Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition

 
This Scrap Book
is personal property
of
John Wakefield
August 19th, 1897
to
February 10th, 1898
 
Business & Industrial Department.
B + I Locked Case
OMAHA PUBLIC LIBRARY BUSINESS & INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT
omaha public library REFERENCE BOOK
 
Rock Island Union
Dec 18th 1896

LOUIS BRADFORD'S DEATH.

An Attack of Appendicitis Which an Operation Would not Relief—His Standing in Omaha.

The Omaha World-Herald gives the following particulars of the death of Mr. Louis Bradford, who for some years previous to 1879 was in charge of the office of Weyerhaeuser & Denkmann in Rock Island, resigning to go into business in Omaha. His death was due to a short attack of appendicitis, for which an operation was performed. The World-Herald says:

Mr. Bradford was seemingly in the best of health up to a few days ago, and his death is a shock to his friends. Saturday afternoon Mr. Bradford left the Omaha club, suffering some pain, but still able to be about. Sunday it was decided by his physician that an operation was necessary. Drs. Summers, Bridges and Wilson operated on Monday, but found the case hopeless.

Mr. Bradford leaves a wife and one son, Robert, also a sister, Mrs. Hall, living at Thirteenth and Vinton streets. He has been engaged in the lumber business in Omaha since 1879, coming here from Rock Island. Until three years ago he was a member of the Chicago Lumber Co., but since has been in business for himself at Tenth and Douglas streets. He was considered a most capable man, is estimated to have an estate of some $75,000, and carries $18,000 life insurance in the New York Life besides other policies in other companies amounting to about $5,000. He was a Knight Templar, a director of the Omaha Board of Trade, the junior warden of All Saint's church and a director of the Omaha club. Beside his Omaha interests he was a member of the firm of Howland & Bradford, doing a large lumber business in South Omaha.

Funeral services were held at 2 o'clock from All Saints' church, interment at Forest Lawn.

On account of the funeral of Mr. Louis Bradford these lumber dealers closed their respective places of business during Wednesday afternoon: H. F. Cady Lumber Co., C. L. Chaffee, Chicago Lumber Co., C. N. Dietz, Guiou & Ledwich, Hampton Lumber Co., Geo. A. Hoagland, Wagner & Buchanan, J. A. Wakefield, Wyatt-Bullard Lumber Co., Omaha; Howland & Bradford, S. K. Martin Lumber Co., and J. B. Watkins & Co., South Omaha.

THE SENTINEL, WED

SHELTON SHOWINGS.

THE SENTIN

Many Handsome Flowers Grace the Marriage Ceremony.

One of the prettiest church weddings of the season was that of Miss Florence Holmes, daughter of Mrs. Lucy Holmes, of Riverdale avenue, Shelton, and Leonard Anson Davis, of Brooklyn, N. Y., which was celebrated in St. James's Episcopal church, Derby, Thursday, at 5. p. m. The church had been most elaborately decorated for the occasion, the chancel being one beautiful tropical garden filled with stately palms of various species and Easter lilies in profusion, and in each recessed window were lilies and other plotted plants in full bloom.

The invited guests began to arrive shortly after 4 o'clock, and were ushered to their seats by Messrs. W. F. Lawrence and F. S. Valentine, of Shelton, and L. F. Anschutz and A. A. Baker, of Ansonia. The church was quickly filled with a very fashionable company. A few minutes past the hour and the bridal party arrived and to the strains of the familiar wedding march by Mendelssohn, rendered by Prof. Goodale, the party moved up the aisle in the following order: The ushers, followed by two little bridesmaids, the Misses Hattie and Florence Valentine, in pink organdie, bearing baskets of pink roses, and closely after them Miss Ethel Holmes and Miss Jessie Goldsmith, in pure white, bearing white marguerites. The maid of honor, Miss Blossom May Holmes, followed, attired in a handsome costume of Persian colored silk, and immediately following her came the bride, leaning on the arm of her mother.

The bride wore a simple costume of white silk mull, trimmed only with white ribbons, and wearing as ornament a fine diamond pendant, a present from the groom. At the chancel the party was met by the groom and his best man, Dr. Edgar Wright, of New York city, and Rev. C. E. Woodcock, of Christ church, Ansonia, stepping to meet them, the impressive service of the Episcopal church was repeated, the bride and groom responding clearly, while the organ's softest tones mingled with the solemn service.

After the benediction the procession marched down the center aisle, the bride on the arm of him she had just promised to love, honor and obey. The bridal party were at once driven to the home of the bride's mother, where a brief informal reception was held, only the immediate relatives of the contracting parties being present. Both bride and groom are well known here, the former being a general favorite with all the people and the latter—a native of Great Hill—has many friends here who have rejoiced at his successful efforts to carve out a career for himself in the great metropolis.

It is the verdict that he, however, never made a more surely successful move in his life than when he won his bride. The newly-wedded couple will take up their abode in New York city, and thus once more Shelton loses by the peal of the marriage bells.

The young couple were driven to New Haven, last evening, and took the train from there to New York, thus eluding the vigilance of their friends who were lying in wait for them at the local depots.

Omaha Hotel Reporter of Sat, Jan 11th 1894
Editor OMAHA HOTEL REPORTER:

I wish to make public, at least to the hotel world, a few statements regarding the Madison Hotel affairs. In the first place it will be well to mention, that the bungled up article that appeared in the Evening Bee of January 10, 1894, was nearly entirely lacking a word of truth in it, and I am sure the Bee does no credit to itself when such a blundering article comes forth.

Charles L. Gyger, who is simply a clerk for John A. Wakefield, is the trustee for the lien holders of the property at Twenty-first and Chicago streets, and nothing more or less, and further he does not own a dollar's worth of the Madison hotel furniture or even on the building. The furniture is valued at about ($12,000) twelve thousand dollars and the equity is in the name of Helen A. and Sam'l A. Lewis, and there is a mortgage on it to Courtney & Co., Omaha's leading grocer, for $4,500 and outside of this no one has a claim of any sort against it.

A few of the lien holders interested in this biding are some of the leading material men in Omaha, and some out of town, but there is a ring of men (which does not include the innocent parties) who I denounce as the most unscrupulous band ever letf​ at large in a civilized community, and I think it my duty to warn the widows who may be left for them to operate upon, and not let them go on victimizing any more unfortunates who may fall in with them.

John A. Wakefield and his little ring have been able to break up more than one home, and a truthful statement of facts may enlighten an ignorant public.


A Subscriber.
Sam'l A. Lewis

THE DAILY NEWS.

SATURDAY, MAY 18, 1895

Established February 5, 1883.
FRANK S. READER & SON, PUBLISHERS

— The circumstances of the death of Thomas Fulton and the subsequent raising of the body to make a medical examination, are still fresh in the minds of our readers. The following article appeared in a morning Pittsburg paper: "A suit will be filed in court this morning by R. A. and James A. Balph, attorneys for Harriet and Annie Fulton, of 76 Manhattan street, Allegheny, against the Commercial Travelers' Mutual Accident Association of America, to recover $5,000 insurance for the death of their brother, Thomas K. Fulton. On January 1, Fulton, while walking along Pennsylvania avenue, Allegheny, fell, striking his head against a metal pipe, and died within 15 minutes. His sisters, Annie and Harriet, sent proofs of his death to the Travelers' company. The latter refused to settle, claiming that the death was due from heart disease and not from violence. On April 1, the body, which was buried at New Brighton, was exhumed, and an autopsy held by physicians representing both sides. The autopsy failed to produce evidences of heart disease, although the wounds on the head were plainly visible. The company still refused to pay the insurance, and the suit today is to recover the full amount."

 
Page 4 consists of the reverse sides of the newspaper articles from Page 3.

Union Adlets.

WANTED.
WANTED—Sewing by day in private famlies. Address M. F. Union office. 1-6
WANTED—Salesmen in every district; new season; samples free; salary or commission with expenses from start. Luke Bros. Co., Chicago. sp16ws3m
WANTED—A partner with small capital, to place on the market a life-saving device which enables a person to remain in the water a year, and to carry provisions for two weeks. Address Charles Sacowich, Union.
FOR RENT.
FOR RENT—Two good rooms, with all modern conveniences, with board. Fine location, private family. Address L, Union office. 4t
FOR RENT—A seven-room house, modern improvements, on Twenty-Sixth and Vine. 6tf.

Incorporated Under State Law.

Rock Island Savings Bank

ROCK ISLAND, ILL.

Open daily from 9. a. m. to 3 p. m. and Saturday evening from 7 to 8 o'clock. Five Per Cent Interest Paid on Deposites. Money loaned on Personal Collateral or Real Estate Security.

OFFICERS.
J. M. BUFORD, President.
JOHN CRUBAUGH, Vice-President.
P. GREENAWALT, Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
Joh Volk.
Wm. Wimerton.
John Crubaugh.
J. M. Buford.
H. P. Hull.
Phil Mitchell.
L. Simon.
E. W. Hurst.
C. F. Lynde.

Commenced business July 8, 1890, occupying new rooms in Mitchell & Lynde's new building.

Jackson & Hurst, Solicitors.

Rock Island Iron Works.

9th St. and 7th ave.

NESDAY, APRIL 29 18

been said that if oil were a necessary part of an equipment for a journey of such length, the traveler could obtain it in small quantities anywhere from Poland

 

FACTORIES DAMAGED BY FLOOD

The Art Tile Works May Lose $5,000, and Other Plants Suffer—The North End In a Bad Condition.

There have been many hard rains during the past few years, and a vast amount of damage has resulted from them in this vicinity, but none of these can be compared to the rain of yesterday afternoon. The North End, which has always had its share of the damage, is not the only place in town that felt the effects of the flood yesterday. The property owners all along Walnut Run met with heavy losses. The plant which suffered most in Beaver Falls was probably the Art Tile Works, situated almost on the run at the west end of Thirteenth street. Their loss will, it is estimated, amount to almost $5,000. The water rose so rapidly that their property could not be protected, their clay and one of the kilns being ruined by the water.

The Howard Stove Foundry also suffered greatly, and so did the other plants located on Walnut Run. The Consolidated Mills probably contained the greatest amount of water, but their loss will not amount to much. The Rod Mill, however, was compelled to shut down last night. Almost all the foot bridges along the run were swept away, and a great number of outhouses were either swept away or dislodged from their foundations. The large lot at the Knott, Harker foundry, which occupies more than a block, was completely under water. The worst part of the flood, however, was in the North End.

From Twenty second street to the Book House it was completely immersed, and every cellar in that distance from Eighth to Ninth avenues was filled with water. street cars could not run past Twenty-second street, and at Twenty sixth street the track was badly washed out, so that several cars were derailed. People could not leave their homes unless they went in boats or waded in water several feet deep.

About 6 o'clock, when the flood was at its worst, the culvert under the Ft. Wayne tracks, leading to Steffen's hill, was almost filled with water.

The people of the North End are again loud in their complaints about the poor protection that is given to them, but it would have been impossible to control such a quantity of water as came down Walnut Run yesterday.

It is estimated that the loss to the different works along Walnut Run, will amount to about $30,000

For years there lay in my house a volume of manuscript to which I used to turn when life pressed hard and I cudgeled my brains to make out how much I would have lost had I never existed. The pages are discolored by time and bear printer's marks in red pencil. I treasured them, often wondering what to do with them, but made up my mind as to that when I saw the Mertz musical collection in the Pittsburg Carnegie library. I would have them bound and put them with that, first as the memorials of two as good men as ever walked the earth, William Hunter and Samuel Wakefield, both Methodist itinerants, and second as showing how they went about it to teach the people of this region to love music and song, for these are the pages of the "Minstrel of Zion," the text by Hunter and the quaint notes by Wakefield. They say in the preface that they sought the simple rather than the sublime, because (with characteristic modesty) "if the authors had been capable of producing a work adapted throughout to the taste of the critic, it might have failed of their design, as being too far in advance of ordinary taste." It was copyrighted in Pittsburg early in 1845, but many of the pieces in it and the music for them had been composed long before that. Here is one, "The Old Ship of Zion, Rebuilt." Who the author was perhaps no one now knows, as it was one of the spiritual songs sung by Methodists and others far back in the century. It was recast, or according to his Country Antrim drollery, "rebuilt," by Hunter, likely as not in the 30s. It is crowded with references to the sea, which seem to indicate that it was written when immigrants were coming fast and had fresh memories of the sea. It is in parts, for women and men, and recalls the days when they sat apart in worship. The women pipe out:

Come, tell of your vessel and what is her name,
Oh, happy Christian sailors.
Say who is your captain and what is his fame,
Oh, happy Christian sailors.

The men lift up their voices and roar in chorus:

She's the old ship of Zion,

BEAVER VALLEY FLOODED.

Storm Was Terrific and Caused Damage of About $20,000—Several Narrow Escapes.

Beaver Falls, Pa., June 7.—One of the most severe rain and electric storms for years occurred here about 2 o'clock this afternoon, the lightning striking at a number of places, but no fatalities are reported. The rain continued from 2 to 7 o'clock and resembled a cloudburst. Walnut run overflowed its banks and the north end was inundated, many families being driven to the upper stories of their houses. Cellars were filled and streets and pavements torn up by the rushing water while many gardens are destroyed. The people are going about on rafts and in boats aiding each other in their distress.

At Fifth street, in the lower end of town, a number of houses are surrounded by water and it is feared that the culvert through which the run passes at that point will become clogged and cause the water to overflow the entire lower end of town.

In the North end a young woman was saved from drowning by several men. She was in an outhouse when a large body of water came down with a rush, upsetting the little building and precipitating her into several feet of swiftly running water. Her perilous situation was seen by several men and she was rescued.

The damage to the consolidated steel plant will be considerable, as also to Knott & Harker, founders and machinists, and other factories along the run. Reports from the country districts are that great damage has been done by the washing of fields, carrying away of bridges, etc.

New Brighton, Pa., June 7.—The storm here to-day flooded the Block House run district, which runs along the eastern edge of town and comprises the manufacturing district. At 5 o'clock the waters were rising at the rate of a foot a minute. The sewer pipe works of the Pittsburg Clay Manufacturing company, which come first in their path, had $10,000 worth of property swept away. Cars on the siding were swept before the flood; $4,000 worth of sewer pipe piled on the grounds went down in the torrent; their sheds and wagons were carried away, and several car loads of lumber.

T. D. Brown, the superintendent of the works, narrowly escaped drowning and was pulled out by ropes. Mrs. McCleland, who was driving along the valley road, narrowly escaped being washed away. A horse and buggy belonging to J. W. Beacom was carried down the stream a mile. A small store room belonging to Samuel Smith was lifted from its foundation and dashed to pieces. The railroad bridge on the run switch of the Pennsylvania company was swept away.

Lower down the stream a wareroom of the Dawes and Myler bath tub factory was picked up, carried 100 rods and smashed to splinters. It contained about $2,000 worth of ware ready to ship. The water reached their enamelling rooms and destroyed a large quantity of enamelling powders. A wagon bridge in front of the Sherwood Bros. pottery was carried away. O. H. Couch's barns went down, the horses and cattle being saved by the greatest exertion.

The Atlantic Refining company's offices were wholly wrecked and Thomas Richards’s green house ruined. The coal yards of Orlando Couch were flooded and his sheds with 1,000 or more bushels of coal carried off.

The Beaver Valley Traction company's lines were washed out at a number of points and traffic stopped for several hours.

Washouts at Monaca delayed Pittsburg and Lake Erie trains for several hours, and Pennsylvania company trains were held at various points. The entire damage in the valley is [?] at $20,000.

Name Born Died
David C. W. Mar. 23_'15. Dec. 28_ '64
Eleanor W. May 31_'28.
Agnes W. June 23_'49. July 21_'51
John A. W. Dec. 3_'51.
A. Gertrude W. Apr. 1_'54.
Theodore C. W. Aug. 20_'56.
Idessa W. Apr. 26_'59.
George B. W. Mar. 29_'63.
Samuel A. Mar. 8_1800. May 6_'88
Agnes A. Sept. 9_1804. Jan. 30_'88
you can say how old your Uncle Samuel W was when he died 96 and his Wife 93 good old age was it not
 
Page 6 consists of the reverse sides of the articles on Page 5.
 

IS DEVASTATED

THE BLOCK HOUSE VAPPEY SWEPT BY A FLOOD OF WILD WATER.

The Raging Torrent Sweeps Everything Before it—A Horse Carried a Quarter of a Mile—A House Completely Demolished—The Railroad Company and Manufacturers Lose Thousands of Dollars.

The awful rainstorm which burst upon the town yesterday afternoon caused a loss of thousands of dollars.

The factories and railroad company were the heavy losers. The scene up Block House run this morning was one of desolation and devastation. Houses and stables are wrecked, roadways are washed away and wreckage and debris is piled up dozens of feet high. The NEWS reporter traversed the valley from the Sewer Pipe Works to Third avenue this morning. On all sides there are ruins and property laid waste. The flood was at its worst after 4 o'clock and as soon as debris began to float, it clogged the railroad bridges and made the volume of the water greater.

The Sewer Pipe Works was the first plant to suffer. Hundreds of pipes were carried down the stream and destroyed. The railroad track was undermined and the rails and ties sank with cars on them. A house which stood just below the office and was unoccupied, was picked up and washed down stream. Not enough of it was left to know that it ever was a house. A stable at the plant, in which a horse and buggy belonging to J. W. Beacom was standing, was taken from its foundation and crushed into a mass of timber. It was totally demolished but the horse and buggy floated on. The horse struggled in the roaring torrent and became detached from the buggy a few hundred feet below the factory. The vehicle was twisted out of shape. The unfortunate animal was tossed wildly down the run as far as the American Porcelain Works, over a quarter of a mile from where it started. Here three young men named Jackson, Huffman and Thomas rescued it. This morning it died from its injuries. A long platform built over the run at the Sewer Pipe Works, was demolished and the ware carried away.

At the Dawes & Myler plant a shed containing ware ready for shipment stood on the Run banks. It was washed away and piled up at the trestle. The ware was washed down stream. A stable at the Atlantic Refining Company’s plant was removed to another location. A car load of cement which was to be used in constructing the new county bridge at 13th street, was washed away. The greenhouse of T. W. Richards was covered with rushing water and much damage resulted. Six feet of water covered the low part of O. H. Couch's property, wagons, etc., being submerged.

An iron wagon bridge near the office of the E.S. & B pottery was washed out and doubled up like a jack knife, shoved under the railroad bridge and carried to the Enterprise pottery, a distance of about six squares. A vegetable garden belonging to Mrs. Snyder, opposite the works, is covered with a coating of broken pottery and flower pots. It is ruined. About 100 feet of track is washed out between the Sherwood Bros. pottery and Warren Soap Works. At the latter place a big building was undermined and fell into the run.

At the Enterprise pottery works a wagon bridge was washed away, not a vestige of it remaining. A part of the new stone arch recently built by the County Commissioners over the run on lower Third avenue, at a cost of $3,500, was washed out. It was the lower part, and was wrecked by the eddying waters undermining the foundation. The lower part of the arch crashed into the run about 10,30 o'clock at night. Street cars transferred today. The rushing water being unable to get through the arch, overflowed the banks, and inundated the lands lying on lower Third avenue, below the arch. The place was a sea of water today. Commissioners Carey, Harton and Freed were at the scene today, and said that it would take $1,000 to repair the damage.

A large slide took place on the P. & L. E. road opposite this place last night about 9:30 o'clock. Workmen blasted the rock today and traffic was not long delayed.

The damage up the run falls heaviest on the Pittsburg Clay Manufacturing Company, the railroad company and Dawes & Myler. Messrs. Elverson and Brown, of the first named company, could not estimate the loss this morning. They said it was impossible to make any calculation and probably never would know just how much they lost. It will be up in the thousands. The railroad company will have to find a new road bed in many places and will have to spend a few thousand. The loss at Dawes & Myler's will reach $2,000.

The factories have encroached on the run bed to such an extent that the water had not room enough to get out without overflowing its banks and creating havoc. Block House run gets wild at times and must have more room. At least two thousand persons walked up the run today, climbing over the lop-sided railway tracks, and over piles of debris, to see the sights. Hundreds of men were working in the wreckage. Such devastation was never seen in the town before. About six inches of water fell.

Married Last Evening.

Frank W. Tallon and Miss Lillie A. Biddell, both of New Brighton, were united in marriage last evening at seven o'clock by Rev. Aaron Wilson, at his home in Rochester. After the ceremony they left for the Beaver P. & L. E. station, where they boarded the 7:35 flyer for Buffalo, N. Y., and Niagara Falls. After a week's trip they will return and reside in this place.

The bride is one of New Brighton's most estimable young ladies. She is a daughter of Mrs. Selina Biddell, of Eighth avenue. Mr. Tallon is a trusted member of the NEWS force and is a young man of rare worth.

Many friends of both the bride and groom join in the NEWS in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Tallon a life of unbounded happiness and prosperity.

 
Page 8 consists of the reverse side of the articles from Page 7.
 
JOHN A. WAKEFIELD,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS.
IMPORTED & AMERICAN
PORTLAND CEMENTS.
STATE AGENT
MILWAUKEE HYDRAULIC CEMENT
AND
BEST QUINCY WHITE LIME.
OMAHA, NEB. Nov 25 1887

JOHN A. WAKEFIELD

WHOLESALE & RETAIL
STATE AGENT FOR MILWAUKEE CEMENT
PORTLAND CEMENTS
THREE ACRES OF YEARD, ENTIRELY UNDER COVER, ALL STOCK KEPT DRY.
Lumber, Cements & c.
EXTRA *A*
**A**
JOHN A. WAKEFIELD
OFFICE
LUMBER, LATH, LIME, SHINGLES.
A FULL STOCK OF BUILDERS MATERIALS.
COR. 18TH & PIERCE STS.
LATH LIME,
C ALLEY.
REES PRINT. & LITHO. CO. OMAHA

John A. Wakefield,

LUMBER & BUILDING MATERIALS.
IMPORTED & AMERICAN
PORTLAND CEMENTS.
STATE AGENT:
MILWAUKEE HYDRAULIC CEMENT,
& BEST QUINCY WHITE LIME.
OFFICE & YARD
NINTH & JONES STS.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL.
Omaha, Neb. Apl 3 1886
OMAHA LITH & STAT'T, CO

John A. Wakefield,

WHOLESALE & RETAIL
Lumber & Building Materials.
IMPORTED & AMERICAN
PORTLAND CEMENTS.
STATE AGENT:
MILWAUKEE HYDRAULIC CEMENT,
& BEST QUINCY WHITE LIME.
OFFICE & YARD, NINTH & JONES STS.
IM REPLY TO YOURS OF
Omaha, Neb. May 23 1887
Omaha Lith. Co, Omaha, Neb.
 
THE ONLY LUMBER YARD ENTIRELY UNDER COVER IN THE WEST.
ALL STOCK KEPT DRY AND BRIGHT.
PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS - CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
3 ACRES OF YARD ENTIRELY UNDER COVER.
18TH & PIERCE STS.
OMAHA, NEB.
JOHN A. WAKEFIELD
PORTLAND AND DOMESTIC CEMENTS, LIME, HAIR, POSTS, PICKETS, WINDOWS, DOORS, BLINDS, MOULDINGS, INT
PIERCE ST. 17TH ST.

JOHN A. WAKEFIELD.

IMPORTED &
AMERICAN
PORTLAND CEMENTS.
STATE AGENT
MILWAUKEE HYDRAULIC
CEMENT,
AND BEST QUINCY
WHITE LIME.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL
Lumber & Building Materials.
OFFICE & YARD, 18TH & PIERCE STS.
IN REPLY TO YOURS OF
Omaha, Neb., 188
 
RETURN AFTER 5 DAYS TO
THREE ACRES OF YEARD, ENTIRELY UNDER COVER, ALL STOCK KEPT DRY.
JOHN A. WAKEFIELD
LUMBER, LATH, LIME, SHINGLES. OFFICE
A FULL STOCK OF BUILDERS MATERIALS.
COR. 18TH & PIERCE STREETS.
OMAHA, NEB.
REES PRINT & LITHO. CO. OMAHA.
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
1492—1892
POSTAGE TWO CENTS
RETURN AFTER 5 DAYS TO
THREE ACRES OF YEARD, ENTIRELY UNDER COVER, ALL STOCK KEPT DRY.
JOHN A. WAKEFIELD
LUMBER, LATH, LIME, SHINGLES. OFFICE
A FULL STOCK OF BUILDERS MATERIALS.
COR. 18TH & PIERCE STREETS.
OMAHA, NEB.
REES PRINT & LITHO. CO. OMAHA.
RETURN AFTER 5 DAYS TO
THREE ACRES OF YEARD, ENTIRELY UNDER COVER, ALL STOCK KEPT DRY.
JOHN A. WAKEFIELD
LUMBER, LATH, LIME, SHINGLES. OFFICE
A FULL STOCK OF BUILDERS MATERIALS.
COR. 18TH & PIERCE STREETS.
OMAHA, NEB.
REES PRINT & LITHO. CO. OMAHA.
 

GRIFFITH BEGINS HIS WORK

AN ART EXHIBIT FOR THE EXPOSITION

Fall of Babylon, Depicting a Scene at the Feast of Belshazzar Has Already Been Secured.

The securing of an art exhibit for the Transmississippi Exposition has been commenced. Art Director Griffith reporting to the Department of Exhibits that he has secured two valuable paintings for the exhibit.

One of these pictures is a work which has never been shown in the United States, and has been shown but once on the American continent. This was in Toronto in 1878, and the picture created such a furore and such a storm of objections was raised to its exhibition that it was removed, and has been stored in New York City since that time. The picture is called "The Fall of Babylon," and depicts a scene at the famous feats of Belshazzar when the city was destroyed. It is oriental in its richness, and at the time of its exhibition in Toronto, it was said by critics to have been one of the finest examples of historic representation ever shown. The painting is about fifty feet in width and about twenty feet high. It is valued at $80,000.

The famous painting was brought over from the continent by Mr. Griffith in 1878, and was exhibited in Toronto under the auspices of a local art association. Its exhibition caused a great ruction among the directors of the association, and one of the directors resigned in anger after unsuccessfully endeavoring to prevent the display of the picture. The general public took up the discussion, and it finally became necessary to close the exhibition on account of the adverse criticism. Since that time public opinion has changed somewhat and Mr. Griffith anticipates that no serious objections will be made to the picture, which he regards as one of the finest paintings in the world.

The other picture which has been secured by Mr. Griffith is called "Die Flagelletten," (the Whipping), and is the work of Carl Marr, a celebrated German artist. This picture is stored in Milwaukee.

CHANGE LOCATION OF BUILDINGS.

Structure for Liberal Arts Will Displace the Auditorium.

The arrangement of the buildings on the main court of the exposition will be changed somewhat from the plan originally adopted in order to meet the growing demand on the part of the Department of Exhibits for more space in the Manufactures building. This demand, coupled with the fact that the bids for the construction of the Auditorium greatly exceeded the limit of cost fixed by the executive committee, operated to cause a change to be made which will add another building to those to be erected for housing the exposition. This building will be known as the Liberal Arts building. In order to accommodate it on the main court and place it near the Manufactures building, of which it will properly be an annex, it was decided by the executive committee at a meeting held yesterday afternoon to place the Liberal Arts building on the site assigned to the Art building, directly west of the Manufactures building and but a few feet from it. This necessitated the selection of a new site for the Art building and it was decided by the committee to reject all bids for the construction of the Auditorium building and locate the Art building on the site formerly assigned to the Auditorium.

The Liberal Arts building will be 130x240 feet in size and will cost $25,000. The plans for the new building will be drawn by Fisher & Lawrie, and it has been agreed that the plans and working drawings shall be completed by them before September 20.

Manager Rosewater reported on the railway matter, which had been referred to a committee consisting of Mr. Rosewater and Superintendent Owens of the Department of Transportation. He stated that the exposition could lay its own tracks on the grounds and operate them by electric power. The cost of construction would be less than $6,000 and the material would sell for almost its cost after the exposition is over. Mr. Owens had estimated that the exposition could handle the cars at a much less rate than the Missouri Pacific proposes to charge and save money by the operation. He had secured estimated of the cost on a trolley car of twenty-horse power and the cost of power. By this means Mr. Rosewater said either the Elkhorn or the Missouri Pacific could land cars in the grounds and the handling of the cars would be entirely in the hands of the exposition management.

No action was taken on the matter, it being deferred until further consideration was given to it.

SPACE FOR THE DAIRY EXHIBIT.

Commissioner Dinsmore Reports Receipt of Many Applications.

The dairy exhibit is beginning to assume very fair proportions, Commissioner J. J. Dinsmore reporting to the Department of Exhibits that he has received applications for space from a long list of dairy supply houses.

Among the houses which Commissioner Dinsmore reports are the following: W. F. T. Bushnell, Aberdeen, S. D., A. E. Baker, Beaver Dam, Wis.; A. W. Brayton, Mt Morris, Ill.; A. H. Barber & Co., Chicago; E. F. Brown, Minneapolis, Minn.; H. V. Burrell & Co., Little Falls, N. Y.; C. S. Garkley, West Liberty, Ia; Creamery Packing company, Kansas City, Mo.; Champion Milk Cooler company, Courtland, N. Y.; W. H. Caldwell, Petersboro, N. H.; Canajoharie Creamery company, Canajoharie, N. Y.; S. A. Converse, Cresco, Ia.; D. E. Lavell Separator company, Chicago; A. N. Foster & Co., Chicago; Elgin Butter Tub company, Elgin, Ill.; Haney-Campbell company, Dubuque, Ia.; F. B. Hearne, Independence, Mo.; A. M. Hunter, Denver, Colo.; Hawthorne Brothers, Elgin, Ill.; V. T. Hills, Delaware, O.; Harry Johnson, Logan, Ia.; Hoffman, Brown & Wilson Manufacturing company, Circleville, O.; A. G. Lytle, Oscaloosa, Ia.; T. B. Linfield, Logan, Utah; John H. Monrad, Winetka, Ill.; J. C. Murray, Maquoketa, Ia.; G. H. Miller, Mexico, Ind.; M. E. Moore, Cameron, Mo.; G. E. Nissley, Topeka, Kas.; New York Condensed Milk company, New York City; Record Manufacturing company, Conneaut, O.; A. H. Reed, Elgin, Ill.; Thatcher Manufacturing company, Potsdam, N. Y.; H. Woolworth, Hillsville, Mich.; T. G. Wallace & Son, Bunceton, Mo.; James P. Younger, Freeport, Ill.; Frank Zachary, Mount City, Mo.

WORK ON THE CHINESE POGODA.

Thirty Artisans Direct from China Will Be Employed.

Work on the erection of the pagoda in which will be housed the Chinese section of the exposition will be commenced about October 1. This section is under the charge of Wong Chin Foo, Chinese commissioner for the exposition, who has been in the city for several days in consultation with the exposition management.

Before leaving for the east Foo said he would have thirty Chinese artisans in Omaha by October 1, and would put them at work constructing the pagoda which is to form the center of the Chinese exhibit. He said that instead of bringing the materials from China, with which to construct the building, he would use American materials and would construct a building costing $25,000. Mr. Foo has gone to Washington to secure permission from the treasury department to bring into this country thirty Chinese artisans to work on this pagoda.

Bee Keepers Want Representation.

Pressure is being brought to bear by bee keepers all over the state to secure the appointment of E. Whitcomb as superintendent of the apairy exhibit at the exposition. Mr. Whitcomb is editor of the Friend Telegraph, president of the Nebraska Beekeepers' association, was superintendent of the apairy section of the Nebraska exhibit at the World's fair, and was in charge of the apairy exhibit at the Nebraska state fair.

COMMISSIONER UTT IS CALLED IN.

Will Examine Into Missouri Pacific Contract with Exposition.

The executive committee of the exposition held a meeting at the Commercial club rooms at noon today to take up the question of trackage facilities on the exposition grounds. In addition to the report made yesterday by Mr. Rosewater a telegram was received from Manager Babcock to the effect that whenever the Missouri Pacific presented a contract drawn in accordance with the understanding had between himself and the Missouri Pacific officials the contract should be executed.

The contract which had, up to this time, never been before the committee, was presented, together with a letter relating to it, from C. S. Montgomery, general counsel for the exposition. Mr. Montgomery stated that, as drawn, the contract gives the Missouri Pacific exclusive control over the tracks inside the exposition grounds and gave the exposition no control whatever over the tracks or the handling of cars on the tracks.

Secretary Wakefield, in glancing over the contract, read one section for the information of the committee, in which it was provided that the Missouri Pacific should have the right to use the tracks inside the exposition grounds for the use of itself or its patrons, "whenever, in the opinion of the superintendent of the Missouri Pacific road, such use would not interfere with the use of such tracks for exposition purposes." This clause seemed to be rather surprising to the members of the executive committee and to throw more light on the letter of the corporation counsel. Considerable discussion ensued as to how the interests of the exposition were to be protected in the absence of an experienced railroad man on the committee. It was finally decided to call upon Commissioner Utt of the Commercial club for assistance and the whole matter was turned over to him for examination. The question will be taken up at a later date.

It was decided that the proposition submitted by Commissioner Powell of Mexico, whereby it was proposed to secure the attendance of the Mexican National Military band at the exposition, on condition that the Mexican government makes an exhibit, was accepted and Commissioner Powell will be instructed to close his negotiations with the Mexican government. The band will be here during a part of the time the exposition is open and will furnish some of the music.

For a Moorish Village.

A. E. Felder, concessionaire for the Moorish village, is in the city making arrangements for beginning work on the erection of the buildings which will constitute the village. He stated that he would commence work on the main Building by October 1, and would have the building under cover before cold weather so that the interior finishing could be continued throughout the winter. The interior decorating will be on the most elaborate scale, according to Mr. Felder, and the rich embellishment will require considerable time for its execution.

Utah Will Be Represented.

A. H. Shurtliff, vice president of the exposition for Utah, was in the city yesterday. Mr. Shurtliff is taking an active interest in having his state well represented at the exposition, and has been working up an interest among the people of Utah in making an exhibit. He filed an application with the Department of Exhibits for 10,000 feet of space in the different buildings, and also secured space for the erection of a Cleopatra's needle 110 feet in height, to be made of salt from Great Salt Lake.

WISCONSIN TO HAVE AN EXHIBIT.

Governor Will Issue a Proclamation Calling for Contributions.

MADISON, Wis., Aug. 19.—(Special Telegram.)—The Wisconsin legislature this evening adopted a joint resolution heartily approving the Transmississippi Exposition and authorizing Governor Scofield to address a proclamation to commercial organizations and manufacturers throughout the state, urging them to prepare suitable exhibits, showing the resources and products of Wisconsin. Walter W. Pollock, the commercial agent for the exposition for Wisconsin, found upon arrival in Madison yesterday that it would be impossible to secure an appropriation from the state, owing to a strong objection on the part of legislators to the introduction of new business and the fact that a three-fourths vote of both houses would be necessary to permit the introductioon​ of a bill for an appropriation. It was, therefore, decided to take advantage of the friendly disposition of the governor and legislators toward the exposition and the resolution passed without a dissenting vote. The governor's proclamation will suggest the organization of an association to solicit voluntary subscriptions to a fund for a state building. It is believed that the materials for the building can be secured by donations from lumbermen and stone quarry concerns. The state officials have partially promised to lend "Old Abe," the famous Wisconsin eagle, for a part of the proposed historical exhibit.

