borders of Nebraska.

If after the federal government has shown its appreciation of the importance of this exposition the Nebraska legislature should fail to [?] appropriation, or making an appropriation, should limit it to a compa[?] insignificant sum, what would be thought of Nebraska? Would not [?]dition of this state be humiliating to every good citizen? Would not N[?] be the subject for the jests and jibes of those who are only too willing [?] reflections upon western states?

The preliminary work on this great enterprise has been brought [?] point where all that is necessary to insure its success is a liberal appropriation by the state which more than any other one state will be benefited [?] this enterprise. And it must not be forgotten that all that is necessary [?]sure the utter collapse of the enterprise is for the Nebraska legislature either fail to make any appropriation or to make an appropriation [?] a sum that would practically be of no benefit.

Turning from this point of view, which demonstrates the necessit[?]tion on the part of Nebraska, the legislature has but to consider the [?]tions: "Do the people of this state favor a liberal appropriation, a[?] Nebraska afford to make the outlay for the returns that are assure[?] state?"

Concerning the first proposition there ought to be no doubt. The [?] Herald undertakes to say, after careful investigation, that there i[?] county in Nebraska whose taxpayers, by an overwhelming majority [?] favor a liberal appropriation. Concerning the second proposition, it [?] necessary to present evidence in the affirmative. The appropriation [?] would not increase the taxes of any citizen of the state, while the p[?] of this sum would be less than 30 cents for every individual in the state [?] returns by way of increased value in Nebraska real estate and the [?]ment of all Nebraska interests, together with the splendid adver[?] afforded this state, are so evident that it is hardly necessary to mention.

The World-Herald believes it to be the duty of every member of the [?]ture, regardless of politics, to go to the support of the exposition bill [?]fore the lower house. That measure ought not to become the instru[?] which political grievances are avenged. Republicans and bimetallists to unite upon this measure and show to the world that Nebraska is a [?]sive state.

While it is the duty of men of all parties to support this measure [?] not be forgotten that the dominant party in all legislative bodies [?] carries the burden of all legislation or the failure of legislation.

Some of the members who have opposed this bill seem to have [?] all their attention to one side of their responsibility. These have dwelt [?] upon the idea that if they make no appropriation or make an insignificant appropriation they will escape all serious responsibility. They seem n[?]alize that in refusing to make an adequate appropriation they assume responsibility of striking a death blow at the exposition. That is [?]sibility which no political party in existence could safely assume.

Speaking directly to the dominant forces in the legislature the W[?] aid will be pardoned if it reminds those forces that no individual or [?] in Nebraska has a deeper interest or a greater anxiety for wise legisla[?] creditable discharge of all duties by the bimetallists in this legisla[?] the World-Herald itself. We do not believe it is necessary for the W[?] aid to assure the bimetallists in the legislature that the World-Herald not urge this exposition appropriation at the hands of a bimetallist. [?] if the World-Herald did not believe that such a course would reflect [?] the dominant political forces in Nebraska.

The men who imagine that public sentiment in this state is [?]whelmingly in favor of a liberal appropriation have studied public [?] to no purpose. The taxpayers of this state are favorable to this me[?] the legislature ought to pass it by a practically unanimous vote.

 

WHAT THE WOMEN WILL DO

Plan of Organization for the Woman's Board of Managers.

EDUCATIONAL EXHIBIT IN THEIR HANDS

Board Will All Have Charge of a Series of Congresses on Various Scientific and Philanthropical Lines—Call for Mass Meeting.

One of the several very important matters in connection with the Transmississippi and International Exposition yet to be settled is the election of members of the Woman's board, which will be disposed of the latter part of next week. The plan of organization for this board was approved by the executive committee of the exposition at the meeting yesterday afternoon, and all that now remains to be done is to elect the members of the board.

It was not deemed advisable to have a distinct woman's building in connection with the exposition, and the Woman's board has been given charge of the educational exhibit, which is made a bureau of the Department of exhibits. The board will also have the direction of such congresses on scientific and philosophical subjects as may be gathered together during the life of the exposition.

The board will be composed of twenty-seven members, distributed as heretofore published in The Bee, and will be empowered to elect its own officers, and adopt rules for its own government, its actions, however, to be at all times subject to the approval of the exposition executive committee.

The plan of organization in detail as adopted by the women and approved by the executive committee, giving the full scope of the work to be undertaken, is as follows:

Section 1: That the women be given charge of the subdepartment of education in its various branches, viz: The exhibits of the work of public schools, kindergartens, manual training and industrial schools, schools for the deaf, blind, and feeble minded, art schools, reform schools, and all schools of special instruction; and that they also have charge of a series of congresses on various scientific and philosophical lines during the months from June to November, 1898.

Section 2. That this subdepartment of education be in the hands and under control of a board of managers of twenty-seven in number, as more particularly specified in section 11, subject to the approval of the Board of Directors of the exposition; eleven of said managers shall be chosen from Omaha, two from South Omaha, two from Council Bluffs and twelve from Nebraska outside of Omaha and South Omaha.

Section 3. That the local members of the Board of Managers be elected at a mass meeting of the women of Omaha; that the members from South Omaha and Council Bluffs shall be elected at a mass meeting of the women in each of said cities called for that purpose, each of said meetings to be called by the secretary of this board; the Omaha meeting to be held Friday, February 11, 1896 at 2 o'clock p.m.

Section 4. That from each congressional district in the state, two members of the Board of Managers shall be elected at a mass meeting of the women of each district called for that purpose.

Section 5. That the congressman from each congressional district shall designate where the said mass meetings shall be held, and, if desired by the women of said district, the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition will send a woman from Omaha to said district to fully explain the ends and aims of the expositions.

Section 6. That the said Board of Managers may elect its own officers and adopt rules governing its actions.

Section 7. That two women from each state outside of Nebraska be selected to form an advisory council, auxiliary to the Board of Managers.

Section 8. That the advisory council be selected by the Board of Managers from names suggested to the board by the different state federations of clubs and other educational organization

Section 9. That the members of the Board of Managers and of the advisory council do not receive renumeration.

Section 10. That in the work of the various departments and committees of the Transmississippi and International Exposition where the services of women would be valuable, that they be asked to render such services.

Section 11. The powers of the said Board of Managers shall be complete for the purposes above outlined, subject, however, to the approval of the executive committee of the Transmississippi and International Exposition, and to provide for this approval the secretary of the said Board of Managers shall transmit a report of the proceedings of their meetings to the secretary of the exposition, who shall thereupon lay same before the executive committee for its approval.

In pursuance of the power conferred upon him by the foregoing articles, Secretary Wakefield has issued the following call for a mass meeting of women to be held in this city next Friday afternoon:

In accordance with the provisions of the plan of organization for the Bureau of Education of the Transmississippi and International Exposition, a mass meeting of the women of Omaha is hereby called to meet on Friday, February 12, at 3 o'clock p.m. in the Creighton theater. Fifteenth and

column ends abruptly

NORTH SIDERS EXPRESS APPROVAL.

The reading of the report consumed some time and it was listened to with the closest attention. When the secretary finished reading the lobby enjoyed itself and nearly raised the roof. It is unnecessary to remark that the exuberance did not emanate from the supporters of the sites other than Miller park.

Mr. Bidwell gained the floor as soon as order was restored and moved that the report be adopted and that the board proceed at once to vote on the selection of a site.

Mr. Montgomery objected to any such procedure and wanted the report placed on file and the vote on a site postponed until the directors had time to examine the report.

Mr. Rosewater suggested that the report should be published in full and thoroughly discussed by the board before taking a vote.

Mr. Montgomery's amendment to place the report on file was adopted and then Mr. Farrell moved that the consideration of the report and a vote on the site be postponed for one week.

This was hotly opposed by the Miller park people and it was urged that the city council had deferred making the annual tax levy until it was determined whether the exposition was to be held in one of the public parks or on private ground. In this connection Mr. Wharton called on President Wattles to state the result of his interview with the members of the city council on this point.

Mr. Wattles stated that some of the councilmen had told him that the council would not make an extra levy for the park fund until it was decided whether the exposition was to be located in one of the parks.

Mr. Wharton moved an amendment that the consideration of the report and a vote on a site be deferred until Tuesday afternoon.

Mr. Lindsey opposed this, saying that the matter should be given ample time to afford full discussion and avoid any charge that the board had taken snap judgment in the matter.

MR. HITCHCOCK'S ATTITUDE.

Mr. Hitchcock said Thursday would be ample time, but called attention to what he regarded as important details. He said that the supporters of all sites would be required to appear before the board next Tuesday and present good evidence that there were no defects in the title to the ground offered for sites which would interfere in any way with the exposition or cause any expense to the association, and to also make a showing as to the approaches to the grounds in order that there might be no misunderstanding when it came to getting into the grounds by rail or otherwise. Mr. Hitchcock said that if the site should be selected before these points were settled it might be the means of causing great expense to the exposition association.

Mr. Rosewater said he did not want to discuss the report of the engineers but he called attention to the fact that the recommendation of Miller park was based on the supposition that the old fort ground was at the disposal of the people of Omaha. Mr. Rosewater said this ground could easily be secured by special act of congress and he explained briefly the situation with respect to the disposition of this ground.

Mr. Wharton urged prompt action and said that postponement until Tuesday would give everybody plenty of time to investigate the various sites if they had not already done so.

Mr. Montgomery made a strong statement of the legal points which must be guarded against in making the selection of a site, in order that no complication surrounding the title might imperil the success of the exposition.

Mr. Webster said the question of a site should be decided as soon as possible in order to prevent strife between the different sections of the city. He made a lengthy speech along this line and concluded by offering a substitute that the board proceed at once to select a site, each member expressing his preference upon roll call.

COULDN'T CONTROL THEIR JOY.

While this discussion was going as the adherents of Miller park is the lobby applauded every speaker who urged prompt action and were very boisterous in their behavior. This caused Mr. Montgomery to enter an indignant protest. He said it was very evident that there were a number of Miller park people on the board and int he lobby, but he said he did not intend to be bulldozed and her served notice that if the site question as forced to a vote at once he would refuse to vote, not because he was opposed to Miller park or in favor of any other site, but simply because he had not had time to consider the recommendations and findings of the engineers.

"Why don't you say you will refuse to pay your subscription if it is located in Miller park?" shouted A. T. Rector, the director elected to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of J. A. Wakefield.

When order was restored again Mr. Rosewater secured the floor. He prefaced his remarks by saying that no one could accuse him of obstructing the exposition in any way, but he expressed the opinion that the whole course of developments had been foreordained. He charged that the report of the engineers sounded suspiciously like another engineer's report which had ben read [?] the city hall not very long ago. Mr. Rosewater said that while he was in Chicago recently he had taken occasion to inquire about the engineers employed by the special committee of the board. He told about the difficulties he had encountered in getting any trace of the gentlemen. He said he had inquired of the city engineer and was met with the statement that the gentlemen were unknown to that official. He had then tried prominent engineers who had been long in the city, but with no better success. He found that they were not members of the American Society of Civil Engineers, or of any other prominent society of engineers, but after extended inquiry he said he had found that Mr. Alexander was the superintendent of Lincoln park, on the NOrth Side and Mr. Shrader was connected with the park board on the West side of Chicago. Mr. Rosewater said he had learned that the two men were placed in their positions by the reigning political party, and were about to be ousted from their positions by the succeeding party, that they were not engineers of prominence or of standing n the profession. Continuing, Mr. Rosewater attacked the report of the engineers, which he said was weak in several points.

SPECIAL ACT OF CONGRESS NEEDED.

General Manderson followed Mr. Rosewater and explained still further the conditions and complications surrounding the use of the old fort grounds, saying that the land is directly in charge of the secretary of war,w ho is charged with the duty of dividing it and selling it to the highest bidder, and has no power to lease it or permit any portion of it to be used. The speaker expressed the opinion, however, that congress might easily be prevailed upon to pass such legislation at the coming special session as would allow the ground to be used temporarily for exposition purposes. General Manderson then made some very sarcastic references tot he faces of the directors being blank pages, whereon the name of the very best site for the exposition was yet to be written, and said that the members of the board were eminently qualified to sit as judges, as he doubted not that none of them had been improperly approached. Continuing, the speaker said that he was not prepared to vote on the selection of a site, as he had not heard the report of the engineers, and he asked that the talking of a vote be deferred until a full session of the board was secured, at which the merits of the several sites should be presented and a vote then taken. He suggested that the advocates of each site be required to present the advantages and conditions surrounding their site, and that fifteen minutes be given to each site at a meeting to be held Tuesday afternoon.

FINAL ACTION POSTPONED.

This idea met with favor, and after a great deal of discussion the following resolution was adopted.

Resolved, That when this board adjourns it be until Tuesday, at 2 p. m., to act upon the selection of an exposition site, and that the supporters of all sites be required to present at that time—

First—Proof of the character of the legal title and of power of possession;

Second—Proof and specification of the sufficiency of approaches, including both public highways and railroad trackage and maps of the ground offered;

Third—A bond of $10,000, conditioned to furnish possession and approaches without expense to the exposition, and that free and unobstructed use of the site shall be given to the exposition without expense to the exposition; that the site so selected by the directors shall be at their disposal whenever the directors ask for it, and continue during the exposition and thereafter until the exposition directors shall have removed all exhibits, structures, etc., and not later than April 1, 1899.

Resolved, That the promoters of each site shall be given fifteen minutes at the meeting on Tuesday in which to present the merits of their proposed site.

After the adoption of this resolution the meeting adjourned to meet Tuesday of this week at the Commercial club rooms at 2 p. m.

TO BE THE BUREAU OF EDUCATION.

Executive Committee Discusses the Woman's Department.

The woman's department of the exposition constituted the principal topic for discussion at the regular meeting of the executive committee at noon yesterday. It was decided that the department to be given over to the charge of the women should be designated as the Bureau of Education of the Department of Exhibits.

The mass meeting of the woman of Omaha to be held at Creighton theater Friday afternoon of this week at 2 o'clock will be called to order by President Wattles if he is int he city and int he event of his absence of Vice President Alvin Saunders will preside.

The executive committee decided to recommend to the mass meeting of women that the eleven members of the Board of Managers be elected int he following manner: That an informal ballot be first taken, each woman to vote for eleven names. The twenty-two women receiving the highest vote shall be considered as the candidates and a formal ballot then taken, each woman voting for eleven of these twenty-two women, the eleven receiving the highest vote to be declared elected.

On recommendation of the Department of Promotion it was decided to send excursions to the legislatures of the various transmississippi states to appear before those bodies and explain the merits of the exposition and endeavor to secure the passage of the bills making appropriations for state exhibits. Manager Hitchcock presented a number of invitations from the various states, asking that delelgations be sent to present the merits of the exposition. A committee was appointed, comprising Manager Babcock of the Department of Transportation, President Wattles and Chairman Lindsey of the executive committee, to make the necessary arrangements.

 
Page 49

THE ENGINEERS' REPORT.

It is always the unexpected that happens, runs the old adage. It was not so, however, with the sealed verdict which the imported expert engineers rendered in the case of the competing exposition sites. Although the resolution adopted by the full board of the exposition directors was voted with the general understanding that no recommendation was to be made of any particular site, and that the engineers were to be employed to make an unbiased professional report of the advantages and disadvantages of each of the sites from the standpoint of engineering and landscape architecture, the two Chicago experts have gone out of their ways to relieve the directors of their duty to fix upon the location and to direct them what to do.

Instead of presenting a carefully prepared review of the engineering problems to be solved, the relative cost of making each of the sites available for exposition purposes, including grading, sewerage, water supply, fire protection, paving, drainage, building artificial lakes, the experts simply regale the public with a job lot of platitudes as to distances, transportation facilities and topographical descriptions, with great stress in every other sentence on the importance of irrigation. Judging from the tenor of the report, the chief object of the exposition is the establishment of a model irrigation farm. From first to last the report is so constructed as to create the impression that not less than four hundred acres are required for the exposition and that the approaches from the city by rail or roadway must be on a dead level.

With such conditions imposed upon the exposition managers, Miller park would be the only available site. If that were really the case there was no necessity for squandering money on experts or going through the meaningless form of a competition for location. The fact is that neither 400 acres nor half that number are required for an exposition site, even if irrigation were to be the greatest feature.

The false assumption of the engineers that Fort Omaha is a part of the Miller Park site is as misleading as their assertion that location is preferable to others because it affords a splendid opportunity for the erection of permanent buildings. Fort Omaha cannot be utilized for the exposition without a special act of congress, and no permanent building designed with a view to its conversion into a museum or auditorium would be of service located four miles from the postoffice. Even Chicago, with its vast population and improved rapid transit system, has found that the field museum has lost its value as a public institution by reason of its distance from the business center, and a proposition to remove it to the lake front is earnestly advocated.

It is not the purpose of The Bee to attempt an analysis of the expert report, as there is scarcely anything to analyze. It reads like the plea of a retained lawyer, instead of an uncolored statement of facts and figures by an engineer. It goes without saying that it will be so regarded by all persons familiar with the subject. As a guide to the directors the report can carry no weight. It scarcely affords a plausible excuse for those predetermined to follow its advice.

If Nebraska wants to make the Transmississippi Exposition an assured success, let her legislature make the appropriation asked for. If Nebraska will lead others will follow.—Salt Lake Herald.

for the Women's Board.

Since Secretary Wakefield of the Transmississippi Exposition has issued a call for a mass meeting of women to be held next Saturday afternoon at the parlors of the Young Men's Christian association, interest in the matter has been revived to some extent. South Omaha will be entitled to two members on the board of women managers, and already there is one candidate in the field for that honor. Mrs. N. B. Mead, Twenty-second and N streets, is being urged bzy​ her friends to enter the race, and very likely she will do so. Mrs. Mead is quite prominent in church work and is very well and favorably known here, her husband being manager of the Western Union Telegraph company's office at the exchange. Besides belonging to several church societies, Mrs. Mead is one of the prominent members of the Eastern Star. Her friends are of opinion that she would be a creditable representative of the city on the board of women managers.

OMAHA WOMEN AND EXPOSITION.

Mass Meeting to Elect Board of Lady Managers.

Secretary Wakefield of the exposition association announces that the mass meeting of the women of Omaha to elect eleven members of the Board of Lady Managers of the exposition, which is called to meet in Creighton theater Friday afternoon of this week, will be called to order at 2:30, instead of 2 o'clock, as at first announced. This change was made in order that the school teachers of the city, who have manifested a lively interest in the exposition, may have an opportunity to take part in the business of the meeting. Superintendent Pearse called the attention of the secretary to the fact that if the meeting was called to order at 2 o'clock, as announced, the teachers would not be able to be present, and he requested that the hour be changed to 3 o'clock. After consulting with the officers of the exposition association it was decided to change the hour to 2:30.

Board of Lady Managers.

The following named women have consented to allow their names to be balloted upon in the selection of members of the Lady Board of Managers of the Transmississippi Exposition: Mesdames J. H. McIntosh, Thomas L. Kimball, N. P. Feil, W. W. Keysor, Grace B. Sudborough and W. P. Halford.

LOCATING THE EXPOSITION

MEETING OF DIRECTORS THIS AFTERNOON

Resolution Requiring a Majority of the Directors in Favor of One Site to Decide is Defeated.

The meeting of the directors of the Exposition association to decide upon a site for the exposition was held this afternoon in the Board of Trade building. The meeting was held in the large room on the second floor that the lobby might be accommodated, and the lobby was out in full force. It was a very miscellaneous gathering, composed largely of residents of the northern part of the city, with a large sprinkling of representatives of organized labor, and advocates of the several proposed sites, with those representing Miller park greatly in the majority.

Roll call at 2 o'clock showed less than a quorum present, and it was fifteen minutes after the hour when a bare quorum of twenty-six mebers​ was counted.

President Wattles called the meeting to order and cautioned the lobby against indulging in applause or making any noise during the meeting.

During the reading of the minutes other members came in until there were thirty present, when Mr. Lindsey presented a resolution providing that when a vote is taken on the question of a site a majority of the board shall be required in favor of a site before it can be selected, and providing, also, that the vote be taken by written ballots.

Mr. Wharton objected to the resolution for the reason that a number of the directors were out of the city and others had remained until today in order to vote on the question, and it would be unfair to them to wait until a full attendance is required.

In reply to a request by Mr. Payne, the secretary read the resolution offered by Mr. Wharton at the meeting of January 11, which provided that the full board shall vote on the question of a site.

President Wattles ruled that the latter resolution had no bearing on the matter in hand and referred simply to the Board of Directors as distinguished from the ex-

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Mr. Webster and Mr. Millard opposed any further delay and urged immediate action.

Mr. Lindsay urged that the choice for site should not be left to a bare majority of the board, thus throwing the choice of a site into the hands of fourteen or fifteen men.

President Wattles took the floor to oppose the resolution, saying that all members of the board had ample notice of the meeting and if they were not present it was not the fault of those who had come to the meeting. He advised the rejection of the resolution.

General Manderson opposed the position taken by the president, and predicted that if the question of a site was not decided by the vote of a majority of the entire board for one site there would be great dissatisfaction and the exposition would suffer. He opposed allowing a majority of thirty-three men to decide the location.

Ex-Governor Saunders charged that the resolution was simply brought in for the purpose of delay and he opposed it.

There was applause and yells from the lobby at the conclusion of Saunder's remarks, and President Wattles cautioned the spectators that the room would be cleared unless they refrained from making so much noise.

A vote was taken upon the resolution and a roll call was taken, resulting as follows: Ayes, 16; nays, 20. It was declared lost.

The president announced that the special order of the meeting would be taken up and he said the supporters of each site would be given ten minutes in which to present the points in favor of their site.

On motion of General Manderson the sites were called in alphabetical order.

East Omaha was called, but no one appeared to defend the claims of that location.

Elmwood park was called next and W. R. Bennett read a paper, setting forth at length the advantages presented by the site which includes Elmwood park and the State fair grounds.

WILL PROTEST AGAINST THE BILL.

Central Labor Union Decides to Send a Committee to Lincoln.

At a special meeting last night the Central Labor union decided to draw up a protest against the Transmississippi Exposition appropriation bill as it has been introduced in the legislature. A committee of three, consisting of Grabach, Clark and Bell, was appointed to draw up this protest and have it printed. Copies to the number of 250 were ordered printed and those are to be taken to Lincoln by two members of the committee for distribution.

This committee is further empowered to see that the friends of labor in the legislature work for the amendments which the central labor union desired to be incorporated in the appropriation bill. These amendments provided that labor on the exposition shall be employed but eight hours a day at a minimum scale of $1.50 a day. The fact that these amendments were not found in the bill introduced called forth the special meeting.

It was also determined that this committee should attend the meeting of the board of exposition directors today to invite a committee from that body to a conference in the labor matter. If this conference should be held the labor union would endeavor to persuade the board committee to recommend the adoption of the union's desired amendments by resolution. It is not expected, however, that the invitation will be accepted.

In case of a refusal to confer, the union committee will then go to Lincoln to lobby against the bill as now prepared. The members will try to have it so arranged that the appropriation shall never reach the hands of the board of exposition directors, but shall be expended by a state board of managers. At least one-half of this board shall consist of laboring men.

This plan of campaign was decided upon after a discussion that lasted over three hours. It was practically the only matter considered, although a motion was made that the action of the union in recommending the selection of the poor farm site for the exposition be rescinded. The motion was not allowed to come up on the grounds that the meeting, being special, could not consider it.

 

Exposition Endorsements

BY THE TRANSMISSISSIPPI PRESS.

Eureka (Utah) Miner: The Transmississippi Exposition which will beheld in OMaha from June to November, 1898, will be a western institution for the benefit of western industries and every western state should lend its influence and assistance in making the exposition a success. there is no doubt but that this Transmississippi Exposition will be of almost incalculable benefit to the entire west on account of the advertisement of our resources and advantages which it will furnish. We believe that every western state will take advantage of it to push its own interests to the fore and we trust UTah will not be a laggard. The exhibit from Utah ought to be one of the most extensive at the exposition, for no state in the west has the advantages for investment and settlement which we have. We trust that the legislature will see to it that this matter is not overlooked in the list of appropriations.

Ellensburg (Wash.) Capital: Active preparations are being made in Omaha for the Transmississippi and INternational Exposition, which is to be held there in 1898. The idea is one that appeals especially to the people of the great west, and no doubt their best energies will be thrown into it.

Ft. Smith (Ark.) News Record: The News-Record has, from time to time, referred to the Transmississippi Exposition which is to be held in Omaha in 1898.

The indications now are that this exposition, which is to show the resources of the region west of the Mississippi river, will be a great success. Already a hearty response is being sent from every section of the country invited to participate, and there is every reason to believe that the affairs will be in all respects worthy of the closing years of a remarkable century. From the golden wheat fields of the north to the cotton fields of the south the territory to be embraced in the exhibits is one of incomparable richness in every element of natural wealth. Drawing from such a region, an exposition of the character projected cannot but be of tremendous importance.

The people of Omaha, with their characteristic push and enterprise, have risen to the occasion and subscribed something over $300,000 to the enterprise—a feat of no small magnitude in times such as these. A bill is now pending in the Nebraska legislature providing for the appropriation of $350,000 more, and we have no doubt that if necessities demand it the people of Omaha and Nebraska will do still more.

With the memories of the splendid results flowing from our exhibit at the World's fair to spur them on the Arkansas legislators should not fail to provide an appropriation of sufficient magnitude to give Arkansas an exhibit at the Omaha exposition worthy of the imperial resources of this commonwealth.

What states in the union can show to the world timber, fruit, cotton, wheat, lead coal, gold, silver, zinc, copper, iron, manganese, marble, granite, novaculite, petroleum and a score of other equally important products?

Arkansas—Arkansas alone. And it is only her just due that all the world should know of these things.

West Union (Ia.) Gazette: The Transmississippi and International Exposition will be held in OMaha in 1898. The work is in good hands, and cannot be otherwise than a success. It will undoubtedly prove a big thing for Omaha and the entire middle west.

Little Rock (Ark.) Gazette: In the bill appropriating a certain amount for exhibition purposes at both the Nashville and Omaha expositions ample provision should be made for bringing out the features and excellences of our public school system.

There is no longer any question of Arkansas' mineral, timber, agricultural and horticultural resources, but it is in evidence that not enough is known of our excellent and successful public school system to become an inducement for strangers to settle in the state.

An amendment to the bill should be introduced setting apart a certain amount that would in reason cover the expense necessary to a creditable exhibit of the public school work of the state; and the money so appropriated should be assigned to the control of the state; and the money so appropriated should be assigned to the control of the state superintendent of public instruction, whose experience and position make him the best judge of what is required to make a successful school exhibit.

Surprise has been expressed that nothing was heard of our public schools at the Atlanta exposition. Inquiry at Superintendent Jordan's office brings out the reason. It appears that out of $10,000 appropriated to make an exhibit of the mineral, timber, agricultural and educational resources of the state the commissioner set apart only $500 for the use of the department of education. This was insufficient and in the present bill ample provisions should be made for this department.

Shulenberg (Tex.) Sticker: The managers of the Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in the year 1898 are at this early day doing a great deal of work. They claim that it will be the greatest advertisement for the states int he Mississippi valley and of the west that has ever been attempted. The intention is to show what said states are capable of manufacturing and producing, and in that way bring capital and labor from the north and east. The managers say that millions of people will visit the exposition and come for the purpose of home-seeking and to invest their spare capital. We earnestly hope that the exposition will be a complete success.

Alamosa (Colo.) Independent-Journal: The great Transmississippi Exposition to be held in OMaha from June to November, 1898, will excel, if anything, the World's fair at Chicago. The government has recognized it and will give financial support to the project. Foreign countries will have representatives and exhibits on a large scale. The silver palace will be one of the greatest attractions, where the mineral wealth of the world will have a representative display. Being so near Colorado it can almost be considered a home enterprise. The Colorado legislature will probably be called upon to contribute to have Colorado and her wonderful resources will represented. This should be done not scantily or grudgingly, but liberally, for every dollar contributed to this enterprise will return to the state one hundredfold.

Creston (Ia.) Advertise: A very strong and commendable effort is being put forward by Omaha to work up enthusiasm in the Transmississippi and International Exposition, set for dates from June to November, 1898, in the city of OMaha, the coming western metropolis. This exposition is one which can be made of untold benefit to the entire west and the great Mississippi valley in particular, and is worthy of the encouragement of the citizens of Iowa. Union county, the home of the great Blue Grass palace movement, which did so much for southwest Iowa, cannot afford to be behind in this movement, but should make all preparations to be in it. The Board of Supervisors should take the subject up, appoint a committee to arrange a display from this county and appropriate a sum to properly advertise the advantages of the county at that exposition.

Searcy (Ark.) Citizen: In conformity with the recommendation of ex-Governor Clarke, a bill has been introduced in the Arkansas legislature appropriating $25,000 for an exhibit of the resources and productive industries of Arkansas at the Transmississippi and INternational Exposition of 1898 at Omaha. Iowa has already made a preliminary appropriation for the purpose, and will increase it later on. A bill is pending before the ILlinois legislature providing for an appropriation of $100,000, while Nebraska is considering a bill carrying $350,000, which, it is said, will pass the legislature within the next ten days. Colorado, South Dakota, Kansas, Wyoming, Utah and many other western states in interest are now considering appropriation bills, and the prediction is that every state west of the Mississippi will participate in the Great exposition of 1898. The people of OMaha have subscribed over $400,000 in stock and will raise the amount to $1,000,000. Congress has pledged $200,000 and Senator Allen says this will be increased to $275,000 this session. The selection of a site for the exposition grounds is now under discussion at OMaha and it is expected that ground will be broken within thirty days.

West Point (Neb.) Nebraska Volksblatt: Nearly twenty states and some southern republics are waiting what the state legislature of NEbraska will do in regard to the bill which asks $350,000 for the great exposition to be held in OMaha, and they will be guided by what Nebraska will do. It is given into the hands of our legislature whether this expositions hall be a great one, benefiting Nebraska in particular and the west in general, or not. We hope the members of the legislature will see the importance of such an exposition for Nebraska, and importance which becomes greater in view of the fact, that the exposition will be one of the great west, and we hope further that our legislature will act accordingly. CLose estimates show that within the next two years at least $6,000,000 would be brought into nebraska through the exposition, and that besides this capitalists, manufacturers and farmers would come into our state and settle here, investing their money, and this is just what we need here. But without money nothing can be accomplished in the exposition matter.

Fremont, (Neb.) Platte River Zeitung: As every endeavor to develop the resources of the land is of interest to the whole nation without discrimination in favor of the party of the country where such endeavor is made, therefore the Transmississippi and International Exposition, which will beheld in Omaha next year, is of more than ordinary importance.

Besides showing the manifold resources of the country, and its progress in regard to industry, science, and husbandry, there will be another noticeable fact; it will be the first exposition which has ever been held west of the MIssissippi river. The fact that such an exposition is to be held alone tends to show the enormous progress and growth of the far west. Not every long ago the western half of the northern party of the American continent was a desolate wilderness, inhabited by Indians, and today civilization in the broadest sense of the word has taken possession of it.

It is the home of a prosperous and enterprising people, whose energy is foremost directed toward tilling the soil, thereby making this great part of the country the granary of the nation. But also the manufacturing industry has found its place in it as the progress of the west has more than sufficiently proved during the last few years.

The plan to hold a Transmississippi Exposition in Omaha, which was greeted enthusiastically when it was first made known, has received in the meantime the section of the whole west, and the project has assumed gigantic dimensions. That the exposition may be made successful depends not only upon the innumerable resources of the west, but also upon the never resting and unyielding work of the Board of Directors.

The authorized capital of the Transmississippi and International Exposition association is fixed at $1,000,000, of which $400,000 is already subscribed, while the balance will be taken up undoubtedly within the next six months.

In our state legislature a bill has been introduced calling for an appropriation of $350,000 to aid the exposition.

The present session of congress will without doubt increase the appropriation of $200,000 for a government exhibit at least by one-half.

The aim of the exposition is to promote the welfare of the country and its people. The Platte River Zeitung therefore wishes the Transmississippi and International Exposition the greatest possible success.

Alma Record: The people are almost unanimously in favor of the great Omaha exposition. It means much for Omaha and it means much for Nebraska. Omaha is doing her part toward the exposition and Nebraska should respond likewise. The present legislature should make a liberal appropriation, and every citizen of the state should lend his influence and assist in making it a success. It would attract thousands and thousands of people to the state and none of them would get away without spending some money. The resources of the state could not be brought before the eastern people in better, more substantial or economical way than this. Omaha the metropolis of the state is the proper place for the exposition and no petty strife should be permitted to retard its progress.

Tecumseh Chieftain: Nebraska can scarcely​ expect other states to make a liberal appropriation for a display at the Transmississippi Exposition if she doesn't set them an an example. The legislature has a duty to perform in this matter which ought not o be delayed. The legislatures of other states are waiting to see what Nebraska is going to do.

Hastings Tribune: The Nebraska editors who are opposing the appropriation of about $300,000 by the legislature for the Transmississippi Exposition are working against their own interests and the interests of everybody in Nebraska. We do not believe that they are sincere in what they say and therefore their words will have no weight wtih​ the matter.

Madison Reporter: To all progressive men, the Nebraska legislators who are exerting themselves against the Transmississippi Exposition bill must appear as men of small caliber. This, however, is not all that might be charged against them. It might be said they were merely opposing the measure in hopes that a lobby with a good fat purse would be sent to Lincoln. This, however, will not be done, as the managers of the exposition are not in possession of the fat purse, nor will they be int he future.

It is more probable, however, that opposers of the bill find a source for their opposition in the desire to gain notoriety and pose as "watchdogs of the treasury." But here is where they fall down. The people of the state are fully cognizant of the benefits to be derived from this exposition. They know it will bring thousands of people and thousands of dollars into the state, besides being the very best medium through which to advertise our state to the seekers of homes and investments. During the progress of this exposition the eyes of the whole country will be focused upon Nebraska and the result cannot be beneficial.

 
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Exposition Endorsements

BY THE NEBRASKA PRESS.

Falls City Populist: Last week we gave a few reasons why the state of Nebraska should take a specially active part in the Transmississippi Exposition in Omaha, and regret that time and space prevent us from giving many more this week, but one fact we wish to particularly call to the attention of every populist especially. This legislature, we are glad to say, is largely populist, and is controlled in both branches by the populist party. We, as a party, can cause a liberal appropriation to be made, which will cause most other states to make a like liberal appropriation, or we can make a small, penurious, niggardly appropriation, which will cause other states to say, If Nebraska has no more faith in the success and profit of the exposition than the small appropriation indicates they will make no appropriation and display, or at least so small that it will be of no financial value to us.

The opposition to this appropriation, and a liberal appropriation, say $250,000 or $200,000, is political suicide to our party and financial suicide to our state, as we have consistently claimed that more money in the hands of our people was our greatest immediate need, and any legitimate means to place that money within the reach of our people should be favored and voted for by every populist member of both houses of this legislature, regardless of the action of others, as the establishment of the exposition, the construction of massive and expensive buildings, the improvements of grounds in every way, the pavement of streets, extension and construction of new motor lines, railway and telephone connections, the vast population which would be attracted within the limits of Omaha and our state, and the expenditure of from six to sixteen million of dollars of money, directly or indirectly in property and the products of our state and the employment of labor would bring to our people more money and bring it to us quicker than by any other means that could possibly be devised by the people or legislature of our poverty-stricken state.

We hope that our monetary reform party, which now holds the reins of government of this state, will make no mistakes they will hereafter be compelled to explain, and that no false idea of economy may prevent it from making an appropriation which will draw to it and to our state millions of money that our people would never see without such a liberal appropriation.

Nebraska City Press: The eyes of all the loyal people of Nebraska are at present centered on the legislature awaiting in breathless suspense the action of that body on the Transmississippi Exposition, which will be the making of Nebraska and will in effect offset the terrors of the drouth of 1893 and 1894.

While the exposition will be held in Omaha it will nevertheless be a semi-national affair and will be of especial benefit to the state of Nebraska. It will be a particular advertisement to all Nebraska, and the county, city, village, precinct or individual so short-sighted to offer opposition to an enterprise the beneficial results of which are so clear is certainly deserving of a leather medal. It seems almost waste of time to take up and present the many and varied branches in which this magnificent exposition of the resources of the transmississippi states will benefit Nebraska. The percentage of gain to the amount of the investment will be ten times 16 to 1, and the percentage of increase in population and permanent capital will be equally as great.

The legislature should cease its dilly-dallying and trifling with little "dinky" measures when a question of such vital importance stares it in the face. The exposition bill should be passed and for the full amount of $350,000.

Burwell Mascot: The Transmississippi Exposition would benefit the entire states unmeasureably​, and this fact is realized by a majority of the voters of Garfield county, irrespective of party, the "Eye" to the contrary notwithstanding.

Hayes County Times: The Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha will be a great thing for Nebraska and the west. Even the state legislature should comprehend that fact.

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$250,000. This is certainly little enough, and we are well satisfied that our people in general are in favor of a good, fair, liberal appropriation.

Kearney Star of Empire: Governor Silas Holcomb in his excellent message to the Nebraska legislature, January 7, gave a flowing description of the good things which may come to Nebraska and the great central and western portion of the United States, through the medium of the great Transmississippi Exposition, to be held at Omaha from June to November, 1897. He showed what congress and some other legislatures had done, and were going to do, by way of appropriation, to make it and the ends to be attained, a glorious success. Now let our Nebraska legislature do the handsome and square thing, by outdoing all other states in promoting financially, this utilitarian element for stimulating American industry and national progress. Let the people, editors and public men everywhere use their influence with their representatives to help push the good work forward. It takes united effort to bring about successful results. Stand up for Nebraska!

Tilden Citizen: Surely the members of the Nebraska legislature cannot fail to vote a liberal appropriation in aid of the Transmississippi Exposition if they have any regard for the future welfare and prosperity of our state. This is the best opportunity Nebraska has ever had for letting the people of the world know just what this grand commonwealth is capable of accomplishing under favorable circumstances, besides it is a Nebraska project, and if our state will not do the proper thing by making a liberal appropriation other states need scarcely be expected to go into their treasuries and expend large sums for a state display. It is safe to predict that Nebraska would soon get back, in taxes from the new industries and improvements induced to locate here by the big fair, enough to more than repay it for whatever appropriation it may make.

Hastings Republican: The Transmississippi Exposition not only means much for Omaha, but from an industrial, commercial, agricultural and investment standpoint. It means millions for Nebraska and the whole mid-west. It is indeed a narrow-minded policy to oppose lending it encouragement and assistance. Let it be met with leberal​ encouragement and endorsement on the part of all western people. Its ultimate and lasting results will be of incalculable value and worth not only to Omaha as a city, but to the whole state of Nebraska.

Dixon Tribune: It seems to us that the fight in the legislature against a proper appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition is very short-sighted and one that will prove of much damage to the enterprise. If our own state, that will reap the benefit, does not see fit to aid the enterprise, how can it be expected that other states will do it? We hope the false idea of economy some of our legislators have will be changed so that they are willing to give a dime and get a dollar back.

Kearney Hub: Said Senator Allen in the United States senate the other day, referring to the Transmississippi Exposition: "I think that the people of Nebraska have set their hearts on this exposition, and it would be regarded as a great misfortune for it to miscarry at this time. After it has been pushed along successfully thus far, we cannot stand the chagrin that would be cast upon us by letting the enterprise lapse." This is true. Yet the populists in the legislature are holding the appropriation measure back at a time when other western legislatures are in session and prompt and liberal action is necessary to enlist these states in the enterprise. Other western states cannot be expected to make appropriations for the exposition if the Nebraska legislature does not intend to. Nebraska virtually stands sponsor for this magnificent enterprise, and state pride should over-shadow anything else in providing the means for a Nebraska exhibit.

The refusal of the legislature to pass a bill allowing a liberal appropriation for the exposition will be a lasting reproach on the state. The people desire this appropriation and we believe will retire into political oblivion those legislators who oppose it. Indeed if they did not do so they would not be doing their duty.

Osceola Independent: So far as we have been able to learn the feelings of the people in this country on the question of the state making an appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition, the conviction of a large majority seems to be in favor of making an appropriation of an amount sufficiently large to allow a credible showing to be made of the resources and advantages of our state. while it is freely admitted that the present hard times make it necessary to economize at every point possible, the general impression appears to be that this is the opportunity of a lifetime for Nebraska, and one that the state cannot afford to miss.

Surprise Herald: The appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition still hangs fire, the dufficult​ part of the bill is how much shall be appropriated. there is no division on an appropriation, but there is a wonderful difference of opinion as to what the amount shall be. Three hundred and fifty thousand dollars is the amount asked for by the exposition committee. We predict that the appropriation will be $150,000, but we could be pleased to see our legislature appropriate.

IDAHO WILL HAVE AN EXHIBIT.

Proposes to Appropriate Thirty Thousand Dollars.

BOISE, Idaho, Feb. 9.—(Special Telegram.)—Among the interesting bills introduced in the house during the session yesterday was one by Waters making an appropriation of $30,000 for an exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha. It provides for a board to be composed of five commissioners appointed by the governor, who are to serve without pay. The bill contemplates the erection of a building for the state on the exposition grounds.

NORTH DAKOTA AND EXPOSITION.

Colonel Lounsberry is Appointed Vice President—Appropriation Bill Soon.

BISMARCK, N. D., Feb. 9.—(Special Telegram.)—Governor Briggs yesterday appointed Colonel C. A. Lounsberry of Fargo vice president for North Dakota of the Transmississippi Exposition. An appropriation bill will be introduced in a few days.

Colonel Lounsberry is a magazine publisher and newspaper writer and is a war veteran. He was married to the widow of Colonel Brownson of Omaha in 1893.

SITE NOT YET AGREED UPON

BALLOTING BY THE EXPOSITION DIRECTORY

Contest Over Location is Between Miller Park and Hanscom Park, and Will Probably Be Disposed of This Evening.

After a stormy session lasting over four and one-half hours, during which seventeen ballots were taken and stinging personalities were exchanged between members of the directory amid the yells and shouts of a large lobby, the exposition site is still unsettled. After a deal of parliamentary sparring a fighting minority forced an adjournment until 8 o'clock this evening when the fight will be resumed and another attempt made to secure a majority of the board in favor of either Miller or Hanscom parks as a site for the exposition.

At no time were there more than thirty-seven of the directory present, and these stood twenty-one in favor of Miller and sixteen in favor of Hanscom park. Ballot after ballot was taken without any material change in this vote, and then the minority won its point and forced an adjournment under an arrangement whereby a full vote of the board of directors will be secured.

The meeting was held in the large room on the second floor of the Board of Trade building in order that the lobby might have plenty of room, and the wisdom of this course was manifest when the lobby began to appear. It filled the vacant space behind the directors' chairs until the onlookers were packed in like sardines. In the crowd were business men and laboring men, men of   moderate means who had subscribed their mite, and men of large wealth who had not subscribed a cent; mechanics who were anxious to have the preliminaries settled and work commenced, and men who would rather live on charity than work.

BOOMERS IN EVIDENCE.

Mingling in the crowd, and forming a large portion of it, were the advocates of the severals ties tendered as locations for the exposition, and they took an active hand in the business of the meeting. Among the supporters of the several sites were a number of persons who industriously labored with the directors during the progress of the balloting, and some of this work was successful in changing a few votes, as developed during the progress of the meeting. The lobby was as noisy as it was numerous, and the voices of the speakers were frequently drowned in the uproar of the lobby as it expressed its approval or disgust at the remarks made upon the floor. The president was obliged to frequently call the lobby to order and give notice that the hall would be cleared unless the spectators were less demonstrative.