GOES UP AMONG THE CLOUDS

AMUSEMENT FEATURE FOR EXPOSITION

Gigantic Umbrella to Be Erected on the Plaisance—Engineers Declare the Concern is Practical and Safe.

R. E. Sherman, the inventor of the umbrella which will be the prominent engineering novelty of the exposition, has notified the Department of Concessions that he will be in Omaha before September 1, prepared to commence active work on his machine.

Mr. Sherman was notified by the department some time ago that he must furnish satisfactory proof that his machine would be absolutely safe and feasible before he would be granted the concession for its erection or allowed to do anything toward putting it up. Since that time, Mr. Sherman has furnished certificates from two civil engineers of recognized standing in the profession, to the effect that the plane for the machine contemplated a contrivance which will be perfectly stable and safe and thoroughly practical. In addition to this, the department has submitted the plans to the inspection of other competent engineers and has received assurance that the project is practically safe.

"Sherman's Umbrella," as the machine will be known, nothwithstanding​ the inventor dubbed it "the soaring carousal," will rear   its lofty head among the villages and other attractions on the Plaisance 350 feet above the level of the ground and 450 feet above the level of the river. The standard of the machine, or the stick of the umbrella, will be a steel cylinder forty-five feet in diameter and reaching a point 350 feet above the ground. The lower end of the cylinder will rest on a solid foundation many feet below the surface of the bluff. The ribs of the umbrella will each carry a car capable of holding twenty people, and the diameter of the circle when the cars are raised will be 275 feet. When the umbrella is raised the cars will be turned slowly around in a circle so that the passengers may survey the entire horizon before descending again to earth.

The erection of this gigantic umbrella will cost about $80,000 and will require a great amount of mechanical work. Its erection will be under the direct supervision of Inventor Sherman.

IN BEHALF OF THE EXPOSITION.

Meeting of Executive Committee and Important Matters Discussed.

The meeting of the executive committee of the Council Bluffs Exposition association at Council Bluffs last evening was lightly attended. There were present, however, members of all of the subcommittees, and reports were received from several of them. Chairman Test of the transportation committee presented two resolutions which his committee asked the general association to adopt. One was a request for the committee on literature to furnish his committee with a short article on Council Bluffs, its hotels and resorts, parks and advantages and its convenience and accessibility to the exposition grounds. Chairman Test explained that his committee desired to use such an article at once. As this article was on the line of one that the literature committee had already drafted it was acceptable to the members of the committee and was approved by the association. The other resolution was as follows:

Resolved, That we request the general committee of fifty to invite the Merchants' and Manufacturers' association, the Business Men's association, the public officers, the fraternal societies, the workingmen's associations, the railroad men's associations, the women's clubs and the women of the city and all other well disposed citizens of Council Bluffs and Pottawattamie county to co-operate in the work of the Transmississippi association.

The resolution was adopted and the secretary instructed to issue the invitations called for.

The committee on exhibits reported that it had taken the initial steps in the work assigned. It had decided that the fruit exhibit was to be the chief thing undertaken and had planned the work of the committee to interest at once the largest possible number of fruit growers and secure the finest specimens of all kinds of fruits that ripen in the autumn. The discussion of the report indicated that it was the opinion of all present that the energies of the association should be directed to the preparation of a magnificent fruit exhibit.

Secretary Barrett of the literature committee reported that the members had the work well in hand, and the committee was about ready to turn off the results of its first assignment. Suggestions were called for from the association concerning several points upon which the members were undecided, and a number were given.

The special committee appointed to secure a location for permanent headquarters for the association reported that it had examined several rooms and had received some propositions. The most favorable of these came from Mr. Clark of the Grand hotel. The next general meeting was fixed for Thursday evening at 8:30.

EXPOSITION DIRECTORS TO MEET.

Vacancy on the Board May Be Filled This Afternoon.

The Board of Directors of the exposition will meet in adjourned session at 4 o'clock this afternoon if enough members of the directory can be found to make a quorum. It is probable that one of the things done will be to change the rules in such a way as to provide that less than a majority of the directors shall constitute a quorum to do business. Several adjournments have been taken because a majority of the directors could not be found and several of the members who attend all the meetings have expressed themselves very strongly to the effect that those who avoid the meetings as much as possible should resign and allow their places to be filled with men who will attend to the business of the exposition.

One of the matters which will probably be given attention will be the filling of the vacancy caused by the death of Dan Farrell, jr. There are several candidates for this vacancy, the most active being County Commissioner Thomas Hoctor. Each time a vacancy has occurred on the board the South Omaha people have insisted that they should be given the place, but a man from Omaha has been chosen each time. This time the South Omaha people say they are determined to be ignored no longer and will insist that they be recognized.

German-Americans Incorporate.

The movement among the German-American citizens of Omaha to participate in the exposition has taken form in the incorporation of a company to carry out the plans perfected some time ago, which contemplates the establishment, inside the exposition grounds, of a German restaurant and cafe, combined with amusements characteristic of the "Faderland." The articles of incorporation of this company have been filed with the county clerk. The name of the company is the German-American Transmississippi association, the capital stock being fixed at $25,000, in shares of $5. The incorporators are: Charles Kaufmann, Herman Schunke, Edward F. Schurig, Richard Englemann, F. W. Koetter, F. Christman, George Heimrod and J. E. C. Rumohr.

After the Music Contract.

Professor Christopher Bach, director of the Milwaukee Symphony orchestra, is in the city, the guest of Vassily Andrejevitch Ebell, honorary commissioner for the Russian empire, Bosnia, Servia and Tchernogoria at the Transmississippi and International Exposition. Prof. Bach is in Omaha to figure with the exposition directory with reference to furnishing music during the great show next summer. Besides leading the Milwaukee Symphony orchestra Prof. Bach is the leader of a military band of fifty pieces. In the even that he should make terms with the exposition people, he will bring both of his musical aggregations to this city next season.

Advertising the Exposition.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion has sent to the printer an illustrated pamphlet of the exposition which will fit an ordinary envelope. These will be ready for giving out some time next week. The department will receive from the architects within a few days the perspective drawings of the Arch of States and Government building, and a revised ground plan showing the arrangement of the exposition grounds. These will complete the drawings of the main buildings, and all the pictures will be incorporated in the next pamphlet, which will be issued by the department.

HOCTOR SUCCEEDS FARRELL

ELECTION BY THE EXPOSITION DIRECTORY

Geraldine Called Upon to Explain Why He Made the Switching Contract with the Missouri Pacific.

The exposition directory held an adjourned meeting yesterday with twenty-six members present. Thomas Hoctor of South Omaha was elected to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Dan Farrell, jr., and the railway trackage and water supply questions were fully discussed.

When the meeting was ready for business Allen Rector called attention to the death of Mr. Farrell, and moved the appointment of a special committee of three to prepare suitable resolutions. A motion to that effect was carried, and the president appointed Messrs. Rector, Wharton and Saunders, who will report at a subsequent meeting of the board.

President Wattles said the next business would be the election of a man to fill this vacancy.

C. F. Weller placed Clement Chase in nomination.

A. H. Noyes said considerable dissatisfaction had existed in South Omaha because a resident of that city had not been elected as a director when former vacancies had occurred. He placed Thomas Hoctor in nomination.

F. M. Youngs nominated William H. Bell, president of the Central Labor union, as the representative of organized labor.

The president appointed Messrs. Yost and Lee as tellers.

While the vote was being counted General Manderson asked for the information on the subject of water for the lagoon.

President Wattles said negotiations were pending with the Omaha Water company for supplying water on terms favorable to the exposition, but final arrangements could not be made until the litigation in the courts is ended. He said figures are now being obtained for pipe.

General Manderson wanted to know if the artesian well was a success or a failure.

Mr. Wattles said it was a success, giving a flow of about forty-five gallons per minute. He said it was the intention to put an air lift in the well, which would increase the volume to about 250 gallons per minute.

In response to another question Mr. Wattles said the well had cost about $3,500.

Mr. Wharton said the Park board had agreed to take the well contract off the hands of the exposition and pay for it. He declared most emphatically that the well was a good one and would answer fully for park purposes. He said he had overheard some one remark that the well contract was the most foolish contract ever heard of. He refuted this assertion, and said the Park board intended to put an air lift in the well.

The well was then dropped and Mr. Wharton introduced an amendment to the by-laws providing that a quorum of the board should be fifteen members.

Mr. Kountze thought fifteen was too small a number and amended by making twenty constitute a quorum.

TOM HOCTOR WINS OUT.

At this point the tellers reported on the ballot for a director to succeed Mr. Farrell as follows: Chase 5, Bell 1, Hoctor 17. Mr. Hoctor was declared elected and Mr. Noyes escorted him into the room, where he took his seat amid applause.

General Manderson opposed any change in the by-laws. He said he thought that since the summer vacation was over a majority of members might be obtained.

Mr. Wharton favored reducing the quorum so that those interested enough to attend should not have their hands tied.

Mr. Lindsey favored changing the by-laws to provide that any director failing to attend two consecutive meetings might be dropped from the directory.

Mr. Korty offered a substitute in writing, which he had drawn up. It was along the same lines as Mr. Lindsey's suggestion, making sickness or absence from the city sufficient excuses for absence.

The substitute was adopted without a dissenting vote, Mr. Wharton calling attention to the fact that it did not make any real change in the by-laws.

By this time Dion Geraldine, superintendent of construction, had come into the room, and President Wattles called on him for a statement regarding the artesian well.

Mr. Geraldine said the well had cost within a few dollars of $4,500, and has a flow on the level of the lagoon of fifty gallons per minute. He said it was the intention to use an air lift, which might increase the flow to 100 or 200 gallons per minute. He said it could not be told definitely what the result of an air lift would be. Mr. Geraldine said further that the well had not been "shot" for the purpose of increasing the flow, but simply to increase the capacity—making a reservoir at the bottom of the well so that the water would flow in rapidly when it was pumped out.

Mr. Rosewater then asked Mr. Geraldine for a statement regarding the railway trackage on the grounds and regarding the rate that should be charged for shifting cars. Mr. Rosewater said he wanted an expression of opinion from the directors on this matter.

Mr. Geraldine said he would not like to make a statement unless he was allowed to go into detail on the history of the whole matter.

Mr. Manderson expressed the hope that the whole matter should be thoroughly discussed and said that he hoped there would be no disposition to throttle debate or cover up any matter in which the directory was interested. He made extended remarks along that line, and said the duty of the board was to protect the interests of the exposition and it would only do this by knowing the full details.

GERALDINE ON THE CARPET.

Mr. Geraldine then made a statement. He said that the water question was a serious one. If the water could be secured from the water company on favorable terms that was undoubtedly the best thing to do. If that could not be accomplished, he said water could be secured from Cut Off lake; or, if the owners of that property objected, then water could be drawn from the river at a maximum cost of $11,000.

Mr. Geraldine then went into an exhaustive statement regarding the railway question. He said when he first advised that the site might be changed he had been assured that the right of way for the Elkhorn to cross the Missouri Pacific tracks had been secured. Afterward it had developed that this right had not been secured, and the Elkhorn had notified him that they would not attempt to enter the grounds. Later, he said, the whole matter had been turned over to Mr. Babcock and an agreement reached between Mr. Babcock and the Missouri Pacific for a terminal charge of $4 per car. Mr. Geraldine said it was untrue that the contract had been in his possession two weeks, as had been stated in the newspapers. He said it was returned to the Missouri Pacific by Mr. Babcock for correction and had been returned by the railway company. He said that on account of Mr. Babcock's office being closed the contract was left in the speaker's office and was turned over by him the same day to Mr. Babcock's representative. He also recounted the events of recent occurrence, taking occasion several times to slap at the newspapers for making what he characterized as reports which were "absolutely untrue."

In reply to a question by General Manderson, Mr. Geraldine stated that the contract, as now drawn, complies substantially with the suggestion of Mr. Babcock.

A question by Mr. Kountze elicited the statement that the World's fair management laid its own tracks and made a terminal charge of $2 per car.

At the conclusion of his remarks Mr. Rosewater said he only wished to say that so far as the statement of Mr. Geraldine, regarding alleged misstatements in the newspapers   to the effect that he had held the railway contract two weeks, were concerned, that the information on which this statement was based came from the Transportation department, and the truth of the statement rested between Mr. Geraldine and that department.

TERMINAL CHARGE EXCESSIVE.

Mr. Rosewater then took up the railway trackage matter. He said this was a vital question and one in which the exposition had a great interest. He discussed the proposed terminal charge of $4 and showed that it was higher than corresponding distances in other parts of the city. Mr. Rosewater said further that the estimated cost of construction as figured by Missouri Pacific were excessive. He outlined the proposition for the exposition to construct the tracks and use electric power, which was discussed by the executive committee.

Mr. Manderson said the directors were not experts and could never settle the matter, and he moved that the whole question be referred to the executive committee with the request that the committee call in Messrs. Dickinson, Holdrege and Bidwell, general managers respectively of the Union Pacific, Burlington and Elkhorn roads.

This motion was adopted and the board adjourned to go into executive session with the executive committee regarding matters connected with the exposition.

EXPOSITION MUST MAKE REQUEST.

Secretary Gage on Importation of Foreign Laborers.

Secretary Lyman Gage of the Treasury department, has written to President Wattles regarding the permission for the importation of Chinese laborers and artisans desired by Hong Sling, the concessionaire for the Chinese village.

The secretary encloses a letter received by him from Mr. Sling, asking permisison​ to bring into this country 500 Chinese of various stated occupations for employment on the exposition grounds for erecting and conducting the Chinese village. Secretary Gage informs President Wattles that the Treasury department proposes to handle this matter through the exposition authorities, and gives notice that no action will be taken until a request for the admission of foreign laborers and artisans is received from the exposition management. This mater belongs to the Department of Concessions, and it is possible that no action on it will be taken until the return of Manager Reed, who is now in the east.

Switzerland May Participate.

President Wattles has received a letter from Secretary of State Sherman, enclosing copies of the correspondence had by United States Minister Peak at Berne, Switzerland, with the president of the Swiss government, regarding the exposition. The letter of the minister encloses the invitation to Switzerland and its people to participate in the exposition, and the reply of the president assures the representative of this government that he will take pleasure in placing the matter before the people of Switzerland. Attached to the correspondence is a copy of the official commercial paper of Switzerland, containing the official announcement of the Swiss government to the people regarding the exposition.

Governors Become Interested.

Letters have been received from the governors of South Dakota and Idaho by the Department of Publicity and Promotion regarding the promotion of the exposition in their states. Governor Lee of South Dakota writes that he is interested in the matter and will lay it before the people of his state at an early day. He expresses the opinion that South Dakota will be represented in a creditable manner, notwithstanding no state appropriation was made for the purpose. Governor Steunenberg of Idaho writes that he will consult with Vice President Shawhan of Payette, Idaho, and will try and stir up a sentiment favorable to making a good exhibit.

Regarding Railway Facilities.

The question of railway facilities on the exposition grounds will probably not be settled until some time next week. No action could be taken today because there is not a quorum of the executive committee in the city. There has been but a bare quorum of the committee for over a week, and last night Manager Bruce was called out of the city, leaving the committee without a quorum. General Manager Dickinson of the Union Pacific is also out of the city. He is expected to return Monday. Manager Bruce is also expected to return the same day, so that the matter may be taken up at that time.

An Exhibit from Utah.

Lewis W. Shurtliff of Ogden, Utah, vice president for the exposition and chairman of the Utah Exposition commission, was in the city this morning on his way home from an eastern trip and was in consultation with the exposition authorities regarding space for an exhibit to be made by Utah. He said the mineral resources of Utah would probably form a prominent feature of the exhibit, and that the agricultural resources would not be neglected, material for that portion of the exhibit being now collected from all parts of the state. He also stated that the Bear River Canal company, one of the largest irrigation concerns in the state, would put in an exhibit showing a model irrigated farm.

Notes of the Exposition.

F. W. Brewer, professor of biology and curator of the museum of the Utah Agricultural college, makes application to the Department of Exhibits to be placed in charge of the hygienic and sanitary exhibits of the exposition. He says he held the same position at the World's fair.

Commissioner Hodgins writes from Ohio that he is meeting with encouraging success in that state in securing exhibits and in arousing public interest in the exposition. He encloses the application of the Case Manufacturing company of Columbus, O., for 2,000 feet for an exhibit of flour mill machinery and supplies.

George Kincaid of O'Neill, Neb., who was appointed commissioner for the exposition to Alaska, and who started for that territory, writes to the Department of Exhibits from his home at O'Neill that he was unable to reach Alaska on account of the rush of people to the Klondike region, and was obliged to return. He says he will make another start in the spring.

OWENS REPLIES TO GERALDINE.

Produces Records to Sustain His Previous Statements.

Superintendent Owens of the Department of Transportation expressed considerable indignation when he read the report of the statement made at the meeting of the Board of Directors by D. Geraldine, denying that he (Geraldine) had held the Missouri Pacific contract two weeks before turning it over to the Department of Transportation. Mr. Owens said he was prepared to substantiate his statements that Mr. Geraldine had held that contract two weeks as had been stated, and he referred to his letter books for proof of what he said.

"There is another matter about which Mr. Geraldine seems to be mistaken," continued Mr. Owens, turning to a large folio containing a number of circulars issued by various railroads. "Here is a circular," said he, picking up one of them, "which was issued by the Illinois Central railroad. It is dated June 29, 1891, and states that the rate for material switched from the tracks of the Illinois Central to the tracks of the exposition will be $1 per car on and after the date of the circular. It states, in so many words, that this charge of $1 per car is 'to cover all charges for services rendered by the exposition management on its own tracks and with its own engines.' That doesn't look as though the charge was $2 per car, as stated by Mr. Geraldine, does it?"

EXPOSITION MUST MAKE REQUEST.

Secretary Gage on Importation of Foreign Laborers.

Secretary Lyman Gage of the Treasury department, has written to President Wattles regarding the permission for the importation of Chinese laborers and artisans desired by Hong Sling, the concessionaire for the Chinese village.

The secretary encloses a letter received by him from Mr. Sling, asking permisison​ to bring into this country 500 Chinese of various stated occupations for employment on the exposition grounds for erecting and conducting the Chinese village. Secretary Gage informs President Wattles that the Treasury department proposes to handle this matter through the exposition authorities, and gives notice that no action will be taken until a request for the admission of foreign laborers and artisans is received from the exposition management. This mater belongs to the Department of Concessions, and it is possible that no action on it will be taken until the return of Manager Reed, who is now in the east.

The above article appears twice, non-consecutively.

MEXICO PROMISES TO EXHIBIT.

Official Reply to Invitation from President Wattles.

Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion has received the following from Hon. William H. Michael of the Department of State in answer by the Mexican government to the invitation from the United States and President Wattles of the exposition:

"The Mexican government wishes to accept the invitation that has been received; and will, therefore, when the regulations and papers are received, give them publicity in the Diario Official, that they may be brought to the knowledge of all persons who may wish to make exhibits; and that the government will also take part in the exposition and send an exhibit."

Switzerland May Participate.

President Wattles has received a letter from Secretary of State Sherman, enclosing copies of the correspondence had by United States Minister Peak at Berne, Switzerland, with the president of the Swiss government, regarding the exposition. The letter of the minister encloses the invitation to Switzerland and its people to participate in the exposition, and the reply of the president assures the representative of this government that he will take pleasure in placing the matter before the people of Switzerland. Attached to the correspondence is a copy of the official commercial paper of Switzerland, containing the official announcement of the Swiss government to the people regarding the exposition.

The above article appears twice, non-consecutively.

Governors Become Interested.

Letters have been received from the governors of South Dakota and Idaho by the Department of Publicity and Promotion regarding the promotion of the exposition in their states. Governor Lee of South Dakota writes that he is interested in the matter and will lay it before the people of his state at an early day. He expresses the opinion that South Dakota will be represented in a creditable manner, notwithstanding no state appropriation was made for the purpose. Governor Steunenberg of Idaho writes that he will consult with Vice President Shawhan of Payette, Idaho, and will try and stir up a sentiment favorable to making a good exhibit.

The above article appears twice, non-consecutively.

An Exhibit from Utah.

Lewis W. Shurtliff of Ogden, Utah, vice president for the exposition and chairman of the Utah Exposition commission, was in the city this morning on his way home from an eastern trip and was in consultation with the exposition authorities regarding space for an exhibit to be made by Utah. He said the mineral resources of Utah would probably form a prominent feature of the exhibit, and that the agricultural resources would not be neglected, material for that portion of the exhibit being now collected from all parts of the state. He also stated that the Bear River Canal company, one of the largest irrigation concerns in the state, would put in an exhibit showing a model irrigated farm.

The above article appears twice, non-consecutively.

Notes of the Exposition.

F. W. Brewer, professor of biology and curator of the museum of the Utah Agricultural college, makes application to the Department of Exhibits to be placed in charge of the hygienic and sanitary exhibits of the exposition. He says he held the same position at the World's fair.

Commissioner Hodgins writes from Ohio that he is meeting with encouraging success in that state in securing exhibits and in arousing public interest in the exposition. He encloses the application of the Case Manufacturing company of Columbus, O., for 2,000 feet for an exhibit of flour mill machinery and supplies.

George Kincaid of O'Neill, Neb., who was appointed commissioner for the exposition to Alaska, and who started for that territory, writes to the Department of Exhibits from his home at O'Neill that he was unable to reach Alaska on account of the rush of people to the Klondike region, and was obliged to return. He says he will make another start in the spring.

The above article appears twice, non-consecutively.

ARTESIAN WELL GOOD INVESTMENT.

Solves the Water Problem for the Parks.

President Tukey of the Board of Park Commissioners says that the people who regard the artesian well on the exposition grounds as a waste of money do not know what they are talking about. He says:

"The artesian wells have solved the question of water for lakes in the municipal parks which could not have been settled in any other way. The well at the exposition grounds will furnish an ample supply for the permanent lake and this is worth much more than the amount expended even if the flow is not adequate for exposition purposes. The flow would continue for as many years in the future as anyone would care to look, and the cost of the well would be saved a hundred times over. The first cost of the well represents practically the entire expense of the water supply for the lake, when if the water was purchased from the water company the cost would be enormous. Even the small amount of water that is required to keep the ice in Hanscom park in condition for skating costs the board upwards of $500 every winter, and if the board had to buy all the water for a lake in each park it would cost thousands of dollars every year."

WORKING WITH THE STAFF

PREPARE COATING FOR THE EXPOSITION

First Work of Putting Staff in Position Will Be Begun This Week on the Administration Building.

The work of modeling the artistic creations which are to grace the buildings on the main court of the Transmississippi and International Exposition is now well under way and the operation of casting the staff from these models will be commenced this week. Up to this time two firms have been awarded contracts for the staff work of these main buildings, viz: The Artistic Stucco and Modeling company, and Smith & Eastman, both being Chicago firms. The former firm has already started the active work of making the models, and the other contractors have   almost completed the erection of their building.

The active head of the Artistic Stucco and Modeling company is Leo Bonet, one of the best known workers in stucco in this country. Mr. Bonet did a large amount of the staff work on the World's fair buildings, among the buildings which he decorated being the Woman's building, Mines, Electricity and Horticultural buildings, and the French section in the Manufactures building, one of the most elaborate and beautiful spots on the grounds.

Mr. Bonet has secured the contract for the Administration building, and the work will all be done under his immediate supervision. He has erected a workship on the north side of the brick building on the bluff tract, at Sherman avenue and Manderson street, and has several men at work making models from the drawings furnished by the architects.

The ornamental portions of the staff work must be cast and "set" before being placed in position on the building of which they are to form a part. The flat surfaces may either be laid on after the manner of ordinary plaster, or molded in large slabs and nailed on like so much lumber. Mr. Bonet states that the former method is far preferable for several reasons, and is the method he will adopt in the case of the Administration building. He says that the plan of molding the flat surfaces and fastening them in place after they are dried is only necessary when it is desired to proceed with the construction regardless of the outside temperature.

FIRST WORK THIS WEEK.

Mr. Bonet says he will commence work directly on the Administration building the latter part of this week. The first point attacked will be the interior arch beneath which visitors to the exposition will pass to reach the old fair grounds tract. The upper portion of this arch will be elaborately decorated and the stucco for this decoration will be made right on the spot and put in place before it is dry. For this purpose a temporary work shop will be established in the building and this will give visitors an opportunity of seeing just how it is done. The exterior staff work on this building will not be commenced until the carpenters are through with the erection of the frame work, as a blow from a piece of timber would destroy the work of several days. The interior work will require the time of several workmen for two or three weeks, and this work may be done while the carpenters are completing their part of the work.

The making of models for the many columns and other forms of decoration which will be required on this building has been going on for the past week in the workshop on the bluff tract. The greater part of this work has been done by G. Prano, an expert modeller and sculptor who has been with Mr. Bonet for the past ten years. He is the foreman of the work and has full charge during the absence of his chief.

A large number of columns and brackets of the same size are required to complete the building and for these plaster models are made in order to secure a mold in which as many may be made as desired. In making these models "hard wall plaster," such as is used for the final coating in buildings, is used and the plastic material is skillfully manipulated by the workmen while it is "setting" until a finished model of pure white is produced which assumes the hardness of stone when it is entirely dried.

MAKING MODELS OF CLAY.

In the case of the capitals and brackets which are formed of conventionalized ornaments, such as leaves, etc., the model is made of clay. In the case, for instance, of a large bracket which is to form a part of the ornamentation near the top of the Administration building, the model was made yesterday by Mr. Bonet. A heavy board, longer and wider than the bracket would be when finished, was placed in a slanting position and a large lump of clay was placed on it. With the hands it was formed rudely into the general shape of the bracket and then with modeling tools it was finished in detail. Owing to the distance of the bracket from the ground when in place it was molded along strong lines with bold strokes of the modeling tools. When completed the clay model was placed to one side to dry. When dried it will be covered with a coating of shellac varnish and a mold will be made from it in which will be cast the staff brackets which are to be placed on the building.

An ornamental capital for a Corinthian was made in the same way. It may interest molders in metal to know that in this stucco work it is not necessary to avoid "undercuts" as in metal, but the desired effect is obtained, regardless of forms which would be impossible to cast in metal on account of undercuts which would necessitate so many sections in the mold as to be impracticable. This is explained by the character of the material from which the molds for casting staff are made. These molds are made of gelatine mixed with glue, giving a pliable mold of sufficient firmness to give form to the stucco, but with enough elasticity to allow it to be drawn away from the hardened stucco without injuring the cast.

The establishment of this stucco working in Omaha has resulted in developing Nebraska's fertile resources in a most unexpected direction, and adds another to the already long list of supplies of various kinds which are to be found within the borders of the state. The modeling of the intricate artistic forms required for the finer decoration requires the use of modeling clay in very large quantities, and the question of supplying this material promised to be a serious one. If brought from the east the material would cost several dollars per barrel and would form a most important issue in determining the cost of the work. Before ordering any clay from the eastern supply houses, Mr. Bonet determined to do a little investigating. Securing a team and a local resident who was familiar with the country along the river banks, Mr. Bonet started up the river from Ames avenue, looking for a clay which should be free from grit and fine enough, when dry, to form a smooth surface. The mud in the river bottom was tried, and several samples of clay taken from the banks along the river were examined, but none of these proved satisfactory. The trip extended for some distance up the river, but with no satisfactory result. Then a trip down the river was tried and the bend of the stream beyond East Omaha was followed.

GUMBO USED FOR MODELS.

Near the East Omaha bridge the driver made a detour to avoid a large bed of "gumbo." When asked the reason of this divergence from the river bank, the driver informed Mr. Bonet that it was to avoid getting into the gumbo, which would stick to the vehicle and the horses' feet.

"Let me see that 'gumbo,'" exclaimed Mr. Bonet quickly.

The driver stopped his team with an expression of disgust for the "infernal stuff," and Mr. Bonet leaped from the vehicle. Picking up a lump of the clay which was moist, he worked it with his fingers, smelled of it, broke it up and tested it in numerous other ways.

"This is just the thing! Excellent!" exclaimed Mr. Bonet with delight. "We need look no further; this will make the very best modeling clay."

They returned to the city and Mr. Bonet at once ordered a wagon load of the despised gumbo to be put in his shop. Here he instructed a laborer how to mix the clay and the result was a material which he says is equal to the best modeling clay to be had anywhere west of New York.

The clay is hauled to the shop for the price of the hauling, and here it is wet with water from the Missouri river, then a stout man with a club pounds it and kneads it, after which it is laid in the sun to dry, and then it is put through another course of kneading until it has the consistency of putty and is perfectly smooth to the touch and free from grit.

STATE COMMISSION MEETS

NEBRASKA EXHIBIT AT THE EXPOSITION

Counties of the State Preparing to Make a Great Show Nest Year—Applications for Space.

The Nebraska Exposition commission will hold a regular meeting this afternoon at its headquarters in the Manderson block, and will remain in session until some time tomorrow.

There are two or three important matters which will engage the attention of the commission. The principal thing will be to outline the policy to be pursued regarding county exhibits. Assistant Secretary Dearing has a large number of letters from the officers of the several county agricultural societies regarding the amount of space which they would like and the conditions which should govern the exhibits. These will be laid before the commission and some plan will probably be adopted. The bulk of these letters are to the effect that if the necessary space for an exhibit in the Agriculture buildings supplied, the counties will fill the space and furnish men to keep the exhibit in order.

The letter received from Platte county is a fair sample of the majority of the letters. This states that the Platte county will not hold a county fair this year, but will save money and make a good showing at the exposition, the farmers of that county now being engaged in gathering materials for this exhibit. The state commission is asked to provide space for the exhibit, the letter stating that floor space about 20x20 feet will be required. This county proposes to furnish a man to take care of the exhibit during the exposition and to distribute advertising matter.

Assistant Secretary Dearing says that the replied indicate that about forty counties will make exhibits and that the average space required for each county will be 500 feet, making a total space of 2,000. He also says that it does not seem to be necessary for the commission to offer any premiums for the best county exhibits, as the counties which propose to make exhibits are enterprising enough to do so without the incentive of premiums, provided space is furnished free to the counties.

Some of the members of the commission coincide with the assistant secretary in this view and regard it as a most economical solution of a perplexing question.

Another matter which will engage the attention of the commission will be the State building. The plans and working drawings of this building are about completed and these will be laid before the board for approval. It is probable that the superintendent [?] be instructed to invite bids for the material necessary in the construction of the building.

President Wattles will meet with the commission tonight to discuss the location of the State building. The plans will be submitted to the supervising architects this afternoon for approval and the selection of a site will remove all obstructions to the immediate commencement of construction.

Governor Holcomb was in the city this morning and was in consultation with the members of the commission at state headquarters regarding the work of the commission. He stated that he would not be in attendance at any of the meetings of the commission during this season as he would return to Lincoln this evening.

DIAZ WILL BE REPRESENTED.

Mexican Government Promises and Exhibit.

The Republic of Mexico will be represented at the Transmississippi Exposition with a suitable exhibit of the resources of that country. Furthermore, the exposition is to be properly advertised through the official organ of that country, so that all who desire to place individual exhibits may be put in possession of all the facts regarding the big show.

Assurances to this effect were received yesterday afternoon by President Wattles of the exposition through Secretary of State Sherman. The information was conveyed in a communication from A. A. Adee, second assistant secretary of state which gave the cheering news that Mexico had accepted the invitation to take part in the exposition. Enclosed in this communication was the following report regarding the negotiations in the matter from United States minister to Mexico, Powell Clayton, to Secretary of State Sherman:

MEXICO, Aug. 11.—To the Hon. John Sherman, Secretary of State, Washington D. C.—Sir: Referring to your unnumbered instructions dated June 15 and July 22, ultimo, respectively, I have the honor to enclose herewith copy and translation of a note from the foreign office transmitting a communication from the minister of fomento, containing the reply of the Mexican government to the invitation of the Transmississippi Exposition, and to my note of June 24 ultimo.

The president, after considering the documents, thanks the government of the United States and the president of the exposition, and indicates that the Mexican government wishes to accept the invitation; and will publish the regulations and papers when received in the Diario Oficial that they may come to the knowledge of all persons who may wish to make exhibits; and that the government will send an exhibit to the exposition. I have the honor, etc.,

POWELL CLAYTON.

The following translation of the note from the minister of fomento to Minister Clayton, mentioned in the above, was enclosed:

MEXICO, Aug. 7.—His Excellency, Powell Clayton—Mr. Minister: Referring to your excellency's note of June 24 ultimo, I have the honor to forward herewith copy of a communication from the secretary of fomento, dated the 2d instant, relating to the exposition that will be held in Omaha, Neb., in the year 1898. I renew to your excellency the assurances of my distinguished consideration.

IGNO MARISCAL.

Following is a translation of the official document in which the invitation is accepted by the Mexican government:

MEXICO, Aug. 2.—To the Secretary of Foreign Affairs: This department has received your note of the 1st ultimo inclosing another from the minister of the United States, expressing the desire of the Transmississippi and International Exposition and the American government that Mexico take part in an exposition to be held in Omaha, Neb., in the year 1898. With this note I was pleased to receive a letter from the president of this exposition to the president of Mexico in which the invitation is conveyed.

In reply I have the honor to say that after considering the documents the president desires to thank the government of the United States and the president of the exposition, and states that the Mexican government wishes to accept the invitation that has been received, and will, therefore, when the regulations and papers are received, give them publicity in the Diario Oficial that they may be brought to the knowledge of all persons who may wish to make exhibits; and that the government will also take part in the exposition and send an exhibit.

I have the honor to transmit the resolution of the president, and I renew the assurances of my consideration.

FERNANDEZ.

President Wattles also received from Second Assistant Secretary of State Adee another communication, in which he says that he encloses for his information "a letter from the Venezuelan foreign office replying to your letter inviting the government of Venezuela to take part in the Transmississippi and International Exposition."

President Wattles has not yet succeeded in figuring out the exact nature of this "information." The enclosure consists of a communication from Ezequiel Ryaz of the Department of Foreign Affairs of Venezuela to Secretary Sherman, but it is written in Spanish and it has not yet been translated.

PLANNING GOVERNMENT EXHIBIT.