The meeting was held in pursuance of the adjournment taken last Saturday, when it was decided to defer action upon the selection of a site until yesterday, that all of the directors might have an opportunity to carefully study the several sites in the light of the report of the outside engineers employed to examine them and report to the board. When the roll was called at 2 o'clock there was not a quorum present, and it was necessary to wait a few moments. As soon as a quorum was secured the minutes were read and the absentees continued to appear.

TROUBLE PRECIPITATED.

Thirty members were present when Z. T. Lindsey arose to offer a resolution providing that a majority vote of the entire board should be necessary before any site could be chosen, and providing, also, that the vote should be taken by written ballot.

this precipitated a fight which lasted until long after the gas jets threw a sickly glimmer over the scene. The lines were drawn at once and they remained drawn until the meeting adjourned. This motion was taken as a slap at the Miller park people, and they resented it.

John C. Wharton, who developed into the leader of the Miller park forces, opposed the motion, saying it was unfair. He said that many of the directors were out of the city and others had remained in order to be present at the meeting, and he said that it was unreasonable to defer the selection of a site until a full attendance of the board was secured. He insisted that a majority of the board was all that was necessary to transact business and a majority of that quorum should select the site.

John L. Webster and J. H. Millard opposed the motion because they said it meant more delay and they advocated immediate action.

Mr. Lindsey said it would be ridiculous to leave such an important question as the selection of a site to a bare quorum of the board and thus throw the matter into the hands of fourteen or fifteen men.

President Wattles took the floor to oppose the resolution, saying that all members of the board had ample notice of the meeting and if they were not present it was not the fault of those who had come to the meeting. He advised the rejection of the resolution.

General Manderson opposed the position taken be the president, and predicted that if the question of a site were not decided by the vote of a majority of the entire board for one site there would be great dissatisfaction and the exposition would suffer. He opposed allowing a majority of thirty-three men to decide the location.

Ex-Governor Saunders charged that the resolution was simply brought in for the purpose of delay and he opposed it.

There were applause and yells from the lobby at the conclusion of Saunders' remarks, and President Wattles cautioned the spectators that the room would be cleared unless they refrained from making so much noise.

A vote was taken upon the resolution and a roll call was taken, resulting as follows: Ayes, 16; nays, 20. It was declared lost.

The president announced that the special order of the meeting would be taken up and he said the supporters of each site would be given ten minutes in which to present the points in favor of their site.

On motion of General Manderson the sites were called in alphabetical order.

East Omaha was called first, but no one appeared to defend the claims of that location.

FOUR SITES ARE CHAMPIONED.

Elmwood park was called next and W. R. Bennett read a paper setting forth at length the advantages presented by the site which includes Elmwood park and the State fair grounds. At the conclusion of his remarksMr. Bennett handed the secretary a bond complying with the resolution adopted by the board at its meeting Saturday, protecting the exposition association against any expense or trouble in connection with the possession of the grounds tendered or in securing access to the grounds for railways, etc. The bond was for $5,000 and was signed by the Omaha Fair and Speed association, by W. R. Bennett, also by O. J. Pickard and J. A. Weaver.

When Hanscom park was called W. J. Connell appeared and made a strong talk, in which he presented the claims of the site nearest to the center of the city. In closing Mr. Connell presented a bond for $10,000 issued by himself, complying with the resolution heretofore referred to.

The merits of Miller park were presented by R. W. Richardson in a flowery speech describing the beauties of his favorite site and he presented a bond for $5,000, signed by W. A. Saunders and A. T. Rector.

E. J. Cornish presented the claims or Riverview park in an extended argument, and presented a bond for $5,000, signed by E. J. Cornish, E. Stuht, John Powers, W. H. Hanchett, A. E. Walkup and W. F. Lorenzen.

After the part of the proceedings had been dispatched Lucius Wells, the member of the board from Council Bluffs, moved that the roll be called and that each member express his preference. This was adopted after it had been amended to provide for the reading of the bonds before a vote was taken.

At this point C. S. Montgomery attempted to force a recess of fifteen minutes. This was voted down and then he moved that the taking of a vote on the selection of a site be postponed until next Saturday. Hisses and cat-calls from the lobby drowned Mr. Montgomery's explanation of his position, but he stood his ground and insisted on his motion. The chair ruled him out of order and then he moved that the board adjourn until Saturday. This forced a vote, but the motion was defeated by a decided majority.

The bonds offered by the advocates of the several sites were then read.

MAJORITY VOTE REQUIRED.

As the president was about to order the roll called on the selection of a site, General Manderson offered a resolution providing that, upon a vote being taken, a majority of the whole board should be necessary to constitute a choice and that, as the balloting proceeded, the site receiving the lowest vote should be dropped until only two sites remained, and that balloting should then proceed until one of those sites should receive a majority of the votes of the full board.

In support of this resolution General Manderson made a strong speech in which he urged the directors to proceed carefully in deciding the most important question which had yet come before the board. He advised that such a course should be pursued as would insure a full and fair expression of the members of the board and avoid any ill feeling. He said that if the advocates of any particular site felt sure of a majority of those present, but were afraid to trust the fate of their site to the test of twenty-six votes, that fact was the strongest evidence why the greatest care should be exercised in selecting a site.

Mr. Webster objected to having this matter brought up after it had already been voted down int he same meeting, and he insinuated that "there must be something behind it."

"The only thing behind it, Mr. Webster," exclaimed General Manderson, "is that you and other shall be fair in this matter."

After the applause which greeted this sally had subsided Mr. Webster made an impassioned speech in which he urged immediate action. In the course of his remarks, Mr. Webster adverted to the remarks which had been made at a previous meeting regarding the Chicago engineers employed to examine the sites, and read a telegram from Thomas F. Johnson, who signed himself as president of the Western Society of Civil Engineers of Chicago, in which he referred in terms of high praise to A. C. Schrader, one of the engineers in question. Continuing, Mr. Webster contended that a vote should be taken at once and that a majority of those present should be sufficient to choose a site. He closed by moving to amend the resolution offered by General Manderson to provide that a majority of those present should be all that would be required to select a site.

G. M. Hitchcock and Mr. Montgomery supported the resolution offered by General Manderson, while Mr. Saunders supported the amendment offered by Mr. Webster.

Mr. Wells shut off further debate by moving the previous question. The roll call on Mr. Webster's amendment showed 16 for it and 22 against it, and the chair declared the amendment lost. The resolution was then put to a vote and adopted.

FIRST ROLL CALL ORDERED.


The roll was then ordered called, each member expressing his choice as his name was called. The first ballot showed the following result: Miller park, 19 votes; Hanscom park, 13; Riverview park, 4; Elmwood park, 1.

In detail, the vote stood as follows: For Miller park, Bidwell, Brandeis, Brown, Hibbard, Hussie, Jardine, Lee, Markel, Millard, Murphy, Rector, Saunders, Wattles, Webster, Weller, Wells, Wharton, Wilhelm, Yost—19; for Hanscom park, Carpenter, Dickinson, Farrell, Hitchcock, Holdrege, Johnson, Kilpatrick, Montgomery, Noyes, Payne, Price, Arthur C. Smith, Youngs—13; for Riverview park, Bruce, Kimball, Manderson, Metz, 4; for Elmwood park, Lindsey; absent, Babcock, Creighton, Evans, Kirkendall, Korty, Kountze, Lyman, Paxton, Reed, Rosewater, Dudley Smith, Thompson, Wilcox—13.

The lobby, aided and abetted by several of the directors, proceeded to raise the roof in their exuberant joy at what they seemed to think was the forerunner of a brilliant and decisive victory for Miller park.

It developed that this first ballot was but a preliminary skirmish for positioning, and the next ballot showed just where the shoe pinched. Under the rule Elmwood park was dropped and the second ballot commenced. Brandeis changed from Miller park to Hanscom park, and Kilpatrick changed from Hanscom park to Miller, but otherwise the original Miller park and Hanscom park men "stood pat." Bruce and Metz switched from River to Miller, and Manderson changed from Riverview to Hanscom, leaving Kimball as the only supporter of Riverview. This left the second ballot standing as follows: Miller, 21; Hanscom, 15; Riverview, 1.

ALL DROP OUT BUT TWO.

Rivervew was dropped on the third ballot and Kimball voted for Hanscom park, the third ballot standing 21 and 16.

The lines were then tightly drawn and ballot after ballot was taken with no material change. One or two directors "wabbled" slightly during the next few ballots, but they were steadied afterwards and no change was effected. During the taking of the fifth ballot A. L. Reed appeared and voted for Hanscom park, and while the sixth ballot was being taken F. P. Kirkendall came in and cast his vote for Hanscom park. In the meantime A. C. Smith had changed from Hanscom park to Miller park, and on the seventh ballot the vote stood 22 for Miller park and 17 for Hanscom park.

The eighth and ninth ballots stood the same, and then a motion was made to adjourn until tomorrow night. This was defeated and a motion to adjourn until tonight met with a similar fate.

The tenth ballot showed no change, but before the eleventh ballot could be taken General Manager Holdrege of the B & M., General Manager Dickinson of the Union Pacific and Dr. E. W. Lee were called out by the news of a wreck. This took two from Hanscom and one from Miller park, the vote then standing 21 for Miller park and 15 for Hanscom.

The twelfth ballot was taken with no indication of a break in the forces on either side. In the mean time the Miller park forces had been doing a little quiet caucusing on the floor and Director Wells secured the floor to make a motion to reconsider the vote whereby it had been decided that a majority of the full board should be necessary in the selection of a site.

FEELING GETTING BETTER.

During the progress of the balloting a number of little pleasantries had been indulged in by the two sides, but the fire was smoldering all the time, and the motion of Mr. Wells fanned it into a flame. The air was thick with shouts designed to attract the attention of the presiding officer, but sides trying to secure the floor to speak on the motion.

Mr. Montgomery distanced all competitors and when quiet as restored he proceeded to roast the Miller park people in the most approved style. He accused them of trying to force a gag down the throats of the opposition and said that if the pending motion prevailed the Hanscom park men ought to leave their seats in a body and leave the meeting without a quorum. This remark was greeted with hisses and catcalls from the lobby, and it was with difficulty that order was restored.

Mr. Wells defended his motion and said it was evident that those present might vote all night without any change, and he said he was desirous of securing a decision one way or another.

Mr. Payne said it was important that the question of a site should be settled right and if as it could not secure a majority of the full board it had better be abandoned.

Mr. Wharton argued that the matter should be settled at once as the city council was waiting to make the annual tax levy and cooed not do it until it was settled whether the exposition was to be located in one of the public parks or on private land. He proceeded to make a stump speech to the lobby, which was greeted with cheers and applause. In the course of his remarks Mr. Wharton charged that Mr. Montgomery had said that he would not pay his stock subscription unless "this thing is done thus and so."

Mr. Montgomery was on his feet in an instant and branded the statement as a lie, and then he explained what he had said at the time referred to by Wharton. Proceeding, Mr. Montgomery said that if a site could not get 26 votes it was not a proper location for an exposition, and then he proceeded to belabor the MIller park people again for trying to take advantage of the fact that they had a majority of the present meeting.

The motion to reconsider was lost, the vote being : Ayes, 16; nays, 20.

Mr. Payne then moved to adjourn until 8 o'clock. This was lost and another ballot ordered.

The thirteenth ballot resulted as follows: Miller park, 20; Hanscom park, 15.

Mr. Montgomery moved to adjourn until 8 o'clock, but the motion was voted down.

While the fourteenth ballot was being taken Mr. Hitchcock announced that the would change his vote to Miller park, and he explained his vote by saying that he still thought Hanscom park was the best place but Miller park seemed to be the choice of a majority of the board and he did not wish to obstruct the selection of a site.

On the same ballot Fred M. Youngs, the representative of organized labor, announced that he had been voting for Hanscom park under the instructions of the organized labor unions of the city, but he said he had become convinced that he had fulfilled his instructions, and would cast his vote with the majority. In doing so he said he appealed to the advocates of Miller park to assist him in his efforts int he interest of labor in connection with the exposition. Again the lobby cheered and shook the building with its stamping and pounding.

After the sixteenth ballot had been taken without showing any further break int he lines, Mr. Lindsey asked that the Hanscom park people be allowed to retire to an adjoining room for consultation. This was conceded and they withdrew.

When they returned to the room another ballot was taken with precisely the same result as before.

 
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General Manderson then arose and said that those voting for Hanscom park had decided, after consultation, that Hanscom park was the best site the for the interests of the city and of the exposition. Because of this fixed conviction, he said, they had been voting that way, but they did not desire to stand as obstructionists. In canvassing the probable wish of the majority of the board, the speaker said the advocates of Hanscom park were of the opinion that a majority would favor Hanscom park if their opinion could be secured. The voting had shown, he said, that Miller park had 23 votes, and he was of the opinion that this represented the maximum strength of that site. He admitted, however, that Miller park might obtain a majority of the board, but the supporters of Hanscom park wanted to demonstrate positively that such was the case before yielding their position. The Hanscom park people, he said, had a proposition to submit providing for an adjournment until 8 o'clock this evening, and instructing the president or secretary, in the meantime, to telegraph every member of the directory who is out of the city, and secure his vote on the question of location as between Miller park and Hanscom park. By that means he said an expression of every member of the board would be obtained and the question be settled squarely and fairly.

This proposition provoked a short but very spirited discussion, and it was finally agreed to, after it had been amended to provide that any member who would be unable to be present tonight might lodge with the secretary his written ballot expressing his choice, which would be counted the same as though he were present. The vote on the proposition as thus amended was 19 ayes and 17 nays.

The meeting was then adjourned until 8 p.m.

DECLINES TO PUSH THE MATTER.

Populist in the Senate Objects to Expediting the Exposition Bill.

LINCOLN, Feb. 11.—(Special Telegram.)—In the senate this forenoon Mr. Murphy offered a preamble and resolution, urging the importance of speedy action on the Transmississippi Exposition bill and moved its adoption. Objection was made, however, by Graham, populist of Frontier, and the resolution went over until tomorrow under the rules. The resolution was as follows:

"Whereas, We believe that the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in our proud metropolis, the great central gateway to the west, where the world can behold all the products, industries and civilization of the states west of the Mississippi river, would be of great value not only to the transmississippi states in general, but would be of incalculable value to the great state of Nebraska in particular, and,

"Whereas, Instead of acting promptly, in a business-like manner, and passing the appropriation bill now before this legislature within the first two weeks of this session, the whole matter has been handled from one house caucus to another and thereby held in abeyance, and other states whose legislatures are now in session and will soon adjourn, are seriously doubting whether Nebraska intends to make any appropriation for said exposition, and,

"Whereas, We believe further delay means defeat to the success of said exposition, is disappointing to the national government, humiliating to the people of Nebraska generally, and disastrous in the extreme in its effect upon the action of our sister states, therefore, be it

"Resolved, As the sense of this body, that house roll No, 93, which is the exposition bill, should be taken up and considered at once in the house by the committee of the whole and disposed of promptly in that broad-minded, business-like and public-spirited manner which the public, both in and out of this state, have a right to expect of this legislature."

TEACHERS WILL BE REPRESENTED.

Four Candidates to Be Presented to the Woman's Mass Meeting.

The teachers in the Omaha public schools met last night at the board rooms and held a "family council" to ascertain who they desired to support to represent them upon the woman's board of the exposition. It was decided to furnish four candidates to Friday's meeting. A committee consisting of Misses McCheane, Butterfield, Wheatly, Mrs. Lemon and Mr. Wilson brought six names before the body, from which the following four were selected: Miss McHugh, Miss Foos, Miss Hitt, and Mrs. Chittenden.

Although some discussion was heard on the subject of selecting representatives from outside the ranks, all those chosen are members of the present corps except Mrs. Chittenden. As nearly as four persons may do so these represent the various departments of the public work, the High school, principals and grade, special instruction and kindergartens.

Since the sympathy, interest and co-operation of Omaha's teachers has much to do with the success of this department of the exposition, they hope that some plan will be devised which will enable them to attend Friday's meeting and support their candidates and help to elect the other members.

AN OPPORTUNITY THAT SHOULD BE IMPROVED.

(SALT LAKE HEARLD.)

This exposition should, and will if properly encouraged, invite the attention of the whole country to the possibilities of the great trans-Missouri west, and when they are fully recognized it cannot but result in a great growth for the west. Growth, growth in population and in capital, is what we want in the new state of Utah. In natural resources of all kinds this state is the peer of any in the Union. But they must be made known, and where is a better place or a more opportune time to make them known than at this Trans-Mississippi exposition? Whenever the resources of a state are exhibited within that state or in close proximity to it, interest in the state is much greater than when they are exhibited far away from it. The very fact that this Omaha exposition is to be held west of the Missouri river makes it unique and gives it an added interest. It will afford a great opportunity to make known the resources of the state, an opportunity that should be improved. It should be remembered that Omaha was once the gateway to Utah and the people of the state have always cherished a kind memory of Omaha and her people, dating back to the time when many of them started from there in the '40s. Let Utah do what she can to make its exposition a success, and the greater its success, the greater the benefits that will inure from it to this state. It is a matter demanding the attention of the legislature.

MILLER PARK WINS

SITE FOR TRANSMISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION

Twenty-Eight Votes for Miller Park to Twenty-Two for Hanscom.

DIRECTORATE MAKES IT UNANIMOUS

Best of Feeling Prevails After the Choice is Finally Made.

LOBBY MAKES ITSELF SEEN AND HEARD

Factions Shake Hands and Everybody Will Now Work Hard to Make the Big Show a Success.

The Transmississippi and International Exposition will be located in Miller park. This was decided by the first ballot at the meeting of the Board of Directors last night and the Miller park site had two votes more than a majority of the full board. The vote of every member of the board was cast upon the question of location, and after the result was announced the choice was made unanimous, and every member of the board by a rising vote signified his acquiescence to the will of the majority. Led by the advocates of Hanscom park, three rousing cheers were given for Miller park, in which the members of the board and the crowd of spectators vied with each other to see who could cheer the hardest. The meeting wound up with a love feast in which the utmost good feeling prevailed.

The result was not reached without a preliminary parliamentary skirmish, however, in which the liens between the advocates of the two sites under consideration were closely drawn. These by-plays occupied the time of the meeting over an hour before a vote on the selection of a site was taken, but during the progress of these skirmishes the position of the doubtful directors was disclosed and the result of the final vote was anticipated.

The meeting was held in the large hall in the Board of Trade building, as before, and the lobby was larger than it was on Tuesday night. There were fully 600 spectators present, and they crowded around the sides of the room and filled the rear of the hall until there was scarcely breathing room. As at the meeting the night before, the lobby took part in the proceedings in the way of furnishing the noise and applause, but it was very evident that the sentiment of the large majority of those in the audience was in favor of Miller park, and the advocates of Hanscom park received cold comfort

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ABSENT DIRECTORS PAIRED OFF.

When President Wattles called the meeting to order every member of the directory was present in person or by written ballot deposited with the secretary. Thirty-six members answered to their names at roll call and the following named members who were absent had sent in their ballots by letter or by wire: Babcock, Bidwell, Lee, Markel, Paxton, Wells and Wilcox instructed the secretary to cast their votes for Miller park, and Dickinson, Evans, Kirkendall, Korty, Rosewater, Dudley Smith and Thompson instructed the secretary to cast their votes in favor of Hanscom park.

These instructions left only Creighton, Kountze and Lyman, all of whom had been absent the night before, on the doubtful list and the interest centered about the way their votes should be cast. If all the members who had been present the night before "stood pat" the Miller park people had twenty-six votes without these three, but there was at least one on the Miller park list who was regarded as doubtful and this made the course to be taken by the three named as of the utmost importance to the advocates of both sites.

President Wattles announced that the first business in order would be the calling of the roll on the selection of a site.

T. T. Lindsey said that before a vote was taken he would move that when balloting was resumed the method of voting be changed and that each member, as his name was called, should deposit a written ballot expressing his choice of a site, and that when twenty-six votes had been cast for any site that he declared the choice of the board.

This motion precipitated a discussion which lasted over half an hour.

Mr. Lindsey explained his motion by saying that there were directors present who were known to be voting contrary to their honest convictions, and all that was desired to accomplish by his motion was the securing of an honest expression of sentiment from every director.

John L. Webster raised the point of order that the motion was out of order for the reason that the board had already determined the course to be pursued in taking the vote on a site.

The chair sustained the point of order and ruled the motion out, saying that the only way in which the method of voting could be changed was by reconsidering the vote whereby the resolution offered by General Manderson had been adopted, and he ruled that a motion to reconsider would require a two-thirds majority.

General Manderson and G. M. Hitchcock contended that the construction put upon the resolution of General Manderson was erroneous, and they claimed that the resolution in question provided simply that a ballot should be taken, without specifying the manner of voting.

The president declined to recede from his position, and then Mr. Lindsey moved to reconsider the vote whereby the resolution provided for a ballot on sites had been adopted.

Mr. Webster said this would wipe out all that had been done under that resolution, and a long discussion ensued on the motion, after which Mr. Lindsey, seeing that there was no chance of carrying his point, withdrew his motion to reconsider.

C.S. Montgomery at once revived the subject by moving that the ballot on a site be taken in writing.

PRESIDENT IS SUSTAINED.

The chair renewed the former ruling and declared the motion out of order. Mr. Montgomery appealed from the decision of the chair, and the chair was sustained.

Again a

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  called E. C. Price moved that G. W. Holdrege be allowed to address the meeting briefly on the accessibility of Hanscom park by means of the railroads.

The chair ruled the motion out of order, but Mr. Manderson protested against the ruling. He said the board of directors was not the house of representatives of congress, and was not working under the strict order of parliamentary law, and he insisted that the board give the matter under consideration the free and full discussion which its importance merited. He said all matters in the hands of the board should be held open for discussion as long as any member desired to express his opinion.

Alvin Saunders said that if the supporters of one site were allowed to argue the merits of their site he would call upon the supporters of every other site to speak about their sites.

Mr. Hitchcock moved that the Street Railway company be given ten minutes to present the advantages of Miller park from a transportation standpoint and that Mr. Holdrege be allowed the same time to present the advantages of Hanscom park from a railroad standpoint.

The motion was ruled out of order.

Mr. Hitchcock appealed from the ruling of the chair and made a warm speech in which he referred to the importance of the matter under consideration and insisted that all interests be given a full hearing.

The vote being taken the chair held that it had been sustained, but a division was called for, and the roll call showed 15 ayes and 20 nays, and the chair was reversed, Mr. Hitchcock's motion was then carried, the roll call showing 18 ayes to 17 nays.

Frank Murphy, president of the Street Railway company, was called for, but he contented himself with remarking that he had nothing to say, that Miller park spoke for itself and he would take his chances on getting there with his street cars after a vote was taken.

HANSCOM PARK AND RAILROADS.

Mr. Holdrege, general manager of the B. & M., was called for and surprised his most intimate friends by making a speech. He said that the report of the engineers showed on its face that it had been made hurriedly and he characterized as untrue their statement that tracks for construction purposes could not be laid on the grounds to connect with the present railway tracks. He said it would be a very easy matter to lay tracks to any point on the grounds from a connection with the Belt line near the north line of the poor farm. With reference to the accessibility of the grounds during the holding of the exposition. Mr. Holdrege said that he felt satisfied that the great majority of the people coming to Omaha at that time would be landed down town at the depots, and he dwelt upon the disadvantage of travelling nine miles on the street cars to reach Miller park. He also stated that he could see no way in which the Union Pacific, B. & M., Rock Island or Milwaukee roads could reach Miller park, as none of these roads have tracks in the north part of the city. All of these roads, he said, could reach Hansom park by switching their trains to the Belt line at the Summit.

At the conclusion of Mr. Holdrege's remarks the lobby hissed and hooted him in a most disgraceful manner and it was some time before the president could make himself hear above the uproar. HE repeated the warning used frequently the night before, to the effect that the hall would be cleared of spectators unless order was maintained.

FINAL ROLL CALL ORDERED.

The president then ordered the roll called on the selection of a site. There were no further motions and the roll call proceeded, with the following result:

For Miller Park—Babcock, Bidwell, Brown, Bruce, Creighton, Hibbard, Hussie, Jardine, Kilpatrick, Kountze, Lee, Lyman, Markel, Metz, Millard, Murphy, Paxton, Rector, Saunders, Wattles, Webster, Weller, Wells, Wharton, Wilcox, Willhelm, Yost, Youngs—28.

For Hanscom Park—Brandeis, Carpenter, Dickinson, Evans, Farrell, Hitchcock, Holdrege, Johnson, Kimball, Kirkendall, Korty, Lindsey, Manderson, Montgomery, Noyes, Payne, Price, Reed, Rosewater, Arthur Smith, Dudley Smith, Thompson—22.

When John A. Creighton announced his vote for Miller park there was a slight ripple of applause and this was increased when Herman Kountze followed suit. This virtually decided the matter, but there was no demonstration until after the secretary had announced the result, and then the Miller park directors and the entire lobby joined in one grand shout which threatened to raise the roof. The air was thick with hats, canes and other movables and pandemonium reigned.

When quiet was restored General Manderson moved that Miller park be made the unanimous choice of the board of directors. A rising vote was called for and every director rose to his feet.

As a climax W. J. Connell; one of the spectators who had been the warm supporter of Hanscom park site, called for three cheers for Miller park. They were given with a will, everybody joining in, and then the meeting adjourned itself.

The advocates of the two sites shook hands after it was all over and the best of feeling was manifested on both sides.

WOMEN AND THE EXPOSITION

SELECTION OF LADY BOARD OF MANAGERS

Forty Candidates for the Eleven Positions to be Filled at the Meeting to Be Held Next Friday Afternoon.

The women of Omaha will hold a mass meeting in the Creighton theater tomorrow afternoon to elect eleven members of the Board of Lady Managers of the Transmississippi and International Exposition. Every woman in the city who has an interest in the success of the exposition, and especially in that part of it to be governed by the women, is entitled to a voice and a vote in the meeting.

An impression has obtained in some quarter that the whole connection of women with the exposition has been in the hands of the Woman's club of this city and will continue to be managed by members of that organization. It is true that the plan adopted by the executive committee of the exposition association was drafted by a committee appointed by the Woman's club for that purpose, but it is questionable if the plan can be regarded as the child of the Woman's club, as that organization has never been officially notified that a plan was in existence, and has never acted on any plan. The committee appointed by the club went ahead on its own responsibility and prepared a plan which was presented to executive committee of the exposition and approved by that body without having received the approval of the Woman's club, so that the plan is the creation of the executive committee to all intents and purposes.

This plan has been printed in full in The Bee, and it provides for a Board of Lady Managers to consist of eleven women from Omaha, two from South Omaha, two from Council Bluffs and two from each of the six congressional districts in Nebraska. After these women are elected they are to elect their officers from among their own number. The Board of Lady Managers is to have charge of the Bureau of Education under the Department of Exhibits, and all the acts of the board are to be subject to the approval of the executive committee of the exposition.

Since the announcement of the details of the women's connection with the exposition there has been a lively interest manifested in the meeting to be held tomorrow, and a lively skirmish to center on desirable candidates. The interest displayed among the women of the city has been unprecedented, and the result is that there is a large field of candidates from which to choose. There are over forty women who are available candidates, not in any offensive sense, but they have yielded to the pressure brought to bear upon them by their friends and have manifested a willingness to fulfill the duties of the office if elected. It will be seen, therefore, that there is plenty of room for a lively time at the meeting, and the affair promises to be a most animated gathering. None of those interested have made any attempt to estimate the probable attendance, but it is expected that the theater will be crowded from pit to dome.

The meeting will be called to order by President Wattles of the Exposition association, who will preside until a chairman is selected, unless the meeting sees fit to retain him as the presiding officer during the proceedings.

As order of business has already been formulated by the executive committee of the exposition and will be recommended to the women's meeting. There seems to be every probability that the plan will be followed, as no sentiment against it has developed up to this time. This plan provides that an informal ballot shall first be taken, each woman present voting for eleven women. This vote will then be counted and the twenty-two women receiving the highest vote on this ballot shall be declared elected. This method will give every woman present an opportunity of voting on the first ballot for anyone she pleases. There will be no verbal nominations and, consequently, no nominating speeches. It is estimated that the counting of the votes cast on the first ballot will consume several hours and it has been suggested that an adjournment be taken until some day early next week before taking the second ballot in order to give the tellers ample time to count the ballots and announce the result. Just what will be done in this regard will be determined by the meeting itself.

As stated heretofore, there are a number of candidates in the field. At least two tickets have appeared, and it is reported that other tickets will be circulated at the meeting. The tickets already announced each contain the names of more than eleven women, one containing twenty-two names and the other nineteen. Both tickets will be printed, and it will be necessary for each woman voting to scratch out the names of those for whom she does not wish to vote. Additional names may be written on the ballots with lead pencil or with ink, or an entire ticket may be written. The ballot being purely informal, and for the purpose of nominating candidates, any one may be voted for, regardless of whether the name appears on any of the printed tickets or not. For this purpose every woman attending the meeting should provide herself with a lead pencil and some blank paper.

One of the tickets now if the field contains the following names: Mesdames Ed A. Cudahy, Will B. Millard, Thomas L. Kimball, James H. McIntosh, N. P. Fell, A. N. Ferguson, W. W. Keysor, T. K. Sudborough, John Gordon, William Fleming, Clark Woodman, Dr. Cuscaden, James W. Van Nostrand, W. P. Harford, S. R. Towne, H. W. Yates, Marlette Shields Chittenden, Misses Margaret Boyd, Anna Foos, Kat McHugh and Alice Hitte.

The other ticket contains the following names: Mesdames Frank Haller, Frances M. Ford, W. P. Harrod, Mary Girard Andrews, G. M. Hitchcock, Ed A. Cudahy, C. C. Belden, J. N. Cornish, Alvin Saunders, Clark Woodman, J. A. Gillespie, John S. Briggs, W. S. Strawn, N. P. Fell, James H. McIntosh, T. L. Kimball, H. S. Jaynes, Charles Rosewater, Hainer and Miss Elizabeth Shirley.

The first of these tickets contains the names of eleven women who are members of the Woman's club, and the second ticket contains the names of nine club members.

In addition to the names appearing on these tickets the Nebraska Ceramic club has presented the name of Mrs. Euclid Martin for election as a member of the board. There are also other names which will be publicly announced, at or before the meeting, so that there will be no lack of candidates. Among the other names which will probably be presented is that of the honored wife of ex-Senator Manderson. Mrs. Manderson has been very generally mentioned in connection with the office of president of the Board of Lady Managers, and she has not declined the proffered honor, although she has not signified her acceptance.

BOARD OF LADY MANAGERS

Women of the City Are Getting Ready for the Election This Afternoon.

No Qualification for the Voting Is Required Except Interest in the Exposition.

Probable That Several Tickets Will be in the Field—List of Candidates—Teachers Represented.

The mass meeting of the women of the city to elect eleven members of the board of lady managers of the Trans-Mississippi exposition will be held in the Creighton theater this afternoon at 2 o'clock.

All women who take an interest in the matter, whether they or their husbands are subscribers to stock or not, will be entitled to vote. The meeting will be under the auspices solely of the executive committee of the exposition directory. It is anticipated that perhaps 1,000 will attend.

Considerable talk has been had with regard to candidates, and at least one printed ticket containing twenty-two names will be distributed. This ticket:

Mrs. T. L. Kimball, Mrs. Dr. Towne,
Mrs. J. H. McIntosh, Mrs. W. W. Keysor,
Miss Kate McHugh, Mrs. Orietta Shields
Mrs. N. P. Fell, Chittenden,
Mrs. Ed Cudahy, Miss Anna Foos,
Miss Alice Hitte, Mrs. W. B. Millard,
Mrs. A. N. Ferguson, Miss Margaret Boyd,
Mrs. John Gordon, Mrs. William Flem-
typesetting is off for remainder of list
Mrs. Dr. Cuscaden, ing,
Mrs. J. W. Van Nos-Mrs, Clark Wood-
trand, man,
Mrs. To. K. Sodbor-Mrs. Holyoke,
ough. Mrs. W. P. Harford,
Mrs. H. W. Yates.

Four of these candidates, Miss McHugh, Miss Foos, Miss Hitte and Mrs. Chittenden, were nominated by the city teachers at a meeting Wednesday afternoon. The meeting was called by Superintendent Pearse, who said that inasmuch as very many of the teachers had taken stock and the work to be given to the board of lady managers was work in which the teachers were professionally engaged, it was eminently proper that they should be represented  

Page 55
on the board.

A committee consisting of Mrs. Lizzie Roudebush and Misses Shirley, LaRue and Morgan was appointed to present these names to the mass meeting and it is understood that the candidates will receive the unanimous support of the teachers.

But other names will be brought before the meeting. Mrs. Morrell, secretary of the Nebraska Ceramic club will on behalf of that club nominate Mrs. Euclid Martin. Another name mentioned is that of Mrs. Dr. Rosewater, and it is certain that many more candidates will be presented at the meeting. There is a feeling on the part of some that the Woman's club through the action of its individual members is trying to assume the direction of the election, but this is denied and attention drawn to the fact that not more than half of the candidates mentioned are members of the club.

The meeting will be called to order by President Wattles of the exposition, and then the women will probably choose their own chairman and proceed as they like, though it has been suggested by the executive committee that on the first ballot each woman vote for eleven candidates and that the twenty-two receiving the highest number of votes be considered the candidates on the second ballot it is thought that the election may not be completed at one sesion​. All are asked to come provided with pencils.

Sentiment as to who the president of the board shall be after it has been elected has not crystallized. There was some talk for a time of Mrs. Manderson, but it is said that she will not accept the position.

DELEGATIONS TO LEGISLATURES.

Arrangements for the sending of delegations to the several state legislatures are in progress, and will probably be completed today. This much as​ been agreed on, that Messrs. Wattles, Hitchcock and a few others will leave Sunday night for Topeka, where they will be Monday. They are due at Denver Tuesday, at Cheyenne Wednesday and at Salt Lake Friday. From there a part of the delegation will probably go on to the Pacific coast states and return through the northern tier of states.

Secretary Wakefield has arranged for the streamers that will be stretched along the sides of the cars. Each one will be three feet wide and fifty feet long and will bear in large letters:

Omaha, 1898, Trans-Missis-
sippi and International
Exposition.
June to November.

AFTER THE PLUM

The South Omaha Ladies Will Tomorrow

Select Two of their Number to Represent the

Magic City of the Board of Lady Managers

Of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition.

One would think there was a presidential election or a Bradley Martin ball on hand from the number of caucuses being held by the ladies to boom the candidacy of certain females for the board of lady managers. The fight has got down to that condition where the ladies talk of factions, boodie and coercion with as much fluency as they do of each other's social standings. While the idea is to select some one who is not only a "good woman," but who is able to do the work demanded with an exceptional degree of enlightenment it is not deterring nearly every member of the softer sex in the city from trying to get in her oar. Yesterday and today many of the dear creatures made a house to house canvass for support and went through all the little jollies incident to professional vote getting. Some of them thought they ought to be elected because they once got a prize for making a mince pie that wouldn't promote indigestion; others that they had lived in South Omaha so long that they were surely entitled to some reward; others wanted to be elected because they were the original new women crusaders; othere​ because they knew how to get off a street car without attracting the attention of all the men in creation; others on the ground that they had never applied for a divorce; a few knew they should have it because they could beat the universe playing whist; one or two wanted it because they were "nice old women," and four or five considered they should have it because their names appeared quite often in the papers.

Tomorrow will be a blazing hot day, indeed. The women are all worked up and there is not a hall in the city that will hold them. Some of the men are going to leave the city until the fun is over; others will leave for good unless their wives are elected.

Mesdames Towl, Mead, Munro, Talbot, Watts and Carroll appear to be the leading candidates. This afternoon Mrs. Towl's friends will hold a caucus, as will also Mrs. Mead's. The idea of selecting both a Catholic and a Protestant lady, as suggested by the TRIBTNE​ yesterday, is generally approved and will doubtlessly be adopted. Mesdames Carroll, Tanner and Geary are the most prominent women suggested from the Catholic ranks and any one of them would be a credit to the city.

Some of the women are stirred up because Omaha women have been brought to the city to work up the candidacy of one of the ladies. Mrs. W. S. White is another lady who has many friends for one of the positions.

MUCH OPPOSITION PROMISED.

Exposition Appropriation Will Be Fought in House and Senate.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Washington, D. C., Feb. 11.—Although the house appropriation committee has recommended in the sundry civil bill the item appropriating $200,000 for the Omaha exposition, the friends of the great Trans-Mississippi show are not so confident that the appropriation will not meet with a stormy passage and possibly defeat.

Representative Hainer of the appropriation committee thinks the provision will pass the house. The danger just now appears to be in the senate.

The opponents of the appropriation have been very industrious in working up an antagonistic sentiment at both sides of the capitol, on the plea that the provisions so far made by the Nebraska legislature and the state generally in aid of the exposition are altogether disproportionate to the amount which the people of the United States are asked to put up.

Hainer represents the sanguine sentiment of the house. Others are not so sure of its passing the lower branch, and utterly despair of being able to secure the consent of the two houses increasing the amount to $275,000.

RANSOM IS ELOQUENT.

Senator Ransom wondered why any senator could do anything to hinder or retard the exposition. Would men never get over the idea that the map of their county was a map of the world. He scored men who were opposed to showing to the whole world the beauty and grandeur of Nebraska. He said when the president of the exposition asked Grover Cleveland to issue a proclamation to the world that the exposition would be held the president declined to thus proclaim, and instead thereof Secretary Olney had advised the very action embodied in the resolution, and had agreed to place the governor's invitation in the hands of every foreign ambassador.

Senator Gondring again arose and denied being opposed to the exposition, but insisted that it was a plan to hold up the senate for a greater appropriation than the state can afford. No action was taken upon either motion, and the senate took an adjournment until 10 o'clock tomorrow morning.

ALL FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Wolbach, Neb., Feb. 10.—Harris Bros. have built eight new corncribs, 12x14x96, and filled them all with corn. This makes ten cribs they have here.

Everybody in this place says the state should give the exposition at least $250,000 and take as much more and build a beet sugar factory instead of paying a bounty.

Wolbach will soon have a big silver club, and there are many who will join it now who voted against bimetallism.

 
Washington World-Herald Bureau.
Room 23 Post Building.
Washington, D. C., Feb. 10.
[?]Speaker Reed chooses to rec-
article ends abruptly

ON EXPOSITION STAMPS.

The postoffice department today notified Representative Mercer that no proposition will be entertained for the issue of special stamps to commemorate the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition.

This by no means indicates that the issue will not be made, but the present officials argue that they are too near the end of their terms to undertake the matter, and prefer to let their successors do it.

As soon as the new administration is settled down the scheme will be revived with every prospect of success.

John L. McCague, receiver of the German Savings bank, is here looking after his interests in connection with the South Omaha building site.

BIG BOOM FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Outside Papers Devote Space to the Big Show.

The press of California and the Pacific coast states is devoting considerable space to the Transmississippi Exposition. The metropolitan dailies of Portland, Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles have commended the enterprise editorially and have published much descriptive matter concerning it. The papers of smaller towns on the coast have been no less liberal. There is every promise of a large appropriation by the California legislature. The San Francisco Chronicle of Sunday, February 7, published a full page, finely illustrated write-up of the exposition, copy for which was furnished by the press bureau. Pictures of prominent public buildings in Omaha and a view in Hanscom park embellish the article, which is largely made up of a chronicle of what has been done by the promoters of the exposition, a description of Omaha and an epitome of the wealth and resources of the west. It is by far the strongest advertisement of the exposition that has appeared in the western press, which, generally speaking, has shown a spirit of liberality in treating of the enterprise.

The eastern press is becoming aroused to the importance of the project. The Buffalo Illustrated Sunday Express will tomorrow contain a full-page write-up of the exposition, with half-tone illustrations upon book-print paper, and will doubtless prove to be the most artistic publication which has to date been made with reference to the exposition. The Chicago Inter Ocean will, Monday morning, contain a page of illustrated matter about the exposition, while the Chicago Sunday Chronicle will tomorrow present an exhaustive illustrated article about the big show. Other influential papers of the east and south have also given space to the recent issues of the press bureau.

DION GERALDINE TAKES THE PLACE

Will Be Superintendent of the Exposition Grounds.

This afternoon F. P. Kirkendall, manager of the Department of Grounds of the exposition, received a telegram from General Superintendent Dion Geraldine of the World's fair at Chicago, accepting the offer of a similar position for the exposition here in 1898.

Contest Getting Interesting.

Several caucuses were held by the women yesterday in an attempt to arrive at some understanding in the matter of selecting two women for the woman's board of the exposition. Every club, clique and faction has its candidates, and the fight has broken into religion. The fight at the meeting this afternoon will be a warm one, as friends of the candidates will be there in force. It would be a hard matter to predict who will win, since there is so much feeling in the matter.

STOP THE CHILDS PLAY.

That was a remarkable resolution which Senator Murphy, republican, introduced in the senate yesterday. To be sure the resolution could very readily be ruled out on a point of order, and probably will be so ruled, for it contains a criticism of the other branch of the legislative body. At the same time this is an important resolution, and ought to be thoroughly digested by the people of Nebraska regardless of politics. The resolution is as follows:

Whereas, The national government at Washington has shown its appreciation of the Trans-Mississippi region and its confidence in the business integrity and public spirit of Nebraska by appropriating $200,000 to the Trans-Mississippi exposition, and,

Whereas, Many of our sister states have already made preliminary appropriations, with the assurance of large appropriations later, and,

Whereas, A number of other states are ready to join Nebraska in this great demonstration of western resources and western energy, and,

Whereas, The proposed Trans-Mississippi exposition is an undertaking laudable and worthy and is earnestly desired by all progressive people of this state, regardless of political ambition or party creed, and,

Whereas, At a banquet given by the people of Omaha to the governor of this state and other newly elected state officials recently, they did openly promise and pledge prompt action and a liberal appropriation by the fusion majority in control in this legislature, and,

Whereas, The governor of this state in a public interview sent through the association press, gave to the country at large the assurance that the political party now in control of this state was not a party of retrogression and repudiation, but a party of progress and public spirit, and,

Whereas, The Hon. W. V. Allen, the leader of the fusion party of this state in the United States senate, in a public speech in the senate on December 14, 1896, declared that the fusion party in Nebraska would demonstrate that it was not a party of antiprogress, but a party representing great public spirit and enterprise, and,

Whereas, We believe that the Trans-Mississippi exposition to be held in our proud metropolis, the great central gateway tot he west, where the world can behold all the products, industries and civilization of the states west of the Mississippi river, would be of great value, not only to the Trans-Mississippi states in general, but would be of incalculable value to the great state of Nebraska in particular, and

Whereas, These assurances of the governor, the senior United States senator of this state, and their political associates have failed to materialize up to this time, and

Whereas, Instead of acting promptly in a business-like manner and passing the appropriation bill now before this legislature within the first two weeks of this session, the whole matter has been bandied from one house caucus to another, and thereby held in abeyance, and other states whose legislatures are now in session and will soon adjourn, are seriously doubting whether Nebraska intends to make any appropriations for said exposition, and

Whereas, We believe further delay means defeat to the success of said exposition, is disappointing to the national government, humiliating to the people of Nebraska generally and disastrous in the extreme in its effect upon the action of our sister states, therefore, be it

Resolved, As the sense of this body that house roll No. 33, which is the exposition bill, should be taken up and considered at once in the house by the committee of the whole, and disposed of promptly in that broad-minded, business-like and public-spirited manner which the public, both in and out of this state, have a right to expect of this legislature.