Official Board Looking Forward to the Exposition Next Year.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 23.—(Special Telegram.)—W. V. Cox, secretary of the Board of Management of the United States government exhibit at Nashville, has addressed the   following letter to the heads of executive departments, Smithsonian Institute and members of the Fish Commission from Nashville, a copy of which has been forwarded to Senator Thurston:

Sir: I am directed by the board of management of the United States government exhibit at the Tennessee Centennial exposition to invite attention to the fact that much of the material now on exhibition in this city will necessarily be shown at the Transmississippi and International Exposition, to be held in Omaha next June, and should therefore be selected and packed with that object in view, and as some of the members of this board have already been designated as members of the Transmississippi and International Exposition board, it would seem desirable to have the members of the latter board meet the members of the Tennessee Centennial board at its next meeting for conference on matters of mutual interest. I have, therefore, the honor to extend through you an invitation to the representative of your department on the government board for the Transmississippi and International Exposition to be present at the meeting of the Tennessee Centennial board, to be held at the Department of Agriculture, Washington, September 6 next, at 10 o'clock a. m. Yours very respectfully,

W. V. COX, Secretary.

Representatives from the State, Postoffice, Interior, Justice and Navy departments and the Smithsonian institute are yet to be appointed, but it is thought this will be looked after before the date of the called meeting outlined in Secretary Cox's letter.

COLOR ON EXPOSITION BUILDINGS.

Subject Upon Which Architects and Contractors Cannot Agree.

It is probable that the plan of the supervising architects to color the staff for the building by mixing the coloring with the staff while it is being prepared will not be carried out. The staff contractors take the position that this method is not practical and cannot be done in an artistic manner with good results. The staff is mixed with water, and the plan of the architects, which they insist is entirely practical, is to mix the coloring matter with the water. The staff workers say that it will be impossible to secure the same shade in all the work for the reason that the staff must be mixed in such small quantities owing to the fact that it "sets" so rapidly that different shades will be produced and the buildings will have a mottled appearance.

The architects are reluctant to yield on this question, but experiments are now being made with a cheap water color paint which may be desired to give the buildings the desired tint. The lasting qualities of this material are being tested and experiments are also being made at the Union Pacific shops with a compressed air apparatus for spraying the paint on the buildings. It is believed that the buildings may be painted in this way at a very small cost. This method of painting is very expeditious, and the architects say that all of the buildings may be painted in less than thirty days. If this proves practical and desirable the buildings may be painted next spring and have a fresh and clean appearance all through the exposition.

The color with which experiments are being made is a warm, neutral tint which will harmonize excellently with the proposed brilliant colors which it is proposed to use for decoration.

Electricians Come to Exposition.

Prof. R. B. Owens of the University of Nebraska has returned from a trip through the east, where he has been for the past two months in the interest of the exposition. Prof. Owens is commissioner for the electrical section of the exposition, and his recent trip was for the purpose of securing the 1898 conventions of the two leading electrical organizations to be held in Omaha next year and the secure exhibits by the principal electrical instrument manufacturing concerns in the country. In both of these he was signally successful. He secured the meetings of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and the National Electric Light association, the most important associations of electricians in this country. He also secured applications for space for exhibits from all of the large manufacturers of electrical machinery and instruments, thus assuring a large and instructive electrical section.

Applications for More Concessions.

The Department of Concessions has received an application from Michel Pitliaroff, in charge of the Russian exhibit at the Stockholm Exposition, for a concession for exhibiting recent inventions in the phonograph and cinematographe. Another application for a concession is for a Swiss chalet with grill room. An inventive genius wants the privilege of seeling​ popcorn disks and exhibiting the machine which swallows a lot of popcorn and turns out disks of the toothsome morsel two and one-half inches in liameter​ and half an inch thick mixed with syrup and pressed into compact form.

EXHIBIT FROM NEBRASKA

ESTIMATE OF NEEDS FOR FRUIT DISPLAY

More Than One-Tenth of State Appropriation Asked For to Makes an Exhibit in This Branch.

The Nebraska Exposition commission convened yesterday afternoon in its regular bi-monthly meeting.

The first business taken up by the commission yesterday was the receiving of a delegation from the Nebraska Horticultural society. The delegation comprised President G. A. Marshall, E. F. Stevens of Crete and Peter Youngers, jr., members of the executive board of the state society.

The request of the society for a part of the state appropriation to aid it in making an exhibit of horticultural products of Nebraska was presented by Mr. Stevens. He said the report he had to present had been made up by the executive board after serious consideration and was considered a very conservative estimate. He dwelt especially on the amount of labor involved in gathering desirable and perfect specimens of fruit of all kinds. He said that less than 5 per cent of ordinary commercial fruit is suitable for exhibition purposes, and this makes it necessary to handle the fruit a number of times in order to sort out all spotted or damaged fruit.

Mr. Stevens said that after considering all these points the horticulturists had concluded that their previous estimates would have to be increased rather than lowered. As an illustration of the value of care in selecting fruit, Mr. Stevens produced a basket of grapes containing about a dozen bunches of different varieties, each bunch being wrapped by itself in tissue paper. These bunches were each perfect and presented a very tempting appearance. He also produced from another basket a few apples, each wrapped in paper. While these appeared to be perfect specimens of fruit, Mr. Stevens pointed out blemishes, which he said would count against the fruit in a contest for premiums.

With these object lessons before the commission, Mr. Stevens proceeded to read the following detailed estimate of the expenses necessary for a horticultural exhibit:

200 feet of space $1,000
Shelving and decorating 500
350 barrels of apples at $4 1,400
300 barrels of apples at $3 900
240 crates strawberries at $4 960
240 crates raspberries at $4 960
240 crates blackberries at $4 960
240 crates cherries at $3 720
400 crates plums at $3 1,200
1,500 baskets peaches at 50 cents 750
3,000 baskets grapes at 40 cents 1,200
Pears, apricots, gooseberries, currants, etc. 350
Cold storage of apples at $1 per barrel 350
Total $11,500

Mr. Stevens explained the prices quoted by saying that the quality of fruit necessary for exhibition purposes is worth three or four times as much as ordinary fruit. He explained the apparently large quantity by saying that it would be necessary to change the fruit frequently in order to keep it fresh and this would require a superintendent and assistant and two laborers. The salary of these men was not included in the estimate given.

The matter was informally discussed, but no action was taken, as all these estimates will be taken up at once in executive session when all are received.

Mr. Stevens impressed upon the board the importance of getting the work of collecting apples started at once before the apples are fully matured as they keep better in that condition in cold storage. He said that 600 varieties of apples ought to be obtained and that it would be necessary to visit about 500 orchards to secure them.

FOR NEBRASKA FLOWERS.

L. C. Chapin of Lincoln, a member of the Nebraska Floriculture society, appeared before the commission to present the request of the society in making a floral exhibit. He said that the florists estimated that 2,000 feet of space would be required to make a creditable exhibit. The cost of this display, including the cost of the space and the expense of transporting the plants and flowers to the exposition, and the salary of a superintendent and such assistants as would be required, would not exceed, in the judgment of the florists, $2,500 or $3,000. Mr. Chapin explained that the florists would not make any charge for the plants, but would simply want to be paid for the expense of packing them and transporting them to the grounds.

This matter was laid over to be taken up later.

The commission adjourned at this point for supper, and when it convened in the evening Superintendent Johnson of the agricultural department reported what he had been doing since his appointment. He said he had secured some specimens of oats, wheat, alfalfa, clover and other small grains, but reported that the farmers are too busy harvesting their immense crops and selling dollar wheat to stop and gather grain for the exposition or anything else but the market.

Superintendent Foster of the live stock department reported progress in his department, but said he had not been able to do much, because the rules regarding live stock have not been formulated. He was instructed to confer with Superintendent Dinsmore regarding this matter and report to the commission what is necessary to be done.

L. C. Chapin of Lincoln was appointed superintendent of the floral department.

It was decided to ask the State Board of Agriculture for a room for headquarters for the commission at the fair grounds, so that an exposition sentiment may be worked up among the patrons of the fair. All superintendents under the commission were instructed to attend the state fair and make themselves acquainted with exhibitors and endeavor to secure exhibits.

The greater part of this morning was spent by the commission in executive session, with President Wattles of the exposition, regarding the state building. The president suggested that the state building be made larger and so designed that it could be used as an auditorium. In return for this change in the plan on the part of the commission the president suggested certain concessions which he would recommend to the executive committee of the exposition.

Before anything definite was decided on in this matter, the commission and the president went out to the grounds to look up the question of a site for the state building.

Notes of the Exposition.

Edwin T. Swobe has applied for the appointment as commercial agent for the exposition in the city of Chicago.

Governor Mount of Indiana has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he will appoint a state commission to see that the state of Indiana is properly represented at the exposition.

The first application for space in the educational section was received this morning by the Department of Exhibits, coming from P. T. Buckley, secretary of the Board of Education of Stromsburg, Neb. The application is for 200 feet of space.

Commercial Agent McAusland of the Pacific coast notified the Department of Exhibits that he has arranged with G. A. Cooper, secretary of the Manufacturers' association and Board of Trade of Portland, to look after the interests of the exposition in Oregon.

Governor Rogers of Washington informs the Department of Publicity and Promotion, in a letter, that he will do all he can to assist in promoting an interest in the exposition among the people of his state, and will confer with the exposition vice president for Washington.

Walter Baker & Co. of Boston, manufacturers of chocolate preparations, have notified the Department of Exhibits that they will erect a booth in the Manufactures building instead of erecting a pavilion, as they first intended. The booth will occupy 2,156 square feet and will be constructed on an elaborate scale, as shown by drawings.

Superintendent John Owens of the Transportation department, has returned from Chicago, where he went early in the week to confer with the World's fair people regarding matters connected with the transportation department of that exposition. He secured a large number of valuable suggestions, as well as copies of the rules governing the handling of traffic.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion has prepared a large half-tone engraving of the Administration arch, which is printed on heavy enameled paper, 17x24 inches. These pictures are intended for posting in conspicuous places and will be given to all persons who will agree to display them where they will be seen by the general public. They may be obtained at the office of the department, room 601 Bee building.

The Department of Concessions has entered into a contract for the concession of the Streets of Cairo. The concessionaire is Leo Bonet, one of the staff contractors. Superintendent Burns of the Department of Concessions says that Mr. Bonet has associated with him in this concession one of the best oriental showmen in this country and is backed by a large amount of Omaha capital. The street in this concession will be about 400 feet long and the buildings will be constructed of staff, their estimated cost being from $15,000 to $20,000.

The governor of Colorado has notified the Department of Exhibits that he has appointed an exposition commission for Colorado, which will at once take up the work of seeing that the interests of Colorado are properly represented at the exposition. The commissioners are John Barrett of Denver, Mrs. E. A. Thayer, a prominent society woman of Pueblo; M. L. Allison, mayor of the town of Grand Junction and president of the Colorado Fruit congress; R. E. Goodell, a prominent mine owner of Leadville; J. B. Swan, owner of an experimental farm at Loveland; H. A. Lee, Ouray, state commissioner of Mines; Mrs. M. A. Shute of Denver, secretary of the State Horticultural board.

Commissioner J. T. Lowe, who is enroute to New Zealand as the accredited representative of the exposition to that country, writes to the Department of Exhibits from Honolulu that a great interest has been aroused in the exposition on the part of the Islanders, and that a good exhibit will be obtained from there. He expects to secure a Hawaiian village and many interesting articles for exhibition. It is supposed that he is in New Zealand by this time, and further news is expected from him in the [?]

 

CRANE MATURES HIS IDEAS

PLANS FOR MAGNIFICENT STRUCTURE

Modern Renaissance in Style, with Noble Proportions and Artistic Exterior Decorations to Complete its Beauty.

WASHINGTON, Aug. 24.—(Special Telegram.)—The government building at the Omaha Exposition will be modern renaissance in style, with a magnificent dome overlooking the lagoon, 150 feet high, surmounted by an heroic allegorical figure of Liberty Enlightening the World. This is the present intention, according to Architect E. A. Crane of the supervising architect's office, who returned today after his vacation.

"Instead of three buildings, united by a central court, as originally planned," said Mr. Crane, "the government building will be one large structure 500 feet long and 100 feet wide. The grounds selected for the exposition are ideal in character, and the position accorded the government building could not be improved upon. I believe the Omaha Exposition will be easily the greatest exposition since the World's fair, for the people of Omaha are being aroused to the importance of the exposition and everybody seems to talk and think of nothing but next year's fair. Walker & have done a great work in planning the grounds and the general outlining of the designs of the several structures, which will be rich in coloring and artistic conception. I hope to have the working drawings of the government building finished in about three weeks or a month. As soon as possible the department will call for bids, the design being to have the building under roof before January 1, when the staff for the exterior may be made in the building itself.

"As for Omaha, it's a busy metropolis, full of handsome structures, and its people impressed me most favorably. I like the city and its people and believe the government building will be a credit to the exposition."

LOCATE NEBRASKA BUILDING

WILL OCCUPY A SITE ON THE BLUFF TRACT

Plan of Converting the State Structure Into an Auditorium for Exposition Purposes Has Now Been Abandoned.

The Nebraska exposition building will stand on the bluff tract of the exposition grounds, facing west, a short distance south of the point where the east end of the grand viaduct across Sherman avenue from the main court rests upon the bluff tract. The Nebraska building will be the first structure to catch the eye of the visitor, who turns to the beautiful park at the south end of the bluff tract for a rest. It will be surrounded by beautiful beds of blooming flowers and winding paths, bordered with handsome shrubbery. An unobstructed view of the broad valley of the Missouri and the beautiful bluffs along the Iowa shore can be had from the balcony on the second story, as there will be nothing in between this building and the edge of the bluff.

This location was decided upon this morning by the committee appointed by the Nebraska Exposition commission and the representatives of the Department of Buildings and Grounds. Nothing remains to be done to make the location officially certain except the approval of the executive committee of the exposition. As this is the location which has been virtually decided upon from the beginning, there seems to be but little question about it being approved.

All negotiations looking to a change in the State building with a view to using it for an auditorium have been dropped and will receive no further consideration. Both the executive committee and the state commission have come to the conclusion that the scheme is not practical and the commission has instructed its superintendent to make an estimate of the amount of material required for the building already designed. It is the intention to order the material purchased at the meeting to be held September 7.

The members of the state commission are beginning to have doubts about their ability to construct the state building in the way they have decided to operate and keep the cost within the original estimate of $16,000. This estimate was intended to cover every expense in connection with the erection of the building and it is the intention to have the work done by day's labor, employing men from all sections of the state on the work. Under this plan the commission has no means of telling what the cost will be and some of the members are beginning to have serious doubts on this point.

OMAHA FIRM BIDS THE LOWEST.

Propositions for Construction of Machinery and Electricity Building.

The Department of Buildings and Grounds opened bids at 5 o'clock last evening for the construction of the Machinery and Electricity building. The bids were opened promptly on the hour and in the presence of all the bidders, President Wattles, acting manager of the department, superintending the operation.

The bid of G. H. King of Omaha was irregular, not being on the blank furnished for bidders and not complying with the instructions to bidders in other particulars. The bids included interior plastering, but did not include the staff work, and it was announced that it would be impossible to separate these two. It is probable that this bid will be rejected on account of irregularity. The lowest bidder on the carpentry was Hamilton Brothers of Omaha, $32,791. On the staff work Smith & Eastman were the lowest, $10,757, making the total cost of the building under these bids, $43,548. These are the bids in detail:

Bidder. Carpentry. Deduct for Piling. Deduct painting Glazing. Time in days.
R. A. Estell $38,200 $1,200 90
Hamilton Bros 32,791 1,500 $1,350 120
Newman & Wahlstrom 39,874 1,620 150
G. H. King 32,456 120
Wallace H. Parrish 35,990 1,140 1,500 135
Wm. Goldie & Son 39,940 1,200 1,600 100
William Mavor 38,950
J. L. Nelson & Bro, staff 14,900
Smith & Eastman, staff 10,757 30

PLAN FOR ANOTHER CONVENTION.

National Association of Letter Carriers May Come Next Year.

The chances for securing another important convention for Omaha next year have been greatly improved within the last few days.

Omaha letter carriers are jubilant over the turn affairs have taken recently and think that the 1898 meeting of the National Association of Letter Carriers will be held in this city. At the last meeting San Francisco was fixed upon as the place of meeting for this year, the date being September 6. It was agreed that the San Francisco people should do certain things if the convention was located there. They failed to keep their promises and the executive committee, which was vested with that power, has recently announced that the meeting this year will be held in Chicago on the date named. The Omaha carriers say this will greatly increase their chances for securing the next convention, as no meeting of the association was ever held in the west. They will send a well organized delegation to Chicago with instructions to secure the next meeting.

TAKE UP EXPOSITION MATTERS.

Interest in Educational Department of the Big Show.

The Transmississippi Exposition was boomed at this morning's session of the Douglas County Teachers' institute, which is going on at the High school building. County Superintendent of Schools Bodwell and Mrs. Jennie Keyser ofth ectiy​ schools tried to interest the teachers in the educational department of the big show. The exposition management intends to offer prizes and diplomas for school work of various classes and it is desired that the Douglas county schools make a good display. The matter will be further advocated beforethe​ institute closes.

Today's work consisted in still more advanced instruction in music language, reading, didactics, history, primary reading and bookkeeping. The regular corps of instructors conducted the classes. The lecture this afternoon at 3 o'clock was delivered by W. H. Skinner of Nebraska City, who spoke upon "Oliver Wendell Holmes."

The attendance at the classes still continues to increase.

Wisconsin Merchants Coming.

Walter W. Pollock, commercial agent for the exposition in Wisconsin, writes to the Department of Exhibits from Milwaukee that the merchants of Wisconsin have formed a private company to erect a building on the exposition grounds, working in conjunction with several of the famous mineral spring companies of the state, and architects are at work for plans for the building. Mr. Pollock says the building will be beautified in the interior by fountains supplied with the various mineral waters and that statues by Wisconsin artists will be grouped in the building. Another feature will be an interesting historical exhibit, which is now being collected. Mr. Pollock gives every assurance that Wisconsin will be represented in a way which will reflect great credit upon the state.

Space for Works of Art.

Arthur L. Bressler, president of the Venetian Marble Mosaic Art company of Detroit, Mich., who is also commissioner for the Transmississippi Exposition to Venezuela and Central America, forwards from Detroit an application for space for an exhibit to be made by his firm. In connection with the application he writes to the Department of Exhibits as follows: "We will make an exhibit of a working plant in the renowned mosaic art, both in marble and the ancient Venetian art mosaic which, until within the last few years, was never done in America. Our artists are all Italians, belonging to the celebrated Pellarin and Rosa families of mosaic artists, known throughout the world.

Indorsed by Iowa Republicans.

Secretary Chase of the Iowa Exposition commission sends the following relating to the exposition, which was unanimously adopted by the republican state convention recently held at Cedar Rapids: "We regard the Transmississippi and International Exposition, to be held in Omaha in 1898, as an important event, and it is already an assured success, having been nationalized by act of congress and aided by a liberal appropriation, and foreign nations invited to participate. We are in hearty sympathy with every effort to make it a success, as in the friendly rivalry of states our prosperity and greatness may be fully shown, and we favor the judicious expenditure of such an amount as may be necessary to make a creditable exhibit of Iowa products and industries."

Full of Musical Ideas.

Yesterday morning Homer Moore returned to Omaha from a summer vacation in the east. Mr. Moore left this city the latter part of June to work up musical matters in New York for the Transmississippi Exposition. In July he went to Chantauqua, N. Y., to fill an engagement at the Assembly as lecturer on "Wagner and His Musical Dramas," and as vocal soloist.

Mr. Moore has returned to Omaha full of ideas and enthusiasm. He says that he has a carefully worked-out plan for the music of the exposition. He reports a very pleasant summer in the east.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Rushford Pin company of Lawrence, Mass., has made application for twenty-five feet of space for an exhibit.

Antonio Feireira de Serpa has been commissioned as honorary commissioner for the Transmississippi Exposition to Portugal.

George M. Mischke, commercial agent for Colorado, has been apopinted​ secretary of the recently appointed Colorado Exposition commission.

There is an active demand for the large half tone prints of the Administration arch, now being issued by the Department of Publicity. The limited supply will soon be exhausted.

The Marble Head Lime company has applied for 200 feet of space for an exhibit. This concern had its headquarters in Chicago and has works in Wisconsin, Illinois and Missouri.

R. F. Hodgins, commercial agent for the exposition in Ohio, has sent in an application for space for the S. A. Weller Pottery company at Zanesville, O. The application is for 2,000 feet, with the right to increase this to 4,000 feet. Mr. Hodgins writes that this concern will make a display of art pottery, such as has never before been produced in this country.

Art Dirtetor​ Griffiths will go to St. Louis early in September to visit the art exhibit at the exposition for the purpose of securing desirable pictures or other works of art which may be displayed there. It is stated that an unusually fine display of pictures will be made at St. Louis this year, Artist Kurtz having just returned from Europe, where he has been for some time making a collection of desirable works for this purpose at a heavy expense. Mr. Kurtz was a candidate for the position of art director of the Transmississippi Exposition.

YORK COUNTY TO HAVE AN EXHIBIT.

Farmers' Institute Shows Interest in Transmississippi Exposition.

YORK, Neb., Aug. 25.—(Special.)—At a meeting of the York County Farmers' institue​ held yesterday in this city it was decided to take steps toward making an exhibit of county products at the Transmississippi Exposition. A petition has been prepared for presentation to the county commissioners requesting an appropriation sufficient to defray expenses of collecting and caring for the exhibit. York county is awake to the advantages offered by the exposition and intends to do its share toward making a good showing for Nebraska.

future.

Following on the heels of Commissioner Lowe's visit to Honolulu the Department of Concessions has received an application from A. M. Mellis of that place, who wants the concession for a Hawaiian cafe. He asks to be allowed to erect a two-story building and use the second story for an exhibit of Hawaiian articles of various kinds.

 
Picture consists of the reverse side of the last article in the preceding picture.

Second Ward—Herdman Ticket: Adam Sloup, Stanley Letovskey, Chris Rossen, Frank Fixa, Frank Hynek, Fritz Damman, John Sullivan, Edward Kennedy, Louis Piatti Albert Hoffman, Emil Angastad.

Anti-Herdman Ticket: John Audrit, Otto Beil, A. Excell, Peter E. Elsasser, Thomas J. Flynn, Max Grimm, Conrad Krug, Richard O'Keefe, Anton Scalzo, John Schmidt, David L. Shanahan.

Third Ward—Anti-Herdman Ticket: Cu-

 

WATER FOR THE EXPOSITION

LINE OF MAINS WILL BE LAID ON GROUNDS

Bids for Digging Ditches and Laying the Water Pipes Will Be Received Until the First of September.

The plan for a water system for the exposition grounds was approved by the executive committee of the Transmississippi Exposition at its regular meeting yesterday afternoon. These plans had previously been examined and approved by the city engineer and the chief of the fire department. They provide for lines of mains extending the entire length of the main court on the north and south sides at the rear of the main buildings, with branches extending entirely around each of the main buildings; also a large main extending the full length of the Plaisance on the bluff tract with numerous branches, and a main for the old fair grounds tract with a connecting main running through the "neck" between the main court and the north tract.

The Department of Buildings and Ground was authorized to close a contract with Dennis Long & Co. of Louisville, Ky., for the pipe and fittings necessary to lay this system for $8,668. The plan also contemplated the placing of a number of fire hydrants and the department was authorized to enter into a contract for these at a price not exceeding $2,625.

President Wattles, who is in charge of the Department of Buildings and Grounds in the absence of Manager Kirkendall, asked for authority to advertise for bids for digging the ditches and laying the water pipes. He was informed that the department already had authority to ask for bids for the work and he gave notice that he would ask for bids for this work, to be opened at 5 p. m. September 1.

EMPLOYES CANNOT BID.

The bids for the construction of the sewer on the bluff and the north tracts, which were opened a few days ago, were laid before the committee for action. The lowest bidder was found to by John F. Daley, whose bid was $809.37. Objection was raised by members of the executive committee against awarding the contract to Daley for the reason that he is in the employ of the Department of Buildings and Grounds as an inspector at $5 per day, and it was urged that employes of the exposition must not be allowed to compete for contracts without first severing their connection with the exposition. This view met with the unanimous approval of the committee and it was decided to award the contract for the sewer to the next lowest bidder, H. C. Sharp, whose bid was only $1.36 higher than Daley's, being $810.83. A contract for this work was ordered drawn with Sharp.

The bids for the construction of the Machinery and Electricity building were next laid before the committee for action. The attention of the committee was called to the fact, which was published at the time the bids were opened, that the bid of G. H. King of Council Bluffs, $32,456, was irregular in that it was not made in accordance with the plain instructions to bidders. The bid stated that the price named included the interior plaster work, but did not include the piling. The instructions to bidders required that they must include the plastering with the staff work, and that the piling must be included in the carpenter work with the deduction which would be made by the contractor in case the exposition decided to do the piling. The form of King's bid made it impossible for any comparison to be made with any of the other bids, and it was decided by the committee that the bid must be rejected and this was done.

The next lowest bid on the carpentry was that of Hamilton Bros. of Omaha, $32,791. This included the piling, for which the bid allowed a reduction of $1,500 in case the exposition did the piling. Acting Manager Wattles announced that an agreement had been made with Hamilton Bros. by which they had agreed to do the piling and make a reduction in their original bid of $300, thus making the carpenter work cost $32,491. The contract for the staff work was ordered let to Smith & Eastman, the lowest bidders, at their bid of $10,757, making the total cost of the building, $43,248.

The bond of Goldie & Sons of Chicago, carpenter contractors for the Mines building, was presented, with John M. Smyth, a Chicago millionaire, as surety. The bond was approved.

RAILWAY QUESTION AGAIN.

A faint echo of the railway question was heard in the shape of letters from General Manager Dickinson of the Union Pacific and Assistant General Freight Agent Merchant of the Elkhorn road. Mr. Dickinson said he had been unable to be down to attend any meetings of the committee, but had looked over the Missouri Pacific contract and thought the charge per car was somewhat higher than is ordinarily charged in this section, but did not regard it as excessive in consideration of the outlay required. Mr. Merchant explained that General Manager Bidwell is out of the city and suggested that if the exposition would secure a crossing over the Missouri Pacific tracks the Elkhorn might enter the grounds on terms that would be favorable to the exposition. No action was taken on the matter.

The committee has not yet been able to get a meeting with the railway managers, as there had been no time since the committee was instructed to confer with them that all three of the managers have been in the city at the same time.

Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion announced that the plan for holding an interstate reunion of the members of the Grand Army of the Republic during the exposition had made favorable progress at the national encampment at Buffalo. He stated that the movement had received the sanction of Commander-in-Chief Clarkson and that a proclamation had been issued by the Department of Nebraska at the encampment inviting the members of the organization in Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, the two Dakotas and Minnesota, to come to Nebraska in September, 1898, and hold a grand interstate encampment.

Notes of the Exposition.

The working drawings of the Agriculture building have been completed and bids for the construction of the building will be called for at once.

The placing of the staff work on the Administration building was commenced yesterday afternoon, some of the cornice being put in place.

Dwight Perkins of Chicago, architect of the Machinery and Electricity building, will arrive in the city tomorrow for consultation with the supervising architects of the exposition regarding the detail work on the Machinery building.

BUILDING THE EXPOSITION

EVERYTHING TO BE READY OPENING DAY

All the Main Buildings Will Be Under Course of Erection Before the Close of September.

The work on the exposition grounds is progressing favorably. The grading on the main court is now completed and it is no longer difficult for a visitor to form in his mind's eye a picture of how the main court will look when the buildings are erected and all of the embellishments are in place. The site which each building is to occupy is now marked by a depression of from two to four feet. All around these depressions the ground is levelled off and covered with black dirt in readiness for the gardener when the buildings shall have been completed. In the depressions the piles for the foundations will be driven and the buildings erected on these, the floors of the buildings rising slightly above the level of the ground surrounding them. All is now ready for the building contractors and within the next thirty days the main court will be a veritable bee hive.

Contracts for the erection of the Administration building, the Manufactures building, the Mines and Mining building, and the Machinery and Electricity building have been let, and the Agriculture building will be put on the boards for bids this week. The working drawings for the Art building will be ready for the contractors within a few days, and the revised place for the Auditorium are under contract to be completed by September 10. Plans for the new building for the main court, the Liberal Arts building, will be completed within a short time.

The Administration building is in the hands of Briggs & Cushman, carpenters, and Leo Bonet, staff contractor. The frame work of the building is almost completed and the work of putting on the staff was commenced Saturday morning. This building will be completed within thirty days.

SECOND BUILDING UNDER WAY.

The Manufactures building is let to R. C. Strehlow of Omaha, carpenter, and Smith & Eastman of Chicago, staff workers. The pile foundation is all in place, and the sill and portions of the superstructure have been completed in some parts of the building. The material is nearly all on the ground and the work is progressing rapidly. The staff contractors have their workshop completed and have commenced work on molding the staff ornamental work.

Goldie & Sons of Chicago have the carpenter contract for the Mines building and they say they will commence work putting in the foundation this week. The staff contract for this building was let to Smith & Eastman.

The contract for the Machinery and Electricity building was let Friday of last week to Hamilton Bros., carpenters, Omaha, and Smith & Eastman, staff contractors.

The supervising architect of the Treasury department of the federal government is at work on the plane for the government building, and it is announced from that office that the building will be under cover by January 1, and that the staff work will be carried on inside the building.

When it is borne in mind that the erection of staff buildings is almost like the growth of a magic city in the night by the lamp of Alladin, it will be seen that the progress made up to this time is really wonderful. If the necessity arose for extreme haste any building on the ground could be completed within sixty days, so that the apparent slowness is only the result of involuntary comparison with ordinary building operations.

BUILDINGS TO BE PAINTED.

Although no official announcement has been made, it has been practically decided that the "old ivory" effect on the buildings will not be accomplished by mixing the coloring material with the staff as it is being prepared, but will be obtained by painting the buildings after the staff is all in place. This decision seems to be the result of a strong disinclination on the part of the staff contractors to try what they say is simply an experiment. Notwithstanding the fact that the art building in the Nashville exposition is a forcible proof that the staff may be successfully colored, the contractors refuse to concede that it may be done, and the attempt to convince them has been abandoned.

Experiments are now being made with a cheap paint by which the same effect may be produced. This paint will be sprayed on the immense surfaces of the main buildings with air brushes, similar to those used at the World's fair. For this purpose compressed air machinery is used and the paint is sprayed in a fine stream through a nozzle which is handled by a workman in much the same manner as hose is used to sprinkle a lawn. Experiments have recently been made at the Union Pacific shops, which has the largest compressed air plant in this part of the country. It has been demonstrated that this paint may be put on by these machines at a price which is ridiculously low. One of the machines with which these experiments have been made has seven nozzles and the surface which may be covered in a day by a single machine is astonishing. The paint with which experiments have been made is a rich, warm cream color and appears to be permanent in its color. It is being subjected to severe tests and will be adopted if it passes through the ordeal successfully. With this as a background the rich hues contemplated in the elaborate color scheme of the main court will stand out in strong contrast and impart a rich flavor to the scene which will rival the beauties of old Pompeii.

DIVISION OF BLUFF TRACT.

The grading of the bluff tract is about completed and the work of erecting the buildings which are to stand on this portion of the grounds will soon be commenced. A line drawn across this tract east and west from the east end of the viaduct leading into the bluff tract from the main court will divide the tract into two distinct sections. North of this line will be the Plaisance with its foreign villages, its engineering novelties, and its various sources of amusement and instruction. South of this line will be the horticultural section of the great show, taking the form, in part, of a beautiful park where the public may seek rest and repose and enjoy at the same time, a view of the beautiful valley of the Missouri and the frowning bluffs skirting the river on the Iowa side.

The Horticulture building will form a prominent feature of this section of the grounds. It will stand about in the center of the south half of the bluff tract, opposite Lothrop street. It will be a handsome and imposing building and will be filled with rare and beautiful creations of nature. Surrounding this building will be a beautiful park, filled with flower beds and winding walks and with plenty of shady nooks where the visitor may seek rest while enjoying the beauties of nature.

Here and there about this park will be the various state buildings, each of which will be used only as a meeting place for visitors from all over the land. The Nebraska building will be prominent among these and will probably be the headquarters for many of the states. The Nebraska Exposition commission has offered accommodations in their building to any state which desires to take advantage of it, and the building is designed to afford plenty of office rooms besides the ample parlors and reading rooms, toilet rooms, and the numerous other things necessary for the accommodation of the visiting public, but which could find no place in an exhibit building.

SEVERAL STATE BUILDINGS.

The indications at this time are that several other states will erect buildings of their own on this tract. Illinois will have a building; Wisconsin has taken steps to erect a handsome building which will be decorated by the numerous mineral spring companies of that state; Iowa will have a state building for a meeting place for Iowans; negotiations are being made by one or two other states for space and other preliminaries for the erection of state buildings, and it appears probable that the state buildings will form a prominent feature of the bluff park.

The experiment of mixing black earth with the clay of the bottom of the lagoon and rolling the mixture with a heavy steam roller seems to be a success so far as holding water is concerned. The entire bottom has been rolled and is as level and hard as a floor. Water from the rain early in   the week is still standing in places in the lagoon.

The work on the sheet piling which is to line the banks of the canal is progressing slowly. The stay piles and back piles are all in place and the work of bracing the stay piles by fastening them to the back piles is going along. The stringers to which the sheet piling is to be fastened are being put in place and the sheet piling is on the ground ready for use.

Since the banks of the canal have been "squared up" it has been rather inconvenient to get from the north to the south side of the lagoon without going entirely around the big hole, a distance of at least half a mile. A temporary bridge will probably be put across at the point where the permanent iron bridge will be constructed, where the canal intersects Twentieth street.

INTERESTS FLOWER GROWERS

PROF. TAYLOR RETURNS FROM THE EAST

Florists Preparing to Come to the Exposition for the Purpose of Making a Great Exhibit.

Prof. F. W. Taylor, chief of the Bureau of Forestry, Irrigation and Horticulture of the Transmississippi Exposition, has returned from a trip through the east in the interest of the exposition. The main object of Prof. Taylor's trip was to attend the meeting of the American Florists' association, which met in Providence, R. I., early in the month. The fact that he secured the next meeting to be held in Omaha in 1898 has already been announced.

At this meeting Prof. Taylor met all of the prominent florists of the country and interested them in the exposition and secured agreements that they would attend and make exhibits of the flowers. F. R. Pierson of Tarrytown and J. C. Vaughan, the well known Chicago florist, were especially enthusiastic over the idea of making striking exhibits. Both of these men are intensely interested in the development of the canna, the bedding plant of large leaf and brilliant bloom, which has sprung into great popularity in recent years. Mr. Pierson is the proud possessor of a new canna, which is said to possess the attribute so eagerly sought in canna growers—a brilliant yellow flower of perfect form. Both Pierson and Vaughan were anxious to secure space on the bluff tract outside of the Horticulture building, where they can make exhibits of all varieties of cannas.

ARRAY OF FLOWERING PLANTS.

In addition to these, Prof. Taylor found a large number of other growers who made application for space with a view of installing exhibits of rare and beautiful flowers. These applications show that water plants of all kinds, the beautiful water lilies of all species and many other varieties of these rare and wonderful plants will be exhibited in profusion. Bulbous plants of all species, together with rare plants grown for their foliage, will decorate the interior and exterior of the Horticulture building with all the hues of the rainbow.