Manifestly this is an attempt on the part of republican leaders to unload all the blame for the delay of the exposition bill upon the populists. It is true that a number of populists have aided in preventing speedy action on this measure, but it is also true that the organized effort in which these populists, some knowingly and others innocently, co-operated, was devised and planned by republican leaders in the house. Had it not been for determined opposition of certain republicans in the house on Tuesday the exposition bill would have been taken up on Wednesday. There are the facts, and while from a partisan standpoint Senator Murphy may be justified in attempting to lay the blame upon the populists, the public ought to know exactly where the blame belongs.

World-Herald believes it is now warranted in saying that if the republicans of the house or any considerable number of them will shake themselves loose from would-be leaders who are endeavoring to destroy this bill and would go to its support that a liberal appropriation would be insured. It is true that if the exposition is injured by the failure of the legislature to act promptly that the majority party in the legislature would be held largely responsible. But the republicans who have contributed to the fight against this measure could not escape responsibility until the republicans go to the support of the exposition in a businesslike way they are debarred from passing any criticism upon the populists for failure to act.

As a matter of fact the great majority of republican members of the house are favorable to the measure, but they have so far allowed themselves to be held in check by a few republicans who are desirous of delaying the bill until beyond the danger line.

Senator Murphy is a sincere friend of the exposition, but he ought to have introduced his resolution in a republican caucus rather than in the senate, and instead of criticising the populists he should have criticized Jenkins of Jefferson and those members of the Lancaster delegation who have aided the gentleman from Jefferson in preventing action upon the measure.

The time for child's play is at an end. The people of this state by an overwhelming majority favor a liberal appropriation and yet certain republicans and certain populists who have combined to delay this measure have by their actions carried their opposition to the point where they have even endangered the federal appropriation. The World-Herald desires to remind the members of the legislature who are responsible for this condition that they are assuming for themselves and their respective political organization an awful responsibility. The burden of that responsibility cannot be escaped by the men in the party upon whom that burden ought to rest.

Members of the legislature, without regard to political prejudice, ought to unite to push this measure through, and there ought to be no more needless delay.

The World-Herald, in behalf of the people who pay the taxes in Nebraska, urges the populists to break away from Wooster, and the republicans to abandon Jenkins, and all unite in standing up for Nebraska and one of the greatest expositions that has ever been held upon American soil.

 
Page 57

BOARD OF LADY MANAGERS

ELEVEN WOMEN NAMED FOR THE PLACES

Spirited Contest Over the Selection of Members Who Will Dictate the Affairs of the Exposition Bureau of Education.

Members of Board of Lady Managers:
MISS ANNA FOOS.
MISS KATE M'HUGH.
MISS ALICE HITTE.
MRS. O. S. CHITTENDEN.
MRS. S. R. TOWNE.
MRS. W. W. KEYSOR.
MRS. W. P. HARFORD.
MRS. E. A. CUDAHY.
MRS. J. H. M'INTOSH.
MRS. T. L. KIMBALL.
MRS. EUCLID MARTIN.

The above named women were elected yesterday by the women of Omaha, in mass meeting assembled, as the Omaha members of the Board of Lady Managers of the Bureau of Education of the Department of Exhibits of the Transmississippi and International Exposition.

The meeting at which these women were elected was held in the Creighton theater yesterday afternoon and long before the hour announced for the meeting the women of Omaha, by one common impulse, wended their way to the place of meeting in little groups of three or four. When they arrived there they at once became imbued with the spirit of politics and they began peddling tickets and electioneering for their favorite candidates with as much ardor as though they had been in training in political logrolling for years. The theater presented the appearance of an active political convention and the women were rushing to and fro, buttonholing one another and soliciting votes with as much animation and earnestness as though the fate of the nation depended on the result of the meeting. One or two men who were rash enough to venture inside the sacred precincts of the theater were brushed to one side and ignored as completely as though they had not been in existence.

SOME OF THE TICKETS.

There were six printed tickets in the field, and it was evident in the beginning that a hot fight was to be waged. One of these tickets was prepared by the members of the Woman's club, who have been freely alluded to as "the ring" by those in and out of the club who have been opposed to ring rule and put-up jobs. This ticket was designated by its advocates and makers as "the authorized ticket" and great stress was laid upon that designation. This ticket contained the names of twenty-two women, among them being the four school teachers selected in the mass meeting of public school teachers held in the city hall a few days ago.

Another ticket contained twenty-two names and was issued by the element in the Woman's club which opposes "the ring" and its methods. Another ticket bore the heading "Representative Woman's Ticket" and contained the names of eleven of the representative women of Omaha, the list being headed with the name of Mrs. Charles F. Manderson. Another ticket had the heading "Woman's Club Ticket," but the president of the Woman's club, Mrs. W. P. Harford, authorized the statement that no ticket had been "authorized by the Woman's club." A fifth ticket was headed "Teachers' Ticket" and contained the names of eleven women, four of them being the school teachers referred to heretofore. The sixth ticket contained the names of the four school teachers and no others. This last ticket was not in general circulation, but was in the possession of every school teacher in the meeting, about 300 of them, and they voted it "straight," thereby forcing their candidates far ahead of all the others. This is an old political trick and is often practiced for the purpose of advancing the interests of a particular candidate, but the other women in the meeting were not prepared for it. The result of this piece of political engineering was to elect every teacher who was nominated in the teachers' meeting.

When the meeting was called to order every seat in the lower part of the house was filled, as well as the first two tiers of boxes, and there were several hundred women in the balcony, a careful estimate placing the number in attendance at 1,100. Every woman had a pencil in her hand, and many had provided themselves with blank paper. A few had prepared their tickets before coming to the meeting, but most of them contented themselves with studying the printed tickets and trying to determine which of them to vote.

WHAT SOME OF THEM EXPECTED.

Those who had not received a "tip" witnessed the opening of the meeting with a feeling of pride and pleasant anticipations of the shining example this great mass meeting of women would afford to the horrid men in the way of running a convention without manipulation or having the whole thing "cut and dried" beforehand. Their dream was dispelled very early in the proceeding, however, and the large majority of the women simply sat helpless and with bated breath as they saw the whole convention being run by a few people in a manner which would have excited the admiration and astonishment of the late lamented Mr. Tweed, better known as "Boss" Tweed.

It was evident to the most casual observer, before the meeting had been in operation five minutes, that the "machine" was in full operation and had been well oiled in anticipation of the work which would be required of it. It moved with scarcely a jar and the woman who had the termity to raise a voice in protest was squelched with a celerity which took her breath and prevented a repetition of the offense.

The meeting moved with the utmost smoothness and while the minority had the machinery of the meeting in its hands it was evident after the votes had been counted that the women who were opposing the ring had the votes.

Of the twenty-two names on the ticket prepared by the element which controlled the machinery of the meeting, ten were elected, but four of these were the four school teachers who were forced on the "ring" by the action of the teachers themselves, and one of those elected was a woman whom the members of "the combine" and their friends were secretly knifing, so that of the eleven women for whom the machine members were voting but five were elected.

Of the eleven women elected, the following five are members of the Woman's club: Mrs. Keysor, Mrs. Harford, Mrs. Whittenden, Mrs. Towne, Miss McHugh. Of these Mrs. Chittenden and Miss McHugh were nominated by the school teachers.

PROCEEDED TO ORGANIZE.

The meeting was called to order by President Wattles of the Exposition association, who referred briefly to the occasion of the meeting and asked the further pleasure of the convention.

A woman in the parquette moved that the meeting proceed to elect a chairman. This was something of a surprise to those who had anticipated that Mr. Wattles would preside in order that the meeting might be steered clear of any parliamentary tangles, but the motion was put and carried before any one had time to draw a second breath and nominations were called for.

Mrs. Z. T. Lindsey was nominated by a woman in the parquette and another woman on the opposite side of the parquette nominated Miss Mary Fairbrother.

"In order to save time we will take a viva voce vote," said Chairman Wattles. "All those in favor of Mrs. Lindsey say aye, all opposed say no; Mrs. Lindsey is declared ejected."

This was a little two swift for the women to grasp, so none of them said anything, but the way they looked around to see what had struck them was an indication of the effect of this drastic dose.

Mrs. Lindsey made her way to the stage from the wings and announced that the next thing in order would be the election of a secretary and called for nominations.

A woman in the parquette nominated Mrs. Draper Smith and, as before, a woman on the opposite side arose and nominated Miss Mary Fairbrother.

"All in favor of Mrs. Smith being the secretary say aye, all opposed say no," said Mrs. Lindsey; the ayes seem to have it, Mrs. Smith is elected."

The women were watching this time and a woman in the parquette arose timidly and said, "Madam president, don't you think it would be a good idea to let us vote on the other nominee?"

It was evident that this was not in accordance with the program as arranged for the meeting, but in order to accommodate any request, however unreasonable, the chairman put the nomination of Miss Fairbrother. There were a number hearty ayes and several feeble noes, and the chair ruled that Mrs. Smith had been elected.

The chair then announced that President Wattles would address the meeting and he was given the floor.

ANNOUNCES THE OBJECT.

Mr. Wattles opened by stating that he had stood before a cage of untamed lions and had not been rendered speechless, but he said his heart sank within him when notified that he would be expected to address the meeting of women. In order to avoid the awful consequences of stage fright he said he had written out what he had to say, and thereupon drew from his pocket a short written address, which he proceeded to read.

He urged the hearty and equal co-operation in the exposition by both the men and the women of the transmississippi region, and dwelt upon the advantages of the exposition to this section. He complimented the women upon the fact that they did not desire a separate building for women, but preferred to take an equal part with the men, and he closed with a high tribute to the ability of the women of the west.

At the conclusion of the address of President Wattles, Mrs. Lindsey requested the secretary to read the plan which had been adopted for woman's work in connection with the exposition.

When this had been done Chairman Lindsey announced that the work of taking an informal ballot for candidates as members of the Board of Lady Managers would be taken up at once. She said that all nominations of women to be voted for on the informal ballot must be made by sending to the secretary the names of such nominees, and she made the further announcement, in the same connection, that "no name will be considered unless the person two whom that name belongs has authorized the use of her name as a candidate." Continuing, the chairman said that the name of Mrs. C. F. Manderson appeared on one of the printed tickets, but she said she had been repeatedly told by Mrs. Manderson that she would not be a candidate.

The chair then appointed the following women to collect the nominations: Mesdames Misener, Bruce and Love and Misses Baird, Scott and Bache.

LIST OF THE CANDIDATES.

The following names were sent to the secretary: Mesdames T. L. Kimball, James H. McIntosh, W. W. Keysor, E. A. Cudahy, N. P. Fell, W. B. Millard, A. N. Ferguson, H. W. Yates, T. K. Sudborough, W. P. Harford, John Gordon, Orietta Shields Chittenden, William Fleming, J. W. Van Nostrand, S. R. Towne, Emma A. Holyoke, Dr. Gertrude Cuscaden, W. S. Strawn, C. F. Manderson, Mary Girard Andrews, G. M. Hitchcock, C. C. Belden, Clark Woodman, J. N. Cornish, Frank Pugh, Fannie B. Patrick, Clara S. Rosewater, F. L. Haller, J. S. Briggs, H. S. Jaynes, Alvin Saunders, John A. McShane, T. F. Godfrey, Euclid Martin, F. F. Ford, Alexander Pollack, Mary Stiger, Lyle J. Caldwell, R. A. Willis, J. A. Gillespie, Samuel Rees, J. A. Wakefield; Misses Anna Foos, Kate McHugh, Alice Hitte, Dr. F. M. Lankton, Margaret McCarthy and Elizabeth Shirley. These candidates numbered forty-nine.

When these were announced the names of the following women were withdrawn, either by the owners of the names or by some who said that they had been authorized to announce that those named would decline to be candidates: Mrs. Belden, Mrs. Wakefield, Mrs. Manderson, Mrs. Hitchcock, Mrs. Ford, Miss McCarthy and Miss Shirley. This left forty-two candidates before the meeting.

After these names had been announced several attempts were made to name other candidates from the floor, but the chairman refused to allow this to be done, saying it was not in accordance with the rules laid down for the meeting.

A motion was made by Miss Mae Wood, the woman attorney of Omaha, to the effect that upon the first ballot the eleven women receiving the highest vote, providing it should be a majority of the votes cast, should be declared formally elected.

Mrs. Lindsey ruled the motion out of order for the reason that it was contrary to the plan of the meeting laid down by the executive committee.

HAD NO OPTION.

"I thought the women of Omaha were running this meeting," exclaimed Miss Wood.

"We are obliged to follow the plan laid down by the executive committee of the exposition," replied Mrs. Lindsey, "and we have no option in the matter, as we are working under their direction."

The chairman then announced the following tellers to collect and count the ballots: Mesdames Nattinger, Hoobler, Misener, Wilhelm, Metcalf, Bruce, Johannis, Pennock, Bache, Garrett, Belden, Emerson, Love, Squires, Creigh, Perfect, Rouder; Misses Hamilton, Baird, MacCheane, La Rue, Fairbrother and McCarthy.

The chairman then announced the method of voting to be followed. The women were instructed that any of the printed tickets might be used and any names appearing on those which were objectionable might be scratched out with a pencil and other names written on the ticket. It was also announced that a cross must be marked opposite each name desired to be voted for.

The chairman was called on several times to explain the method of voting and considerable confusion seemed to exist in the minds of many of the women on account of the apparent complications arising from this method.

The tellers then passed among the crowd with wicker baskets and collected the ballots after which they retired to an adjoining room to count the vote.

 

WHILE THE BALLOTS WERE COUNTED.

The chairman announced that pending the report of the tellers the meeting would be entertained for a time, and a substitute was sent to the ante-room to relieve Miss McCarthy, who addressed the meeting on "One Day in the School Room." Mrs. Harriet Heller followed Miss McCarthy in a short talk on women's work in connection with the exposition. Miss Ella Day, the elocutionist, was called to the platform and entertained the meeting for some time with recitations. Dr. Freda M. Lankton spoke briefly on women's work in the exposition, making a plea that the work of both men and women be judged by the same standard.

Mrs. Keysor and Mrs. Briggs were called for, but the chair said it would be unwise to allow candidates to have the freedom of the floor.

Mrs. Roudebush was then called for and spoke entertainingly of the experience of a western woman (herself) amid the women of the effete east.

At it was then nearly 6 o'clock, and a large number of the women had left the meeting, a vote was taken to determine whether those remaining should await the report of the tellers and take the second ballot, or adjourn until another day. The sentiment was in favor of remaining until the result of the vote was announced and then taking another ballot and thereby completing the electing of the eleven members of the woman's board.

The meeting then resolved itself into a sewing circle and the women gossiped with one another until the counting board made its report.

TELLERS READY TO REPORT.

Shortly after 6 o'clock the announcement was made that the tellers were ready to report and the meeting was called to order to listen to the report as read by Miss Rene Hamilton. She announced that the following twenty-two women had received the highest vote and had been selected as candidates: Miss Foos, Mrs. Keyser, Miss McHugh, Mrs. Harford, Miss Hitte, Mrs. Cudahy, Mrs. Cirttenden, Mrs. McIntosh, Mrs. Towne, Mrs. Kimball, Mrs. Feil, Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Sudborough, Mrs. Haller, Mrs. Woodman, Mrs. Ferguson, Mrs. Millard, Mrs. Yates, Mrs. Gillespie, Mrs. Briggs, Mrs. Fleming, Miss Boyd.

The chairman then announced that a second ballot would then be taken for the eleven women who were to be elected as members of the board. She instructed each woman to vote for eleven of the twenty-two who had been named as candidates by the report of the canvassing board and to deposit their ballots in tin boxes stationed at the front doors for that purpose. There were about 500 women in the house at the time this announcement was made, the great majority of those who had been present during the first ballot having gone away under the impression that but one ballot was to be taken at that meeting. Of those who remained many were confused by the many printed tickets before them, and the lack of opportunity to designate those who had been elected on the first ballot. As a result many voted for women who had not been elected on the first ballot, thereby throwing away their votes on those who were not candidates.

The ballots were taken in charge by the tellers and were taken to Creighton hall, where the tellers assembled in the evening to count the vote.

THEY COUNT VOTES RAPIDLY.

When the board of tellers retired to count the vote the members were divided into groups, forming eight boards, which proceeded to count the vote in the most expeditious manner. Each of these boards was given a bunch of tickets and a large tally sheet on which were arranged the names of the candidates. The votes were read to the one having the tally sheet and there tallied. When the tickets were counted the tally sheets were footed and the total taken of all the sheets.

No attempt was made to count the whole number of ballots so that it was impossible to tell how many votes were cast.

Some of the groups of tellers counted every name that appeared on the tickets, while others made no record whatever of those names which were "unauthorized," that is, those which had not been announced as having the full sanction of their owners for use as candidates. Among these was Mrs. Manderson, for whom a number of votes were cast, also Mrs. Hitchcock, Mrs. Ford and others. In computing the total vote it was therefore impossible to learn how many votes had been cast for any of these women. Votes were also cast for at least four other women who had not been nominated at all, and these were not counted by the canvassing board. These women were Mrs. Misener, Ms. Heller, Miss LaRue and Miss Fairbrother.

The following is the complete list of the vote as compiled by the canvassing board:

Miss Foos675Miss Boyd137
Mrs. Keysor594Mrs. Andrews102
Miss McHugh484Dr. Cuscaden101
Mrs. Harford465Mrs. Rosewater98
Miss Hitte437Mrs. Holyoke95
Mrs. Cudahy399Dr. Lankton87
Mrs. Chittenden385Mrs. Gordon83
Mrs. McIntish366Mrs. Rees59
Mrs. Towne333Mrs. Caldwell57
Mrs. Kimball296Mrs. Godfrey45
Mrs. Feil278Mrs. Jaynes45
Mrs. Martin287Mrs. Saunders44
Mrs. Sudborough190Mrs. McShane44
Mrs. Haller190Mrs. Strawn44
Mrs Woodman187Mrs. Cornish38
Mrs. Ferguson181Mrs. Tilden30
Mrs. Millard167Mrs. Patrick28
Mrs. Yates147Mrs. Steiger27
Mrs. Gillespie147Mrs. Van Nostrand25
Mrs. Briggs141Mrs. Pugh21
Mrs. Fleming140Mrs. Willis1

The first twenty-two names on this list were duly announced to the meeting as the candidates for election on the second ballot and after the second ballot had been taken, as detailed elsewhere, the canvassing board assembled in Creighton hall and proceeded to canvass the second vote.

SELECTING THE WINNERS.

This work was performed in the same expeditious manner which characterized the counting of the first ballot, the women displaying highly creditable skill in counting votes. The first vote, at which fully 1,000 votes were cast, each vote being for from four to eleven candidates, was counted by the board in about two hours. The second vote, at which about 600 votes were cast, was counted in about an hour and a half.

The result of the count of the second ballot was as follows:

Miss. Foos531Mrs. Feil206
Mrs. Keysor466Mrs. Haller159
Miss. McHugh406Mrs. Sudborough147
Miss Hitte353Mrs. Ferguson161
Mrs. Chittenden335Mrs. Woodman153
Mrs. Harford328Mrs. Gillespie189
Mrs. Cudahy323Mrs. Briggs169
Mrs. McIntosh312Mrs. Millard146
Mrs. Towne303Mrs. Yates115
Mrs. Kimball260Mrs. Fleming112
Mrs. Martin245Miss Boyd108

These were the "regular nominees," having been nominated as candidates on the first ballot. In addition the following women received votes: Mrs. Gordon, 2; Mrs. Stiger, 2; Mrs. Tilden, 3; Mrs. Manderson, 2: Mrs. Caldwell, 2; Mrs. Strawn, 4; Dr. Cuscaden, 4; Mrs. Holyoke, 2; Mrs. Rosewater, 2; Mrs. Andrews, 1; Miss McCheane, 3; Mrs. Van Nostrand, 1. The first eleven women in the above list were declared duly elected.

Will Work Up the Exposition.

A committee representing the exposition has arranged to leave here Sunday night for a short trip, in which it will visit the legislatures in several states and advocate the interests of the exposition. It will go first to Topeka, where it will be on Monday. It will go to Denver, where arrangements have been made for a joint session of the two houses of the state legislature to accommodate the committee on Tuesday. It will then go to Cheyenne for Wednesday and to Salt Lake for Thursday. It has not been definitely settled who will form the party going, but President Wattles, G. M. Hitchcock, John L. Webster and Clement Chase will be part of it.

BILL MAY PASS THIS WEEK

Appropriation for the Exposition is Nearer Accomplishment Than Ever.

ITS FRIENDS HAVE TIRED OF THE DELAY

Partisan Schemes Intended to Give Advantage Through the Measure Will Be Pushed Aside for Action.

LINCOLN, Feb. 12.—(Special Telegram.)—The friends of the Transmississippi Exposition propose to make a determined effort during the ensuing legislative week to bring the bill appropriating $150,000 for the aid of the enterprise before the legislature for final action, one way or the other. There has been but one reason why the measure has not been acted upon, and that one reason is compressed within the word "politics." The assertion has been made and reiterated that the fusion majority in the house is strong enough to pass the bill, but that the republicans have delayed action. The unreasonableness of this assumption seems to be apparent when it is remembered there are in the house of representatives seventy-two fusionists and but twenty-eight republicans. The ability of the majority to take up the measure should be unquestioned. Of course, it must be admitted that not all of the members of the majority party are favorable to the bill; on the other hand, it is not denied that those of the majority who are unwilling to vote an appropriation are ready at any time to accept the responsibility of their votes. There are many republicans ready to vote for the measure when they are given an opportunity. The favorable result of a vote is not doubted by any friends of the exposition. The republican minority in the house keenly resents the imputation that it has delayed action upon the bill. It is true, several republican members are favoring a policy of delay, but the larger proportion of the republican members are ready and anxious to vote for the bill.

BUSY PLAYING POLITICS.

It is well established here that a faction of the majority has been engaged in a game of politics every day since the opening of the session. The program of this faction has been clear from the beginning. The leading features of that program have been the unseating of the four republicans from Douglas county, the recount of the ballots cast for the constitutional amendments, and the repeal of the beet sugar bounty law. The program has been outlined and presented by the very men who should have the exposition most at heart. The feeling is growing that distinctive party measures should be left to party men, and that the men who have been designated to push the exposition enterprise should confine their efforts to that project alone.

It cannot be successfully refuted that the leaders of the majority have determined to make the exposition a party measure. The whole policy of delay has been pursued in the vain hope that by some means the republican minority can be crowded into a position where it will oppose the exposition as a party question. Then the majority leaders hope to rush the exposition bill through the house and the senate and to the governor so as to be able to point to the appropriation as one of the things for which Omaha should be grateful to the free silver party. The republicans comprising the minority will not be caught in a trap so skillfully conceived, but so carelessly executed. Most of them, if not all of them, will vote for the exposition bill. They are ready to vote at any time.

MAY BRING ALL HANDS TOGETHER.

The feeling is rapidly growing in legislative circles that the time for action has come and that the attempts of the free silver leaders to force the republicans to vote against the exposition enterprise should cease. The exposition means everything for Nebraska. The triumph of a single faction means nothing for the state. Prompt action seems to be imperative in order to prevent unfavorable action in other states, and many members of the legislature believe that the time has come when such action should be taken without regard to party triumph. If the exposition bill passes it must pass as the will of a majority of the members of the legislature without a resort to party distinction.

There is a movement on foot, participated in by members of each house, to bring about a joint caucus of the majority element in behalf of the exposition. Friends of the bill among the populists declare that the time has come for action, that the credit of the state is suffering from delay and that if it depends on the populists to pass the bill they cannot act too quickly. The caucus will likely be arranged for on a night early next week.

BRINGS IN COUNTY BOARDS.

Senator William D. Schaal of Sarpy county has prepared and will introduce early next week a bill looking toward the co-operation of county agricultural societies in the Trans-Mississippi Exposition. The bill as drawn does not include the State fair, but it is the intention to do so. A similar bill will also be introduced in the house. Following is the full text of the measure:

A bill for an act to permit county agricultural societies to participate in the transmississippi congress and to provide for expenses of county exhibits.

Whereas, The Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha, Neb., during the year 1898 is an event of supreme importance in the history of the state, and

Whereas, A just feeling of state pride impels the agricultural societies to co-operate with the directors of the exposition, that the resources and advantages of our commonwealth may be better understood by the thousands who attend:

Therefore, Be it enacted by the legislature of the state of Nebraska:

Section 1. That any county agricultural society of the state upon a majority vote of the directors thereof, is hereby authorized to appropriate the funds to which it would be entitled for the year 1898, as provided for in section 12, chapter 11, article 1 of the Compiled Statues of 1895, for the purpose of securing and maintaining a suitable exhibit of the manufactured and agricultural products of said county at the Transmississippi Exposition, to be held in Omaha, Neb., during the year 1898.

Sec. 2. It shall be the duty of said board of directors of any agricultural society entitled to act under the provisions of this act to secure and maintain county exhibits for the exposition, which exhibits shall be in lieu of the "annual fair," required of county agricultural societies in section 12, chapter 11, article 1 of the Compiled Statutes of 1895. Provided, that the said board of directors shall publish at the first annual meeting thereafter of said society a full and complete statement of all expenditures connected with said exhibit and to turn into the treasury for the benefit of said society and funds remaining unappropriated.

Sec. 3. This act shall take effect and be in force from and after its passage, approval and publication, according to law.

 
Page 59
So. Om. Tribune

TODAY'S BATTLE.

The Warring Amazons are in the Field

So Look out for an Earthquake.

No Fear nor Favor will be Shown.

Women's Memorable Afternoon.

The clans are marshalling this afternoon and the songs of war are welling up to the overthrow of other sounds. Grim visaged war will not know itself after the women get together at the Y.M.C.A. and the imps of discord will scatter in afright at the outcome of their work. The affair will be enjoyable strictly so for the newspaper men, and Monday's TRIBUNE will tell you all about it. Like the professional politicians none of the candidates have died or resigned since yesterday's issue of the TRIBUNE. Some may take to their beds with a sick headache or two after the tournament, but they will not mind such things during the fray. It is life or death with some of them so they think, and there will be no "dearie, dearie" business in their campaigning. If you hear the climax of an earthquake this afternoon just pass it up as the final clasp of the opposing Amazons.

EVENTS IN COUNCIL BLUFFS

Two Members of the Exposition Board of Lady Managers Are Selected.

Mrs. Edith M. E. Reed and Mrs. Sarah C. Key Chosen From Many Names Presented.

Both Are Eminently Qualified for the Work Set Before Them—-Round of Social Events—-Gossip.

A mass meeting of women was held yesterday forenoon in the Roval Arcanum hall in the Beno block for the election of two Council Bluffs members of the board of lady managers of the Trans-Mississippi exposition. The attendance included about fifty ladies, of whom a large majority were members of the various women's clubs of the city. The chief interest in the enterprise, in fact, seemed to be among the women's clubs, and members of at least half a dozen different clubs were present, each club having its candidates for the honor of election.

The gathering was called to order by Mr. Lucius Wells, the Council Bluffs member of the board of directors, who explained briefly the nature, origin and object of the movement for the holding of a Trans-Mississippi exposition and how the work of preparation is being conducted.

On motion of Mrs. A. W. Casady Mrs. Joseph R. Reed was unanimously elected chairman and Mrs. O. W. Wirt was chosen secretary.

On motion of Miss Clara Evans it was resolved that nominations should be made by informal ballot, and the chair announced that the persons receiving the four highest number of ballots on the informal ballot would be voted for on the formal ballot.

The result of the informal ballot was as follows: Mrs. Edith M. E. Reed, 35; Mrs. Sarah C. Key, 9; Mrs. James McCabe, 9; Mrs. George C. Phelps, 7; Mrs. Horace Everett, 6; Mrs. Thomas Metcalf, 4; Miss Carrie Dodge, 2; Mrs. W. O. Wirt, 2; Miss Clara Evans, 2; Mrs. P. J. Montgomery, 1; Mrs. A. W. Casady, 1; Mrs. J. E. Harkness, 1; Mrs. F. S. Thomas, 1; Dr. Sarah Smith, 1; Miss Peterson, 1.

The formal ballot resulted: Mrs. Edith M. E. Reed, 41; Mrs. Sarah C. Key, 20; Mrs. James McCabe, 18; Mrs. George C. Phelps, 5.

Mrs. Reed and Mrs. Key were declared elected, and on motion the election was made unanimous. The latter was not present, but Mrs. Reed expressed her thanks for the honor in a brief but graceful little speech.

Both the ladies elected to represent Council Bluffs on the board of lady managers are unusually well qualified for the work. Mrs. Reed was formerly, before her marriage to Judge Reed, the cashier and general manager of a bank in which she was a heavy stockholder, and Mrs. Key has been prominently identified with the club work of the women of this city.

EXPOSITION BUILDINGS.

Important Business Transacted by Executive Committee.

At the meeting of the executive committee of the Trans-Mississippi exposition directory yesterday afternoon the dim outlines of the physical aspects of the big show began to appear.

It was decided that there should be buildings as follows:

Agriculture, Horticulture and Forestry.
Mines and Mining.
Manufactures and Liberal Arts.
Fine Arts.
Electricity and Machinery.
Auditorium.
Nebraska Building.
Grand Army of the Republic.
Silver Palace.

It is understood that this plan may be changed if necessary.

There was some informal discussion as to the general plans of the grounds, but no action will be taken in this respect until architects are appointed and conferred with. Mr. Reed suggested that the exhibition buildings be arranged in the form of a circle and that the plaisance buildings form a circle around it with a board avenue between.

Manager Kirkendall of the buildings and ground department announced that he had appointed Dion Geraldine of Chicago superintendent of construction. It is expected that he will be here tomorrow and begin work at once.

The first delegation to visit the state legislatures will leave tonight for Kansas. Its itinerary has been published. The party will comprise G. W. Wattles, G. M. Hitchcock, John L. Webster, W. S. Poppleton, Clement Chase and H. E. Palmer.

They will travel in the Pullman "Silver City."

Among those who have been mentioned for the secretaryship of the board of lady managers is Mrs. Julia Crissey Hoobler.

Wyoming Lawmakers Interested.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Cheyenne, Wyo., Feb. 13.—In the Wyoming legislature today a joint committee of both houses was appointed to make arrangements for the suitable reception on Wednesday next of the committee from the Trans-Mississippi exposition managers who are to visit the Wyoming legislature.

FOLLOW UP AN ADVANTAGE.

At Erfling hall last evening the North End Improvement club held its first meeting since the location of the exposition at Miller park. The club was jubilant, and resolved to follow up the advantage thus gained by going after the city council and board of county commissioners for increased appropriations for good roads and streets and other municipal improvements in keeping with the needs of the exposition surroundings. Captain Reynolds of Florence, Charles Y. Craig and G. F. Franklin were elected a committee to labor with the county commissioners and another committee, with Councilman Dave Christie as chairman, was elected to draft resolutions setting forth the needs of the north end.

The club will hold a big rally the coming Thursday evening at Erfling hall, at which time the resolutions will be presented for discussion and the local situation will be thoroughly overhauled. It is proposed to send a committee to Lincoln to lobby for the exposition appropriation if there isn't something favorable done in the meantime.

PROMPT AND LIBERAL ACTION.

Washington, D. C., Feb. 13.—Omaha World-Herald, Omaha, Neb.: Prompt and liberal legislative action in aid of the exposition in Nebraska is highly essential to stimulate congressional aid. I fear much damage will result to the enterprise in congress and in the several state legislatures from the growing impression that the legislature and people of our own state are indifferent to its success. WILLIAM V. ALLEN.

 

EXPOSITION IS MOVING

Directors of the Transmississippi and International See Light Ahead.

ARE PLANNING FOR THE MATERIAL WORK

Decide Upon the Nine Main Buildings for the Grounds.

GRAND SILVER PALACE TO BE A FEATURE.

G. A. R. Structure Designed for the Display of War Souvenirs.

STATE LEGISLATURES TO BE VISITED

Dion Geraldine of Chicago Engaged as Superintendent of Construction, and Will Arrive Tomorrow to Begin Work.

The directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition held their regular weekly meeting yesterday under auspices more favorable to the success of the vast enterprise than at any time since the matter was first broached. They saw their way clear at least to take definite steps toward the building of the city which is to exist for six months in the northern part of Omaha, and have within its limits displays of the resources and development of most of the twenty-four transmississippi states, and possibly of a few states not so classed.

The directors decided upon the nature and number of the main buildings to be erected. There are to be nine of them. They are in general to be such buildings as were at the World's fair, except that they will be more compact. Two or three departments will be managed under one roof. Two new departures in exposition buildings have been decided upon. One of these is a building for a Grand Army of the Republic display, in which souvenirs of the nation's wars will be exhibited. The other is a Silver Palace, in recognition of the marvelous wealth of the mountain states, and a description of which was published in the exposition number of The Bee a few weeks ago.

Apropos to this decision by the directors came the acceptance by Dion Geraldine of Chicago of the position of superintendent of construction, a position similar to the one he held at the World's fair. He will arrive tomorrow and enter at once upon his duties.

PROSPECT OF STATE PARTICIPATION.

The outlook for a generous appropriation by the state legislature has materially improved during the past few days, prominent members of the dominant party in the legislature assuring the managers of the exposition that the bill is none the less sure because of having been delayed in its passage.

Senator William D. Schaal of Sarpy county, a populist, has introduced a bill providing that agricultural societies in the state may take the aid they receive from the tax levy created for that purpose, and use it in making a display for their counties at the exposition.

Three different parties of friends of the exposition will visit the legislatures in the transmississippi states and advocate a suitable appropriation for a creditable display from those states. One of these parties will leave tonight for the west; one will leave tomorrow for the north; and later another will leave for the south.

The women of South Omaha and Council Bluffs have followed the action of their sisters in this city, and have held enthusiastic mars meetings, in which they have elected two members of the Board of Lady Managers for each city. Mrs. A. B. Towl and Mrs. A. A. Munro were chosen from South Omaha, and Mrs. J. R. Reed and Mrs. S. C. Key for Council Bluffs.

DECIDE ON THE MAIN BUILDINGS.

Exposition Directors Plan for Nine Main Structures as a Starter.

The general appearance of the grounds of the Transmississippi Exposition is beginning to assume tangible form, and already the dim outlines of the main buildings which will form the central portion of the great fair are becoming visible. The number and names of the principal buildings to be erected on the grounds were determined at the regular weekly meeting of the executive committee of the exposition, held yesterday afternoon at the Commercial club rooms.

The committee, after a full discussion of the matter, passed as resolution providing for the following nine buildings, which will constitute the nucleus around which the minor buildings will be assembled: Building No. 1, Agriculture, horticulture and Forestry; No. 2, Mines and Mining; No. 3, Manufactures and Liberal Arts; No. 4, Fine Arts; No. 5, Electricity and Machinery; No. 6, Auditorium; No. 7, The Nebraska Building; No. 8, Grand Army of the Republic Building; No. 9, The Silver Palace.

In the discussion regarding these buildings the idea was advanced that the Auditorium building should be made a model of the world-famed temple in Salt Lake City, a building renowned as having the most perfect acoustic properties of any auditorium in the world. This idea met with great favor with all the members of the committee present, and it was tacitly conceded that no better plan could be followed.

Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Buildings and Grounds announced that he had secured the services of Dion Geraldine as general superintendent of construction of the exposition buildings and grounds. He recommended his appointment and the committee endorsed the appointment. Mrs. Geraldine occupied a similar position in connection with the World's fair and was highly recommended to Mr. Kirkendall by the highest officers of the Columbian exposition. Mr. Geraldine will arrive in Omaha tomorrow and will enter at once upon his duties in connection with the work of the Department of Buildings and Grounds.

A rule was adopted by which all the regular employes of the exposition will receive their pay on the first day of each month, commencing with the 1st of March.

WILL VISIT LEGISLATURES.

A party of directors will start west tonight to visit the state capitals and appearing before the legislatures to urge the passage of bills making appropriations for state exhibits at the exposition. The party will be headed by President Wattles and will comprise the following: G. W. Wattles, G. M. Hitchcock, J. L. Webster, W. S. Poppleton, Clement Chase, H. E. Palmer. The party will visit Topeka, Denver, Cheyenne, Salt Lake City and other points, the route beyond Salt Lake not having been definitely decided upon.

Another party of directors will start on a similar tour of the states to the north, leaving Omaha early this week. This party will visit St. Paul, Minneapolis and Duluth, Minn.; Pierre, S. D. and possibly Bismarck, N. D. This party will be under the leadership of Chairman Lindsey of the executive committee, but the exact composition of the party has not yet been determined.

Preparations are being made to send a third party to the southern states as soon as arrangements can be made. The route of this party has not been decided, but it will probably cover all of the states to the south.

SOUTH OMAHA'S LADY MANAGERS.

Lively Mass Meeting Makes a Choice Out of Nine Candidates.

Mrs. E. B. Towl and Mrs. A. A. Munro were elected as South Omaha's members of the Board of Lady Managers of the Transmississippi Exposition at a mass meeting held yesterday afternoon.

Long before 2 o'clock the gymnasium of the Young Men's Christian association in South Omaha was filled with women, and fully fifty were unable to find seats when Mrs. M. Carl Smith called the meeting to order and announced that the selection of a permanent chairman was the first business in order. Miss Hettie Moore was nominated for the position and elected, there being no opposition.

Chairman Moore, after thanking the women, stated that the selection of a secretary would come next and Mrs. Carl Smith was nominated by Mrs. John L. Martin and Mrs. John Carroll was nominated by Mrs. Aberly. Mrs. W. S. White obtained the floor and suggested that a secretary be elected by ballot. Mrs. Talbot thought an oral vote would save a great deal of time and it was decided to choose a secretary by an aye and nay vote.

At this point Mrs. Carl Smith announced that she withdrew in favor of Mrs. Carroll, but the women would not allow this. On an aye and nay vote for Mrs. Smith she was declared by the chairman elected secretary, no one having voted against her. Mrs. Carroll was not voted upon at all, although the attention of Chairman Moore was called to the fact.

Secretary Smith then read the call for the meeting issued by J. A. Wakefield, secretary of the exposition directory.

NAMES THE TELLERS.

The next move was to appoint tellers, and upon motion of Mrs. Talbot ten tellers were appointed, one to be chairman. Chairman Moore appointed tellers as follows: Mesdames Crassy, Martin, Schrie, Montgomery, Redmond, Witten, Pinnell and Misses Evans, Littell and Pollard. Miss Evans was to act as chairman of the tellers and the nine were to be divided up in groups of three to collect the ballots. In announcing the tellers the chairman read the list from a card which she held in her hand, the names having been written in ink before the meeting was called to order. This gave quite a cut-and-dried look to the proceedings, but no protests were made.

The rooms by this time were uncomfortably crowded and women were standing way out on the stairways unable to get into the gymnasium. Mrs. Towl moved that the meeting adjourn to the Methodist church and a vote was taken. The motion to adjourn was lost, but nevertheless the chairman declared it was carried and the march to the church was taken up. The edifice was as cold as a barn, the windows having been open a great part of the day, but this did not appear to dampen the ardor of the women in the least. Every seat in the church was soon filled and it was estimated that fully 500 women were present.

It was decided that nominations should be made by ballot, the eleven having the highest vote being declared candidates. At this juncture Mrs. Aberly was recognized by the chair and she announced herself as a candidate, and added that she had been unable to induce any of the newspapers to print her name in the list of candidates.

NAMES BROUGHT OUT.

The nominating ballot resulted in the following receiving votes: Mesdames Towl, Munro, White, Geary, Mead, Carroll, Talbot, Smith, Westerfield, Carley, Aberly, Sloane, Ensor, Montgomery, Lane, Holmes, Vail, Haide and the Misses Pollard, Havens, Mullen, O'Teele and Moore. In rapid succession the women arose and withdrew their names until only nine were left to be voted on at the informal ballot.

While the ballots were again being distributed Miss Moore announced that the four having the highest number of votes would be voted upon for directors. The convention then proceeded to ballot on the following names: Mesdames Towl, Munro, Mead, White, Geary, Talbot Westerfield, Lane and Aberly.

During the counting of the ballots Mrs. Lindsey of Omaha was called upon for a few remarks in regard to the exposition and explained in a measure what the women directors would be expected to do and the possibilities for good work in the educational line.

The informal ballot stood: Towl, 279; Munro, 164; Mead, 99; Guary, 64; Talbot, 30; White, 20; Westerfield, 13; Lane, 4; Aberly, 1, the four highest votes alone being read to the convention. A total of 337 votes were cast on this ballot.

Next came the formal ballot, the results being: Towl, 291; Munro, 212; Geary, 64; Mead, 101.

Chairman Moore declared Mrs. Towl and Mrs. Munro elected and the convention adjourned.

SKETCHES OF THE OMAHA ELEVEN.

This City's Contribution to the Woman's Board—Who They Are.

Unusual interest has been attached to the selection of members of the Board of Lady Managers of the exposition. Now that the strife for office has been settled by the women themselves, it may be of interest to know who the successful candidates are. The following are brief sketches of the active members of the board:

Miss Anna Foos is the principal of the Kellom public school, Twenty-second and Paul streets. She has been a resident of this city and a teacher in the public schools for the past fifteen years. She is an active participant in the best educational circles and is the owner of considerable property throughout the city. Her name was one of the first suggested when the school teachers decided to make an effort to elect several of their number to the board of managers. Her popularity is attested by the fact that she received 531 votes out of 600 cast on the final ballot, easily leading all other candidates.

Mrs. Jennis Ellis Keysor taught in the public schools when she first came to Omaha. She was stationed at the eighth grade and then at the High school. English literature has always been a favorite study with her, and she taught it for many years in the public schools here. She studied at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, for several years. Mrs. Keysor has been the vice president and is now the leader of the art section of the Woman's club. She has written and published one or two thoughtful books on literary subjects. She has lectured on art and literature in many cities of Nebraska. She leads a class in English  

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literature in this city and presides over a beautiful and cultured home. She is a logical and persuasive speaker, and never fails to convince an audience.

Miss Kate McHugh is another representative of the school teachers, being the assistant principal of the High school and instructor in English literature. She has been engaged in pedagogic work in this city for the past ten years. She is prominent in Unity club circles, and a frequent contributor to their meetings. She is a sister of Judge William D. McHugh, and came to this city from Galena, Ill.

Miss Alice Hitte is a representative of the city school teachers on the board. She has been connected with the public school system of Omaha for the past seven years, and is now engaged as the special instructor of drawing, having supervision of all the drawing in the public schools.

Mrs. O. S. Chittenden, while not actively engaged in educational work at present, was until a year ago. She was identified with the kindergarten department of the public school system as Miss Shields, and resigned on account of her marriage a year ago.

Mrs. W. P. Harford has been a resident of Omaha for the past three years. Before coming west she was a resident of Dayton, O. There she was the missionary secretary and general manager of the foreign missionary societies of the denomination known as the United Brethren in Christ. She held this position for thirteen years and during that time did considerable field work for the missionary society in this country. She was also editor-in-chief of the missionary journal, The Woman's Evangel, during the same period. She was educated at Otterbein university, Westerville, O., where she took the degree of master of arts. While acting as missionary secretary she made two foreign trips. The first was in 1888, when she was one of the delegates from the United States to the world's missionary conference in London. During the other trip she spent much time in travel through continental Europe. She had identified herself especially with the work of churches and of temperance and missionary societies.

Mrs. Edward A. Cudahy, the wife of the head of the great packing house firm of South Omaha, came to Omaha from Chicago about five years ago. Besides being a most cultured woman and a liberal entertainer, she is greatly interested in music. Before coming to this city she was prominent in Chicago musical circles. In this city she is well known among musicians as the leading soprano soloist of the choir of St. John's Collegiate (Catholic) church.