In addition to securing the next meeting of the florists, Prof. Taylor called upon four members of the executive committee of the American Seed Trade association and invited them to hold the next meeting of the association in Omaha. The association holds its meetings early in June, the meeting this year having been held at Washington, D. C. The executive committee of seven members is empowered to fix the place of meeting and Prof. Taylor says he feels safe in saying that the next meeting will be held in Omaha.

While talking about his experience in the east Prof. Taylor remarked especially about the different feeling that eastern people seem to have toward the west, and Nebraska especially about the different feeling that eastern people seem to have toward the west, and Nebraska especially, as compared with the sentiments freely expressed throughout the east on that subject a year ago. He said he had constantly been met with inquiries about the change which had taken place in conditions in Nebraska and especially as to the effect the rise in the price of wheat would have on the state. He found a great interest in all parts of the east in the general conditions in this state and also in the values of land and kindred matters.

IT WILL BE A GREAT EXPOSITION.

Views Expressed by Architect Perkins of Chicago.

Dwight H. Perkins of Chicago, architect of the Machinery and Electricity building, is in the city in consultation with the supervising architects of the exposition regarding the working out of the detail decoration of the building.

"There is one thing about your exposition," said Mr. Perkins this morning, "that your people are to be congratulated upon, and that is the tremendous progress that has been made in the mechanical part of the work. Matters have reached a point where your exposition could easily be opened February 1 of next year, so far as the buildings are concerned. People who are not familiar with this class of work do not appreciate the great effect the duplication of units in these large buildings has upon the time required for their construction. If it became necessary, every building on the grounds could be completed within ninety days.

"What strikes me most forcibly in connection with your exposition," continued Mr. Perkins, "is the lack of hotel accommodations. Your people do not seem to appreciate the fact that Omaha is going to be overcrowded with a perfect horde of visitors who will require accommodations which your city is not prepared to give.

"To get back to the exposition, I can truthfully say that Omaha is going to have an exposition which will compare favorably with any exposition ever held in the world and which will eclipse anything ever held on this side of the water, except the World's fair, and it will compare very favorably with that from an architectural standpoint. I am delighted with the prospect and feel as much interest in it as though I was a citizen of Omaha. I have been in consultation with Mr. Kimball regarding the detailed ornamentation on the Machinery building and shall take occasion to return to Omaha at frequent intervals during the construction of that building."

EXPOSITION COMMITTEE MEETS.

Missouri Pacific's Switching Contract Under Discussion.

The executive committee of the exposition held a special meeting at noon today for the purpose of taking up the railway question and arriving at some conclusion respecting the matter. The three directors who are general managers of Omaha roads were invited to attend the meeting, according to the instruction of the Board of Directors to the committee, but Mr. Bidwell of the Elkhorn was the only one who responded.

The question was discussed at length and in detail, Commissioner Utt of the Commercial club being called in to take part in the deliberations. The principal feature of the discussion was the charge of $4 per car which was contemplated in the Missouri Pacific contract. Mr. Utt suggested a sliding scale by which the amount of charge would be made to all shippers, the exposition to receive a rebate under the operation of the sliding scale.

Mr. Bidwell was very guarded in his expressions regarding the terms proposed by the Missouri Pacific contract, but said the charges "were high enough." He reviewed the circumstances of the Elkhorn's connection with the exposition-railway question and stated, in effect, that the Missouri Pacific had broken faith with the Elkhorn by violating the promise made when the change of site was suggested to the effect that the Missouri Pacific would consent to any reasonable arrangement for allowing the Elkhorn to cross its tracks under any arrangement. In this connection, Mr. Bidwell took occasion to emphatically deny the statements circulated by a local representative of the Missouri Pacific to the effect that he (Bidwell) had voted against the change of site. He said he had voted for the change as being in the best interest of the exposition.

In reply to a direct question from one of the committee, Mr. Bidwell said he did not think it advisable for his road to undertake to enter the grounds with a view to doing the switching for the exposition, as the attitude of the Missouri Pacific would cause a delay of form sixty to ninety days.

The discussion continued for some time, but no action was taken by the committee.

PLEASED WITH THE EXPOSITION.

George W. Lininger Speaks Highly of Nashville's Show.

Hon. George W. Lininger has returned from a trip to his old home in Pennsylvania, where he spent a couple of weeks in renewing the acquaintances of his youth, before he left for the then untraveled west, with the substantial progress of which he has since been intimately identified.

On his return trip, Mr. Lininger stopped at Nashville, where he visited the Tennessee Centennial exposition. He speaks in terms of the highest praise of the artistic merit of the exposition, and says that it promises to be a financial success. Up to a week ago the total attendance reached about 900,000, sand interest seems to continue unabated.

Speaking of the art exhibit and the collection of historical articles, Mr. Lininger said the collection of each was well worth a visit to see. He said the exposition was much more extensive than he expected to see, and he was more than favorably impressed with the manner in which strangers in the city were treated. He said there was no disposition to overcharge visitors for accommodations, meals and accommodations being maintained at ordinary rates. In addition to this, he stated that the residents of Nashville seemed to take a personal interest in seeing that strangers were courteously treated.

PULLING FOR FARMERS' CONGRESS.

Efforts to Secure Another Convention for Exposition Year.

The delegates from Nebraska to the National Farmers' congress which meets this week at St. Paul, Minn., met in this city yesterday afternoon to organize, and started for their destination in the evening. They were at the exposition headquarters, where they were met by President Wattles and Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion and furnished with exposition literature for use in inducing the organization to hold its next meeting in Omaha. In addition to this the delegation was armed with letters of invitation from the exposition management, the Commercial club and Mayor Moores. The congress is usually attended by about 1,500 delegates, the sessions continuing several days.

Those composing the delegation were: H. E. Heath, editor of the Nebraska Farmer, delegate-at-large; W. G. Whitmore, A. O. Akerlund, D. H. Knowlton and B. R. Stouffer of the Second district; M. M. Coad of the Third district, Eli A. Barnes of the Fifth district, S. C. Bassett of the Sixth district. They organized by electing Mr. Barnes chairman and Mr. Whitmore secretary.

Colorado Commission Organizers.

The Colorado Exposition commission has organized by electing the following officers: President ex-officio, Governor Adams; first vice president, H. P. Steele; treasurer, Colonel Ed F. Bishop; secretary, G. M. Mischke; assistant secretary, Mrs. M. A. Shute. The committee has issued an address to the people of Colorado setting forth the salient features of the exposition, urging the people to put their shoulders to the wheel and not allow Colorado to be overshadowed by any other state. The mayors of all towns, the county commissioners and all secretaries of city and county committees are asked to aid in the work of supervising displays from their sections. It is stated in this address that all displays of an imperishable nature will revert to the state at the close of the exposition for use in future displays.

Sheeting Up the Lagoon.

The putting in of the sheet piling which is to line the lagoon like a tight board fence was commenced this morning. The planks are of pine, three inches thick, twelve inches wide and are tongued and grooved in the edges. The joints are covered with white lead before the planks are put in place and they are then driven closely together, forming a watertight joint. The lower end of the piling is set in a trench and driven into the ground about six inches. The trench is then filled up, the earth being tamped tightly. It has not been found necessary to use cement at the bottom of the piling, as it was first thought might be required.

LAYING THE EXPOSITION SEWER.

Work Will Be Completed Within the Next Ten Days.

The work of laying the sewer on the exposition grounds is progressing rapidly and the whole work will probably be completed within the next ten days. There is about 2,000 feet in all to be laid, and Contractor Daley now has about 300 feet completed. The pipe used in this sewer is 12 and 15-inch sewer pipe laid below the frost line. It is the intention to allow the sewer to remain after the exposition is closed and for this purpose the pipe is being laid as a permanent sewer.

Notes of the Exposition.

Frederick Mayer, editor of the Nineteen Hundred, the official publication of the Paris exposition, has been appointed as commissioner for France to represent the Transmississippi Exposition.

The auditorium building will be supplied with an organ which will be used for recitals and for concerts and oratorio purposes. The instrument will be twenty-nine feet in height, twenty-seven feet wide and ten feet in depth, handsomely finished in oak. It will be built by M. P. Moeller of Hagerstown, Md., and will cost the exposition management $5,000.

Roy Stone, in charge of the road division of the Department of Agriculture, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that the secretary of agriculture has determined to make an exhibit of road building at the Transmississippi Exposition that will be a prominent feature of the exhibit to be made by the federal government. The practical operation of building roads will be fully shown by constructing various kinds of roads and the most approved kinds of machinery will be exhibited.

 

DRAWINGS NOW COMPLETE

DESIGN FOR THE HORTICULTURAL BUILDING

Another Exposition Structure to Be Erected Upon the Bluffs Tract—Drawings of Liberal Arts Building About Complete.

The design for the Horticulture building has been completed and the working drawings are in hand. It is expected that the drawings will be ready for inviting bids within a very short time. This building differs somewhat from the other main buildings in that it has a broken sky line. It has a strong central mass with flanking wings. The center is surmounted by a large dome, flanked by pavilions surmounted by subsidiary domes. There is a profusion of ornamentation on the free classic order and a most pleasing effect is seen in the entire design. Charles F. Beindorff is the architect of this building, which is located on the bluff tract amid the flower beds with which this portion of the grounds will be decorated. It will contain the exhibits of horticulture, forestry and kindred industries.

The Liberal Arts building, the new building on the main court which is to be erected as an adjunct to the Manufactures building, is well under way and Fisher & Lawrie, the architects, announce that the drawings will be completed within a week. This building is to be 240x130 feet and will occupy the site originally designed for the Fine Arts building. It will pair with the Fine Arts building, which will stand next west of it, and will be a simple, but dignified structure of classic design. The building will be forty-five feet in height, with a high stylobate surmounted by an order with columns in pairs. There will be no central motive, as in the other main buildings, but the building will be characterized by strong corner pavilions, accentuated by pediments bearing appropriate motives. There will be entrances at the corners, in the center and at the ends of the building.

LOUISIANA WILL BE ON HAND.

Makes Application for Space at the Exposition.

Louisiana is the first state in the union to make a formal application for space for a state exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition. The application was received this morning from Colonel G. J. Lee, commissioner for the Louisiana Bureau of Agriculture.

Accompanying the application was a letter from Colonel Lee in which he stated that a representative of the state would visit Omaha the latter part of this month for the purpose of arranging the details for the exhibit to be made by the state. The writer further stated that it would be the aim of the state officials to make the best possible showing of the resources of Louisiana, and they were especially desirous of doing so in view of the display made by Nebraska at the New Orleans exposition in 1887.

Notes of the Exposition.

Commercial Agent R. F. Hodgins, who is touring Ohio in the interest of the exposition, notifies the Department of Exhibits that he has obtained applications for space from the Brown-Manley Plow company, the Marietta Boiler works and the Stevens Organ company, all of Marietta, O.

The Nashville, Tenn., newspapers are devoting a good deal of space to booming "Nebraska day" at their exposition. October 8 has been especially dedicated to Nebraskans and the people of Nashville are making preparations to give the people from the Antelope state a rousing welcome. Governor Holcomb and his official staff will attend in a body.

Commissioner John D. Peabody of Florida informs the Departments of Exhibits that Governor Bloxham will appoint a commission to see that the state of Florida is properly represented at the Transmississippi Exposition and has notified Mr. Peabody that he will be one of the commission. The letter also states that the governor has requested Commissioner Peabody to suggest the names of those whom he desires to have associated with him on the commission.

MOTOR LINE TO EXPOSITION.

Manawa Company Proposes to Land Passengers at the Big Show.

The regular meeting of the Council Bluffs Transmississippi association was held last evening. The chief matter taken up for discussion was the proposition of the Lake Manawa Railway company to extend its lines via the East Omaha bridge directly into the exposition grounds in Omaha. The subject was introduced by the submission of the following resolution:

Whereas, The interests of Council Bluffs in the exposition and the benefits that our city will derive therefrom very largely depend upon the success of your committee in obtaining good and rapid transportation facilities, and

Whereas, There is a proposition pending between the Lake Manawa Railway company and the East Omaha Street Railway company and the East Omaha Street Railway company, whereby the Lake Manawa Railway company proposes to construct and equip an electric line from Council Bluffs to the bridge of the Omaha Bridge & Terminal company, and thus connect with the East Omaha Street Railway company direct to the grounds of the exposition, and

Whereas, The route proposed is the shortest and most direct route from Council Bluffs to the exposition and would be exclusively a Council Bluffs rapid transit line and would consequently be of great benefit to the business interests of Council Bluffs, and

Whereas, We believe from an investigation that, by the granting of a franchise to the Lake Manawa Railway company for the proposed route, said company will be able to carry out the proposition and that the proposed line will be constructed; therefore, be it

Resolved, That it is the sense of this committee that the franchise asked by the Lake Manawa Railway company should be granted for the best interests of the city and to better enable our city to derive her just share of advantage from the coming exposition.

J. P. GREENSHIELDS.
M. F. ROHRER.
J. M. BARSTOW.
SAMUEL HAAS.
J. H. CLEAVER.

The matter required but little explanation, for all of the members of the association were familiar with the plans of the Manawa company and knew the project of building a new line across the river has been under contemplation ever since the exposition movement was gotten well under way. Mr. Greenshields, who presented the resolution, explained it for the benefit of any members who did not fully understand it. There was no opposition whatever to giving the company all of the assistance the association could and the resolution was approved.

WANTS A NEW CHARTER.

Later in the evening Mr. Tinley, the attorney for the company, was seen and explained the proposition the company would soon submit to the council. He said the request to have the present charter extended was a part of the plan, and at the next meeting of the council an amended charter would be presented, empowering the company to construct the new line. This will run from the present terminus of the road at Ninth street and Broadway, Council Bluffs, over the most feasible route to the new bridge. The construction of less than half a mile of track on the Nebraska side of the river would enable on the other side of the river would enable the company to form a junction with the East Omaha line, whose track would be used from there to the south entrance of the exposition grounds. Altogether, the company would not be obliged to construct more than two and one-half miles of line. This, with the equipment of the present Manawa line with electric cars, would necessitate an expenditure of only $75,000. Every dollar of this money was in sight, Mr. Tinley declared, and it is all Council Bluffs capital. The new line will be able to land passengers at the exposition gates in twenty-five minutes. It will also go through the heart of the manufacturing district of East Omaha and give a new boom to that section. Mr. Tinley declared that work on the line will be commenced at the earliest possible moment after securing the franchise from the council.

The members of the exposition association are very much taken with the idea, and will give the plan all of the assistance possible.

The financial affairs of the association received a good deal of attention. It had been discovered that the resolution taxing each of the members $10 to start with was not very popular, and a motion rescinding it was made and carried. The treasurer reported that a number of the members had paid their assessments and asked what disposition should be made of the money. All of the members present who had paid announced their willingness to let the money remain in the treasury as a donation.

A resolution was passed requesting the members of the Fruit Growers' association to make an appropriation to assist in the financial work of the association. The finance committee was instructed to go ahead and raise as much money as possible in the usual way of soliciting funds for public purposes.

REUNION OF OLD SOLDIERS

VETERANS MEET IN OMAHA NEXT YEAR

Plan for the Gathering of the Boys in Blue is Indorsed by Officers of the Grand Army of the Republic.

Colonel John H. Pierce of Omaha, who attended the national encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic at Buffalo in the interest of the Transmississippi Exposition for the purpose of working up the project for an interstate reunion of the members of the Grand Army of the Republic in Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Colorado and Nebraska, to be held in Omaha the latter part of next year, during the progress of the exposition, has returned to Omaha greatly elated over his success in accomplishing the result desired. As was announced in The Bee Friday of last week, the projected reunion received the endorsement of Past Commander-in-Chief Clarkson and Commander-in-Chief Gobin. The official invitation was issued by the Department of Nebraska, inviting the members of the states named to attend the reunion.

The Buffalo Express of last Saturday contained an article on this subject which Colonel Pierce brought back with him and from this the following extracts are made:

"The Grand Army of the Republic, members of the states of Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming and Colorado will hold an interstate reunion at Omaha, Neb., next year. The reunion will be held in conjunction with the encampment of the regular army and the National Guards, which is to be in Omaha in 1898. Besides the encampment of the regular army and the national guards, the Transmississippi Exposition is to be held at Omaha in 1898, and the reunion will be at that time.

"The idea of holding an interstate reunion originated with some of the prominent men of Nebraska. One of the leaders in the movement is Colonel John H. Pierce of Omaha, who came to Buffalo with other members of the Grand Army of the Republic, and while here worked hard in the interest of the interstate reunion.

"The following is the document in pursuance of which tens of thousands of veterans will no doubt assemble in Omaha next year:

Whereas, More than 100,000 of the surviving veterans of the union armies have made their homes in the great Mississippi valley; and

Whereas, An encampment of the regular army and national guards will be held at Omaha during the month of September, 1898, in which fully 25,000 men are expected to participate; and,

Whereas, The Transmississippi Exposition to be held at Omaha in the year 1898 will present an opportunity for securing low transportation rates; therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Department of Nebraska hereby extends a cordial invitation to the members of the Grand Army of the Republic in the stated adjacent, namely, those in the states of Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming and Colorado, to participate with them in an interstate Grand Army of the Republic reunion, to be held at a time agreed upon by department commanders of these states.

"First securing the written endorsements of both the retiring and incoming commander-in-chief and the signatures of the department commander of Nebraska and his official companions, Colonel Piece immediately interested the commander of the various states named in the resolutions, and without an exception they not only accepted and endorsed, but promised to work for and attend this western reunion of the veterans."

The following is an addenda to the resolutions:

"On behalf of the respective departments we, the undersigned, officers of the Grand Army of the Republic, accept the invitation so advantageously extended." It was signed by A. H. Evans, D. C., of Iowa; D. W. McElroy, A. A. G., of Iowa; John P. Platt, D. C., of Missouri; E. D. Wood, D. C. of Minnesota; Theodore Botkin, D. C., of Kansas; C. B. Clark, D. C. of South Dakota; U. S. Hollister, D. C. of Colorado and Wyoming; Theodore W. Cook, P. D. C. of Colorado and Wyoming; George W. Carpenter, P. D. C. of Kansas; S. L. Wilson, S. V. C. of Kansas; B. L. Carr, P. D. C. of Colorado and Wyoming.

The following constituted a second addenda: "Reunions are needed, the more the better, for they are schools of patriotism; hence we will use every endeavor to make a signal success of this great Transmississippi gathering of our comrades." This was signed by the following named past commanders-in-chief: John P. Rea, John Palmer, Robert B. Beath, J. G. B. Adams, I. N. Walker, A. G. Wissert and Louis W. Yates.

 

Colonel Pierce said that among the Nebraskans who helped to secure this union the following labored zealously: John A. Ehrhardt, D. C.; James G. Gage, A. A. G.; A. C. Cole, P. D. C.; J. H. Culver, P. D. C.; C. Adams, P. D. C.; H. E. Palmer, P. D. C.; and M. L. Hayward, delegate-at-large. Many others were heartily interested, and among them Colonel Pierce gave the names of General T. S. Clarkson, General John P. S. Gobin, Colonel James Lewis and Corporal James Tanner, but Colonel Pierce said that the man who worked harder than any other and who was most eminently successful, the soldiers and everybody else knows as Captain Jack Crawford, the poet scout.

No definite arrangements have yet been made for this reunion, but Colonel Pierce said this matter would be taken up at once and preparations made for making this encampment a memorable one in many respects.

GOVERNMENT'S MINERAL EXHIBIT.

Dr. Day Confers Upon the Subject with Exposition Management.

David T. Day, Ph.D., chief of the mining division of the United States Geological survey, was in the city today for the purpose of conferring with the exposition management with reference to the exhibit of the mineral resources of the transmississippi region, which the government is desirous of making. Dr. Day was in full charge of the mining building at the Atlanta exposition, the local management turning the entire mining exhibit over to the government officials, who took the exhibits furnished by exhibitors from all the mining districts of the state and supplied what was lacking to make a complete and systematic exhibit of the mineral resources of the south. The result was an exhibit which was declared by a competent judge now in this city, and who was in Atlanta during the entire exposition, to be the best exhibit of mineral resources ever made in this country.

Dr. Day stated to a Bee representative that Director Wolcott of the survey had directed him to prepare a plan for showing the entire mineral resources of the transmississippi region and he was here for the purpose of informing himself regarding the facilities which will be provided for making such an exhibit. He met President Wattles this morning and visited the exposition grounds this afternoon, after which he left the city, returning again to the east.

Speaking of the mineral exhibit, Dr. Day said: "It would be located in the Government building unless the exposition management furnishes the space in the Mines building. It would be much better to have the exhibit located in the latter building, as a considerable space would be required to make a creditable exhibit, and the space which could be devoted to that purpose in the Government building would be too small to give good results."

"The mineral resources of the transmississippi region are so extensive," continued the doctor, "that a very large space will be required to show them properly and systematically. The exhibit, if properly made, will cover almost the entire range of minerals known to man. The government exhibit is arranged in orderly sequence and is calculated to give the visitor an intelligent idea of the subject. It is easy enough to get exhibits which are of a commercial order, such as exhibits of various products from the exhibition of which the exhibitor expects to derive a direct advantage, the same as he would from an advertisement, but when it is attempted to secure the material for a systematic mineral exhibit, the task is much more difficult. This is exactly what the geological survey does, and it is what we expect to do at the Transmississippi Exposition. Whether the government exhibit will be made in the Government building or in the Mines building remains to be seen. If the exposition management desires to have us put the exhibit in the Mines building, that will be done under certain contingencies, but otherwise it will be placed in the Government building, but in the latter event it will be considerably curtailed on account of lack of space."

WOMEN TALK EXPOSITION MATTERS.

Executive Committee of Woman's Board in Session.

The executive committee of the Woman's Board of Managers convened this morning for the purpose of considering matters pertaining to the affairs of the exposition. Four of the seven members were present: President Sawyer, Chairman Hartford, Mrs. Giffert of West Point and Miss McHugh of Omaha.

The committee will remain in session all day, there being several matters which will be laid before it for consideration. Among these will be the question of congresses, covering the number and character of these gatherings and the manner of conducting them. The matter of forming an advisory council, as contemplated by the plan of organization of the Board of Managers, will also receive consideration.

The question of raising funds for the erection of the Girl's and Boys' building will be another matter which will engage the attention of the committee. Secretary Ford has a plan of raising $1,000 of the $5,000 required, by soliciting $1 subscriptions from the parents of Omaha. Each subscription of $1, covering twenty shares of stock, entitled the subscriber to a stock certificate which is suitable for framing.

Exposition to No Expense.

It was stated yesterday that the sum of $5,000 would be paid by the exposition management for an organ to be installed in the Auditorium building. This was a mistake. The organ in question will cost the manufacturer, according to his statement, the sum of $5,000, but the only pay he will receive will be the advertisement derived from having his name on all the programs in which the organ will be used.

Commission for Colorado.

Edward F. iBshop​ of Denver, well known in this city, has just been appointed one of the commissioners for the Transmississippi and International Exposition for the state of Colorado.

PEOPLE LIVING AROUNG OMAHA.

Over Twenty Millions Within Five Hundred Miles.

OMAHA, Sept. 2.—To the Editor of The Bee: A recent issue of the Philadelphia Record contained a very flattering notice of the Transmississippi Exposition. It predicted a successful show and gave reasons why. One of them was that within a radius of 500 miles of Omaha 5,000,000 people resided. This is so glaring an error that I take the liberty of correcting it through The Bee. I assert that within a radius of 500 miles of Omaha there are more people than there are within 500 miles of Boston. The Boston circle would include Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia and most of Pennsylvania and Virginia, which states in 1890 had a total population of 20,508,800. The 500-mile circle around Omaha would include all of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, North and South Dakota and most of Arkansas, Colorado and the Indian Territory, which had a total population in 1890 of 16,057,047, besides a large part of Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, Texas, Wyoming and Montana, the parts of which lying within the circle contained in 1890 more than 2,000,000 people, this gave the Boston district 2,451,753 more people in 1890 than the Omaha district, but if we calculate the increase of population at the same ratio from 1890 until the present time, as was shown between 1880 and 1890, we should have nearly 1,000,000 more people within the 500 miles of Omaha than within the same distance of Boston. No city in the country is more accessible than Omaha. Twelve great trunk lines of railroads center here, running upwards of 100 passenger trains in and out of the city daily. When the liberality of the western people is considered in comparison with the eastern and southern, there is no doubt that the attendance at the exposition will far exceed the expectations of all but the most enthusiastic.


WILLIAM I. KIERSTEAD.

PLAN FOR THE FEDERAL BUILDING.

Government Prepares to Rush Its Exposition Home.

The government building for the Transmississippi Exposition is making good progress, according to a letter received this morning by Walker & Kimball, suprevising​ architects of the exposition, from E. A. Crane of the office of the supervising architect of the Treasury department, who has direct charge of the designing of the government's building and the drawings showing the elevations will be sent to Omaha, so as to reach here early next week. As has been stated heretofore, thi sbuilding​ will be the largest structure on the exposition grounds. It will stand at the west end of the main court, facing the lagoon. The statue of liberty which will surmount the central dome will rest on a pedestal 150 feet above the ground and will be the highest point on the entire exposition grounds.

It is the intention of the federal authorities to have the government building under roof before snow flies, and to make the ornamental stucco work inside the building during the cold weather ready to be put in position early in the spring. It is said by those who know, that the government has always been on time with its building at exery exposition and that the same will be the case with the Omaha building. As the government building at the Tennessee exposition required but six weeks in its construction from start to finish, it is not difficult to realize that the work will proceed very rapidly after it is once started.

NEW SCHEME FINDS FAVOR

THINK IT WILL BE AN EXCELLENT THING

Plan to Run Through Trains from Omaha to Lake Manawa for One Straight Ten-Cent Fare.

The proposition of the Lake Manawa Railway company to extend its line to connect with the East Omaha lines, and thence directly to the Exposition grounds, has attracted considerable interest in Omaha and Council Bluffs. Just at this time when the Bridge line company is pushing its claims for the extension of its charter in Council Bluffs, the new charter that has been partially agreed upon is being closely scanned by many of the leading lawyers, who are convinced that under its provisions a rival company can demand the right to use its tracks where the laying of additional tracks would interfere with street traffic. They are fortified in this by several decisions of the Iowa supreme court. The proposition of the Lake Manawa company, which will be presented to the Council Bluffs city council at its next meeting in the form of an amendment to its old charter, will include provisions for establishing a loop in the southern part of Council Bluffs that will enable its trains to reach all the local depots and enter Fairmont park by the way of the new south entrance, which will avoid the necessity of climbing a grade of any consequence and bring the trains directly into the most beautiful part of the park and in the vicinity of the present terminus of the old line.

There has been considerable speculation as to where the money for this new enterprise is to come from. The promoters have authorized Emmett Tinley, attorney for the company, to state that the line is to be built with Council Bluffs capital that is now lying idle. Mr. Tinley says his company will have the road in operation by the opening of the exposition and be able by that time to give the people of Council Bluffs and visitors to the exposition a direct route to the grounds.

East Omaha men and Council Bluffs real estate owners are enthusiastically in favor of the new line and have expressed their belief that if the line is completed by the time the exposition is opened it will carry a large portion of the Iowa visitors to the grounds, for the reason that it will be at least two miles shorter than any other route.

Another proposition under consideration which is exciting considerable interest in Council Bluffs is a plan to run through trains from Omaha to Manawa at one straight 10 cent fare each way. This will remove all objections which have long been made against the smoky old steam trains and bring many visitors to one of the most delightful summer resorts in the west.

A. B. DeLong, general manager and secretary of the East Omaha Land company, spent a large portion of the day in Council Bluffs conferring with the promoters of the new scheme. He announced that so far as his company was concerned it could be counted upon to do all that was possible to aid the enterprise and that the consolidation of the Manawa and East Omaha lines had been practically effected, pending the negotiations for the necessary charter.

BIDS FOR NEBRASKA BUILDING.

Proposals for Furnishing Material to Be Invited.

The Nebraska Exposition commission will hold a special meeting Tuesday of next week for the purpose of taking action on the erection of the Nebraska building on the exposition grounds. Superintendent of Construction Blake has prepared an estimate of the amount of material which will be required for the erection of this building and it is expected that bids for supplying this material will come before the board at this meeting.

There will be a number of other matters which will come before the commission. Among them will be the application from the Nebraska State Millers' association for 500 feet of space in the Agriculture building in which to make a display of the resources of Nebraska in the way of milling products. This application is made to the commission by Secretary O. C. Holmes for the millers, who states that the association desires to erect a booth formed of different kinds of grain grown in Nebraska, showing the grain in glass jars.

Among the communications of various sorts which have been received by Assistant Secretary Dearing and which will be laid before the commission is a letter from William George Sheppard, the leader of a band at Indianola, Neb., who asks if state bands are to "be given any show" at playing at the exposition, or whether all the work is to be given to "the great eastern bands." He says he has a band of thirty men and   intimates that an engagement covering all or a part of the period of the exposition would not be objectionable. It is thought possible that the commission will make arrangements to have music in the state building all the time by engaging the principal bands of the state for short periods during the exposition.

W. H. Sutherlin of White Suplhur Springs, Mont., vice president of the exposition for Montana, has written to Assistant Secretary Dearing to ask for office room in the Nebraska building for the Montana Exposition commission. He says the Montana appropriation is so small that no building can be erected, but that the state will be on hand with a creditable exhibit.

PLAN FOR THE FEDERAL BUILDING.

Government Prepares to Rush Its Exposition Home.

The Government building for the Transmississippi Exposition is making good progress, according to a letter received yesterday by Walker & Kimball, supervising architects of the exposition, from E. A. Crane of the office of the supervising architect of the Treasury department, who has direct charge of the designing of the government's building. Mr. Crane writes that the interior plan of the building and the drawings showing the elevations will be sent to Omaha so as to reach here early next week. As has been stated heretofore, this building will be the largest structure on the exposition grounds. It will stand at the west end of the main court, facing the lagoon. The statue of liberty which will surmount the central dome will rest on a pedestal 150 feet above the ground and will be the highest point on the entire exposition grounds.

It is the intention of the federal authorities to have the Government building under roof before snow flies, and to make the ornamental stucco work inside the building during the cold weather ready to be put in position early in the spring. It is said by those who know that the government has always been on time with its building at every exposition and that the same will be the case with the Omaha building. As the Government building at the Tennessee exposition required but six weeks in its construction from start to finish, it is not difficult to realize that the work will proceed very rapidly after it is once started.

The above article appears twice, non-consecutively.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Singer Manufacturing company has made application for 1,000 feet of space for an exhibit of sewing machines.

Hong Sling, the concessionaire for the Chinese village, is in the city in consultation with the Department of Concessions.

A. De Caro of Naples, Italy, has made application for 500 feet of space for an exhibit of tortoise shell goods, marbles, bronzes, mosaics and cameos.

Hereafter the Women's Board of Managers will have a special letterhead, on which appear only the names of the women composing the officers and executive committee of the board.

The second application for space in the educational exhibit comes from the public schools of West Point, Neb., the superintendent of those schools sending in an application for 100 feet of floor space and twenty-four feet of wall space.

R. F. Hodgins, assistant commissioner for Ohio, has sent to the Department of Exhibits and application for space for the Brown Cable Fence company of Norwalk, O., of 200 feet, in which to exhibit a fence. He also encloses an application by Wood & Barnes of Williamsport, O., for 210 feet in which to exhibit a patent roller-bearing axle, which is designed to supplant the ball-bearing axle.

X

EXPOSITION TALK IN ENGLAND

CREATES INTEREST IN THE ENTERPRISE

Government Never Recognizes Expositions, but Appropriates Money for Some Commercial Organization to Make Exhibits.

Dudley Smith, commissioner general for the Transmississippi Exposition to England, has written to the Department of Exhibits a very interesting letter concerning his doings since arriving in the "tight little island," which is herewith printed in full:

I arrived in London on August 5 after a most delightful trip across the Atlantic. The captain informed me that they had not had as smooth a passage this year, so I was very fortunate in deciding upon the North German Lloyd steamship Lahn. I formed some very pleasant acquaintances, who have been of considerable assistance to me since my arrival.

Parliament adjourned the day after I reached London, and I have as yet been unable to deliver all my letters of introduction to the different members. I have met Hon. Michael Davitt, who was most kind to me and he gave me a letter of introduction to Sir Albert Kaye Rollitt, M. P., president of the Board of Trade and also president of the British Brussels commission, who said that if I found the government would not do anything that I could then take the matter up with the Board of Trade, which appointed the Brussels commission, and an organization similar to the Board of Trade had charge of the exhibits at the Columbian exposition. He stated further that the government never directly recognized any exposition, but when it decided to interest itself it would make an appropriation to the Board of Trade, or some such similar organization, which would take the matter up and appoint a commission.

Hon. George Curzon, foreign minister, who I am yet to see, left immediately on the adjournment of Parliament for Scotland, and will not return until September 1. I have called upon Hon. Spencer Walpole, secretary of the postoffice, who was very pleasant and said he would do what he could to make my mission a success. I also spent one afternoon with Mr. Thomas J. Lipton (on Mr. Davitt's introduction) and he virtually promised me a Ceylon exhibit and said he would take the matter up with the representatives from India and he thought he could secure me an exhibit from there also.

MISSES THE KING OF SIAM.

On receipt of your cable I called on the Siamese legation, but found the king of Siam had gone to Scotland, the minister accompanying him. After explaining the object of my visit to the under secretary he agreed to take the matter up with the king and minister on their return. I also paid my respects to our ambassador, Colonel Hay, and our consul general, Colonel William McKinley Osborne, both of whom received me very cordially.

All the above occurred during my first week, and learning that the great week of the Brussels exposition would occur last week I left last Friday week for Brussels and was over there eight days, where I had the pleasure of meeting Prof. Gore, Jean Verhaegen, Colonel Charles J. Murphy, all of whom are interested in our exposition. I also had the pleasure of meeting the king of Belgium, who was doing the exposition during my visit.

The newspaper La Petit Bleu has quite an extensive exhibit on the grounds, showing the process of first grinding up blocks of wood, then the different stages through which it passes until we see a light-blue paper, which finally comes out on rolls, from which is printed La Petit Bleu, also the linotype machines. Everything from blocks of wood to a complete printed newspaper is shown in their exhibit. Mr. Harry, the editor, was very kind to me, and had set up in the machine the following: "Welcome to Hon. Dudley Smith of Nebraska to the La Petit Bleu," which he afterward gave to me as a souvenir.

The American exhibit at the exposition is very small, although a number of manufacturers have exhibits here, Great Britain is fairly good, but France and Italy have very large exhibits, France having appropriated, so I am informed, $200,000 for its exhibit, when the United States government only appropriated $5,000. I also met Sifico, the director concessioner of the Ottoman empire, which includes the streets of Cairo. He had quite a good exhibit and is quite anxious to come to our exposition.

VISIT THE HOLLAND EXPOSITION.

They tell me here that after Parliament adjourns people leave the city as though there was a pestilence abroad in the land and do not get back until the middle of September. So I may go over to Holland next week, as there is an exposition going on there, and next week is the great fete week, being the queen's birthday, and as that exposition closes on September 1 I would not have an opportunity of seeing it unless I go at once, and I am quite anxious to see how the Dutch took Holland.