Mrs. J. H. McIntosh is the daughter of Captain and Mrs. C. B. Rustin, one of the oldest and most highly respected families in Omaha, her maiden name being Miss Claire Rustin. She is a graduate of Vassar college. Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and for several years after her return home taught in the High school of this city. She has also served two terms on the board of directors of the public library, retiring from the board a year ago. She is a pianist of considerable repute and was a prominent leader of the Ladies' Musical society a few years ago.

Mrs. S. R. Towne is the wife of the assistant city physician. When the Woman's club was first organized she was prominent among those who helped establish it and was its first vice president. Subsequently she was elected president and is now holding the position of vice president again. Three years ago she was one of the two delegates from the Woman's club in this city to the biennial convention of Women's clubs of the United States at Philadelphia. Mrs. Towne has also been prominent in the work of university extension in this city and is especially devoted to the study of the natural sciences. She was born in Vermont and resided there during her youth; after that she lived in the central portions of Massachusetts until 1888, when she removed to Omaha.

Mrs. Thomas L. Kimball is the wife of the president of the Union Depot company. She has resided in this city for years and has always been identified with the most worthy charitable institutions. For several years past she has been the efficient president of the Creche, a home that looks after poor boys and girls of a tender age. While she has proven herself an indefatigable worker for this charity, there have been but few, if any, charitable undertakings in this city with which she has not been intimately associated.

Mrs. Euclid Martin is the wife of Postmaster Martin. On the Board of Lady Managers of the exposition she will be the especial representative of the Nebraska Ceramic club. While prominent in other cultured circles, she always devoted considerable time and attention to china painting and is recognized as a leader in that work. She returned last fall from a year's study and residence abroad.

BIG BOOM FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Outside Papers Devote Space to the Big Show.

The press of California and the Pacific coast states is devoting considerable space to the Transmississippi Exposition. The metropolitan dailies of Portland, Seattle, San Francisco and Los Angeles have commended the enterprise editorially and have published much descriptive matter concerning it. The papers of smaller towns on the coast have been no less liberal. There is every promise of a large appropriation by the California legislature. The San Francisco Chronicle of Sunday, February 7, published a fullpage, finely illustrated write-up of the exposition, copy for which was furnished by the press bureau. Pictures of prominent public buildings in Omaha and a view in Hanscom park embellish the article, which is largely made up of a chronicle of what has been done by the promoters of the exposition, a description of Omaha and an epitome of the wealth and resources of the west. It is by far the strongest advertisement of the exposition that has appeared in the western press, which, generally speaking, has shown a spirit of liberality in treating of the enterprise.

The eastern press is becoming aroused to the importance of the project. The Buffalo Illustrated Sunday Express will today contain a full-page write-up of the exposition, with half-tone illustrations upon book-print paper, and will doubtless prove to be the most artistic publication which has to date been made with reference to the exposition. The Chicago Inter Ocean will, Monday morning, contain a page of illustrated matter about the exposition, while the Chicago Sunday Chronicle will today present an exhaustive illustrated article about the big show. Other influential papers of the east and south have also given space to the recent issues of the press bureau.

NORTH SIDERS PREPARE TO HELP.

Mass Meeting to Devise Plans to Aid the Exposition.

A meeting of the North Side Improvement club was held last night at Erfling's hall on Sherman avenue to make arrangements for a mass meeting of the residents and property owners of the north side to be held Thursday evening of this week to take steps to assist the directory of the exposition in every way possible in connection with the work about the grounds, and in assisting in securing additional subscriptions to exposition stock.

Steps were taken to secure a large attendance at the meeting and the members of the executive committee of the exposition who are in the city will be invited to be present. A committee, consisting of President Richardson, Secretary Christie and Mr. Shepherd, was appointed to prepare suitable resolutions expressing the sentiments of the people of the north side regarding the exposition and present the resolutions to the meeting Thursday night.

The meeting will be held at Erfling's hall, at Sherman avenue and Corby streets, Thursday evening at 8 o'clock.

TWO WOMEN FOR THE BOARD

Council Bluffs Ladies Chosen for the Exposition Work.

ELECTION ENGENDERS MUCH INTEREST

Not a Great Turnout to the Mass Meeting, but Much Zeal Shown by Those Who Did Go.

There were not as many women present at the meeting in the Royal Arcanum hall yesterday afternoon as were expected, but those present took deep interest in the selection of two Council Bluffs women to represent the city in the Lady Board of Managers of the Transmississippi Exposition. There appeared to be a reluctance on the part of the Council Bluffs women to take up the matter, and the idea seemed to prevail that the women who were to represent Council Bluffs had been previously selected by the management of the big show, and that the meeting yesterday was only for the purpose of ratifying what had previously been done. Those who did attend, however, had no such idea and they went into the fight for their favorites with great enthusiasm.

Lucius Wells called the meeting to order and stated the object. His speech was brief and to the point and he immediately left the hall after he concluded. Mrs. J. R. Reed, wife of Judge Reed, was called to the chair and Mrs. W. O. Wirt was made secretary. Parliamentary rules were observed up to this point, but the remainder of the proceedings were carried on in sweet indifference to all such restrictions. Miss Cora Evans moved that an informal ballot be taken for nomination of candidates. The presiding officer assented and announced without taking the trouble to put the motion that the four women receiving the largest number of votes on the informal ballot should be considered the candidates and should be voted for at the next formal ballot. This model ruling saved perhaps a lot of wrangling and cut off all the eloquent eulogies that might have been expected in nominating speeches. the chair appointed four tellers to receive and count the secret ballot. They were Mrs. A. W. Casady, Mrs. George Carson, Miss Kingsbury and Miss Clara Evans. The chair announced that the ballots should be written secretly and placed in a hat and when all had voted the hat should be brought forward and deposited on the table, after which the votes should be counted by the four tellers. There was a rustle of perfumed note papers and a general biting of pencils all over the [?] The informal ballot showed that the

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Reed, 35; Mrs. S. C. Key, 9; Mrs. James McCabe, 9; Mrs. Horace Everett, 6; Mrs. Thomas Metcalf, 4; Mrs. George T. Phelps, 5; Mrs. W. O. Wirt, 2; Miss Cora Evans, 2; Mrs. Dr. Thomas, 1; Dr. Sarah Smith, 1; Miss Peterson, 1; Mrs. Montgomery, 1; Mrs. A. W. Casady, 1; Mrs. J. E. Harkness, 1.

It only required one formal ballot to determine which two of the four receiving the largest number of votes were the choice of the meeting. The counting showed that Mrs. Reed had received forty-one votes, Mrs. Key 20, Mrs. McCabe 18 and Mrs. Phelps 5.

Mrs. Reed made a pretty little speech, thanking the women for their handsome vote of confidence. The women then arose to leave the hall without the formality of an adjournment, until Mrs. Harkness called attention to the oversight and suggested that the selection of Mrs. Reed and Mrs. Key be made unanimous. A motion to that effect was accordingly put and carried without a dissenting voice. The adjournment was then made in regular parliamentary form.

Among the clubs represented were the Every Thursday club, the Ideal club, the Woman's club, the World's Parliament club, the Review club, the Oakland Avenue Reading club, the Progress and the Onward clubs.

The women selected are eminently fitted for the duties they will be called upon to discharge. Mrs. Reed is a thorough business woman and before her marriage to Judge Reed, who occupies the bench in the United States court of appeals, was the president and cashier of a bank. She is bright and winsome and has a happy faculty of dealing with large undertakings and solving quickly and without jar perplexing problems. Mrs. Key is one of the best known women in Council Bluffs and is also a business woman. The two will ably represent the women of the city in the board of Lady Managers of the exposition, and they will also help to make the great show a success.

ARKANSAS WILL ACT.

(Little Rock Gazette.)

In conformity with the recommendation of ex-Governor Clarke a bill has been introduced in the Arkansas legislature appropriation $25,000 for an exhibit of the resources and productive industries of Arkansas at the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition of 1898 at Omaha. Iowa has already made a preliminary appropriation for that purpose and will increase it later on. A bill is pending before the Illinois legislature providing for an appropriation of $100,000, while Nebraska is now considering a bill carrying $350,000, which, it is said, will pass the legislature within the next ten days. Colorado, South Dakota, Kansas, Wyoming, Utah and many other western states in interest are now considering appropriation bills, and the prediction is that every state west of the Mississippi will participate in the great exposition of 1898. The people of Omaha have subscribed over $400,000 in stock and will raise the amount to $1,000,000. Congress has pledged $200,000 and Senator Allen says this will be increased to $275,000 this session. The selection of a site for the exposition grounds is now under discussion at Omaha and it is expected that ground will be broken within thirty days.

The managers of the exposition are doing their utmost to assure the people of the entire west—from the Mississippi river to the Pacific coast—that the exposition of 1898 is designed to display the resources and products of every state and territory. The population of Nebraska and states touching her borders is nearly 10,000,000, a fact which is a guarantee that the attendance at the great exposition will be enormous, to say nothing of the hundreds of thousands of people who will come from the east. The states of the south will find in the exposition unexampled opportunity for a comparative display of their productive capabilities. Recent issues of the department of publicity make full exposition of the diversified products, not only of Arkansas, but of every state and territory west of the Mississippi river. When the exhibits of these states are arrayed together in this great exposition which will open its gates in June, 1898, an object lesson will be presented to the world second only in brilliance and magnitude to the Columbian fair of 1898. It is the design of the promoters of the Trans-Mississippi exposition that the exhibits of the states in interest shall be given precedence over those of foreign nations and eastern states. The exposition is to illustrate the progress of the arts, industries and civilization of the states west of the Mississippi river, and the degree of success to be achieved will depend largely upon these states and the co-operation manifested by their legislatures and citizens generally.

The exposition had its origin in resolutions adopted by the Trans-Mississippi commercal​ congress of 1895, represnting​ the twenty-four states and territories west of the Mississippi,

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"Whereas, We believe that an expostiion of all the products, industries and civilizations of the states west of the Mississippi river, made at some central gateway where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these wealth-producing states, would be of great value, not only to the Trans-Mississippi states, but to all the homeseekers in the world; therefore,

"Resolved, That the United States congress be requeted to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi exposition at Omaha in the year 1898, and that the representatives of such states and territories in congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases to assist in carrying out this enterprise."

"NEBRASKA IS ON TRIAL."

Judge M. P. Kinkaid put the question in a nutshell when in speaking of the Trans-Mississippi exposition bill he said "Nebraska is on trial." The committee has started on its way to visit the capitals of other states to urge appropriations for the proposed exposition of 1898. Nebraska ought to take action during the present week. In this matter political prejudice ought not to be permitted to enter. Representatives of all parties ought to unite for the common purpsoe of accomplishing a great good for the entire state as well as for the entire west.

The situation is a most critical one and no man or party can afford to be responsible for any further delay.

WILL TELL OF THE BIG SHOW

Local Committee Starts on Its Tour of the States Which Are Interested.

Members Promised a Hearty Welcome by All Who Are to Take Part in the Exposition.

First Stop Is at Topeka This Afternoon and the Lawmakers of Kansas Are to Hear the Plans—Outlook Is Bright.

Omaha and June to
Trans-Mississippi Exposition
1898. International November

This is the banner which marked the handsome special car, "Silver City," in which the committee of business men representing the Trans-Mississippi exposition left last evening for a tour of the western state capitals to promote the interests of the exposition in securing the appropriations from the legislatures now in session.

The members of the committee are Gurdon W. Wattles, G. M. Hitchcock, John L. Webster, H. E. Palmer, William S. Poppleton and Clement Chase. Mesdames Hitchcock, Webster, Poppleton and Chase accompanied the committee from this city, and Mrs. Palmer and Mrs. Wattles will join the party in Cheyenne. Hon. G. R. Wright, vice president of the Trans-Mississippi exposition for Iowa, will accompany the committee from Denver.

The committee left at 10 o'clock, the car being attached to the Kansas City night express, and will arrive in Topeka this forenoon. During the afternoon it will meet a joint committee of the Kansas legislature. Then proceeding to Denver, it will meet the Colorado legislature in joint session tomorrow evening. By resolution of the Wyoming legislature Saturday, it will receive the committee in joint session Wednesday.

There Mr. Hitchcock leaves the committee, returning home, and the other members will proceed to Salt Lake City, Helena, Boise City, Olympia, Salem, Sacramento and Carson City, the itinerary covering a period of about twenty days.

One of the members of the committee, in speaking of the anticipated success in the present undertaking, said that he had the utmost confidence that before the end of the week he would receive a telegram with the good news that the Nebraska legislature had done handsomely by the exposition.

WYOMING WILL ACT.

Cheyenne, Wyo., Feb. 12.—Hon. G. M. Hitchcock, Manager Department of Promotion, Trans-Mississippi Exposition, Omaha—Sir: I am directed by the honorable house to inform your committee, whose arrival in this city for the purpose of conference with the members of the Fourth legislature is announced for Wednesday, February 17, that the house this day authorized and instructed a special committee to arrange for a joint session of both house and senate for the purpose named, to be held in the hall of the house.

It is desirable that you notify us as early as possible of the hour of your arrival in the city, so that a definite hour for such joint session may be set. Very respectfully,


M. U. BARROW,
Chief Clerk House.

OMAHA'S GREAT EXPOSITION

Question of a Site for the 1898 Show Under Discussion.

Work of Raising Funds for the Mammoth Enterprise Progressing.

Novel Display Planned by Some of the Western States.

Concerted Efforts to Be Made to Enlist Eastern interest.

OMAHA'S BIG SHOW.
WILL BE A WORTHY EXHIBITION.
[Special Correspondence.]

OMAHA, Neb., Feb. 11.—While events in all the western states are contributing to the general interest in the trans-Mississippi exposition, Omaha and the balance of the state are considerably agitated over the preliminary arrangements incident to the selection of a site for the big fair and the appropriation of a handsome amount by the Nebraska legislature for the encourage-[?] the gigantic enterprise. The many [?] that surround this city. [mple?] scope for discussion as to the advantageous location of the affair and citizens have been holding animated discussions for several weeks on the subject. But the incident of location is not permitted to interfere with the details of promotion and the whole section is actively at work pushing the details of primary arrangement.

This week several public meetings have been held, at which animated discussions have been in order with reference to considerations growing out of the exposition's location. The citizens are determined that all interests shall be heard along this line and the utmost freedom is given to all who desire to in anyway express an opinion. That no assertions of unfairness should be made against the board of managers in the preliminary arrangements, two Chicago expert engineers were employed last week to visit the city and examine all the parks and other proposed sites and report on the one which could be most easily brought under the hands of the landscape artists and made to serve the purpose of a location for a mammoth exhibition of the resources of the great west. Even their report as not to be considered final and, though they reported upon Miller park, the discussion still goes on with the determination of all to see that the most available site is eventually selected.

TWO SITES IN RIVALRY.

While there are half a dozen park within a few miles of the city and available in every way for the purposes of an exhibition similar to the one in question, the fight has really narrowed down to two places—Miller park and Hanscom park, but most delightful stretches of territory shaded by nature and arranged in a most artistic manner. Between the two sentiment is quite evenly divided, with the chances in favor of Miller park, because the Chicago experts reported that the exposition company would be able to convert that park into desirable grounds with the least expenditure and effort.

Hansom park stretches over sixty acres in the southwest part of the city. It is one of the oldest resorts of the kind in the city, having been donated for park purposes by A. J. Hanscom years ago. Its many great trees, pretty dells and great stretch of green commend it in many ways to Omahans, but the transportation facilities are not quite equal to those of Miller park. The park commisision​ of the city, however, has spent thousands of dollars in the past fifteen years beautifying the property and the exposition would have the advantage of all these improvements.

Of Miller park, in the northern part of the city, not as much can be said for its present condition as a public pleasure resort, but it is a handsome body of land, capable of being added to indefinitely since it adjoins a great prairie territory, but it lacks the rustic beauty of its rival in the other part of the city. The experts declare that it can be brought to grade at slight expense and that the scope of elaborate improvements is practically unlimited. Further, it adjoins the abandoned military reservation of Fort Omaha, which the company proposes to utilize if congress gives its consent.

The best evidence of the way Omaha and Nebraska feel about the exposition is probably manifested in the manner in which the citizens have contributed their money to encourage the effort. The people of this city have already subscribed $425,000 to the enterprise, and are expected to increase the amount to $1,000,000 before the details are completed, while the county will probably issue half that amount in bonds for the same purpose. The measure before the legislature for the appropriation of $350,000 is receiving splendid support, with a small element of the body inclined to favor the loping off at least one-third of the amount. It has the support of the public men of the state, and Governor Holcomb's message to the legislature strongly advocated the most liberal treatment of the great enterprise. The body will probably make its appropriation next week. Incidentally the bill provides for a board of twelve representative citizens, who shall be appointed from the state at large, to act in conjunction with the exposition managers in promoting the interests of the affair.

No special effort of the state in the way of designs for buildings at the fair has yet been discussed, except in the most informal way, but it is the intention of all sections of Nebraska that a most creditable exhibition of the states resources shall be made, and that it shall be on such an elaborate plan as to challenge comparison from any part of the trans-Mississippi region. It may take the line of a picture of Nebraska in miniature, showing the vast area of fertile valleys, rivers, the magnificent system of irrigating canals covering hundreds of miles, assuring a plentiful supply of moisture by artificial methods if nature should at any time fail in her bounty, incidentally indicating some unique features of modern irrigating arrangements, and concluding with a sketch showing the vast scope of the cattle industry of Nebraska with the gridiron of railroads which cover the state.

THE SILVER PALACE.

While no definite plans have matured for these features in Nebraska, other sections have made very definite progress in the way of proposed exhibitions at the fair calculated to please the visitors as well as give to the world an accurate idea of some of the interesting resources of the west. Probably the feature that has thus far been given the most prominence is the proposed silver palace, which is expected to be the principal feature of the mineral exhibit. The sketch of the structure submitted by S. S. Herman, a Chicago architect, shows a building [?] similar in the world's fair Venetian palace, with a highly ornamented tower in the center 250 feet high, with eight lower towers of probably half that height. The style is to be Gothic and the whole is to be plated with silver. The plans are very elaborate, and if carried to completion as at present arranged it will embody one of the most novel things in the way of a building ever placed before the people of the world. The cost will be something enormous, but the capital for the enterprise is said to be in sight.

In the interior of this building will probably be a reproduction in miniature of the most famous mines of the continent, and as a side feature there will be a little affair wrought in the rarest gems and richest ores obtainable, to be known as the mines of Solomon, from which the great stores of wealth with which that monarch dazzled the ancients were supposed to have been taken.

AN INDIAN DISPLAY.

Another novel design already incubating is to represent all the Indian tribes which roamed the territory west of the Mississippi with the war implements and jewelry of the tribesmen, together with their instruments of art and other peaceful industries. This may involve the presence of some of the most famous living Indian warriors, and plainsmen who contributed so largely to driving the redman into the depth of the wilderness and forced him to surrender the lands of his fathers to the onmarching civilization. Trophies obtained by the pioneers, as well as their ancient antagonists on the field of battle, will be on exhibition.

The managers of the exposition have also decided to have a department devoted to the Grand Army of the Republic, and to gather under the supervision of that organization many mementoes of the late rebellion in the shape of war relics and things associated with the great commanders, who contributed to the stirring events of the contest.

It is quite certain that artificial lakes of very elaborate construction will be leading features of the exposition. This will be partly for the reason that they will easily beautify the landscape which might otherwise partake too severely of a wodland​ scene, and also for the reason that irrigation and its remarkable progress as developed in the west under modern teachings and the investments of great fortunes, will be side lights of much importance in the exhibition. An unlimited supply of water is easily obtained from the Missouri, and some of the sites discussed contemplate placing the exposition so that the current of the great river, or such part of it as may be desired shall be turned directly into the exposition grounds, so that magnificent waterfalls, carrying great volumes of water, can be erected, together with lakes that may add something of grandeur and dignity to the general scene.

PROMOTERS OF THE SHOW.

The men promoting the show which is to dazzle the country in 1898 are the most representative citizens in Omaha and the state generally. Most of them are well known far beyond the confines of their states. Gurdon W. Wattles is president of the exposition. He is vice president of the exposition. He is vice president of the Union National bank and a splendid type of the energetic western man. He devotes many hours daily to the exposition, but receives no compensation for his efforts. This was the first thing determined upon by the directory—that none of the offices would receive a dollar for their services, other than those serving in a clerical capacity.

Alvin Saunders, resident vice president, is a pioneer of the state and a representative business man. His large business interest and conservative business training makes him a valuable adjunct to the directory.

Edward Rosewater, editor in chief of the Omaha Bee, is at the head of the department of publicity, and is bringing all of his energy and newspaper training to bear on advancing the interest and placing before the public ideas as to the elaborate exhibition proposed.

RAILWAYS LEND A HAND.

But the strongest feature of the promoting arrangements is in the fact that every citizen of the state is bending all his efforts to contribute to the success of the enterprise. General Manager Bidwell of the Northwestern has just placed at the disposal of the exposition his private car, and a committee will shortly visit Pierre, S. D., and St. Paul is in the interest of the enterprise. The railroads are doing their share handsomely in the premises. The Union Pacific has also placed at the committee's disposal a private car for a delegation to visit Colorado, Kansas and Illinois. The St. Paul committee will be headed by Chairman Lindsey and that to Illinois will consist of President Wattles, W. J. Bryan and W. G. Hitchcock, editor of the World-Herald. These committees are expected to promote the interests of the exposition in various ways and particularly before the legislatures of the various states considering appropriations in aid of the trans-Mississippi committee of big wholesalers and jobbers from Missouri points will shortly visit Chicago and make a showing to the many manufacturers and wholesalers of that section who sell to this territory. They will be given some idea as to the magnitude of the exposition and just how great an interest the wholesalers of Illinois have in contributing to the success of the big enterprise. They will easily see that as a medium for advertising the approaching fair will offer unsurpassed facilities and for showing the other industries tributary to the manufacturing industries of Illinois no greater opportunity could be offered than the exhibition at Omaha in 1898.

PROPOSED "SILVER PALACE" FOR CENTRAL FEATURE OF EL DORADO.

GERALDINE GOES TO OMAHA.