I could write you a book of my doings since my landing, over two weeks ago, and from the above you can see I am doing quite well. A weekly paper here called Table Talk gave me a very nice write-up, and on my showing the editor the last pamphlet received from you, showing sketches of the buildings, he said he would be glad to use those pictures of the buildings in this week's paper; also give quite a write-up of the exposition, which I have been all the afternoon getting up for him. I told him that I would want to send out 400 or 500 copies of this book to all manufacturers and other parties in Great Britain. This I will do as a matter of introduction before sending out blank applications which I brought with me.

I hope to see Mr. Lipton again next Wednesday, when he may be able to decide upon the space wanted for the Ceylon and Indian exhibits. By the way, Mr. Lipton is very friendly to Omaha, as he started the packing house which is now the Cudahy Packing company, and spoke very favorably of Mr. Cudahy, Mr. McShane, Mr. Paxton and other Omaha people.

I have been very well since my arrival and hope this will find everything progressing very satisfactorily as regards the exposition. With kind regards to all, I remain yours very truly,


DUDLEY SMITH.

CORN FOR TABLE USE.

A model kitchen in which will be prepared in a scientific manner Nebraska's staple product, Indian maize, in all its varied forms, is the scheme proposed by Mrs. Harriet S. MacMurphy of this city to the Nebraska Exposition commission. Some of the members of the commission are disposed to look with great favor upon the scheme as being a most valuable means of showing the world the great value of corn as a food for man as well as beast, thereby increasing the demand for the crop with which Nebraska can supply the world.

Mrs. MacMurphy's plan contemplates the establishment of a kitchen which shall be a model for a housewife, fitted with all the most improved culinary apparatus for preparing food in the most scientific manner. In this kitchen Mrs. MacMurphy proposes to give daily demonstrations all during the exposition, showing to all visitors who desire to be informed the results of scientific investigations into the art of preparing food for the table in a manner which will insure the best results from the nutrition therein contained. Mrs. MacMurphy proposes to make a specialty of preparing corn for table use, and for this purpose she proposes to demonstrate by practical methods the very many tempting forms in which this highly nutritious food may be utilized by man. These delicious preparations will be prepared in plain sight of visitors, and they will then be distributed among the people who desire to have further proof of their excellence.

The members of the state commission are disposed to regard this proposition as an excellent one from a business standpoint, as tending to increase the demand for Nebraska's immense corn crops by increasing the consumption of corn meal and corn flour. They have in mind the experiment along this line conducted by the federal government when it sent "Cornmeal" Murphy to Europe to introduce corn to the tables of the people of those countries.

This matter will be taken up by the commission at its meeting tomorrow and some action will be taken on it.

SOD HOUSE IN PROSPECT.

It seems probable that a typical Nebraska sod house will form a part of the exhibit to be made at the exposition by the Nebraska exposition commission. A suggestion to this effect was made to Governor Holcomb by L. G. Stewart of Omaha, who lives at 2412 Wirt street. The governor referred the matter to the exposition commission with the suggestion that the proposition really involved a concession, but the members of the commission are disposed to take another view of it. They take the position that such an exhibit would properly be a part of a historical exhibit and that it should be operated on that theory. It has been suggested that a genuine sod house should be erected on the grounds as a part of the Nebraska exhibit, and that it should be placed in the hands of Dan Freeman of Beatrice, the man who will occupy a place in the history of Nebraska as the first man in the state to take up a homestead. The suggestion contemplates filling the house with a collection of curios directly connected with the history of the state, forming a most interesting exhibit under the direct charge of the state commission.

The matter will receive the attention of the commission at its meeting tomorrow.

WORKING FOR ANOTHER MEETING.

Fire and Police Superintendents May Come Next Year.

Efforts are being made to secure the 1898 meeting of the International Association of Fire and Police Telegraph Superintendents for Omaha. This meeting this year will be held at Nashville, Tenn., September 14-15. City Electrician E. F. Shurig of this city has already sent a written invitation to the secretary of the association, extending the body a cordial invitation to meet in Omaha in 1898. Mr. Schurig is desirous of attending the Nashville meeting, but it is doubtful if he will be able to do so unless he pays his own expenses, as the city government is not disposed to appropriate money for this purpose.

The association in question is a comparatively new one but is rapidly gaining prominence and now includes among its members the superintendents of city electrical departments in the largest cities in the land.

One of the strongest arguments being used to induce the association to choose Omaha for its next meeting is the fact that already the principal electrical associations of the country have decided upon Omaha as the place for their meetings next year, and this fact, together with the additional fact that it is already assured that the electrical section of the exhibition will be one of the most extensive exhibits of electrical appliances of every kind that has ever been made in this country, is expected to serve as a very strong inducement when the matter is voted upon.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Acorn Stove company has asked for an increase of its space from 270 to 360 feet.

Manager W. N. Babcock of the Department of Transportation, is expected to return to the city Wednesday of this week.

Manager Reed of the Department of Concessions returned yesterday morning from an extended visit to eastern pleasure resorts.

Charles T. N. Engels of Antwerp has applied to the Department of Exhibits for appointment as commercial agent for the Duchy of Luxemburg.

James B. Dinsmore was in the city a few moments this morning en route to St. Paul, Minn., where he will visit the Minnesota state fair and endeavor to secure live stock exhibits for the exposition.

The Carlsbad Suspender company of Carlsbad, Germany, has applied for 450 feet of space in the Machinery building, where it proposes to manufacture suspenders and garters and supply the trade with goods manufactured during the exposition.

The Fort Wayne Electrical company has notified the Department of Exhibits that it will make an exhibit in its space of arc light apparatus, and will conduct experiments in electrical induction.

Major Henry Romeyn, in charge of the Chilian exhibit at the Tennessee exposition, writes to the Department of Exhibits that he believes he can secure a profile model of the Nicauragua canal for exhibition at the Transmississippi Exposition. He also says that he will use his best offices with the Chillian government to induce it to make a government exhibit at Omaha.

The Nebraska exposition commission will hold a special meeting tomorrow afternoon for the purpose of taking action to expedite the construction of the state building. It is expected that a number of other matters will also be acted on. The board will convene at 4 o'clock and will probably continue its session until some time Wednesday.

The Western Electric Light company of Pittsburgh has notified the Department of Exhibits that it will increase its space to 3,000 feet and will make an exhibit consisting of  

12
electrical machinery and supplies, wire making machinery, an illustration of the new three-wire system, instruments for telegraphing without wires, telegraph and telephone instruments of all kinds, house and hotel apparatus and many new and interesting inventions of an electrical nature.

AVOIDING DODGE STREET HILL.

Arrangements for the accommodation of traffic next year during the exposition have not yet been decided upon, although the officers of the company have nearly agreed upon the plans they will pursue. There will be no building of new lines this fall with that traffic in view. The officers say that the Sherman avenue and Sixteenth street lines each take passengers to an entrance to the exposition grounds, and will accommodate all the traffic which will be carried in that direction this year. In the spring the company will probably extend the Twentieth street line out to the main entrance. This line will have to be built over an unpaved street, which is now used as a boulevard, and if put down will be only with the intention of taking up the tracks again after the exposition. There is said to be no call for another through line to the north part of the city, as the experience of the officials has been that the public would rather walk a few blocks further to connect with a car line with frequent service than to have numerous lines with slow service.

In considering the extensions of the Twentieth street line the problem of the Dodge street hill come up again, and the company has almost decided upon a plan to avoid that obstruction to safe and rapid transit. This plan contemplates the turning of the Dodge street line north on Seventeenth street from Dodge, then to Cass street, then west to Twentieth and then north to the exposition grounds. Tracks are already laid on nearly all of this proposed line, and it would not require very much expense to put the new route in condition for travel. Then in the event of heavy traffic trailers could be put on the motor cars. If this plan should be decided upon, and it seems very probable that it will, the Dodge street hill will be abandoned permanently. This would give the company three lines to the exposition grounds, as many as could be conveniently handled. By the system of transfers now in use it would give the people in all localities a chance to get to the grounds for a single fare, and all parts of the city would be thoroughly covered.

AIR LIFT DOES THE WORK

INCREASED FLOW AT THE ARTESIAN WELL

Experiments Are to Be Continued with the Hope of Starting a Much Greater Stream of Water.

The air lift has been connected with the artesian well on the exposition grounds and last night the machinery was started up to test the working of the apparatus. The mechanism consists of an air compressor, which is operated by a stationary engine, the air making its escape from the compressor under very heavy pressure by way of an iron pipe about two inches in diameter. This pipe is let down inside the iron tubing which lines the well from top to bottom. In yesterday's experiment the air pipe was lowered to a depth of about 160 feet.

When the air was turned on the water in the well shot up into the air a distance of several feet and those conducting the experiment said the flow was 130 gallons per minute, being about four times as much as the flow without the air lift. The water was quite muddy, the force of the air seeming to have loosened the sediment on the inside of the pipe. It is thought that by extending the air pipe further down the well a flow of about 200 gallons per minute may be secured. These experiments will be continued until the maximum amount of flow is ascertained.

For the present the air compressor and the engine which operates it are placed alongside the well. Those having charge of the experiment were very well satisfied with the result yesterday.

ERICKSON BACK FROM STOCKHOLM.

Works Up Considerable Interest in Transmississippi Exposition.

C. F. Erickson of this city, who went to Stockholm to visit the Swedish capital and the exposition in the interest of the Transmississippi Exposition, has returned and reports having made very good progress. He appointed two experienced exposition men to look after the interests of the Transmississippi Exposition. He states that he has no doubts about the number and quality of exhibits which wil​ be secured form​ that section of Europe.

Mr. Erickson says that he was inconvenienced somewhat by having to correct erroneous impressions existing among Swedish manufacturers regarding the effect of the new tariff law, but he thinks that he has overcome those objections and that the Swedish section will compapre​ favorably with that of the other European countries.

In addition to Swedish exhibits, Mr. Erikson negotiated with Russian exhibitors who are at the Stockholm exposition and found them very anxious to learn all about the Transmississippi Exposition. He says the Russians are reaching out all over the world for a market for their wares and that a number of them will come to Omaha with exhibits of manufactured articles. At the Stockholm exposition they make a great showing of religious wares of all kinds, such as vestments, embroideries, altar furniture, etc. Mr. Erikson says they will make very rich displays of these goods at Omaha.

Californians Ask for Space.

Frank Wiggins, secretary of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce, makes application to the Department of Exhibits for 2,000 feet of spacefor​ the exhibit to be made by the county of Los Angeles. In a letter accompanying the application, he says that the people of that county are anxious to make a good display at the Transmississippi Exposition, because they realize that the direct benefit to be derived will be even greater than was derived fro mthe​ exhibit made at Chicago at the World's fair. He says that the exhibit made by the country at the Hamburg Horticultural exposition in Germany, won the gold medal, and this exhibit will be used to form a nucleus for the exhibit which will be made at Omaha.

Applies for More Space.

The Walter Baker company, makers for chocolate, has notified the Department of Exhibits that it will increase its space to 2,000 feet. In making this application for more space, the secretary of the company writes that the Transmississippi Exposition is assuming such prominence and promises to be so much more important than the company at first thought, that it is making preparations to make the best exhibit ever made by it at any evposition​. In addition to asking for increased space, the company voluntarily offers to pay 25 per cent more than the usual space rate for the privilege of being assigned a desirable location in the Manufacturers' building.

Proposition to Vote Bonds.

The Bureau of Promotion of the Department of Publicity and Promotion is having prepared a petition to the Board of County Commissioners of Douglas county, asking that a proposition be submitted to the voters of the county at the coming election providing for the issuance of county bonds in the sum $100,000 in aid of exposition. The law passed by the legislature provides that such a proposition shall be submitted when asked by 1,000 voters of the county. As soon as the petition is drawn it will be circulated and presented to the county commissioners in time to allow the bond proposition to be advertised thirty days before the election.

New Mexico is Organizing.

Ex-Governor L. Bradford Prince, vice president for the exposition in New Mexico, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he has issued a call for a meeting of the New Mexico Exposition commission, to be held September 8, for the purpose of organizing and commencing the work of preparing a state exhibit. In this same connection a letter was received from George H. Wallace, territorial secretary for New Mexico, in which he says the people of that section are taking a great interest in the approaching exposition and will make an exhibit which will be a credit to the territory.

Nebraska Commissioners Meet.

The Nebraska Exposition commission will convene at 4 o'clock this afternoon for the purpose of considering the question of a state building. Superintendent Blake has prepared estimates of the material which will be required for the building heretofore decided upon, and these will be laid before the board. There is a possibility that the plan of the building will be changed somewhat, the architects of the state building having decided to recommend certain changes which they think will reduce the cost of construction. If this change is adopted the work of construction will be delayed somewhat.

Notes of the Exposition.

Miss Ida V. Mason of this city has applied for space for an exhibit of dress cutting.

G. T. McDonald of San Francisco has applied for 1,500 feet of space for a moving picture exhibit.

Dr. G. H. Hayden of Montrose, Mo., has filed an application for space for an exhibit of optical goods, making the fourteenth application of this class.

John Sherman, secretary of state, has sent to the Department of Exhibits a formal letter introducing Arthur L. Bressler to the American consuls in the several countries of South America, to which Mr. Bressler is the accredited exposition representative.

Rev. J. E. Gilbert, secretary of the American Society of Religious Education, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that the meeting of the society for 1898 can be secured for Omaha if certain suitable conditions are made. He says he will be in Omaha some time in October and will confer with the exposition management regarding the matter.

Colonel John Doniphan of St. Joseph, vice president for the exposition for Missouri, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he is urging the governor to appoint a state exposition commission and has recommended the names of several experienced people in that state who will make good commissioners. He reports that he has reason to believe that the governor will soon take action in the matter.

F. H. Peavey of Minneapolis, vice president for Minnesota, informs the promotion department that the governor of that state has not yet appointed a commission to prepare an exhibit for the exposition, but he says he has been in consultation with a number of public spirited men of the state and has reason to believe that the matter will assume definite form in the near future.

PLAN OF NEBRASKA BUILDING

WILL ASK FOR BIDS ON THE MATERIAL

Committee Appointed to Agree Upon Maximum Sums to Be Apportioned for Various State Organizations.

The Nebraska Exposition commission held a special meeting last night, mainly to take up the question of a state building. All the members were present.

The architects employed by the board submitted a drawing for a change in the plan of the state building, which contemplated a structure slightly larger than the first building, designed along the lines of an order of architecture more in harmony with the design of the main exposition buildings. The plan showed a building 150x90 feet, two stories in height, with a clear story. The building was rectangular in form and was designed along the Corinthian order.

The adoption of the new plan was urged by Architect McDonald, who said the modified plan was more satisfactory to the supervising architects and would cost slightly less than the first building.

The board discussed the plans at length and decided that no change should be made.

In reply to direct questions both the architects and Superintendent Blake said the building as originally designed could be built for less than $16,000, Superintendent Blake staking his reputation on the statement that it would not cost over $14,000.

The superintendent was directed to advertise for bids for supplying all material which will be required in the construction of the building, bids to be submitted at the meeting of September 14.

President Neville was appointed a committee of one to arrange with the exposition management for an agreement whereby the state commission shall have the unquestioned right to provide the state building with such provisions for the comfort of visitors to the building as may be required.

TO APPORTION THE MONEY.

At the suggestion of Commissioner Poynter a committee of three was appointed to investigate and report the maximum amount of money which should be set aside for each of the various industries which should be assisted in making exhibits at the exposition. The chairman appointed Commissioners Poynter, Whitford and Dutton. The committee will report to the board at the meeting which will be held on the state fair grounds during the progress of the fair.

The committee appointed at the last meeting to select a site for the state building reported the location already described at length, being on the bluff tract, a short distance south of the viaduct across Sherman avenue. The site was approved by the board.

A letter from Labor Commissioner Kent was read, setting forth that he proposes to issue an outline map of Nebraska about the first of the year, containing statistics relating to the crops, etc., as well as pictures of the exposition buildings. He asked the board to have 100,000 of these printed for distribution for advertising purposes. The matter was laid over for future consideration.

The proposition of Mrs. Harriet S. MacMurphy of Omaha, setting forth her plan for conducting a model kitchen during the exposition and asking the aid of the board in demonstrating the advantages of corn as a food was read to the board and was passed for further consideration.

PLANS PROVE SATISFACTORY.

When the board convened this morning the state building question came up for further consideration. Mr. Dutton said he had heard it intimated that the plans for the proposed state building were not designed strong enough to safely hold the crowds of people which would probably visit the building. He suggested that the plans should be submitted to some competent judge for examination. This caused considerable discussion among the members of the board. It was stated that it had been said by the exposition architects that the construction of the building was faulty, and that some of the posts in the second story were not supported from below. It was also stated that the construction was faulty and that the architects had expressed the fear that the building might collapse under some of the high winds if it was not wrecked by being crowded beyond its strength.

Superintendent of Construction Blake was sent for and was asked regarding these matters. He denied most emphatically that the plans were not ample for a building which would support all the people who could crowd into it. He explained the manner of construction and said the building would be supported and braced in all [?]

The matter was discussed fully by the board and it was decided that the plans were satisfactory in evary​ respect.

Mrs. Harriet S. MacMurphy appeared before the board to further explain her proposition for illustrating the manifold uses of corn as a food for human consumption. She said she had made preparations for operating a cooking school for giving demonstrations, illustrating all kinds of scientific cooking of food, and she desired the assistance of the board in displaying the advantages and methods of using corn in various forms for food. She explained that her exposition of scientific cooking was simply an educational factor and was not contemplated as a financial venture. She said she was actuated solely by a desire to educate the race, and her motive in appearing before the board was to ask assistance in illustrating the value of the chief product of the state as a food for man. The amount of money asked for, she said, was simply to cover the expenses of the exhibit. She asked $350, which she said would cover the cost of space, the cost of preparing the food and printing a small book of recipes. This would cover the expense of demonstrations three times each week, or she would give daily demonstrations for $500.

The matter was favorably discussed by some of the members of the board with Mrs. MacMurphy, and was finally referred to the special committee appointed to recommend the amounts to be devoted to making various exhibits.

N. B. Kendall of Lincoln, president, and O. C. Holmes, secretary, of the Nebraska State Millers' association, appeared before the board to ask that it furnish space for an exhibit to be made by the millers of the state. They explained the sort of an exhibit they proposed to make and spoke, incidentally, of cooking some of the milling products and distributing the food to visitors.

Struck by a hapy​ thought, President Neville introduced President Kendall to Mrs. MacMurphy and advised that they pool their issues on the cooking proposition.

The whole matter was finally referred to the special committee for investigation and report.

The application for 10,640 feet of space for the State building was made out and signed by President Neville. This application will be presented to the Department of Exhibits.

The assistant secretary was instructed to send copies of the estimates of material required for the construction of the State building to all parties who desire to make bids for furnishing any of the material.

The superintendent of construction was ordered to secure the necessary piles and commence at once the work of putting in the foundation of the State building.

The commission adjourned to meet again in this city Monday, September 20, at 4 p. m. Members of the board will remain in the city during the week of the State fair and will hold meetings on the fair grounds for the purpose of getting in direct touch with the various interests which will be represented at the fair.

IOWA WILL BE AT THE EXPOSITION.

Des Moines Manufacturers Plan an Interesting Exhibit.

The Des Moines, Ia., Capital has the following to say regarding the exhibits which will be made at the Transmississippi Exposition by various interests in the state across the river from Nebraska:

"The Des Moines Manufacturers' association is planning a​ exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition of all articles manufactures in Des Moines. D. R. Willis of Shenandoah, Ia., who is engaged in gathering corn, showing the different varieties grown in Page county. The Sioux City corn palace may be reproduced in miniature. Creston is arranging to erect on the expopsition​ grounds a duplicate of the famous "Blue Grass Palace," which has formed the center of attraction at Creston during the harvest celebrations. It is proposed to have within this structure an exhibit of the resources of the region about Creston. Glenwood proposes to hold a great apple carnival on the exposition grounds on a day set aside for the event, when tons upon tons of the luscious fruit will be distributed to the visitors. In all quarters of the state there is manifest unusual activity among leading citizens, who seen​ the importance of a comprehensive exhibit."

Will Confer This Afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. William N. Babcock returned from a two months' trip along the Atlantic seacoast this morning. They went east via the great lakes and spent most of their time along the coast of New England. Mr. Babcock overlooked no opportunities to boom the exposition while away. Regarding the controversy over the laying of the Missouri Pacific tracks in the exposition grounds, it is stated that there will be a conference between Mr. Babcock, superintendent of the Department of Transportation of the exposition, and the Missouri Pacific officials this afternoon.

Directors Meet Next Friday.

The regular monthly meeting of the Board of Directors of the exposition will be held Friday afternoon of this week, commencing at 4 o'clock. Among the matters which will come before the board for consideration will be the question of railway trackage inside the grounds, which has not yet been settled, and the question of making the president of the exposition a member of the executive committee with the right to vote on all questions. As the committee is as present constituted the president is authorized to vote only in case of a tie in the committee, but is given a voice in the proceedings.

 

INCREASES INSURANCE RATES

PLANING MILL ON EXPOSITION GROUNDS

Local Firm Secures a Lease and Erects a Frame Structure Close to the Main Court.

The exposition management is somewhat exercised over the notice received from Insurance Inspector Hartman to the effect that the erection of a frame planing mill just outside of the main court at the northeast corner, and about twenty-five feet back of the Machinery and Electricity building, will increase the insurance rate which must be paid on the buildings on the main court and on the contents of all these buildings.

This planing mill was erected recently by Vogel brothers, the building permit being taken out in the name of the Transmississippi Planing Mill company. These people had a contract with the Department of Buildings and Grounds to occupy the brick building on the bluff tract, but the executive committee refused to approve the contract for the reason that it would be discriminiating​ against home institutions which had subscribed to exposition stock.

When this plan failed the planing mill people secured a lease of a lot which is at the northeast corner of the main court, enclosed on the east by a portion of the grounds which runs up to Manderson street, and on this they erected a frame building which is covered with tar paper. This building is almost in direct contact with the fence surrounding the main court and is within a few feet of where the Machinery and Electricity building will stand. To facilitate access to the mill from the exposition grounds a gate has been cut through the fence, directly back of the mill.

After the notice was received from Inspector Hartman, Secretary Wakefield visited the office of the city building inspector and remonstrated with Building Inspector Butler for issuing a permit for such a structure in such close proximity to the exposition buildings. Mr. Butler said he had no knowledge of just where the main buildings would be located and had simply issued the permit without any reference to those buildings. The permit being issued, he said the matter had gone beyond his power.

Inspector Hartman suggested that the fire risk might be reduced by erecting a brick wall between the planing mill and the exposition grounds, but Chief Redell of the fire department said this would not lessen the danger from fire, as the chips and shavings from the mill would blow all over that part of town and the danger to the buildings would be very great.

No official action on the matter has yet been taken by the executive committee.

MONEY FOR AIRSHIP BUILDING.

Proposition Submitted by an Inventor from Missouri.

The Transmississippi Exposition management has received another airship proposition. The inventor of the machine is from Missouri. He accordingly accompanies his proposition with a cabinet photograph showing a small model of the machine with which he proposes to overcome the attraction of gravity to some extent and soar heavenward as with the wings of a bird.

A photograph shows two rectangular frames which intersect one another at right angles. A small platform rests on the point where the lower sides intersect, and on this is placed the motive power, consisting of a small motor which the inventor says may be operated by compressed air or electricity. At the extreme outer ends of the upper sides of the frames are placed wheels resembling turbine water wheels. There are four of these and they are constructed of steel tubing, covered with cloth. The wheels are twenty-five feet in diameter and are operated by means of shafting. Running up above the engine is a rod having a universal joint at its upper end and to this is attached another wheel which may be used as a propeller or a rudder. This constitutes the machine, and the inventor says that the model from which the photograph is taken works successfully. He says that when the machine is in mid-air and the rotation of the wheels is stopped they act as parachutes, and the machine descends slowly to the earth. He says that the completed machine will weigh about 500 pounds.

The inventor is O. G. Newton of Trenton, Mo., and he asks the exposition people to advance him $300 for the construction of the machine, which he proposes to build on the exposition grounds.

TRACKAGE ON EXPOSITION GROUNDS.

Manager Babcock Has a Conference with Missouri Pacific Officials.

 
Page 26 consists of the reverse side of the article on page 27.
 

The executive committee of the exposition held a short meeting yesterday afternoon at which the question of railway trackage on the exposition grounds was discussed very briefly. As a result of the meeting, the whole matter was referred to Mr. Babcock, manager of the Department of Transportation, and he was authorized to negotiate with the Missouri Pacific company for a contract.

Mr. Babcock held a short conference with the Missouri Pacific officials yesterday and another one this morning. He stated this morning that he believed the matter would be closed up at once and that a contract would be made some time this week for submission to the executive committee.

Advertising the Exposition.

The German bureau of the Department of Publicity and Promotion has issued a comprehensive pamphlet of the exposition in the German language. It has sixteen pages and contains handsome cuts of six of the main buildings, together with a large amount of information regarding the exposition in condensed form. The title page contains a handsome seal, consisting of the coat-of-arms of the United States, surrounded by a scroll in which is inscribed the title of the exposition. Five thousand of these pamphlets are being sent to the leading German citizens and to all of the great German papers in the United States. Any person desiring to obtain these pamphlets to send to their friends may obtain them by calling at the headquarters of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, Room 601 Bee building. The German bureau also has in preparation a special edition of a pamphlet which will be sent to all the German speaking countries of Europe. These will be issued in a short time.

Notes of the Exposition.

The supervising architects are preparing a sketch of the Girls' and Boys' building which will be issued to the public through the newspapers by the Department of Publicity and Promotion as soon as it is received from the architects.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion is getting out a large edition of an illustrated pamphlet for use at the Iowa state fair, containing full information regarding the exposition, together with points regarding Iowa. Another edition of the large half-tone engraving of the Administration building will also be issued for use in Iowa, the first edition of 5,000 of this hanger having been exhausted within a few days after it was issued.

The demand for the exposition pamphlet containing cuts of the main buildings was so great that the Department of Publicity and Promotion has issued another edition of this pamphlet, which is now ready for distribution. The second edition has the title page done in two colors, blue and red, and forms a most attractive pamphlet. It has sixteen pages crammed full of cold, hard facts regarding the exposition, together with cuts of six of the main buildings. Those desiring copies of this pamphlet can obtain them by calling at the office of the department, room 601, Bee building.

 

NORTH DAKOTA INTERESTED

STATE TO BE REPRESENTED AT EXPOSITION

Vice President Lounsberry Arrives and Tells of Work Being Done to Make a Creditable Display at the Great Show.

Colonel C. A. Lounsberry, vice president for North Dakota for the exposition, is in the city to look over the ground and formulate plans for North Dakota's representation at the exposition.

North Dakota has no appropriation, but the legislature created a commission and authorized the members to co-operate with the railroad companies and other corporations, with counties, cities, schools and individuals, and through the co-operation of the several interests in the state the commission hopes to raise at least $10,000 for an exhibit.

Colonel Lounsberry is one of the commissioners, as well as vice president. The other two commissioners are Colonel C. B. Little of Bismarck. In 1873 Colonel Lounsberry established the first newspaper in North Dakota, and is now publishing an illustrated magazine at Fargo. Colonel Power is the proprietor of the Helendale farm. Many saw the magnificent painting belonging to the Agricultural department, Washington, which hung at the head of the stairway in the North Dakota building at the World's fair. The painting was by Carl Guenther and was purchased by the United States government as a typical farm scene. The scene was from Colonel Powers' farm and the horses were from life as found on his farm. Colonel Little is president of the First National bank, Bismarck, and a state senator. So that it would seem North Dakota has chosen its representative citizens for the work.

Colonel Lounsberry's visit is preliminary to organizing. He hopes North Dakota will be able to take 10,000 feet in the Agricultural building. The state has no interests in mines, excepting lignite coal, cement and clay, none in horticulture, and, therefore, purposes concentrating whatever display it makes in the Agricultural building. The commissioners will probably have their offices and reception rooms in this space. The state has important stock interests which will take their appropriate place.

NORTH DAKOTA RESOURCES.

Said Colonel Lounsberry: "North Dakota was poor a year ago in taxable resources and in available public funds, but the people of our state have $1,500 surplus from their crops this year for every family, or about $300 for every man, woman and child in the state. We have 50,000,000 bushels of wheat which will bring us $37,500,000; 4,500,000 bushels of flax, worth $4,500,000; 9,000,000 bushels of barley, worth $3,000,000; 28,000,000 bushels of oats, worth $7,500,000; 3,000,000 of potatoes, worth $1,500,000; 2,000,000 pounds of wool, worth $240,000; poultry and eggs, worth $1,800,000; milk products worth $2,500,000, and live stock and meats worth $10,000,000, making a total of $68,290,000 for paying debts, for betterments, and a surplus of a few millions which our people can spend in attracting attention to our unparalleled resources and in having a good time at the exposition.

Only six counties of our state are thickly settled. There are millions of acres subject to entry under the homestead act and many millions which may be purchased on the crop payment plan where half the crop frequently more than pays for the land the first year, and many millions more which may be purchased at $5 an acre.

"Our crop was late and we have needed the hot weather to mature it, but the wheat crop of North Dakota will pay this year an average profit of $10 an acre over and above the cost of production. As we had 3,500,000 acres in wheat, you can see what we rely upon for our ready money.

"With such resources and a disposition to show them, you can rely upon North Dakota coming to the front with a nice exhibit. We gained our first great boom from the New Orleans exposition, at which we had a fine exhibit. The World's Fair did not bring apparent results, but we look for an immigration of 100,000 people next year and know the value to us of the Transmississippi Exposition."

TRACKAGE ON EXPOSITION GROUNDS

Satisfactory Contract Likely to Be Signed by Railway Officials.

The question of railway trackage on the exposition grounds seems in a fair way to be settled within a very few days and then the tracks of the Missouri Pacific will be completed along both sides of the main court and across Sherman avenue from the bluff tract, so that the material for the construction of the main buildings may be hauled directly to where it will be used.

Manager Babcock of the Department of Transportation held a meeting yesterday afternoon with Messrs. Rathbun and Phillippi of the Missouri Pacific and a form of contract was agreed upon. This contract was executed on the part of the exposition authorities this morning, President Wattles and Secretary Wakefield attaching their signatures to it, and it was then forwarded St. Louis for execution by the railway officials. No further tracklaying will be done until the contract is fully executed.

The terms of the contract are briefly and concisely stated and the ambiguous wording which characterized the original document is entirely eliminated. All of the points in the original contract to which objections were raised by Superintendent Owens of the Department of Transportation have been omitted and the document complies with the requirements insisted upon by Manager Babcock's department. It is provided that the railway company shall lay, extend, remove or relay the tracks as may be directed by the exposition management without any cost to the exposition. The moving of care inside the grounds shall be under full charge of the exposition, through its authorized officers. The railway company agrees to furnish an engine and crew for the exclusive use of the exposition within the grounds whenever desired by the exposition. The tracks inside the grounds are to be in full charge of the exposition management and it is stipulated that the tracks may be used by the latter for the operation of miniature trains during the exposition if it is desired to do so. The section of the contract referring to switching charges provides that a uniform charge of $4 per car shall be made for all loaded cars switched to or from or within the grounds, regardless of how many times the car may be handled inside the grounds, but it is provided that this charge of $4 per car shall not be considered a part of the usual switching charge on business with connecting lines.

An Amusement Novelty.

The Department of Concessions is negotiating with a number of parties who are after the concession for "Shooting the Chutes." The rivalry to secure this privilege is very brisk. A combination of local people is pushing hard for first place in this contest and a man from Brooklyn, N. Y., is on the ground determined to capture the prize. The wires are being kept hot by other parties who have been after the concession but who have not been able to be on the ground. It is expected that the concession will be let within a day or two at a good figure.

An Elevated Cycle Railway.

The latest proposition received by the Department of Concessions for the installation and operation of a mechanical novelty is for an aerial bicycle, or, as the inventor calls it, an elevated cycle railway. The plans submitted by the inventor of this new method of locomotion shows a double track of single steel rails, suspended about fourteen feet above ground on cross arms attached to posts much after the fashion of a trolley line, with the posts between the tracks. On these rails are operated bicycles so constructed that the wheels are over the riders' heads instead of being beneath the riders, as in an ordinary bicycle. The machines are propelled in the same manner as a bicycle, each machine or carriage carrying two riders. The lower part of the carriage is seven feet above the ground. The inventor is a Waco, Tex., man named Martin and he wants the privilege of installing his apparatus on the exposition grounds as a means of transporting people about the grounds.

DOUGLAS COUNTY AND EXPOSITION.

Bond Proposition Will Be Submitted at Coming Election.

A petition addressed to the Board of County Commissioners asking them to submit to a vote of the people of Douglas county at the coming election a proposition to issue bonds to the county in the sum of $100,000 has been prepared by the Department of Publicity and Promotion, and copies of it will be circulated among the residents of Douglas county for signatures. Copies of the petition will also be placed in the public offices and in prominent mercantile establishments, where all who may desire to do so may sign it, or copies may be obtained at the office of the Bureau of Promotion on the sixth floor of the Paxton block.

The law passed by the recent legislature provided that such a proposition might be submitted to a vote of the people whenever a petition containing the signatures of 1,000 voters of the county submitted to the   county commissioners. The state law requires that a bond proposition must be advertised for thirty days before the election at which it is to be submitted. The next election occurs November 2, and the advertisement must, therefore, be inserted about the last of September. The board must have time to act on the petition, so that it will be necessary to secure the required number of signatures within the next two weeks.

APPLIES FOR WAR SHIP EXHIBIT.

Inventor Would Show Coast Defense Vessel in Lagoon.

John E. Hallett of Valley Springs, S. D., is the inventor of a coast defense vessel which he wishes to operate at the exposition as a concession and he has made application to the Department of Concessions for the privilege.

Mr. Hallett says he will transform his engine of death and destruction into a harmless merry-go-round which will disport in the lagoon and afford amusement to those who are not especially interested in the mechanical ingenuity displayed in the invention. Mr. Hallett's vessel resembles nothing so much as a tub. It is perfectly round and is fitted with propelling apparatus, which is arranged so that the boat may be whirled about in the water or may be propelled in any direction. When used for a coast defense vessel it is designed to be surmounted by an armor clad turret, but for the purposes of the exposition the inventor proposes to construct a series of promenade decks diminishing in size as the height from the water increases. On these passengers will be carried and the boat will travel about in the lagoon.

WORK ON THE MINES BUILDING.

Contractors About Ready to Begin on Construction.

Goldie & Sons, Chicago, contractors for the carpenter work on the Mines and Mining building, are shipping into the exposition grounds a complete planing mill outfit which they propose to set up inside the Mines building and turn out their material as fast as needed. They will at once commence the work of cutting off the piling that is now in place and will construct the floor of the building first, so that their machinery may be set up as soon as possible.

The floor of the Mines building will be about four feet above the ground level at the west end and it will therefore be necessary to lay the floor so that the workmen can get about. Lumber is on the track and the cars will be set on the track back of the site of the building as soon as the connection is made across Sherman avenue. The work on the piling is provokingly slow, only about one-quarter of the piles being now in place. Little can be done by the contractors until the pile-drivers, who are employed by the exposition, get out of their way.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Department of Concessions has received a proposition to install and operate an Algerian village.

The Omaha delegates to the meeting of the Coopers' International union started for Cincinnati, O., today. They will try to have Omaha selected as the place for the 1898 meeting.

George C. Huttemeyer, editor of Finance and Commerce, a New York commercial paper, has applied for appointment as commercial agent for New York. Negotiations are pending with him for the appointment.

J. B. Dinsmore, superintendent of the Live Stock department, has returned from St. Paul, where he attended the Minnesota state fair. He reports that the live stock men promised to make a fine exhibit at the exposition.

The application for space and the right to erect the Nebraska State building has been filed with the exposition authorities by President Neville and will be laid before the executive committee at its meeting this afternoon.

J. Y. Craig, superintendent of Forest Lawn cemetery, started today for Cincinnati, O., where he will attend the convention of the National Association of Cemetery superintendents. He will endeavor to secure the next meeting for Omaha.

The people who are furnishing the financial backing for the Sherman umbrella, the engineering novelty which is to be erected on the exposition ground, have notified the Department of Concessions that they are ready to sign a contract and make their first payment of cash.

The Department of Exhibits has received a letter from Dudley Smith, commissioner general for Great Britain, in which he speaks in a most emphatic manner of the encouragement he has received from British officials regarding an exhibit at the exposition by the English government. He says he has every reason to believe that he will secure a very satisfactory exhibit from that country.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.

Notice to Bidders.

The superintendent of construction of the Nebraska state building at the Transmississippi and International Exposition will receive bids until September 18, 1897, at 12 o'clock, noon, at the office of the Board of Directors in the Deilone hotel annex, in the city of Omaha, for all materials necessary to construct the Nebraska state building to be erected upon the exposition grounds.

Copies of the estimate can be secured of W. H. Dearing, assistant secretary, at the office of said Board of Directors.


GEORGE W. BLAKE,
Superintendent Construction.
Attest: W. H. DEARING,
Assistant Secretary.

Sealed bids will be received at the office of the Grounds and Buildings Department of the Transmississippi and International Exposition until 5 o'clock p. m., Saturday, September 18, for the construction of the Liberal Arts building. Plans and specifications on file in the superintendent's office, No. 634 Paxton block, or sets will be furnished contractors at cost.


F. P. KIRKENDALL,
Manager Grounds and Building Dept.
Sept10 d8t m&e

Sealed bids will be received at the office of the Grounds and Building Department of the Transmississippi and International Exposition until 5 o'clock p. m. Saturday, September 11, for the construction of the Agricultural building. Plans and specifications on file in the superintendent's office, No. 634 Paxton block, or sets will be furnished contractors at cost.


F. P. KIRKENDALL,
M'g'r Grounds and Buildings Dep't.

EXPO ASSOCIATION MEETS

DISCUSS PERMANENT HEADQUARTERS

Committee Says Two Motor Lines Will Not Handle Crowds from Council Bluffs and Asks a Daily Train Service.

The regular meeting of the executive committee of the Council Bluffs Transmississippi Exposition association was held in Council Bluffs last night, with a fair representation of the members present.

The Union Veteran Legion submitted a request for the help of the association to secure the next national meeting of the legion at Council Bluffs.

The greater part of the evening was spent in the discussion of the report of the special committee selected to secure permanent headquarters for the association for the year. No definite action was taken, and the committee was given further time to look around.

The chairman of each of the seven subcommittees was instructed to report estimates of the amount of money that would be needed to carry on the work in hand and contemplated.

A resolution was passed requiring all members of the general committee who had not been prompt and regular in their attendance at the meetings of the committee to give a reasonably good explanation of their absence and show why their names should not be dropped from the membership rolls. It was decided to amend the constitution at the next meeting, two weeks hence, to permit the filling of the vacancies in the committee.

Chairman Test of the transportation committee reported the belief of his committee that the two transportation lines, the present motor company and the proposed Manawa extension, would prove inadequate to carry the people from the Iowa side of the river to the exposition grounds and that the committee had been in conference with the management of the Union Pacific Railway company relative to the operation of a number of daily trains to the grounds. He presented a communication from President Wells of the Omaha & Council Bluffs line stating that his company was negotiating for facilities over the Omaha Street railway lines that will enable the company to land its passengers at the gates of the exposition. General Test also stated that his committee was in communication with the Western Passenger association, asking assistance in the effort to secure morning trains on all of the roads. The object is to have trains arrive in Council Bluffs at an early hour each morning and leave late in the afternoon so that exposition visitors would have a full day on the grounds. While the subject of transportation was under discussion a very strong sentiment was developed among the members favorable to giving the street car lines every possible encouragement to give a perfect service.

The committee on literature reported the completion of the write-up of Council Bluffs, and the article was read by the chairman. It met the approval of the general committee and was ordered to be printed in pamphlet form.

Remainder of the page consists of the reverse side of an article displayed on page 29.
 

BUILDINGS ARE DEMANDED

MORE ACTIVE CONSTRUCTION IS WANTED

Executive Committee of the Exposition Takes an Account of Stock and Investigates Some Causes for Delay.

The executive committee of the exposition held its regular weekly meeting at the Commercial club rooms yesterday afternoon.

Chairman Lindsey, manager of the Department of Ways and Means, reported that he had not been active of late in pushing the securing of subscriptions to exposition stock, as he had felt that the prevailing sentiment in Omaha desires to see something going up in the way of buildings before more subscriptions can be secured. He said that as soon as work was actively under way at the grounds he would take up the work of canvassing the city thoroughly, and believed that a satisfactory amount could then be secured. In this connection Mr. Lindsey read a financial statement prepared by the secretary, showing that the contracts for the construction of buildings and other work which are now outstanding, amount, in the aggregate, to about $160,000. In addition to this the contract for the Agriculture building will be let today, it being estimated that the building will cost about $56,000. The amount of cash now in the treasury was stated to be $137,000, in addition to which it was stated that the park commission will repay to the exposition management about $13,000, which has been expanded by the exposition on the portion of the main court, which will be known hereafter as Kountze park, making a cash balance of about $150,000.

The question of the delay in the construction of the Manufactures building was brought up, and it was stated that Contractor Strehlow is now four weeks behind on his contract. This delay was attributed to a scarcity of cars, in which to ship the lumber to Omaha from Wisconsin. It was stated that the lumber is white and yellow pine, and is being furnished by H. F. Cady, and that he says the lumber is all cut and will be along in due time. The advisability of using hemlock lumber from another section of the country was discussed, but no action along this line was taken. Some of the members of the committee criticised the superintendent of construction for not bringing this matter to the attention of the committee sooner, and also for not taking steps to prevent delay in the erection of the buildings.

COMMITTEE WAS NOT NOTIFIED.

The superintendent of construction also came in for certain criticism in connection with the erection of the frame fire trap against the exposition fence which is to be used as a planing mill. It was the sentiment of the committee that Geraldine should have warned the committee of the dangerous building which was being erected almost against one of the largest buildings on the grounds instead of cutting a gate through the fence and facilitating access to the grounds from the planing mill.

The application of the Nebraska Exposition commission for 10,640 feet of space on the bluff tract for the Nebraska building was laid before the committee by President Wattles, acting manager of the Department of Buildings and Grounds. The application contained provisions in which the commission asked for certain designated "public comforts" in the state building, such as the privilege of having office room in the state building, operating cigar, lunch and news stands for the convenience of visitors to the state building, etc. Mr. Wattles recommended that the application for space be granted when it was made to comply with the rules of the exposition by being accompanied by drawings showing the plans and full details for the construction of the building. He also recommended that the following privileges be granted in the building, provided no charge is made for the same by the state commission: Desk or office room for states not erecting their own buildings; postoffice, check rooms, telegraph and telephone exchanges, subject to the rules enforced by the exposition; reading room, room for accommodation of the state press, music and auditorium privileges, toilet rooms, subject to the rates for water, etc., in force on the grounds; the police for the building to be subject to the rules and regulations of the exposition. It was further recommended that the privilege of conducting stands for the sale of newspapers, fruit, cigars, etc., be referred for future consideration. The recommendations of the acting manager were adopted after discussion.

Mr. Wattles submitted a proposition from the estate of A. J. Poppleton for the use of the land in Sulphur Springs addition, which will be used by the exposition, being the lower portion of the bluff tract. The proposition provided that the exposition [?] chased by the exposition management, would have cost $8. The bill was, therefore, ordered reduced to the latter amount.

The next to attract attention were three bills for lumber used for constructing a temporary bridge across the lagoon at Twentieth street. These bills amounted to $216.84, and investigation showed that D. Geraldine, superintendent of construction, had bought the lumber without going through the required form of securing a requisition as provided by the rules of the exposition. Mr. Wattles said Geraldine had told him the bridge was absolutely necessary for contractors in hauling their material onto the grounds for the erection of the buildings, but the president stated that he had no personal knowledeg​ on the subject.

GERALDINE'S METHODS DISTASTEFUL.

The members of the committee expressed their strong dissatisfaction at the arbitrary methods of the superintendent of construction in purchasing material in direct violation of the rules and having the bills sent in for payment after the material had been used, and there was no recourse but to pay them. No one knew whether the rule requiring competitive bids to be secured had been observed or not.

Out of this discussion developed the fact that a former employe of Geraldine on the Chicago drainage canal, named Tam, had been on the pay roll for nearly a month without any action on the part of the executive committee. A request for the appointment of Tam was made by Acting Manager Wattles about two weeks ago, but the matter was laid over for the reason that the committee decided that there was no immediate necessity for increasing the pay roll by the addition of another high-salaried man. It was stated yesterday that Tam's name appeared on the pay roll for last month, the time indicated on the pay roll showing that he had been employed some time before the request for his employment was made to the committee. No action was taken on the matter.

Another matter which was referred to was an item appearing on the pay roll, showing that the head draughtsman in the office of the supervising architects was on the list for $60 for sixty hours' overtime during the month for August, in addition to his regular salary of $208.33. There was some comment on the fact that this same man had been paid but $1,800 per year for the same work at the World's fair, but is now receiving $2,500 per year, in addition to being furnished transportation to and from Chicago each month to visit his family; but no action was taken.

It was announced that Collector Rhoades had resigned and Collector Copeland was ordered laid off for the present.

The committee will meet at 5 o'clock this afternoon to open the bid on the Agriculture building. The contract will be awarded at once in order to expedite the work as much as possible. A blank contract will be prepared and will be filled in as soon as the lowest and best bidder is known and he will be asked to execute it forthwith.

Before the committee adjourned the action of the last meeting in instructing the chairman to request the board of directors to change the plan of organization to make the president a member of the executive committee was reconsidered, and the matter was laid over until a full attendance of the members of the committee can be secured.

NEBRASKANS ARE GOING TO TEXAS.

Will Advertise the Exposition Along the Way.

The Transmississippi and International Exposition is to be boomed in the south by another party of Nebraskans. On the evening of Saturday, October 2, there will leave this city over the Wabash railroad a party of six-five Nebraskans, bound for Texas. They will occupy two Pullman sleeping cars and they will be gone eight days. Twenty-five members of the party will be from Omaha, and the remaining forty will be prominent representatives of the leading towns in the state.

The party has been organized by the Real Estate exchange, and will go to Galveston to attend a convention of the Deep Water Utilization committee of the south. This meeting will convene on October 5. It was to have been held earlier in the year, but was unavoidably postponed. The Nebraska party will go from here to Kansas City. From there south to Fort Worth they will travel via the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad. Fort Worth, Galveston, Houston and Austin will be visited, and the party will then inspect the rival ports of Sabine City and Port Arthur. The trip northward will be made over the Kansas City, Pittsburg & Gulf railroad.

The committee of the Omaha Real Estate exchange having the matter in charge has worked indefatigable for the success of the excursion. The necessary transportation has been secured throughout and a representative party of Nebraskans has been made up. The committee will make official application to the exposition management for a large quantity of exposition literature to take along on the trip, and will also ask for the appointment of the two best exposition orators that can accompany the party to make addresses at all point where stops will be made.

 

should pay all special taxes levied against the property except that levied for repaving Sherman avenue. The proposition was accepted and the president was authorized to execute a contract.

PLANS FOR AUDITORIUM.

Acting Manager Wattles recommended that an auditorium be located in the south-east corner of the main court, at Sherman avenue and Pinkney street, the building to have a seating capacity of 4,000 and to cost not to exceed $15,000. The recommendation was adopted and plans were ordered drawn for such a building.

A proposition from the Fidelity and Casualty company to take up the personal bond given by Contractor Strehlow on the Manufactures building and give the exposition a surety company bond on his contract was accepted.

Mr. Wattles announced that the plans for the Liberal Arts building had been completed and that bids for the construction of the building had been called for, to be opened September 18. He also announced that Colonel Lounsberry, vice president for North Dakota, had filed a formal application for 10,000 feet of space for that state's exhibit.

President Wattles, as acting manager of the Department of Exhibits, reported an application from Miss Mellona Butterfield of Omaha for a position in the Ceramic department. Action on the application was deferred to await the return of Manager Bruce of that department.

When the reading of bills was taken up the committee drifted into a general discussion on matters in general. A bill of Clement Chase for letter heads and other stationary furnished the supervising architects, amounting to $20, was accompanied by a statement that the same material, if it had been pur-

 

UTAH APPLIES FOR SPACE

ANOTHER EXHIBIT FOR THE EXPOSITION

Vice President Shurtliff Contemplates Showing the Plan of Irrigation Along with the Resources of His Adopted State.

Utah has made formal application for space in the Transmississippi Exposition. The application is made by L. W. Shurtliff, vice president for the exposition. He asks for 3,000 feet, saying that this is simply preliminary and that more space will be taken as the arrangements for the state exhibit progress.

The applications from states desiring space in the exposition are coming into the Department of Exhibits with encouraging rapidity. It is known that arrangements for taking space are well under way in a number of the states and that when all are in the transmississippi region, as well as states not west of the great Father of Waters, will be represented in a most creditable manner.

Utah applies for space in the Agriculture building, but information is given that exhibits will also be made in some of the other buildings, so that the aggregate amount of space will make a good showing. The plan of Utah's exhibit, so far as it has developed, contemplates an extensive irrigation exhibit and numerous other features showing the many resources of the state to the best advantage.

VISIT TO OMAHA WAS SATISFACTORY

Prof. Day Predicts that the Exposition Will Be a Success.

President Wattles has received a letter from David T. Day, Ph.D., chief of the Bureau of Mines of the United States geological survey, who was in Omaha recently to look into the facilities for the exhibit to be made in the government building by the survey. Prof. Day informs the president that he has made a report to Charles E. Wolcott, director of the survey, to the effect that his visit to Omaha was most satisfactory and that the prospect was very good for the Transmississippi Exposition proving a greater success than any exposition in which the government has participated except the World's Fair, and that the plans being followed by the Transmississippi Exposition are far more sensible than those adopted for the World's Fair.

Dr. Day also states that he has been informed by Prof. Clark, the representative of the Interior department on the board appointed by the government for the Transmississippi Exposition, that a meeting of the representatives of the various governmental departments on the board will be geld at Nashville, October 4, and that President Wattles would be invited to be present at that meeting.

DUDLEY SMITH'S WORK IN ENGLAND

Interests the Newspapers in the Transmississippi Exposition.

Further proofs of the activity with which Dudley Smith, the commissioner general for the exposition to Great Britain, is pushing the interests of the exposition to the front in the English metropolis are being received almost daily at exposition headquarters. The latest indication of the ability of the "member of the lower house of parliament for Nebraska" to get the exposition before the English public in an attractive form is shown in copies of Table Talk, a London weekly society publication. The issue of August 28 devotes a full page to cuts of the main buildings grouped in a most artistic manner and printed in a manner which brings out their strong points in forcible style. In addition to this a full page is devoted to reading matter descriptive of the plan and scope of the exposition and the importance of English manufactures and the British government being well represented in the great fair.

Mr. Smith writes that he has mailed copies of this paper to all the prominent manufactures of Great Britain and to the official of the government.

Illinois Exposition Commission.

The announcement is made from Springfield, Ill., that Governor Tanner has appointed the Illinois Exposition commission, comprising the following men, most of whom are well known as prominent citizens of Illinois: John M. Smith, William H. Harper, L. O. Goddard, Ferd. W. Peck, E. S. Conway and James P. Wheadon, all of Chicago; George Wall, Duquoin; Clarke E. Carr, Galesburg; Oscar P. Trohern, Rockford; William B. Brinton, Tuscola; Edward C. Craig, Matton; Louis H. Miner, Springfield; Willliam​ H. Stead, Ottawa; Lafayette Funk, Bloomington; James A. Black, Carthage; Randolph H. Smith, Flora; Charles C. Williams, Hoopeston; C. H. Keller, Dixon; Martin Kingman, Peoria.

Would Be Musical Director.

A letter has been received at exposition headquarters from Thomas J. Pennell, formerly a resident and prominent musician of Omaha. The letter is written from Florence, Italy, where Mr. Pennell has been for the past year studying music. Under date of August 29, the writer makes application for the position of musical director of the exposition. He states briefly and clearly his views of the manner in which the musical department of the exposition should be conducted in order to make it a success from both a musical and a financial standpoint.

Short Meeting of Directors.

The Board of Directors of the exposition held its regular monthly meeting yesterday afternoon. The board was in session just long enough to read the minutes of the last meeting and pass a motion to adjourn. There was a quorum present, but after the minutes had been read no one seemed to have anything to offer, and the executive committee had nothing to report, so the meeting was adjourned without further delay.

MANY STATES WANT SPACE

Utah the Latest to Ask Admission to the Transmississippi Exposition.

MAKES ITS PRELIMINARY APPLICATION

Department of Exhibits Has Assurances that Many States East and West Will Be Represented.

Utah has made the formal application for space in the Transmississippi Exposition. The application is made by L. W. Shurtliff, vice president for the exposition. He asks for 3,000 feet, saying that this is simply preliminary and that more space will be taken as the arrangements for the state exhibit progress.

The applications from states desiring space in the exposition are coming into the Department of Exhibits with encouraging rapidity. It is known that arrangements for taking space are well under way in a number of the states and that when all are in the transmississippi region, as well as states not west of the great Father of Waters, will be represented in a most creditable manner.

Utah applies for space in the Agricultural building, but information is given that exhibits will also be made in some of the other buildings, so that the aggregate amount of space will make a good showing. The plan of Utah's exhibit, so far as it has developed, contemplates an extensive irrigation exhibit and numerous other features showing the many resources of the state to the best advantage.

MISSOURI AND THE EXPOSITION.

Interesting Facts About the Products of the State.

State Labor Commissioner A. Rozelle of Missouri has prepared for the management of the Transmississippi and International Exposition of Omaha a statement of Missouri's productions and their value in 1896, a copy of which is published in the St. Louis Globe-Democrat. Be it remembered that, excepting the first seven items, this includes only the products actually marketed, excluding the output of all factories except flour mills. Allowing the usual ratio of consumption to production, imperial Missouri's productions last year aggregated in value $400,000,000.

Missouri contains 42,685,600 acres of land, almost 25,000,000 acres of which are now in actual cultivation in grains, fruits, vegetables and grasses. The aggregate production of the "farm staples" of Missouri for 1896, with their values, computed at current market prices, was as follows:

Worth.
Corn, 200,000,000 bushels $50,000,000
Wheat, 13,000,000 bushels 9,100,000
Oats, 22,000,000 bushels 8,520,000
Flaxseed, 500,000 bushels 325,000
Potatoes, 8,000,000 bushels 2,400,000
Hay, 3,500,000 tons 14,000,000
Tobacco, 7,000,000 pounds 560,000

The state's surplus productions actually marketed during 1896, as shown by the records of the railroad, express and boat companies, with their values, computed at prevailing current prices, were as follows:

Worth.
Cattle, 1,016,760 head $38,128,500
Horses and mules, 104,361 head 4,174,440
Hogs, 3,142,074 head 21,994,518
Sheep, 319,372 head 1,117,802
Mixed live stock, 4,068 cars 3,701,880
Poultry, 45,496,179 pounds 3,184,732
Butter, 4,232,189 pounds 592,506
Cheese, 575,342 pounds 51,780
Milk, 304,948 gallons 40,747
Eggs, 31,969,031 dozen 2,557,522
Flour, 4,645,614 barrels 18,117,895
Meal, 8,443,484 pounds 84,435
Mill feed, 61,150,077 pounds 305,700
Apples, 3,334,746 bushels 167,161
Dried fruit, 1,042,849 pounds 41,713
Small fruits, 264,749 crates 176,500
Cotton, 16,600,000 pounds 993,000
Cottonseed and its products, 24,000,000 pounds 480,000
Wool, 2,871,000 pounds 722,123
Grass seed, 365,635 bushels 722,123
Broomcorn, 1,800 tons 72,000
Castor beans, 27,725 bushels 21,820
Vegetables, 32,211,419 pounds 322,380
Fish, 1,010,715 pounds 50,535
Game, 1,440,649 pounds 43,220
Dressed meat, 1,052,859 pounds 84,230
Bacon, lard, tallow, 2,453,369 pounds 140,460
Hides, 9,396,218 pounds 610,754
Furs, feathers, 499,406 pounds 137,347
Canned goods, 5,246,767 gallons 131,170
Wine and cider, 392,410 gallons 331,898
Lumber, logs, piling, 307,496,300 feet 3,133,915
Posts and cordwood, 6,371 cars 115,435
Cooperage, 2,634 cars 395,100
Ties, 2,579,676 cars 551,935
Coal, 2,420,147 tons 2,741,711
Lead, 504¾ tons 1,987,155
Zinc, 92,754⅔ tons 1,831,856
Chats, 97,620 tons 39,048
Barytes and tiff, 17,640,000 pounds 84,880
Lime and cement, 883,676 barrels 1,325,514
Granite, 3,101 cars 418,635
Stone, 3,913 cars 617,000
Brick, 6,472 cars 323,600
Gravel, sand, ballast, 17,914 cars 161,126

The apparent shortage in dressed meats and meat products is due to the fact that most of the packing houses of Kansas City are across the line in Kansas and those of St. Louis being on the Illinois side, hence those states get the credit of Missouri's productions.

VISIT TO OMAHA WAS SATISFACTORY

Prof. Day Predicts that the Exposition Will Be a Success.

President Wattles has received a letter from David T. Day, Ph.D., chief of the Bureau of Mines of the United States geological survey, who was in Omaha recently to look into the facilities for the exhibit to be made in the government building by the survey. Prof. Day informs the president that he has made a report to Charles E. Wolcott, director of the survey, to the effect that his visit to Omaha was most satisfactory and that the prospect was very good for the Transmississippi Exposition proving a greater success than any exposition in which the government has participated except the World's Fair, and that the plans being followed by the Transmississippi Exposition are far more sensible than those adopted for the World's Fair.

Dr. Day also states that he has been informed by Prof. Clark, the representative of the Interior department on the board appointed by the government for the Transmississippi Exposition, that a meeting of the representatives of the various governmental departments on the board will be held at Nashville, October 4, and that President Wattles would be invited to be present at that meeting.

DUDLEY SMITH'S WORK IN ENGLAND

Interests the Newspapers in the Transmississippi Exposition.

Further proofs of the activity with which Dudley Smith, the commissioner general for the exposition to Great Britain, is pushing the interests of the exposition to the front in the English metropolis are being received almost daily at exposition headquarters. The latest indication of the ability of the "member of the lower house of parliament for Nebraska" to get the exposition before the English public in an attractive form is shown in copies of Table Talk, a London weekly society publication. The issue of August 28 devotes a full page to cuts of the main buildings grouped in a most artistic manner which brings out their strong points in forcible style. In addition to this a full page is devoted to reading matter descriptive of the plan and scope of the exposition and the importance of English manufactures and the British government being well represented in the great fair.

Mr. Smith writes that he has mailed copies of this paper to all the prominent manufactures of Great Britain and to the officials of the government.

Illinois Exposition Commission.

The announcement is made from Springfield, Ill., that Governor Tanner has appointed the Illinois Exposition commission, comprising the following men, most of whom are well known as prominent citizens of Illinois: John M. Smith, William H. Harper, L. O. Goddard, Ferd. W. Peck, E. S. Conway and James P. Wheadon, all of Chicago; George Wall, Duquoin; Clarke E. Carr, Galesburg; Oscar P. Trohern, Rockford; William B. Brinton, Tuscola; Edward C. Craig, Mattoon; Louis H. Miner, Springfield; William H. Stead, Ottawa; Lafayette Funk, Bloomington; James A. Black, Carthage; Randolph H. Smith, Flora; Charles C. Williams, Hoopeston; C. H. Keeler, Dixon; Marin Kingman, Peoria.

Would Be Musical Director.

A letter has been received at exposition headquarters from Thomas J. Pennell, formerly a resident and prominent musician of Omaha. The letter is written from Florence, Italy, where Mr. Pennell has been for the last year studying music. Under date of August 29, the writer makes application for the position of musical director of the exposition. He states briefly and clearly his views of the manner in which the musical department of the exposition should be conducted in order to make it a success from both a musical and a financial standpoint.

Notes of the Exposition.

Word comes from West Baden, Ind., that C. H. Picken of the Paxton-Gallagher company of this city, is in that town booming the exposition and the fall festivities.

 

President Wattles says that the statement in these columns yesterday, to the effect that the piling for the Mine building is being put in by the exposition management, is incorrect. He says the piling is being done by Goldie & Sons, the contractors for that building, and that they are responsible for any slowness in getting them in place.

Silas Wilson, a prominent horticulturist of Atlantic, Ia., was a caller at exposition headquarters yesterday. He said that the people of his vicinity are making preparations to have a fine horticultural exhibit at the exposition, and he had come over to learn more about the details of the Horticultural department.

DETAIL PLANS ARE COMPLETE

DRAWINGS OF THE EXPOSTION BUILDINGS

Architects Finish Their Work and Show the Style of Structures that Will Line Up Along the Main Court.

The detail plans and drawings for the buildings on the main court of the exposition have now all been completed except the Government building and the Auditorium. The latter is to be erected in the extreme southeastern corner of the main court, where it will be almost out of sight from the grand promenade so that its exterior appearance will not be material in the ensemble as seen from the banks of the lagoon. The last building to be completed is the Liberal Arts, the building which is to stand immediately west of the Manufactures building and form an annex to the latter. This building was only determined a short time ago and the plans for it have been rushed through with all possible speed. The drawings and specifications have been completed and bids for the erection will be opened Saturday of this week.

The Liberal Arts building was designed by Fisher & Lawrie of this city and the full working drawings were made by them. The completed plans show a building somewhat different in exterior appearance from the other buildings in the main court. It is rectangular in form, being 240x130 feet in size, and is marked by the fact that, unlike the other buildings of the main court, it has no central motive, but depends for effect upon the grouping of the corner pavilions. The general style of the building is French renaissance. It presents the appearance of a rectangular mass, with the corners accentuated by square pavilions with pediments, each pavilion being surmounted by a group of statuary. The general style of the front is that of a low stylobate surmounted by a colonnade, the height of both being about forty feet. The wall surfaces between the pavilion are treated with double colonnades with windows between. The general treatment is on broad lines with large wall surfaces rather than by dividing the design into minor parts. The ornament is French renaissance.

PROF. GORE MEETS WITH SUCCESS.

Likely to Secure a Swedish Exhibit for the Exposition.

Prof. J. H. Gore commissioner for the exposition to Sweden, writes from Stockholm that he has been investigating the matter of securing a Swedish exhibit and is meeting with success. The plan nearest the heart of the professor is one contemplating the securing of a Swedish village, but he says he finds that the experience the Swedish people had with the World's fair people in this direction was not such as to warrant the belief that another attempt of that kind could be successfully made. He suggests, however, that if the Swedes of Omaha and vicinity would form an organization and invite the people now having exhibits at the Stockholm exposition which would be appropriate for use in such connection to come to Omaha with their wares such effort would undoubtedly succeed.

In this connection President Wattles makes this suggestion that the organization of Swedish citizens of Omaha who have already incorporated for the purpose of taking part in the exposition should take this matter in hand and bring about the result hinted at by Prof. Gore.

Referring to a general Swedish exhibit, Prof. Gore says he is negotiating with numerous manufacturers who have exhibits at the exposition and feels quite confident of securing an exhibit which will be representative.

AN APPLICATION FROM ENGLAND.

Proposition to Establish Baby Incubator at the Exposition.

The Department of Concessions has received a proposition which eclipses anything yet received in the way of novelty and interest. It is forwarded by Dudley Smith, commissioner general for Great Britain. It is an application from an English firm for a concession for a baby incubator.

The firm in question proposes to put in a number of these incubators and have them in full operation during the exposition. Enclosed with the application are a number of clippings from English newspapers containing cuts showing the exhibit made by this firm at the exposition now in progress in London. These cuts show a long row of these machines, each having its tiny inmate, which the foot note says are from five to eight months old. The lusty-looking younsters​ are fed from reservoirs seen at the side of the machine, while complicated apparatus serves to keep the temperature and air of the interior at the proper point.

Booklet for Letter Enclosures.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion has just issued a neat pamphlet, advertising the exposition, to be used as an enclosure in letters. It is of such size that it can be slipped into an envelope without folding. The title page contains only a print of the exposition seal, while the last page of the cover has a picture of the Administration arch. The pamphlet has twenty-four pages, including the covers, and contains the pictures of six of the principal buildings, with much valuable information pertaining to the exposition, the names of the officers and directors, and short sketches of the cities of Omaha, Council Bluffs and South Omaha.

Pictures of Exposition Buildings.

The Department of Publicity has issued a handsome one-sheet poster showing seven of the main buildings of the exposition. The cuts are printed on heavy enameled paper, 30x45 inches in size, and the cuts are larger than any which have heretofore appeared. This poster is for use at state and county fairs and will be posted in conspicuous places on the grounds. A number of them have county fairs.

PLAN ENDORSED BY SENATOR ALLEN

Will Work for an Indian Exhibit at the Exposition.

Senator W. V. Allen has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he has written to Secretary Bliss of the Interior department regarding an Indian exhibit to be made at the Transmississippi Exposition. The senator states that he has endorsed the project and has asked the secretary to inform him regarding the probable cost of making such an exhibit in connection with the exposition. In addition to this the senator says he will, if an additional appropriation is necessary, prepare and introduce a bill providing for the necessary expense and will endeavor to have it passed at the next session of congress.

The plan referred to by Senator Allen is that which has been outlined heretofore in these columns, involving an ethnological exhibit, showing the progress which has been made by the American Indian, together with collections of curios and implements of various kinds showing the customs and habits of the aboriginal inhabitants.

Notes of the Exposition.

Albert Meyer of Breslau, Germany, has applied for forty feet of space for the exhibition of patented novelties.

S. Karrer of Teufendal, Switzerland, has applied for 100 feet of space for the exhibition of music boxes.

Fisher & Lawrie, architects for the Auditorium building, have commenced on the plans for the building., which is to be located at the southeast corner of the main court, facing Sherman avenue.

The Department of Transportation is preparing to issue rules and regulations governing the handling of railroad cars inside the exposition grounds and announcing the terminal charges, etc., on material for the exposition.

One of the commercial agents of the Department of Exhibits for Chicago reports that he is negotiating with the following Chicago reports that he is negotiating with the following Chicago firms for exhibits: Reed, Murdoch & Co., wholesale grocers; Franklin, MacVeagh & Co., Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., Marshall Field, Best & Russell, Boston Woven Rubber Hose company, Genessee Salt company and Luxber Prism company.

APPEAL TO IOWA CITIZENS

EXPOSITION COMMISSION TO HAWKEYES

State Secured Honors at Philadelphia and Chicago and Greater Fields Are Open at Omaha Next Year.

The Iowa exposition commission has issued a stirring proclamation to the people of that state, calling upon them to put their shoulders to the wheel and help to push the state to the position it should occupy in the agricultural and manufacturing columns. The circular letter containing this exhortation is the work of a special committee of the Iowa commission, composed of Sylvanus D. Cook, Robert H. Moore and James E. E. Markley. The address is as follows:

To the People of the State of Iowa: Iowa being the pivotal state of those embraced in the wide territory known as the transmississippi as regards wealth, enterprise, education and all that goes to make a great state, the people of Iowa are especially interested in the Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held in Omaha in 1898. This exposition will be held for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries of the twenty-four states and territories included in the transmississippi belt. It has been nationalized by act of congress and aided by a liberal appropriation.

The Twenty-sixth general assembly of Iowa passed "an act to provide for an exhibit of the resources of the state at the Transmississippi and International Exposition to be held at Omaha in the year 1898, which was approved by the governor April 17, 1896. The commission appointed under this act asks your co-operation in carrying out the expressed intent—"that the agricultural, mineral, mechanical, industrial, educational and every resource and advantage of the state of Iowa be creditably represented."

At the Centennial exposition in Philadelphia in 1876 Iowa took the gold medal on farm and dairy products. At the world's fair in Chicago Iowa made an exhibit of her agricultural, horticultural, dairy and live stock interests that did great credit to the state. All the world knows of Iowa and its agricultural wealth and possibilities. The world also knows that in point of education Iowa leads.

The Transmississippi and International Exposition will afford an opportunity that has not hitherto been presented to Iowa, not only to advertise her agricultural wealth, but also to show the possibilities of developing a great manufacturing state.

OPPORTUNITY FOR IOWA.

The Transmississippi and International Exposition offers the best opportunity that has been presented for Iowa to advertise her vast possibilities. The World's fair and Centennial exposition were so overcrowded with foreign exhibits that the west was overshadowed.

The coal fields of Iowa are sufficient to run all the manufacturing interests of the entire northwest. The water power that is undeveloped at one point alone on the Mississippi river near the Iowa shore is equal to 45,000 horse power. This could be made equal to an annual income of more than a million and a quarter dollars.

Experimental tests of sugar beets in Iowa have shown beyond the question the possibility of making beet sugar one of the leading industries of the state. Sugar beets in Nebraska are bringing the farmers about $80 an acre.

Take as a basis a commercial point in Iowa, draw a circle taking in a radius of 200 miles, and you will find more railroads and river outlets for commerce than in the same extent of territory any place in the world. But the Iowa cattle and hog producer must at present find his market in Chicago. The farmer who depends upon the sale of grain for the profits of his farm, either directly or indirectly, finds his market east or south of the borders of his own state. The Iowa wool grower ships his clip to the eastern seaboard.