WILL HAVE CHARGE OF GROUNDS.

OMAHA, Neb., Feb. 13.—F. P. Kirkendall of the department of grounds of the exposition has received a telegram from Dion Geraldine, general superintendent of the world's fair at Chicago, accepting the offer of a similar position for the exposition here in 1898. A committee representing the exposition has arranged to leave here Sunday night for a short trip in which it will visit the legislatures in several states and advocate the interests of the exposition. It will go first to Topeka, where it will be on Monday. It will go to Denver, where arrangements have been made for a joint session of the two houses of the state legislature to accommodate the committee on Tuesday. It will then go to Cheyenne for Wednesday and to Salt Lake City for Thursday. It has not been definitely settled who will form the party, but it will be headed by W. J. Bryan.

   

SATURDAY'S FRAY

Full Proceedings of all the Fun.

A Superb Piece of Machine Manipulation.

Grand Lesson for Political Thorohghbreds​.

How Gentle Femininity can do the Autocratic Act.

A Delicate Chairmadame who Could Give Pointers

To Czar Reed—Two Admirable Women

Elected—Mrs. Towl and Mrs. Munro.

Down in the right-hand corner of the Methodist Episcopal church Saturday afternoon there were four or five newspaper men who for the time being felt as insignificant as a tear drop in a mint julep for in front of them in all the luxury of beauty natural and artificial that makes the American womon​ so attractive in the eyes of fortune hunting nobility, and so noble and endearing to their own plain, rugged American cousins sat "three hundred, thirty, odd," as our up-to-date school professors would p al it off, of South Omaha's most prominent and active stars in the feminine firmament. It was the largest crowd of female features that ever touched skirts with each other in the magic burg, and you didn't have to look through a marine glass to see that it was there for a purpose. Women either turn out in such numbers to listen to a church program, or else to fight and they were there to do the latter at the drop of the hat. But no hat dropped. We've wandered into several political conventions and applauded the smooth way in which one faction not knowing how large its strength, manipulated, through the tactics of one or two shrewd leaders, the body at will; we've envied the success of the Ohio man who commencing as a dismal minority gradually grew and forced into oblivion the long recognized hercules of the g. o. p; and we've pulled our whiskers with pleasure over the way the council has grown from a chaotic mass of inter-logger-heads into the solid eight, but we have never seen anything yet in any point of managerial cleverness to compare with the amiable rough shod, invincible and gumdrop control taken over Saturday's meeting by the winning faction. We are taking it for granted that the whole affair was prearranged, if not hats must be taken off in reverence to the greatest piece of method-like innocense​ that has broken loose in our midst since Bruno Strathman blew the foam off a glass of water at the Towl-Johnston convention. The meeting was called to order at the Y.M.C.A. rooms by Mrs. M. C. Smith who without wasting any words nominated Miss Hetty Moore, the High School Goddess of Instruction for madame chairman, and without wasting anymore time put the nomination to a vote, and declared the lady of learning elected. Miss Hetty assumed the chair with a carriage, expression and activity that shows her to have been forewarned, or to be a very good imitation of a stoic, and that she didn't propose to permit any caramel work to go on while she was looking, and she didn't. Someone named Mrs. Josephine Carroll for secretary, and another person named Mrs. M Carl Smith. "Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Carroll have been nominated for secretary," announced Chairmadame Hettie, "now all in favor of Mrs. Smith will please say aye; contrary no." Of course Chairmadame Hetty didn't in a thousand years intend to keep any one from a chance to vote for Mrs. Carroll, women are not so horrid in such affairs as men, but when the reporter caught sight of the expression of lovable innocence that frisked about her features as she thus arbitrarily chocked off at least a portion of the expression of the convention's sentiment he wondered why women have so long been kept out politics. Mrs. Smith having taken up the secretary's quill someone looked out in the street and saw several hundred women who couldn't get into the hall and suggested an adjournment to the Methodist church which was at once acted upon. As soon as it reconvened Chairmadame Hetty with another delightful expression of innocense​ produced a card and announced the following as tellers to take charge of the voting:

Martha Evans, chairmadame, Miss Pollard, Mrs. Cressey, Miss Littell, Mrs. J. L. Martin, Mrs. Pinnell, Mrs. Montgomery, Mrs. M. Redmond, Mrs. Witten and Mrs. Schrei.

Some of the girls thought the chair ought to be polite enough to wait for instructions before going ahead as if she were the great dynamo but didn't say it except in their balloon sleeves, which of course didn't count.

While the tellers were making the rounds for nominations from fifteen to twenty more or less lusty lunged females were on the floor for five full minutes each firing away some suggestion, sarcasm or platitude, and the cackling was as inspiring as that which occasionally follows, in a respectable hen society, the laying of a bright new egg. Chairmadame Moore recognized everyone as fast as they got up, but she didn't recognize what they said, at least she never let anything go to a vote and as this sort of work had a paralytic effect upon those who might have felt like kicking, there was no objection. Only once was this monarchical manner of running things given a jolt that brought a diamond-dyed frown upon the faces of the push. During a moment of absent mindness the chair without consulting her card to see if it was on the docket recognized Mrs. H. J. Aberly. The latter had a grievance. She had been making a house to house visit for two or three days to convey the fact she was a candidate for directress but in someway the papers had omitted her named, just as they did scores of others, from the list of candidates. This fact had made her wrathy and she arose to tell the convention that while no newspaper had spoken of her as being a candidate she wanted it distinctly understood that she was, and would be in it to the last. The reporters took off their overcoats at the sarcastic way she shot her preliminary remarks at them, and it was quite tropical even with the mercury all in the bulb, during the rest of of​ the session in consequence. Chairmadame Hetty was appalled at the audacity of the woman in so openly electioneering for herself, and tried to stop her, but Mrs. Aberly only quit when she got ready. A few minutes latter when the tellers' record showed on the informal ballot that she had received just one lone, lorn vote it was quite apparent to observers that after being so emphatic in her declaration that she was a candidate. Mrs. Aberly must have used some occult force in communicating to her friends that she was not.

The nominating vote brought out the names of the following:

Mesdames—

D L Holmes,J C Carley,
T H Ensor,C L Talbot,
J C Carroll,W G Sloane,
E E Munro,Anna Geary,
W S White,E C Lane,
H J Aberly,E B Towl,
N B Mead,J G Martin,
Westerfield,W B Montgomery.

Misses—

O'Toole,H Moore,
Havens,Pollard
Mullen,Vail.

As soon as the names of the candidates and the call for an informal ballot was announced Misses O'Toole, Moore, [?] ens, Pollard Mullen, Vai[?] Mesdames Montgomery,[?] sor, Carroll, Carley, J[?] Martin and Sloane witho[?] leaving Mesdames T[?] Mead, Talbot. Wester[?] Lane, Aberly, Munro, W[?] and Geary in the race. [?]chairmadame took another [?] at her score card and wi[?] discommoding a hair in[?] psyche knot states that[?] the four receiving the his[?] number of votes on the i[?] mal ballot would be voted[?] in the formal. This[?] doubtless an expedient ide[?] it robbed the contest of[?] fifths its charm preventin[?] introduction of dark hors[?] mares, and keeping the l[?] candidates from being s[?] with a boom, and as it wa[?] the work of the conventio[?] one like it. But it d[?] phaze the lady of the[?] and the decision went. [?] formal ballot resulted as[?] lows.

Towl......................
Munro.....................
Mead......................
Geary.....................
Talbot....................
White.....................
Westerfield...............
Lane......................
Abealy....................
Total double votes.
The formal ballot p[?]
Towl..........................
Munro.........................
Mead..........................
Geary.........................

The chair announced[?] election of Mesdames Tow[?] Munro, the ladies clapped[?] hands in applause, and the[?] vention adjourned.

   

PASSES THE HOUSE

ACTION BY LOWER BRANCH OF CONGRESS

Appropriation of $200,000 for the Big Transmississippi Exposition.

SENATE LIKELY TO AMEND THE BILL

Allison Agrees that $75,000 Additional May Be Asked.

LOCAL DIRECTORY IS MOVING RAPIDLY

Mass Meetings to Be Called for the Purpose of Selecting Members of the Board of Lady Managers.

In the house at Washington this afternoon the sundry civil appropriation bill was passed without division. This bill carries $200,000 for the Transmississippi Exposition. It is subject to amendment in the senate, where an effort will be made to secure the $275,000 recommended by the Treasury department as being necessary to make the proper government display. Senator Thurston has reported from his committee on international expositions Senator Allen's amended bill making this provision, and Senator Allison, who is chairman of the senate committee on finance, has agreed to allow the house appropriation bill to be amended in accordance with the plan. He preferred that the house bill should take the provision, but the economical element in the house committee on appropriations was against more than the original bill carried. This amount, $200,000, will become immediately available, and will allow work to begin on the government buildings at once. The plans for the government buildings have been under consideration for a long time, only awaiting the appropriation before beginning work.

Secretary Wakefield of the exposition association has received letters from Congressmen Strode, Meiklejohn and Kem in reply to letters sent sometime ago, in which he requested them to name the time and place for holding mass meetings of women of their districts for the purpose of electing two women from each district to be members of the Board of Lady Managers of the exposition.

WHERE THEY WILL MEET.

In each instance the congressman leaves the dates of the meeting to Secretary Wakefield, but the place at which the meeting shall be held is fixed by each of the congressmen. Congressman Strode of the First district fixes Lincoln as the place at which the meeting of that district shall be held: Congressman Meiklejohn names Fremont as the place at which the women of the Third district shall assemble to elect two representatives, and Congressman Kem names Broken Bow as the point at which the women of the Sixth congressional district shall assemble. Secretary Wakefield has opened correspondence with the mayors of each of the towns named by the congressmen, and has asked those officials to select a hall or other suitable place in which these meetings may be held and notify him, after which he will issue a call for a mass meetings in each district. The date of these meetings will probably be Wednesday of next week, and the Department of Publicity will assist the secretary in disseminating the notices of the meetings and the purposes for which the women will be elected.

Dion Geraldine, the newly appointed superintendent of construction of the exposition under the Department of Buildings and Grounds, was expected to arrive in the city today, but Manager Kirkendall received a telegram from him this morning, saying that [?]arrive tomorrow and be ready to [?]take up the work of his department. In the meantime Manager Kirkendall is being flooded with applications for the positions of supervising architect and assistant architects, but he has told all that the time for making these selections has not arrived and that nothing will be done along that line until the time comes.

WILL VISIT TEN WESTERN STATES.

Committee Leaves on an Errand of Instruction and Promotion.

The sleeper "Silver City," gally bedecked with two enormous streams which bore the legend "Omaha, 1898, Transmississippi and International Exposition, from June to November," left the Union depot last night attached to the south-bound Kansas City, St. Joseph and Council Bluffs 10-o'clock train. On board was a committee of Omaha business men, six in number, representing the exposition, and upon them will devolve the work of laying the subject of state exhibits before the various legislatures now in session throughout the western country.

Those who compose the party are G. W. Wattles, G. M. Hitchcock, John L. Webster, H. E. Palmer, William S. Poppleton and Clement Chase. The directors are accompanied by their wives. The itinerary of the tour comprises visits to the capitals of ten states. In the order of visiting they are as follows: Topeka, Kan.; Denver, Colo.; Cheyenne, Wyo.; Salt Lake City, Utah; Helena, Mont.; Boise City, Idaho; Olympia, Wash.; Salem, Ore.; Sacramento, Cal.; and Carson City, Nev.

It is expected that the trip will consume abut​ three weeks, although no visits of more than two days will be given any one point. Most of the capitals visited will be accorded but a single day, but due to the large mileage covered it is thought by the party that three weeks time will be necessary.

In speaking of the prospects of the journey last evening, Mr. Wattles said: "We are going to give the legislative bodies we visit the best inducements in our possession in order to make them come forward with the requisite appropriations needed for the exhibits. In starting at this time with our own appropriations till in the balance, we feel that an extra effort upon our part will be necessary to place the matter before the various bodies in the proper light. We expect, however, to receive telegrams before we have been on the road a week that the bill in our own state has gone through with a liberal appropriation.

"The first stop will be made at Topeka, where we arrive Monday morning. After seeing the proper persons, we leave there at 10 p.m. for Denver. I think we will have a most cordial welcome in the mountain city, as we most assuredly did upon our former visit. The Colorado exhibit will undoubtedly be a handsome one, and an appropriation commensurate with it will go through the house with a rush.

"We will be traveling almost constantly, but think there will be considerable variety in the many cities visited. We will probably reach home about March 7."

Apropos to the departure of the committee on this trip the Department of Promotion announces that it has received much information of an encouraging character in the past few days from many of the states in the transmississippi country relative to appropriations for state exhibits.

Word has been received by The Bee from Idaho that, although the full amount called for by the bill introduced last week at Boise, may not be passed, a reasonable appropriation is certain.

MANY ARE APPLYING FOR SPACE.

Transmississippi Exposition the Center for All Kinds of Exhibits.

Applications for space at the exposition continue to pour into the Department of Exhibits and a very flattering showing has been made in a number of different lines. The line which seems to be receiving the most attention is amusements in the nature of those which formed the immortal Midway Plaisance at the World's fair, Already a number of applications for attractions in this line have been received and the latest is an application for 50,000 square feet for a Chinese exhibit. The application for this large space was made a few days ago by H. Sling of Chicago, a native of China, who had charge of the Chinese concession in the Midway.

Mr. Sling was in town last week and was introduced to Manager Reed by some prominent people of Omaha, who vouched for his financial responsibility. He informed Mr. Reed that he proposed to install a Chinese theater, a village, tea garden, joss house, restaurant and a booth for selling Chinese and Japanese wares. His application was placed on file for future action.

The exposition authorities are becoming aroused to the fact that some measures will have to be adopted to prevent the large number of entertainments naturally attendant upon such an affair as the exposition from locating outside the grounds, thereby detracting from the exposition in many way. These shows will attract the dollars from the pockets of the people before they get inside the exposition, and the exposition itself will not derive any pecuniary benefit from these outside exhibits.

The difficulty to be encountered in connection with the site which has been selected for the exposition lies in the fact that there is an unlimited quantity of vacant land lying outside of the exposition grounds. The proprietors of prospective shows will endeavor to secure ground outside of the exposition grounds for the reason that they can probably make lower terms with the owners of such ground than could be made with the exposition officials. It is probable that the city council will be asked to pass ordinances requiring a high licence for shows and entertainments during the progress of the exposition, with a view of forcing these concerns to go inside of the exposition grounds.

Some of the exposition officials who have been in Lincoln during the past few days report that there is a sentiment among the members of the legislature that money which may be voted for the exposition by the state is likely to be dissipated in the way of salaries for the officers or directors of the exposition, and they are opposing the appropriation for that reason. In this connection Secretary Wakefield calls attention to the first resolution passed by the board of directors at its first meeting and before any officers had been elected. The resolution is as follows:

Resolved, That no director of this corporation shall receive any compensation for services performed in any capacity for the corporation.

This resolution was unanimously adopted and is still in force.

WOMEN'S WOES.

Saturday's Affair Does Not Set Well With

Some of the Participants—A Smoldering

Volcano Under the Crust of Appearances.

Accused of Tampering With the Ballots.

Newspapers often have good intentions, but not always are they discovered to the public. Yesterday we undertook to express the pleasure afforded us by Chairmadame Hetty Moore in her management of Saturday's convention; to reveal to the male population the charmingly determined autocratic way in which she made every one wilt before her authority; how everything though transparently "fixed" before hand was ushered through in the most innocent and amiable kind of a manner; and in other ways to show that the ladies can give the men all kinds of pointers and then some on the art of parliamentary machine work.  

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Call a man a shrewed parliamentarian or political manager and will take you into a saloon and buy you the best in the house.

The brownies swore of Jan. 1 1897, and of course did not expect any such reward from the manipulators of Saturday's circus, but neither did they look for an exhibition of the proverbial perversity of women. But the latter came all right and in no other form than that of a general roast for putting such a construction as they did on the acts of the ladies. Some of the dear girls thought we were real cruel in making Chairmadame Hetty as a sort of a boss, or the perfunctory mouth piece of a faction that had agreed upon its line of work, and assert that whatever she did as in accordance with either her ignorance of the way she was being used, or her ideas of the duties of a chairmadame. And on this subject nothing more need be said. But if there is anything who thinks the convention adjourned under the influence of love and mutual admiration let him or her take a skate through some of the haunts of the women who were there.

A volcano in active operation is about the condition of things under the crust of appearances, for the ladies are madder than whitewashed setting-hens over certain incidents of the convention which at the time was unperceived by them. Though the members of the teller's committee were social queens and paragonesses of female perfection and nobility and were under the leadership of the doughty, energetic and watchful Miss Martha Evans, it is not keeping them from being actually accused of tampered with the votes and miscalling the true vote. The amazing gossip is circulating about like a lost bolt of electricity that Mrs. Mead was "deliberately" cheated out of an election, and by these same tellers not counting the votes cast for her. This charge is so much like those that are in evidence after the local democratic conventions that one has to think a half a half dozen times before he believes it to exist. Before the convention the Mead supporters were willing to bet 16 to 1 that their candidate would be elected, and they are just as confident now that she was elected according to the bonafide vote. of course it is all over, and there's the spilled milk idea, and all that, but the ladies don't care. They are all torn up, and they think it's real mean. Mrs. Carroll's friends are on the gridiron of anger because her name was not voted on for secretary. Mrs. Aberly is the only one who feels real easy over the results. While there's lots of fun in the scrap for the newspapers, there is every reason for believing that the kickers should imitate the action of the clam, and keep silent. Had they gone into the convention as well organized as the Towl-Munro forces, and not got rattled, and made a sky-rocket kick every time an unparliamentary act was committed the result might have been different, but.

 

JUDGE SCOTT ON THE EXPOSITION BILL.

OMAHA, Feb. 13.—To the Editor of the World-Herald: It would be disastrous to all portions and business interests of the state if the legislature should not grant a liberal appropriation to aid the Trans-Mississippi exposition.

This is an enterprise calculated to advertise and bring prominently before the people of the world the fertility of our soil, our climatic advantages, our educational facilities and the very high percentage of intelligence of our people as shown by the census of 1890, as compared with the comparatively low average of the people of some of the eastern states whose press and senators have so unjustly sought to place the people of Nebraska before the world as unfit to exercise the privileges of American citizens.

I desire to say further that if that grand enterprise was intended to be, or would be, an Omaha enterprise and for the benefit of Omaha only, and not for the benefit of the entire state of Nebraska and her people in all conditions and callings, I would oppose the appropriation by the state of a single dollar, but I have too much confidence in the broad and liberal-mindedness of the people of the state outside of Omaha and in their just pride in the state to believe for one moment that they will regard the enterprise of more interest to the city of Omaha than to the entire state.

It is entirely too contracted a view, in my judgment, to charge that it is an exclusively Omaha enterprise, for the exclusive benefit of Omaha, unless they are justified in concluding that Omaha is not a part of the great state of Nebraska, a conclusion no one can be so foolish as to entertain.

In my judgment that exposition, if successfully carried out—and much depends upon the state whether the enterprise will be successful—will be a lasting benefit to all the western states, and to the state of Nebraska in particular. Other western states are getting in line, and propose to aid the enterprise by liberal appropriations because they know what great benefits will result to them if the exposition is made a success. Can Nebraska afford to do less? A commendable state pride and a common interest require that the state of Nebraska should do much for this exposition. The states of the great west expect this of her.

I am opposed alike to a stinted or an extravagant appropriation, but I am certainly in favor of such an appropriation as will go out to the world as an evidence of the broad and liberal policy of the people of this state. Anything less than that will rob the state of the benefits that it would otherwise receive from the exposition, and would, moreover, in my judgment, put the state in a bad light before the people of the word.

I believe that $200,000 would meet the approval of the taxpayers of the state, and I have such an abiding confidence in the wisdom and patriotic pride of the members of our legislature that they will in that regard, as well as in all others, fully measure up to the expectations of the people.

CUNNINGHAM R. SCOTT.

DISTRICT CONVENTIONS.

Secretary Wakefield has letters from Congressmen Meiklejohn, Strode and Kem, respectively designating Fremont, Lincoln and Broked​ Bow as the cities in their districts in which the mass meetings of women to select members of the women's board of managers of the Trans-Mississippi exposition are to be held.

Letters from the other Nebraska congressmen are expected today. All of those heard from left the date of the meetings to Secretary Wakefield, and he has suggested Wednesday, February 24. In the meantime information regarding the scope of the women's board of managers will be sent to all Nebraska papers with the request that it be published.

Mutes and the Exposition

At its last meeting, held at Labor temple, the Omaha Literary Club for the Deaf elected the following named officers for the ensuing six months: President, L. M. Hunt; vice president, Mrs. C. E. Comp; secretary, Miss Ottie L. Crawford; treasurer, William Kline. The club will give a literary and pantomimic entertainment at the same place next Saturday evening in honor of George Washington's birthday. Several committees will be appointed to bring state conventions. Transmississippi congress of the deaf, national association, to Omaha during the exposition year. The club has selected Russel Smith as reporter to write up Omaha and do correspondence for eastern papers published in the interest of deaf and dumb.

EXPOSITION BILL IN WYOMING.

Commission to Be Appointed to Look After the State's Exhibit.

CHEYENNE Wyo., Feb. 16.—(Special Telegram.)—In the legislature yesterday Mr. Davis introduced house bill No. 150, an act to provide for the appointment of a Transmississippi and International Exposition commission and making an appropriation of an amount to be determined by the legislature to pay the expenses of the same.

The general appropriation bill was introduced. It reduces the state expenditures for general purposes $10,000 from the amount expended during the past two years.

 
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ROYAL RECEPTION AT TOPEKA

Warm Welcome to the Trans-Mississippi Exposition Delegation.

Joint Session of the Legislature Held—Special Meeting With the Ways and Means Committee—Favorable Action Is Anticipated.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Topeka, Kas., Feb. 15.—The exposition delegation arrived at the capital city of Kansas