Iowa has not risen to her opportunities. Her wealth is often invested in moonshine that flickers so bewitchingly over the hills of the gold and silver bearing states of the far west. We can point you to one little city of less than 8,000 souls, where the business men have squandered more than $1,000,000 in less than a decade on mining stocks and boards of trade. The people of Iowa do not realize the possibilities in the way of manufacturing at home. Why should the beet sugar industry prosper in Nebraska and the Iowa farmer continue to sell corn at 15 cents? Do towns in Illinois across the Mississippi, afford any better field for the making of farm machinery than a point on the Iowa side? People of Iowa, cast your eyes over the border limits of your state, see what your neighbors are doing, and then tell us why Iowa cannot excel them.

INTERESTING FOREIGN CAPITAL.

Capital is necessary for success in new fields of industry. Iowa has capital and Iowa capital should be used in developing the latent resources of the far-famed agricultural and dairy state and in building up home markets. Foreign capital would naturally be drawn by the magnet, "faith at home," and Iowa, with her vast agricultural resources and her own artisans, would supply her own people and the world with finished goods and would indeed become the pride of the transmississippi group of states.

This exposition can be made a source of profit to Iowa beyond all computation. The time is now ripe for investments in new lines. There has never before been a time in the history of the country when there was so much idle capital as there is today. Idle capital means idle laborers Iowa should form a working ground for these mutual interests. The capitalist and the laborer can join hands in Iowa and develop the natural and latent resources of the state to an extent heretofore undreamed of.

Money is necessary to make an exhibit that will do credit to the state. Only $10,000 has been appropriated. It will require $50,000 more to do the work at all creditably. The farmers and stockmen cannot afford the expense of an exhibit without the aid of the state. The same is true in other departments.

State interest as well as state pride calls for a requisite appropriation. The exhibition will be held at our western border, and Iowa will receive a large part of the direct benefit which falls to the country immediately surrounding any great exhibition. It is probable that Iowa will reap as much direct benefit from eastern travel and transportation as will Nebraska.

The commissioners appeal to all the people to join in making an exhibit that will bring practical results, and expect that those engaged in agriculture, horticulture, stock raising, manufacturing and all other industrial lines of work will at once begin preparation for the exhibit.

The liberal arts department should make an exhibit commensurate with the vast sums of money the state is spending for the education and elevation of its people. Fine arts and the department of woman's work should be especially successful in this exhibition.

Please address the commissioner of the department in which you wish to exhibit. On all general matters address the secretary of the commission.

 

[?] and it might be just as well for Acting Manager Wattles to explain his connection with this transaction and place the responsibility where it belongs.

If the funds are to be eaten up by additional high salaried men from abroad at the will of Geraldine, it is against the whole management, as gross negligence characterizes the whole work in hand.

Next we are told that the head draughtsman had put in a bill for $60 for sixty hours overtime in the month of August in addition to his regular salary of $208.33 for the same month.

Why was this overtime necessary when there are plenty of draughtsmen walking the streets of Omaha, and who would be glad to get sixty hours work? Why, it looks as if the whole enterprise was "the meat" of Geraldine and his gang, and that nobody in this locality was to profit from it.

The "head draughtsman" seems to have a pretty soft snap. He received $1,800 for his services in Chicago, but our "generous" management pay him $2,500 and transportation every month to visit his family in Chicago. This arrangement is simply an outrage and robbery, and shows what stupidity or venality has been practiced by the [?]

The Western Laborer

DION GERALDINE'S GRAFTS

The People of Omaha Are Sick of His Tricks and Cry Out for a Change.

He Looks for a Rake-off from Every Contract--What Influence Keeps Him?

The people of Omaha, as a rule, are a patient people, but we think that their patience with the management of the exposition stamps them as very lambs who willingly stand up to be sheared of their wool by Geraldine and his henchmen.

We took a stroll over the exposition grounds and find the work progressing as if the directory were afraid the construction would be finished too soon. Any practical workingman could see that not one man was at work where 100 could profitably be employed to advantage. The only thing that seemed numerous was Geraldine's bosses and spies, which were largely in evidence.

Gangs of two men each were spiking planks on the face of the lagoon piling; two men were driving spikes and a boss was standing with his hands in his pockets seeing that they drove the nails properly.

This kind of supervising may have been all right in Chicago, but it is quite too costly for Omaha people. We are accustomed to pushing work with a less per centage of bosses.

Judging from the proceedings of the executive board held last Friday, no body of men seems to know less of the work going on than the exposition executive committee. The Omaha Bee says:

The next to attract attention were three bills for lumber used for constructing a temporary bridge across the lagoon. These bills amounted to $216.84, and investigation showed that Dion Geraldine, superintendent of construction, had bought the lumber without going through the required form of securing a requisition as provided by the rules of the exposition. Mr. Wattles said Geraldine had told him the bridge was absolutely necessary for contractors in hauling their material onto the grounds for the erection of the buildings, but the president stated that he had no personal knowledge on the subject.

Now, we would like to know by what right Geraldine constructs temporary bridges, wagon roads, etc., for the accommodation of contractors and paid for out of exposition funds?

What business is it of his how contractors get their material on the ground? or is he a silent partner in these contracts, that he spends the people's money for the benefit of contractors?

If the purchasing department were not as many "bumps on a log" they would not have to express their dissatisfaction with Geraldine's arbitrary and unwarranted methods. If they were honest and competent for their positions Geraldine would not dare to purchase material in violation of the rules and send in the bills for payment after the material had been used. The proceeding is, to say the least, "shady," and looks like a steal on the face of it.

It is not gratifying to find that the management have been carrying men on the exposition pay roll nearly a month unknown to the management. This is not creditable to the manage-management​ in making such a contract.

Taking the whole management into consideration the directors should be ashamed of themselves.

At the executive board session last Friday the three Geraldine members attempted to railroad through the board a recommendation to the directors that Wattles be made a full member of the executive board with the right to vote. Had this been permitted to become a law Geraldine would have four votes solid and all hades could not force him to loosen his graft on the exposition, but Rosewater told them a thing or two as to what he would do at the big director's meeting and the Geraldine men were afraid to go up against the game. That is why there was no business to transact at the directors meeting Friday.

The people will not stand this swindling much longer and the sooner the directory takes the construction and general work out of Geraldine's hands and fires him bodily, and conducts the enterprise with proper economy and honesty the better it will be for the reputation of the board, who, up to now have not given the people satisfaction in the construction department.

Fire Geraldine!

PUSHING EXPOSITION WORK

BEGINNING ON MANUFACTURES BUILDING

Contractors Have Commenced the Erection of Another Structure in the White City—Working on Mines and Mining Building.

The Manufactures building is beginning to loom up, the erection of the uprights having been commenced this morning. The first portion of the building to rise above the ground level was the circular dome which is to form the main entrance. The framework which is to form the center of the massive square columns which will support this dome have been put in place and the skeleton of the dome will soon rise skyward, overlooking the lagoon. The columns stand on a circle fifty feet in diameter and forty feet in height. The columns are square and alongside of each, on the outer edge of the circle, will soon appear a smaller round column, the dome resting on all of these. The dome will be seventy-five feet in height when completed and will be handsomely ornamented.

The long timbers which have delayed the erection of the Manufactures building have commenced to arrive, and Contractor Strehlow says he will now push the building as fast as possible. While he has been waiting for this timber he says he has had his men framing the other timbers for the building so that no time has really been lost, as the work will move all the faster when the actual work of erection commences. As soon as the long looked for timbers arrive on the ground a large force of men will be put to work and the building will rapidly assume form.

The vicinity of the Mines and Mining building is assuming an animated appearance. Goldie & Sons, carpenter contractors, have a large amount of their material on the grounds and have erected a small shed for storing some of the material. The work of trimming off the piles has been commenced and is being pushed as rapidly as possible. A slight delay has been caused by difficulty in getting timber for piling as rapidly as it is wanted. About three-quarters of the piles have been driven and these are being straightened up and trimmed off preparatory to putting on the sills, but the contractor who supplies the piles has been rather slow and the work has been delayed in consequence. There is about two days' work for the pile drivers and then the work of construction will commence in earnest. The machinery for getting out the lumber is on the ground and will be put in the building as soon as the floor is completed.

WORKING ON EXPOSITION RATES.

Department of Transportation Begins Active Operations.

The Department of Transportation of the exposition has taken up the matter of securing special rates on all railway and steamship lines for exhibits of all kinds which are to be placed in the exposition. Letters have been sent to all of the transatlantic, transpacific and coastwise steamship lines trading with South American ports, asking them to make special rates on foreign goods intended for exhibit at the exposition so that the agents of the exposition in foreign countries can conduct negotiations intelligently with foreign exhibitors. Letters have also been sent to all railway lines asking them to concede to the Transmississippi Exposition the treatment accorded to former expositions.

The department has also requested the customs collectors at all ports of entry in the United States to advise the department as to the railway lines from their respective ports which transport goods in bond in order that the department may be able to indicate to foreign exhibitors the lines over which goods in bond may be shipped.

The first circular of the Department of Transportation announcing freight rates has been issued. It announces that, "on shipments of carloads of material consigned to or shipped from the exposition grounds, in addition to the regular freight charges, there will be a charge of $5 per car for switching services from Oak Chatham station, on the Belt Line railway, to all tracks controlled by the exposition."

COUNTY IS ASKED TO VOTE BONDS.

Petitions, Asking Commissioners to Submit Question, Being Circulated.

The blank petitions asking the Board of County Commissioners of Douglas county to submit a proposition for voting county bonds in the sum of $100,000 to the voters of this county at the next election have been prepared and issued by the promotion bureau of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, and have been distributed all over the county. They have been sent to the postmasters in the small towns in the county and have been distributed all over Omaha and South Omaha. They are in the cigar stores, barber shops, business houses, railway headquarters, retail establishments and all other places where voters congregate, and are being signed rapidly. The law requires that 1,000 signatures must be attached to such a petition before the county commissioners are authorized to submit the proposition to a vote of the people.

In order to guard against duplication of signatures it is desired to secure 4,000 or 5,000 signatures so that there may be no question about there being 1,000 fully bona fide signatures. The time is short within which to secure these signatures, and it is desired that all who can do so assist in circulating these petitions for signatures. Blank petitions may be obtained by calling at the office of the promotion bureau on the sixth floor of the Paxton block.

ORGANIZING AN ADVISORY BOARD.

Efforts Made to Secure Holding of Agricultural Congresses.

The promotion bureau of the Department of Publicity and Promotion is working up the project of organizing an advisory board to have charge of the agricultural congresses which it is proposed to hold in connection with the conventions of the many societies of agriculture and kindred industries. Letters have been sent to prominent representatives of these industries asking them to consent to serve on this advisory board and replies have commenced to come in. A letter was received this morning from Theodore Butterworth, editor of the Western Agriculturist and Live Stock Journal, accepting the invitation extended to him and containing several suggestions regarding the organization of such a board.

Mr. Butterworth suggests that those who are to constitute the board meet in Chicago during the fat stock and horse show to be held there this fall and organize for the work. He also suggests the formation of a group of congresses under the general head of a congress of agriculture and that each congress be placed in charge of a chairman who shall work up the details and carry out the plan under the general direction of the central body. He predicts that a number of very successful congresses will grow out of the movement and announces his entire willingness to co-operate in every possible way.

CHINAMEN FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Permission Granted to Bring Celestials Into the Country.

A dispatch from Washington contains the information that the secretary of the treasury yesterday granted authority to the Mee   Lee Wah Village company to bring into this country 400 Chinamen to take part in the Chinese village at the Transmississippi and International Exposition. This is the concession which has been represented in Omaha by Hong Sling the Chinese agent of the Union Pacific road. Sling secured the concession for a Chinese village at the exposition, the village to include a joss house, theater, restaurant, bazaars, etc.

Considerable delay has been experienced by the fact that the secretary of the treasury was not disposed to grant authority for bringing in Chinese artisans and artists, for the reason that the secretary had acquired the idea that the imported Chinamen seemed to melt after their arrival in this country and it was, therefore, impossible to enforce the condition which provided for their deportation to their native country at the expiration of a stated period. The secretary refused to grant the authority until the management of the exposition made the request that it be done, and it is probable that the exposition is made responsible for the return of the Celestials after the exposition.

The granting of this authority opens the way for the granting of like authority to Wong Chin Foo, the Chinese commissioner, who has also requested permission to bring into this country artisans and mechanics from the north of China to take part in the Chinese section in the Manufactures building.

Flow of the Artesian Well Remains About the Same.

A semi-subterranean retreat has been constructed about the upper end of the pipe which rises out of the artesian well at the exposition grounds. This forms a room about ten feet square, the roof of which is level with the ground outside. The water has two outlets—one at what will be the water level when the lagoon is completed and filled, and the other about five feet above that point. When the air lift is not in operation, the water flows out of the lower pipe, but when the pressure is turned on the water rises in the pipe and flows out of both outlets. A small faucet has been let into the main pipe and visitors may draw water in their jug or tin cup, which is furnished by some philanthropist.

The water from the well now flows into the lagoon. A box has been agganged​ beneath the pipe so that the water will not wash away the bottom of the lagoon and the crystal fluid flows in every direction. With only the natural pressure, the flow is about thirty-five gallons per minute, but when the air lift is in operation the flow is increased to about 130 gallons. The pipe of the air lift has been extended further down the well and is now about 190 feet below the surface of the ground. At this depth a pressure of eighty-five pounds of air is required to lift the water.

CHINESE MAY COME TO OMAHA

EXHIBIT OF THE VILLAGE COMPANY

Hip Lung of Chicago Makes an Argument that Overcomes the Scruples of the Head of the Treasury Department.

WASHINGTON, Sept. 13.—(Special Telegram.)—Secretary Gage this afternoon decided he would grant permits for the admission of 400 Chinese for the Omaha Exposition. The secretary had a long conference with Hip Lung, a Chinese merchant of Chicago, this afternoon, who is at the head of the Mee Lee Wah Village company, and who has obtained a concession for an exclusive right to exhibit Chinese at the exposition. Hip Lung made a strong argument to have the secretary permit 500 Chinamen to come into the country. Hip Lung will leave in a few days for China to organize and bring back with him his company. Secretary Gage has restricted to three months the time the Chinese may remain in the country. It has been ascertained that of the 400 Chinese allowed to go to the Tennessee Exposition a large percentage have disappeared, and it will be impossible to get them out of the country. Under the permit granted for them they were allowed to remain in the country for a year.

Acting Secretary of War Meiklejohn has ordered the issuance of a revokable license to Prof. J. A. Gillespie, late superintendent of the Institute for the Deaf and Dumb at Omaha for two buildings on the Fort Omaha military reservation, in which he contemplates the founding of a private school for the deaf and dumb. Superintendent Gillespie has also been appointed custodian of the entire reservation. The license is now being prepared and will in all probability be signed by the acting secretary tomorrow.

The continued illness of Secretary Alger has prompted Acting Secretary Meiklejohn to forego his vacation for the present, at least in view of the fact that the secretary contemplates a quiet sojourn at some of the Atlantic coast resorts, where he hopes to regain his health. Until the secretary returns, therefore, Mr. Meiklejohn will be in [?] the war department.

The queen regent of the Netherlands, through Minister Stanford Newell, has recognized receipt of an invitation to the Transmississippi and International Exposition to the Netherlands government to be represented at Omaha next year and has communicated her regrets to the American government that she cannot send an official representative to the exposition. The correspondence shows, however, that the prospectus of the exposition will be given official recognition in Netherlands journals and will invite chambers of commerce and manufacturers in that country to make a display.

With the return of the president efforts will be made at once to secure the appointment of a chairman of the government exhibit board to the Omaha exposition. Departments have named the following representatives: State, William H. Michael; Treasury, Charles E. Kemper; Postoffice, Brownlow; fish commission Ravenal; Smithsonian Institute and National Museum, True; Navy, McCormick; War, Interior, Agriculture and Justice have not yet designated their representatives.

STRIKE NIPPED IN THE BUD

WALKING DELEGATES ARE TURNED DOWN

Staff Workers on Exposition Buildings Propose to Manage Their Own Affairs, Independent of Dictates of Labor Unions.

The staff workers employed by the contractors who are doing the staff work on the exposition buildings have formed a labor union among themselves. The membership of the new union is about twenty, this being the number of men at present employed by L. Bonet and Smith & Eastman, the only staff contractors who have established plants on the grounds. As the work progresses the number of men employed will be largely increased, and will probably reach 200 or more. The new union has been incorporated and officers elected. The officers are as follows: Guerin Perino, president; Peter Pali, vice president; John Gonnella, treasurer; Emil Weber, recording secretary; James Burdo, financial secretary.

This action on the part of the staff workers was the direct result of an attempt on the part of certain representatives of the local union of the plasterers to dictate to the staff contractors who they should employ and the amount of wages which should be paid. These representatives waited on the staff contractors and informed them that they must pay a certain scale of wages or there would be trouble. They also indicated that members of the local plasterers' union should be employed instead of bringing men from the outside. Inquiry of these walking delegates developed the fact that the plasterers' union contains about twenty members, none of whom understand the handling or working of staff. The men employed by the staff contractors are all experts in their line, all of them having been employed for years in the manufacture of staff and stucco work.

After considering the matter the contractors came to the conclusion that it would be disastrous to think of employing men who were utterly ignorant of working staff. It was also realized that a failure to comply with the demands of organized labor, however unreasonable, meant a strike of the other workmen employed on the exposition buildings. As a solution of the difficulty, the men employed by the staff contractors formed an organization and carried the matter further than is usually done with labor organizations by filing regular articles of incorporation. Thus an incipient strike was nipped in the bud and the walking delegates took credit for another organization added to the list.

CARPENTERS FINISH THEIR WORK.

Administration Building About Ready for Staff Workers.

The carpenter work of the Administration building is almost completed, there remaining but a few finishing touches to be added before the last carpenter descends from his lofty perch at the summit of the lantern which surmounts the tall building. In the meantime the work of putting on the staff has been progressing rapidly under the archway, through which the throngs of exposition visitors will pass to reach the north tract. The staff covering beneath the arches is taking the form of massive ribs, resting upon a heavy cornice at each side of the arch. The effect is most pleasing and is to be still further enhanced by the addition of rosettes about one foot in diameter which are to be placed between the ribs. The work is proceeding rapidly and an idea may now be obtained of how the building will look when completed.

Contractor Bonet has completed a large amount of the staff work for the Administration building and a great deal of it is stored in the lower part of the structure ready for the workmen. For covering the entire building, about sixty tons of raw plaster will be required, and a considerable portion of this has already been made into castings. The remainder will be put on the building much after the fashion of mortar. This latter method is only practical for plain surface, of which there is only a limited amount on this particular building. As soon as the carpenters have finished their work on the building the staff men will commence on the outside where their work will be more in evidence.

Daley Completes the Sewer.

The laying of the sewer on the bluff tract and north tract of the exposition grounds has been completed. The contractor was John F. Daley. No contract for this work has ever been submitted to the executive committee by the Department of Buildings and Grounds for approval, but after receiving bids from several contractors for furnishing the material and laying the pipe, Daley was ordered by Superintendent of Construction Geraldine to go ahead with the work. Inquiry of several contractors who bid on the work, including Daley himself, developed the fact that there were no specifications, so far as they knew, and the quality of the pipe which was put in the sewer trenches is a conundrum. The matter has been the subject of inquiry several times in meetings of the executive committee, but Mr. Geraldine is reported to have stated that "No contract was necessary."

A contract with Daley was filed with the secretary this morning after the auditor had refused to make a voucher for the payment of an estimate allowed the contractor by Geraldine.

Notes of the Exposition.

D. C. Hoke of Bismarck, N. D., has applied for space for an exhibit of ice cream freezers.

The Department of Exhibits is about ready to issue application blanks in German, French, Spanish and Italian.

A prominent firm of Italian importers in New York has applied for space in the Italian section for exhibiting antique furniture, marbles, majolica ware, etc.

Martin Kingman of Peoria, Ill., has received the application from Governor Tanner, as one of the ten members of the Board of Commissioners of Illinois to the Transmississippi and International Exposition, to be held at Omaha.

The Consolidated Steel and Wire company of Joliet, Ill., has made application for 616 square feet of space in the Manufactures building for an operating exhibit showing a barb wire machine and a wire nail machine in active operation.

H. Albert Johnson, United States consul at Venice, has notified the exposition that he will be pleased to assist in any way in securing exhibits for the exposition. He performed the same service for the World's fair and offers several suggestions as the result of this experience.

A meeting of the Douglas County Horticultural society will be held tomorrow evening at 8 o'clock, in the rooms of the park commissioners in the city hall, to which all interested in horticulture and floriculture are invited to meet the executive committee of the Transmississippi Exposition association.

The water pipe for the exposition grounds is arriving and the work of putting these pipes under ground will be commenced as soon as the pipe can be unloaded. The contract for putting in pipes was awarded to William Fitch for $3,229, he being the lowest bidder when the bids for this work were opened September 1. The work will be pushed as rapidly as possible.

Thomas T. Stokes, commissioner for the New England states, has sent the Department of Exhibits a list containing the names of 111 New England firms of manufacturers and jobbers, with the request that the department make calculations for allotting space to each of them. Mr. Stokes is acting in conjunction with the Boston Chamber of Commerce in organizing New England manufacturers to make creditable exhibits at the Transmississippi Exposition and reports that he is meeting with most encouraging success.

Sealed bids will be received at the office of the Grounds and Buildings Department of the Transmississippi and International Exposition until 5 o'clock p. m., Saturday, September 18, for the construction of the Liberal Arts building. Plans and specifications on file in the superintendent's office, No. 634 Paxton block, or sets will be furnished contractors at cost.


F. P. KIRKENDALL,
Manager Grounds and Building Dept.
Sept 10 d8t m&e
 

RECOMMENDS A MUSICAL DIRECTOR.

Another important matter which was laid before the executive committee was a report and recommendation by Manager Lindsey regarding the formation of a plan for the operation of the musical bureau of the exposition and the appointment of a musical director. The report of Mr. Lindsey was as follows:

To the executive committee of the Transmississippi and International Exposition: I hereby recommend the employment, under the rules of the exposition of A. Rommel, of the Mount Pleasant Conservatory of Music of Mount Pleasant, Ia., as musical director of the Transmississippi and International Exposition, upon the terms and conditions herein stated, and I also submit his plan, which I approve, subject to change and modification in detail.

Plan—The music should be divided into two classes, one for amusement pure and simple, the other for the purpose of showing the advancement the art of music has made in the western states compared with the industrial arts.

For Amusement—Band concerts; promenade concerts by orchestra; daily afternoon performances by band; concerts by orchestra and soloists consisting of popular programs; operatic concerts; musical extravaganzas, such as musical tableaux, and the like.

Or showing the advancement of music in the west—Symphony concerts; oratorio performances; production of works by composers living in the west.

To carry out the above plan an orchestra and a band would be needed of skilled performers. As many as are competent would be engaged from among musicians in Omaha and vicinity. For an orchestra of about fifty performers and a band of about forty-five the cost would be about $1,200 per week. The additional expense would be the procuring of music, either by rental or purchase and the salaries of director and two assistant conductors, one for orchestra and one for chorus.

Sources of Income from Music—Recitals by noted artists; concerts by orchestra and soloists consisting of popular programs; operatic concerts; musical extravaganzas; symphony concerts; oratorio performances; production of works by composers living in the west; state concerts.

SOURCE OF INCOME.

By state concerts are meant concerts given by representative musical bodies of the different states, from which they would receive half the proceeds and free admission to the grounds on the day of the concerts. Two of the above performances would be given each week. Oratorio performances or symphony concerts would take place Sunday afternoons, and the other concerts would take place on an afternoon or evening during the week. This would give forty-four performances on a large scale, which, properly managed should yield an average income of $1,000 each, amounting to $44,000 during the season.

There should be free band and orchestral music if possible both afternoon and evening, except at the time of the pay performances. For marches, processions on special days, fireworks etc., the band would be ready to render service.

Mr. Rommel would take full charge of the music of the exposition, giving all the time necessary for successfully carrying out the above plan for the sum of $2,500 for the entire period from now until the close of the exposition, agreeing if elected to take $1,000 worth of exposition stock; salary to be paid monthly from the beginning of the engagement; all necessary traveling expenses to be paid, including hotel bills except while in Omaha and in Mount Pleasant.

Assistant conductors for chorus and orchestral work would not be under pay until the opening of the exposition.

I have known Mr. Rommel personally for over twenty-five years. He is known throughout Iowa and Illinois as a musician of great ability, a man of good business qualifications and bears the reputation of being an honest man. He is a German and received a thorough musical training in Germany, coming to America when a young man about 22 or 23 years of age. He first settled in Baltimore and afterward removed to Burlington, Ia. He was called to Mount Pleasant to take charge of the music in one of the educational institutions, and for many years has successfully conducted the Mount Pleasant Conservatory of Music, besides being director of music in the Iowa Wesleyan college of that place and director of music in Parsons college, Fairfield. He is a member of the American College of Musicians, incorporated in New York, from which he received the degree of Mus. Doc., and has held the position of vice president of the National Music Teachers' association. In 1892 Mr. Rommel received a gold medal from the Iowa Music Teachers' association for the best instrumental composition.

WELL EDUCATED MUSICIAN.

Frederic Grant Gleason, the well-known composer, says: "I regard Mr. Rommel as an exceptionally well educated musician. He has made a thorough study of harmony, counterpoint and fugue (single and double), besides devoting considerable attention to free composition and orchestration.

George Ellsworth Holmes and Charles W. Clark, well known oratorio singers both speak in terms of warmest praise of Mr. Rommel's ability as a conductor and musician. James A. Guest, the most prominent dealer of musical merchandise in Burlington, says: "I have known Mr. Rommel for many years. He is regarded as one of the best musicians in the state. He has shown himself particularly efficient in directing the production of performances of large works. He has given many extensive choral performances, as the 'Messiah,' 'Creation,' 'Elijah,' etc., and they have always been successes."

Hans Albert of this city says: "I regard Mr. Rommel as one of the best known musicians in this country, one for whom I have the most profound respect and admiration. During our business relations about seven years ago I had a fine opportunity to observe Mr. Rommel's remarkable executive ability, which is on a par with his musicianship."

Through his own exertions Mr. Rommel has acquired considerable property and has good financial standing in the community in which he lives. Mr. Rommel is a very conservative man, fully appreciating the stupendous nature and accompanying expense of a great exposition, and if elected would conduct the musical department in the most economical manner possible. Respectfully submitted


Z. T. LINDSEY

In connection with this report Mr. Lindsey also read a letter from Mrs. George W. Holdredge of this city, strongly endorsing Prof. Rommel as a musician of ability.

Action on the matter was deferred until Friday of this week, the day of the regular meeting of the committee, to give the members an opportunity to consider the details of the plan suggested by Mr. Lindsey.

 

LIST CONTINUES TO GROW

THREE MORE CONVENTIONS FOR NEXT YEAR

Old-Time Telegraphers, the Military Telegraphers and the Superintendents of Cemeteries Decide to Come to the Exposition.

The list of conventions which will meet in Omaha next year continues to grow. Scarcely a day passes without at least one more convention being added to the already long list. Yesterday's record shows the addition of three more gatherings for exposition year, consisting of the Old-Time Telegraphers' association, the Association of United States Military Telegraphers and the Association of American Superintendents of Cemeteries. The two first named organizations have been holding their meeting in Nashville and Omaha was selected as the place for the meeting next year. Colonel J. J. Dickey, superintendent of the Western Union Telegraph company in Omaha, was elected president of the Old Timers' association, and Edward Rosewater, one of the delegates from Omaha, was elected vice president of the Military Telegraphers' association.

The selection of Omaha as the next place of meeting by these two societies was largely the work of Mr. Rosewater. He was aided in the work by the fact that when the associations met in this city five years ago they were royally entertained and the members had very pleasant recollections of the visit.

The Old Timers' association is composed of persons who were telegraph operators twenty years before the date of their application for membership. The Military Telegraphers' association is composed entirely of operators who were in the military service of the government during the war. The membership of this latter organization, like that of the Grand Army of the Republic, is rapidly dwindling, but the membership of the other society is increasing. The total membership of both societies is about 1,000. When the associations met in Omaha five years ago there were about 250 strangers in attendance, including the wives of several of the members. The sessions usually continue about two days and conclude with a banquet.

This morning word was received that the city has bagged the next year's meeting of the Association of American Cemetery Superintendents, and in order to make the chain complete the local undertakers have gotten an additional hump on themselves to get the 1898 meeting of the International Undertakers' association.

President J. Y. Craig of the Forest Lawn Cemetery association telegraphed this morning to the effect that the next meeting of the Association of American Cemetery Superintendents had been secured for Omaha. He is the only delegate from this state in attendance at this year's meeting, which is being held at Cincinnati, but his lone efforts did the work. The gathering is expected to bring to the city about 1,000 people, as the number of delegates in attendance is usually about 500 and they are ordinarily accompanied by their wives and families. The session will last about four days. Every city of any size in the country is represented in the association.

The International Undertakers' association meets in Milwaukee next month. A delegation is going from this state to capture the next year's meeting. This contingent is composed of Undertaker Heafey of this city, Roberts of Lincoln, Warner of North Platte and Bell of Norfolk. This meeting will also bring about 500 delegates and their families.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETS.

Bonds of Contractors Are Presented and Approved.

The executive committee of the exposition met last evening, with three members present.

The contract and bond of William Fitch for laying the water pipes on the exposition grounds were approved, the bond being for $1,800, with the United States Fidelity and Guaranty company as surety.

The contract and bond of Hamilton Bros. for the Machinery and Electricity building was also approved, the bond being in the sum of $10,000, with the American Surety company of New York as surety.

A resolution prepared by President Wattles as acting manager of the Department of Buildings and Grounds was adopted, providing that the action of the executive committee in awarding the contract for laying the sewer on the bluff and north tracts of the exposition grounds to John F. Daley be filed with the secretary as the only necessary contract and that the action of the Department of Buildings and Grounds and the president, in that connection, be approved.

As a forestallment of this action of the committee a document had been filed with the secretary earlier in the day. This document consisted of a copy of the journal, showing the action of the executive committee in awarding the contract to Daley, and a letter written to Daley by Superintendent of Construction Geraldine, dated August 29, notifying Daley of such action and ordering him to proceed at once with sufficient force to complete the work by September 15. Daley's acceptance was noted in ink on the face of the order, with his signature, and the signature of President Wattles attached, no date being written in either case. Attached to these two documents was a copy of the printed specifications used by the city of Omaha in its sewer contracts.

Woman Manager for Texas.

Mrs. James Baird of Iowa Park, Tex., has been appointed one of the members of the advisory board of the Women's Board of Managers of the exposition. Mrs. Baird is a sister of N. P. Dodge of Council Bluffs and has been visiting him during the summer. She was at exposition headquarters this morning in consultation with Secretary Ford of the Women's board regarding the functions of members of the advisory board. The appointment of Mrs. Baird to this position is regarded with a great deal of satisfaction by the members of the executive committee of the Women's board, as they say she has an extensive acquaintance in Texas and will be of great assistance to the board.

Advertising the Exposition.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion is at work on another pamphlet which will be issued soon. The pamphlet will contain new matter entirely, together with several cuts of the main buildings which have not yet been published. The demand for the literature issued by this department is enormous, and the people who call for it say they want it to mail to their friends and business acquaintances in all sections of the country. The department is continually crowded to supply the demands which are made upon it for the pamphlets, pictures, etc., which are being issued as fast as the printing presses can turn the manner out.

Exhibit of Nebraska Products.

General Passenger Agent Francis of the B. & M. this morning added to his collection of Nebraska products for exhibit in eastern and middle states 150 bushels of early Ohio potatoes of fine quality. They were grown at St. Francis, on the western edge of Nebraska, the section of the state that was once known as "the arid region." The potatoes were planted on May 15, and have been cultivated once a week since then. They were grown under the principles of the Campbell system of soil culture by A. R. McCullum.

Working for Another Convention.

The American Forestry association will hold a special meeting at Nashville September 22 and invitations to the society to hold its meeting in Omaha next year have been sent to officers of the association, and also to Prof. F. W. Taylor, who is in Nashville on exposition business with Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion. Manager Rosewater expects to return this week, but Prof. Taylor will probably remain to attend the meeting of the forestry association and endeavor to secure the next meeting for Omaha in conjunction with the agriculture congresses which will be held here during the exposition.

NEBRASKA COMMISSION AT WORK.

Bids for State Building to Be Opened Next Monday.

The superintendent of construction for the Nebraska Exposition commission has let the contract or supplying the piles necessary for the foundation for the Nebraska building to P. A. Gavin of Omaha. Negotiations are pending with several parties for driving the piles.

Bids for furnishing all the material required in the erection of the Nebraska building will be received at the headquarters of the state commission until noon on Saturday of this week. These bids will be opened by the commission at a meeting to be held next Monday at 7:30 p. m., at which time it is expected that the contracts for supplying the material will be awarded, and that the superintendent of construction will be ordered to proceed at once with the erection of the building.

Inquiry at exposition headquarters developed the fact that the state commission has not yet complied with the rules of the exposition by filing its application for space, complete plans and specifications for the building it proposes to erect to be passed on by the executive committee before space is allotted the state board.

The Nebraska commission will open headquarters on the State fair grounds next Monday, and will maintain these headquarters during the fair. The State Fair board has assigned the commission space in the Horticultural building and Secretary Dearing will have his office there during the week. All the members of the state commission will be at the fair grounds during the progress of the fair to get in touch with exhibitors.

Plan for Canadian Exhibit.

Superintendent Hardt of the Department of Exhibits feels sure that the Canadian exhibit at the exposition will be very extensive. He bases this opinion on interviews he has had with W. J. White, the representative of the Canadian government who was in this city for the purpose of installing a Canadian exhibit at the State fair. Mr. Hardt states that the fact that a new government is in power in Canada will be a strong factor in the exposition's favor. He says he feels certain that the Dominion will make a fine exhibit showing its resources. Mr. White told Mr. Hardt that after he had installed the State fair exhibit he would devote several days to the exposition and would make a thorough investigation with a view of making an exhaustive report to his government.

Colorado's Mineral Exhibit.

According to Secretary Mischke of the Colorado Exposition Commission the Centennial state intends to carry off the palm for having the finest exhibit of minerals in the entire exposition. Mr. Mischke writes to the Department of Exhibits that Mining Commissioner Lee, who is a member of the exposition commission, is in the field all the time with two experts, collecting mineral specimens for the Colorado exhibit, the intention being to add these specimens to the extensive collection already in possession of the state. This entire collection now fills six rooms in the Colorado capitol building. Mr. Mischke writes that the collectors have not yet visited the Cripple Creek or Breckinridge districts.

Notes of the Exposition.

The executive committee of the Women's Board of Managers will meet Wednesday of next week.

Ed Hall of Des Moines, Ia., has applied for forty feet of wall space in the Liberal Arts building for exhibition of several paintings.

Commercial Agent Montague of New Mexico writes to the Department of Exhibits that the people in that section are manifesting a great interest in the exposition and he is closing a number of contracts for space for exhibits. Among other things, he says he expects to close a deal with a large fruit ranch in Raton for space for an extensive exhibit.

President Wattles has received a letter from the representative of the United States Fish commission on the Transmississippi Exposition, making inquiries regarding the water supply and pressure at the exposition grounds, and stating that the commission will probably install an extensive fish exhibit, similar to the one at the Nashville exposition.

BLUFFITES HARD AT WORK

WILL MAKE A SHOWING AT THE EXPOSITION

Business Men Organize for the Purpose of Bringing Western Iowa to the Attention of the Public.

The general committee of the Council Bluffs Exposition association held its regular meeting in Council Bluffs last evening and discussed matters connected with the work of the association. The most important action taken was the determination of the committee to incorporate and give the organization a legal status. This matter was brought up by E. H. Walters while the subject of finance was under discussion. He called attention to the fact that each member of the committee was personally liable for the debts of the organization, and as it was likely that the committee would handle considerable money and become involved in expenditures of large sums there might be some undesirable sequels and afterclaps. With the organization properly incorporated under the state laws the individual members of the association could not be liable for any debts and deficits that might remain when the work of the association was closed next year. The suggestion met a favorable response, and the officers of the association were directed to prepare articles of incorporation and submit them at a special meeting to be held in the city building on Monday evening.

The committee on literature submitted the matter that was designed to be used on the official letterhead of the association. Several suggestions were made, making alterations and additions, and it was referred back to the committee and Secretary Judson for that purpose. One of the suggestions was the preparation of a small map in outline showing the location of the exposition grounds, their nearness to Council Bluffs and accessibility by railway and street car lines. It was thought advisable to design this map so that it could be used on the backs of envelopes sent out by business men, and should become Council Bluffs' distinctive exposition seal. In this way the nearness of the grounds to the hotels and the central part of the city could be made very prominent and advertised all over the country. The committee and the secretary were ordered to have printed at once 5,000 of these letterheads and envelopes. The write-up of Council Bluffs was also referred back to the literature committee for some changes and emendations that the general committee thought advisable to incorporate in it.

RAISING A FUND.

The chairmen of the various committees were unable to comply with the request of the general committee to submit estimates []   than November 15. Mr. Walters, chairman of that committee, thought with the association properly incorporated and all danger of personal liability removed, the committee would have far less trouble in raising the money required.

The suggestion of a general local exhibit free to all and in a prominent locality was considered at some length. Mr. Bixby believed that a good plan would be to lease the lower floor of the Eiseman building and use it for the general headquarters of the committee and for the local exhibit, assigning space to each township in the county. This exhibit was not intended to interfere in any way with the proposed exhibit in the exposition, but as simply an additional effort to show the resources of the county. The rental of the large room, which contained more floor space than was contained in either of the Sioux City corn palaces, was fixed at $2,500 for the year, and this amount was not thought to be excessive in view of the fact that nearly half of the sum would be required for the rental of suitable headquarters elsewhere. No action was taken, but the matter was looked upon with considerable favor, and may become a part of the big schemes of the association. A new committee was appointed to take up the headquarters question and incidentally consider this also. The committee is composed of W. A. Maurer, H. W. Binder, Dr. Barstow and M. Wollman.

General Test submitted a resolution, asking the assistance of the women in making an attractive educational, horticultural, artistic and floral exhibit. Mr. Test, as chairman of the transportation committee, also reported favorable correspondence with several of the railroad companies concerning transportation matters. The Union Pacific announced that through trains would be run from the Broadway depot to the State Fair grounds. He reported that President Wells of the motor company had assured his committee that the company would run its motor trains to the gates of the exposition next year, and give the best service it could under the conditions that might then prevail.

STILL ANOTHER CONVENTION

GOOD ROADS PARLIAMENT COMES IN 1898

National Gathering Now Being Held at Nashville Decides Upon Omaha as the Next Meeting Place.

The list of conventions that will be held in Omaha during exposition year continues to grow at a rapid rate, and scarcely a day passes that some gathering of importance is not secured. The latest convention that has fixed upon Omaha is the National Good Roads parliament, now in session at Nashville, Tenn.

At noon today Prof. Taylor telegraphed that by a unanimous vote the delegates in attendance upon the annual session of the National Good Roads parliament had decided to meet in Omaha in 1898.

The National Good Roads parliament is one of the largest conventions secured, it being attended by nearly 5,000 delegates, who come not only from all of the states of the union, but from many of the foreign countries. The sessions usually continue for a week. With the convention comes a large number of inventors and men who are interested in road working machines. In addition to the delegates and those who naturally follow the convention, representatives of the government are interested, an appropriation being made for the display of the machines that the United States has used in dredging and improving the highways that are under its direct control.

TO EXHIBIT NEBRASKA FLOWERS.

Florists Discuss Outlook for State Horticultural Display.

About a dozen of the florists of Omaha, together with the officers of the Douglas County Horticultural society, met in the rooms of the Board of Park Commissioners in the city hall last night to discuss the matter of a Douglas county floral exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition.

President Adams of the Horticultural society occupied the chair, and an informal discussion of the matter now under consideration occupied the time for about two hours. President Marshall and Vice President Hadkinson of the Nebraska Horticultural society were present and took part in the discussion. It was the concensus of opinion that a creditable floral display should be made by the Nebraska florists at the exposition, especially in view of the fact that the National Society of Florists would hold its annual meeting in Omaha during the exposition. It was also stated that the only florists in the state who are so situated as to be able to make any kind of a display are located in Omaha.

After discussing the best manner of bringing about a fine floral exhibit it was decided to appoint a committee of three to prepare an estimate of the amount of space which will be required for a good exhibit, together [] filled in a creditable manner, the committee being instructed to report to an adjourned meeting to be held at the same place Saturday night of this week. It was also decided that when the amount of space and other details are determined the Nebraska Exposition commission would be asked to set aside a portion of the state appropriation for the purpose of securing space and providing for the other expenses for the exhibit. The matter will be laid before the state commission at its meeting Monday of next week.

Before adjourning the chairman appointed as this committee Messrs. Erfling, Henderson and A. Peterson.

MUCH INTEREST IN COLORADO.

State Will Not Have a Building on the Grounds.

The Colorado Exposition commission has asked the governor of Colorado to increase the number of commissioners by adding representatives of interests which are not now represented on the board. They ask that Colonel Hooper, the well known general ticket and freight agent of the Denver & Rio Grand Railway company, be made a member of the commission, and that two members be added to represent the educational interests of the state and one member to represent the coal and iron trade.

A letter from Secretary Mischke of the commission to the Department of Exhibits states: "Mrs. Emma Homan Thayer, a member of the commission who is well known to Omaha, has returned from a visit to Omaha and has made a most enthusiastic report to the commission of the progress which has been made by the exposition management in promoting the enterprise. Mrs. Thayer informs the commission of the work which has been done and which is being done by the exposition people. She has aroused a great deal of enthusiasm among the other members of the commission."

The letter of the secretary also states that the commission took up the matter of erecting a separate building for the Colorado exhibits, but concluded, after full consideration, that the best results would be accomplished by exhibiting Colorado's products in the various buildings where they properly belonged in order that opportunity for comparison might be had.

WILL HELP IN EXPOSITION WORK.

United States Consul Send Word to Department of Publicity.

The Department of Publicity recently mailed special letters to United States consuls throughout the world, enclosing illustrated pamphlets and soliciting the co-operation of the officers of the government in promoting the Transmississippi Exposition in foreign countries.

Replies have been received from a number of the officials. All are uniformly cordial in tone and many of then contain suggestions which may prove of great value. Juan I. Casanova, vice consul at Cienfugos, concludes his letter thus: "You may be sure that this office will do all in its power to forward the desires of the managers of the exposition." Consul Andrew D. Barbord, City of Mexico, tenders his kindly offices. Consul William W. Canada, Vera Cruz, says: "I place myself subject to your orders; am willing to do all I can to assist the project." Consul Pulaski F. Hyatt, Santiago de Cuba, says, in part: "It will afford me great pleasure to do all in my power to aid in advancing the interests of your great undertaking. It has occurred to me that it would be well to forward to our consuls abroad a limited number of complimentary invitations to place where, in the judgment of each consul, such invitations would do the most good." Other replies are very similar in tone, and the department will follow up this line of operation.

WILL COME TO OMAHA NEXT YEAR.

Parts of Battleship "Omaha" Secured for Exposition Purposes.

General Charles F. Manderson this morning received an answer from the Navy department at Washington to his request, made sometime ago, that parts of the old battleship "Omaha" to be sent to this city for exhibition at the Transmississippi and International Exposition and for permanent keeping in the city public library after the close of the exposition. Theodore Roosevelt, assistant secretary of the navy, has given the matter careful consideration, and as a result of his investigations the billet-head and the bell of the battleship will form a part of the army and navy exhibit of the exposition here next year.

In his letter to General Manderson Assistant Secretary Roosevelt states that the billethead and the bell are the only parts of the old battleship, which now does duty as a quarantine station at Mare Island, on the Pacific coast, that are feasible to exhibit. As for the permanent exhibition of these parts in the public library, the Navy department suggests that it would take a special act of congress to authorize the transfer. General Manderson thinks that this could be secured without difficulty. The picture of the "Omaha" now on exhibition in the public library is said to be very faithful representation of the battleship in which a new interest has been recently created in this city.

Eastern People Will Exhibit.

Commissioner Thomas T. Stokes, the New England representative of the exposition, is awakening a great interest in the exposition among the manufacturing and other interests of the staid old colonies. His last letter to the Department of Exhibits contains the information that a big exposition of the manufacturing interests of the New England states is soon to be held at Lynn, Mass., and Mr. Stokes says he intends to get the entire lot of exhibits shipped direct to Omaha for exhibition at the exposition. Reports are received from him almost daily, showing the work he is doing, and these are usually accompanied by applications for space to prove that his statements are not unwarranted.

Notes of the Exposition.

G. E. Shukert of Omaha has applied for 216 feet of space in which he proposes to install a working exhibit showing the operation of making fur garments of all kinds.

T. Wood & Co., Boston, manufacturers of builders' hardware, have applied for space in the Manufactures building.

John S. Brown & Sons of Belfast, Ireland, have applied for 500 feet of space in the Manufactures building for a display of table linens, damask, etc.

WILL BE OPENED ON TIME

EXPOSITION COMMITTEE QUIETS RUMOR

Energy of the Management Turned to Pushing the Work that There May Be No Delay or Failure.

At the regular meeting of the executive committee of the Transmississippi Exposition yesterday a general discussion arose among the members of the committee regarding statements that are said to be in circulation in certain quarters to the effect that the exposition will not be opened on time, June 1, 1898. The members of the committee who were present united in saying most emphatically that there would be no failure to have the gates opened promptly on time and that every energy was being turned to that end. In this connection the secretary was instructed to furnish the committee with a statement, showing the contracts already let for the buildings, the date of the contracts and the date at which the buildings are required to be complete.

The action taken at the meeting last Saturday night in awarding the contract for the carpenter work on the Agriculture building to the Congress Construction company of Chicago was reconsidered and the contract for this work was awarded to Goldie & Sons of Chicago.

When the bids for the Agriculture building were opened it was found that the Congress Construction company had offered to do the carpenter work for $28,569, but it was stipulated that painting and glazing and piling were not included. The next higher bid, on its face, was that of Goldie & Sons of Chicago, $39,440. The bid of W. H. Parrish of Omaha was $39,874. Goldie offered to deduct $1,000 for piling if done by the exposition, while Parrish offered to allow $1,700 for the same item.

At the meeting yesterday afternoon President Wattles, as acting manager for the Department of Buildings and Grounds, reported that the Congress Construction company, when notified that it was the lowest bidder, had said a mistake had been made in the figures and that the figures given did not include a lot of items beside those specified in the bid. The president of the company, Gustave Ehrhart, came to Omaha with affidavits to show that a large number of things had been omitted in the schedule from which had been made up the lump bid.

FORFEITING ITS CHECK.

President Wattles served notice on Mr. Ehrhart to sign the contract within twenty-four hours or forfeit the check of $400 which accompanied the bid. This time expired at 10 o'clock yesterday morning, and Mr. Ehrhart appeared with a lawyer and said he was ready to sign the contract, but insisted on being allowed to put his construction on the bid, excluding all the roofing material, translucent material proposed to be used for skylight, painting and glazing, piling, etc.

President Wattles then had estimates made of the probable cost of the items which Mr. Ehrhart wanted to omit, with the following result: Translucent material, $3,172.97; roofing, $1,100; painting and glazing, $1,400; piling, $1,300; total, $6,792.97. Mr. Ehrhart's   estimate of the cost of these items was $1,000 more than that quoted, making his total bid for the building complete without the staff, $36,541.97, or $2,898.03 below the bid of Goldie & Sons.

These facts and figures were discussed in detail by the executive committee, and it was finally decided that the course taken by the Congress Construction company indicated that the execution of a contract with that concern for this building would probably result in endless trouble, as it was evident from attendant circumstances that the attitude taken was merely a subterfuge. The action of the committee in awarding the contract to this company was therefore reconsidered, the disposition of the check being left to the president.

This left the contract in the air, and a discussion then ensued on awarding the job to either Goldie & Sons of Chicago or Parrish of Omaha. Goldie was lower than Parrish, if the piling was given to him, but higher by $266 if the exposition did the piling. A strong argument in Goldie's favor, however, was the fact that he asked only eighty days in which to complete the building, whereas Parrish wanted 150 days, or five months. This point proved a winner, as the strong sentiment of the committee was to the effect that the buildings must be rushed to counteract the impression that little is being done. It was decided that it would delay matters very materially for the exposition to attempt to do the piling, and these two facts taken together outweighed the strong sentiment in favor of awarding the contract to an Omaha man. The contract was then awarded to Goldie & Sons, thus giving the firm the two largest buildings on the grounds, viz.: The Mines and Mining and the Agriculture buildings. The contract on the former requires it to be completed within ninety days from the execution of the contract and the latter building is to be completed within eighty days. Mr. Goldie stated yesterday that he would have his material for the Agriculture building ordered within twenty-four hours after he received his contract.

BIDS FOR ART BUILDING.

President Wattles announced that the plans and specifications of the Art building would be ready by Saturday of next week for advertising for bids for the construction of the building, and he recommended that the Department of Buildings and Grounds be authorized to call for bids for supplying and driving the piles for this building, the bids to be opened Saturday of next week in order that delay might be avoided. The recommendation was adopted.

The president also announced that the new plans for the Auditorium would be completed within two weeks.

On recommendation of Superintendent J. B. Dinsmore of the live stock section D. J. Richards of Omaha was appointed commercial agent for the poultry section.

The Department of Buildings and Grounds was authorized to have photographs made of the buildings as the construction progresses to form a part of the records, the pictures to be taken at intervals of about one week.

On recommendation of Manager Reed of the Department of Concessions the concession for the check stand privileges was let to William I. Kierstead of this city.

A letter from the secretary of the Nebraska Electrical Medical society announced that the society had appointed a committee consisting of Drs. J. M. Keys, W. S. Yager and I. Van Camp, all of Omaha, to represent that branch of the profession in any arrangement which may be made regarding a medical board for the exposition. The matter was referred to the Department of Buildings and Grounds.

The executive committee will meet with the Nebraska Exposition commission at its meeting Monday night of next week to confer regarding matters of common interest.

Secretary Wakefield was authorized to expend a limited amount of money in decorating the exposition headquarters for the fall festivities.

The time for filing bids for the erection of the Nebraska building of the Transmississippi Exposition closed at noon today. At that time eight bids had been received. They will be opened at the meeting of the [?] commission next Monday night.

AWARD ANOTHER CONTRACT

Omaha Man Secures the Carpenter Work on the Liberal Arts Building.

NINETY DAYS IN WHICH TO COMPLETE IT

Contracts Now Let for Six Principal Exposition Buildings, All of Which Will Be Completed by Next February.

Gift

The contract for the carpenter work on the Liberal Arts building was let last night to Wallace H. Parrish of Omaha and he agrees to complete the frame work of the building, ready for the staff workers, within ninety days from the execution of his contract. This makes six of the main buildings of the exposition on which contracts have now been let, viz.: Administration, Manufactures, Mines and Mining, Machinery and Electricity, Agriculture, Liberal Arts. All of these buildings are under contract to be completed, including the staff and finishing, before February 1, next year. This covers all of the large buildings, the ones yet remaining being smaller in size and requiring less time for their construction.

The executive committee held a special meeting at the office of the Department of Buildings and Grounds last night to open bids for the Liberal Arts building and award the contract. Ten bids were received for the carpenter work and two for doing the staff work. The carpentry bids in detail were as follows:

R. A. Estell, Omaha, $22,625.65; deduct for piling if done by the exposition, $1,000; deduct if corner pavilion is omitted, $100; time, sixty days.

Hamilton Bros., Omaha, $23,700; deduct for piling, $800; deduct for painting and glazing, $800; deduct for gallery, $1,500; deduct for pavilion, $150; time, 120 days.

Gwin & Henderson, Omaha, $25,700; deduce for piling, $1,300; deduct for painting and glazing, $900; for gallery, $2,000; for pavilion, $35; time, 120 days.

W. H. Parrish, Omaha, $20,266; deduct for piling, $500; for painting and glazing, $700; for gallery, $3,300; for pavilion, $60; time, ninety days.

John Rasmussen, Omaha, $21,741; deduct for piling, $775; for painting and glazing, $800; for gallery, $1,698; time, 150 days.

George H. King, Council Bluffs, $19,359; deduct for piling, $800; for painting and glazing, $725; for gallery, $2,100; for pavilion, $100; time, ninety days.

Congress Construction company of Chicago, $22,969; deduct for piling, $1,300; for painting and glazing, $800; for gallery, $2,100; for pavilion, $100; time, ninety days.

Westlake Construction company of St. Louis, $22,196; bid sent by telegraph; other items not covered, but notice given that formal bid had been mailed.

Robert Budke of Omaha, $25,330; deduct for piling, $620; for painting and glazing, $750; for gallery, $2,875; for pavilion, $800; time, 120 days.

William Goldie & Sons, Chicago, $20,740; deduct for piling, $650; for painting and glazing, $800; for gallery, $1,500; for pavilion, $100; time not stated.

The bids for the staff work were as follows: Smith & Eastman, Chicago, $7,300; time, thirty days; John L. Nelson & Bro., Chicago, $6,400; time not stated.

After the bids were opened the committee decided that the gallery in this building should be omitted and this decision made Parrish the lowest bidder, his figures for the gallery without the building being $16,966. The contract was thereupon awarded to him and he will be called upon to execute it at once.

No action was taken on the bids for the staff and plaster work, as there was no great haste about this matter. Nelson's bid is the lowest, but this same firm was also lowest on the Agriculture building but have not responded to a notice to appear at once and enter into a contract for the Agriculture building.

WORK ON EXPOSITION BUILDINGS.

Goldie & Sons Say They Will Be Ready for Staff Next Month.

The contract for the construction of the Agriculture building has been closed with Goldie & Sons of Chicago, the time limit of eighty days specified in the bid having been cut down by Mr. Goldie to seventy days. The big building will be ready for the staff workers November 27.

A report has been current that Mr. Goldie intended to bring a large force of carpenters and other workmen from Chicago to work on this building. Mr. Goldie was questioned yesterday regarding this report and he denied most emphatically that it was true.

"I will not bring more than five or six men at most from Chicago," said Mr. Goldie. "Those will be our foremen, who have been in our employ for years, but the workingmen and carpenters who will be employed to do the work will be employed right on the grounds. We will not bring any men from Chicago other than those I have specified, but we will put a large force of men at work just as soon as possible and the work will be pushed at a rate which may surprise some of the Omaha people who are not acquainted with the manner in which these big exposition buildings are erected. We have the largest buildings on the grounds and we do not propose to let any grass grow under our feet. We will put our own mill machinery in the Mines building just as soon as the floor is ready for it and from that moment the wood will fly."

ENTHUSIASM IN THE BLACK HILLS.

Models of Mines and Smelters to Be on Exhibition.

The people of the Black Hills are holding frequent meetings for arranging for the exhibit which the Hills district is to make at the exposition. A Deadwood paper on Thursday contains three columns of an account of a meeting held in the court house at Deadwood Wednesday of this week, at which representatives were present from nearly all of the counties in the Black Hills district. The plans of the exhibits were discussed and the various representatives indicated the general nature of the exhibits which will be made their respective districts. The famous Wind Cave of the Hot Springs district will probably be reproduced on a small scale, and models of famous mines in the hills will be on every hand, together with models of smelters, stamp mills, etc. One general plan which was generally favored consisted of a stone wall surrounding the entire exhibit space, the wall to be constructed of the various kids of building and ornamental stone to be found in the hills, including onyx, quartz, pyritic ore, galena ore, copper ore, etc. Inside this wall will be installed the exhibit of grain, grasses and other resources of the hills.

It was the general sentiment of the meeting that no stone should be left unturned to make the mineral exhibit the finest of that made by any section of the country, and many suggestions were made regarding it. It was decided to apply for 6,000 square feet of space as a beginning, although it was conceded that this would not be enough and fully 10,0000​ feet would be required.

Exposition Notes.

A formal application has been received from the Black Hills people for 6,000 square feet of space for the exhibit of the resources of the Black Hills, S. D., district.

ART AT THE EXPOSITION

PROGRESS OF WORK IN SECURING EXHIBIT

Visits to the Nashville and St. Louis Expositions Result in the Selection of Many Good Exhibits.

The display of art at the Transmississippi Exposition is beginning to take form and the indications favor a collection of works of art which will reflect credit upon the west from an artistic standpoint. The collecting of the articles which are to be housed in the Art building of the exposition has been turned over by the Department of Exhibits to a committee of the Western Art association, of which committee Paul Charlton is the chairman. This committee is assisted by A. H. Griffiths, who has been appointed art director for the exposition. Mr. Griffiths is at present director of the Art museum of Detroit and has a national reputation as an art director, although he lays no claim to ability as an artist.

Messrs. Charlton and Griffiths visited the expositions in Nashville and St. Louis during the last two weeks to make selections from the large number of paintings and other works of art on exhibition at those points. Since his return from this trip Mr. Charlton expresses the greatest confidence in the magnitude and character of the art display. He says most positively that the aim of the art committee and the art director will be to secure a collection of works of art which shall be noted for its excellence and that no attempt will be made to gather a large collection of pictures and other works of art of mediocre qualiay​. On the contrary, Mr. Charlton says every picture or statue will be rigidly scrutinized on its artistic merit and the governing idea will be quality instead of quantity.

Regarding the pictures secured at Nashville and St. Louis Mr. Charlton said he and Mr. Griffiths had selected about fifty of the best pictures in the 1,200 on exhibition at Nashville and about the same number from among the 600 at the St. Louis exposition. The St. Louis collection, Mr. Charlton said, was especially good, Mr. Kurtz, a well known artist, having spent several months abroad in collecting them from among the best works of ancient and modern painters.

ART FROM ST. LOUIS MUSEUM.

In addition to securing these paintings, Messrs. Charlton and Griffiths also induced the authorities of the St. Louis museum to agree to loan the Transmississippi Exposition a number of replica of Pompeiian bronzes, as well as statuary and pictures belonging to the museum. Mr. Charlton stated, in this connection, that other museums would be requested to loan some of their treasures for the art display of the exposition. He mentioned especially a Reubens and a Murillo belonging to the Detroit museum, each of which is valued at $30,000, and a piece of Japanese carving called the "Giant Wrestlers," belonging to the same museum, which is the largest piece of Japanese carving in this country. He also said that the museums of Chicago, Cincinnati and Pittsburg will be requested to loan some of their desirable pieces.

Mr. Griffiths submitted a written report to the Department of Exhibits regarding his visit to St. Louis and Nashville with Mr. Charlton. He laid particular stress upon the point referred to by Mr. Charlton, that quality, rather than quantity, should govern the art display. He referred in detail to the pictures which had been secured for the exposition and enclosed a list of them, which is given herewith:

From the St. Louis collection: The Land of Promise, by Francois Murphy; water color, Charles F. Ulrich; The Bathers, Anders Zorn; Hen and Chickens, Pirie; landscape, A. de Faux; Solitaire, Julian Rix; portrait, Ralph Ott; Fountain at Birkaden, F. A. Bridgman; Village by Moonlight, Casin; Restaurant, E. L. Weeks; Berkshire landscape, D. Gould; Moonlight, Rook; landscape, E. M. Campbell; landscape, Bolton H. Jones; landscape, C. F. Van Saltza; portrait, Louis P. Dessar; The Half Moon, R. M. Stevenson; Elephants at Lahore, Weeks; Women Bathing; Red and Black, F. D. Marsh; Three of a Kind, W. D. Birnie; Dutch Canal, F. Briggs; A Head [?] Church Interior, Isabey; Yacht Party, A. Lynch; water color, F. H. Smith; water color, W. C. Palmer; water color, W. J. Whittemore; water color, Hamilton Gibson; The Young Cock, Joseph Ball; Portrait of a Woman, Robert Henry; portrait of James Lane Allen, B. Irwin; Marketing, B. Gilbert; Touring Club, B. L. Weeks; Two Bridges at Rouen, Pizzano; Sunset, D. J. Boget; Rabbit's Head, Pirie; Flowers (three pieces), Stewart Park; large picture of Charles the Terrible at Nessle, F. [?]oybet; French Vive, Le Charpentier; Peasant Girl, Bastian LePage; Sunset, George M[?]is; Gallaway landscape, Mouncer; Autumn Still Life, Simons; Autumn landscape, J. W. Hamilton.

SELECTIONS FROM NASHVILLE.

From the Nashville collection: Etratot, J. T. Raffaelli; portrait of John Marshall, Thomas Sully; Blessing the Boats, Robert Reid; Good Friday, Elizabeth Nourse; The Dinner, W. A. Bougerea; The Village Road, Ivan Pokitinow; The Shepherdess, George Langee; A Hot Bar[?] at Cairo, F. A. Bridgman; In the Past[?] Jules Dupree; In the Spring, Van Marie [?]Bosse; The Happy Family, B. J. Blommer; Autumn Afternoon, Victor Gilsoul; Daily T[?]nna E. Kerling; Rainy Day, B. M. Kold[?] Marine, H. W. Mesdag; The Holy Fam[?] V. Ouderaa; Sheep, Gaylord S. Trus[?]ember and A Salt Marsh, D. W. Tr[?]vening, A. T. Vanlaer; A Pastoral, Fr[?] Williams; Coming Down the River, [?] Woodwell; The Shepherd's Star, Jules [?]; The Listener, Charles E. Boutbome; [?]avorite, Florent   Willems; The Philosopher, J. L. E. Meissonier; Fond Remembrances, A. Toulmouche; portrait of Thomas Moore, Thomas Phillips; portrait of Canova, Sir Thomas Lawrence; portrait of Alexander Blair, George Romney; portrait, John Opie; portrait of H. Wright, George Moreland; Street Gamin, Louis Mettling; The Mirror, John W. Alexander; October on the Mahketewah, Edward S. Butler; A Holland Harbor, C. C. Cooper; The Mellow Autumn Time, J. F. Cropsey; Abandoned, C. H. Davis; Fisherman's Departure, Louis P. Dessar; St. Ives, Pries Pour Nous, Sergeant Kendall; Sunlight on the Sea, J. C. Nichol; Afternoon, Dutch Mother and Child, Elizabeth Nourse; Mother and Boy, The Vintage Revel, R. V. Sewell; Rainy Day, J. H. Sharp; On the Uplands, C. M. McIlhenney; Moonlight, William E. Morton; Ready for the Welding, Henry Sandham; Rosemary, E. C. Tarbell; Two Friends, Henrietta Ronner, Bride in Old Beyerland, Therese Schwartz; The Boudoir of the Queen, J. T. Hansen; Sunset, Sweden, Carl Johansson; Passage d'Iver, Leonard Schultzberg; Hagar and Ishmael, L. R. Trixen. Sculpture: Awakening of Spring, R. P. Bringhurst; Mauvais Presage, Charles Grafly; Mermaid, G. Moretti; Martyr of the Crescent, Murmur of the Sea, E. H. Wuertz.

PICTURES MUST BE EXHIBITED.

Mr. Griffiths states that in order to make sure of these meritorious pictures it will be necessary to take charge of them and expose them to the public view in some of the large eastern cities, and, he says, that he has made arrangements, on his own account, to have this done as the artists would not consent to having their pictures stored in some warehouse from the close of the expositions at which they are now displayed until the opening of the Transmississippi Exposition, June 1, 1898. Under this arrangement contracts are being made with the several artists for the delivery of their pictures in Omaha, April 15, next year.

Mr. Griffiths also says that he will secure a large and excellent collection of autotypes of the most celebrated paintings in the world.

He will go to Philadelphia and Pittsburg in October to attend the exhibitions of paintings which will be held. He says that these exhibitions always contain many valuable and desirable paintings for the reason that there is always a ready sale in both cities for works of art.

In connection with the collection of the art exhibit the Department of Exhibits is taking steps to select are connoisseurs in each of the principal cities, who will be asked to serve on a committee for each city to pass upon paintings and other works of art which are offered from their vicinity for exhibition at the Transmississippi Exposition. This is to avoid having undesirable pictures or statuary sent to Omaha when their merits would not warrant their exhibition. These committees will be clothed with authority to pass upon this class of exhibits and the department will be bound by their action.

PRODUCES A PRETTY EFFECT

LAGOON RESEMBLES A GREAT MIRROR

Water in the Bottom of the Lake on the Exposition Grounds Reflects the Buildings of the Main Court.

Visitors to the exposition grounds who are not too pessimistic to see good in anything may now form a faint conception of the general effect which will be obtained in the main court be means of the lagoon. The planking about the lagoon has been nearly completed and water has been turned into the excavation. In addition to the water flowing from the artesian well, a two-inch pipe has been laid from the mains of the Omaha Water company and the water from this also flows into the lagoon. This latter pipe is simply temporary and was laid for furnishing water during construction, but the water from it is used to assist in filling the lagoon and the effect is very noticeable. The west end of the lagoon, the broad, three-lobed basin which has been named "The Mirror," is now a sheet of glassy water which reflects everything in that vicinity. The water extends in narrow channels for some distance past the bridge at Twentieth street, and the tall form of the Administration building is reflected from these narrow ribbons water in a way which gives a faint impression of the effect which will be produced when the lagoon is filled with water of crystal clearness and the stately forms of the palatial structures surrounding the canal are reflected from the placid surface.

The bottom of the lagoon seems to hold the water in a satisfactory manner, but the efficacy of the sheet piling as a stop to leakage laterally remains to be tested. This piling will be completed very soon and the water will be allowed to run into the lagoon until it acquires the requisite depth, unless the piling fails to hold it.

Grading for the Auditorium and Power buildings was commenced this morning. These two buildings will be on the Kountze tract, the Auditorium at the southeast corner, near Sherman avenue, and the Power building at the northeast corner, occupying a corresponding position. A small amount of grading will be necessary to prepare the sites for these buildings, it being necessary to remove a small portion of the approach to the viaduct over Sherman avenue.

NEBRASKA COMMISSION TONIGHT.

Contract for Supplying Material for State Building to Be Awarded.

The Nebraska Exposition commission will meet tonight for the transaction of general business. The special committee appointed at the last meeting to report upon the division of the state funds so as to secure the best results will probably report. Until action is taken on the matter referred to this committee, the several state societies and others who have applied to the state board for assistance in making exhibits will not know "where they are at."

Bids for supplying the material for the erection of the State building will also be opened and a contract will probably be awarded for the lumber and other material necessary for its construction. Superintendent Blake has already let the contract for supplying the piles necessary for the foundation and for driving them. The former contract was led to P. A. Gavin of Omaha and the work of driving the piles was awarded to an Omaha man named Welsh, a practical piledriver.

This week the headquarters of the commission will be on the State fair grounds in the Horticultural building. Assistant Secretary Dearing has removed his office to the fair grounds and will make that his headquarters during the week. The members of the commission expect to spend the greater part of their time during the week on the grounds looking after the interests of the Nebraska portion of the exposition.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Chase Pump & Manufacturing company of the Columbus, O., has applied for 400 feet of space for an exhibit of pumps, etc.

W. L. Clark of Santa Barbara, Cal., has applied for 100 square feet of space for an exhibit of Indian, Mexican and California curios.

Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Buildings and Grounds has returned from an extended eastern trip, and all the members of the executive committee are now in the city for the first time in several months.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion has opened headquarters in the Horticure building on the State fair grounds and visitors to the fair are supplied with literature and information regarding the exposition which is to open in Omaha, June 1, 1898.

Kern county, California, is making preparations to give the other California counties a close race in the way of an exhibit, and it has opened up negotiations with the Department of Exhibits regarding a space of 1,000 square feet for a country exhibit of fruits and other products.

General Agent Phillippi of the Missouri Pacific Railway company notified the Department of Buildings and Grounds this morning that his road was ready to proceed at once with laying the tracks on the exposition grounds in accordance with the contract recently entered into. He says the material is all on the grounds and that track laying will be commenced at once.

PUSHING EXPOSITION WORK

CONTEST BETWEEN RIVAL CONTRACTORS

Hundreds of Men Are Soon to Be Employed in the Erection of Structures that Are to Comprise the White City.

A friendly rivalry has been instituted between the contractors for the main buildings on the exposition grounds and a hot race is now on to see who will first complete one of the large buildings. The race promises to be between the big Mines building and the Liberal Arts building. Goldie & Sons of Chicago have the contract for the former and Wallace H. Parrish of Omaha has the latter building. The Chicago firm has thirty days' start of the Omaha man, but this is counterbalanced by the difference in the size of the buildings. The Mines building is to be 140x400 feet, while the Liberal Arts building will be 130x240. Each contractor wagers that he will have the first completed building on the grounds, barring the Administration building, which will be finished within the next thirty days.

The pile foundation for the Mines building is finished and the work of putting on the frame work and joists for the floor was commenced this morning. All of the material for this building has been ordered and nearly all of it is either on the ground or on the railroad track, awaiting the completion of railway connections with the grounds. The contract for the Liberal Arts building was executed last night and the number has been ordered. Mr. Parrish says he will have the building completed within less than sixty days from today. Mr. Goldie says the Mines building will be ready for the staff workers by the middle of November.

In this contest of speed in construction, the Manufactures and Machinery buildings may prove to be dark horses, especially the former. Contractor Strehlow, who has the contract for the Manufactures building, has been seriously hampered by the slowness with which the lumber firm has delivered his material. He has his sills all in place, but cannot go ahead with the superstructure because he has not yet received his long timbers for post. He has the large entrance dome well along, however, and will be in position to make good time whenever his delayed material arrives. Much of his archwork and other prepared timber is ready to be put in place and a large force of men could be employed to advantage as soon as the material arrives.

Hamilton Brothers expect to commence work on the Machinery building within the next ten days. The contract for the pile foundation has been let and the material for the superstructure is on the way.

When the work on these buildings is well under way there will be fully 700 carpenters employed on them, besides a large number of laborers and helpers. Goldie & Sons will employ 300 carpenters on the Mines and Agriculture buildings and there will be from 100 to 150 carpenters employed on each of the other three big buildings in addition to a large number of laborers to handle the heavy timbers.

ORDERS A THOUSAND CIRCULARS.

Executive Committee of Exposition Association Holds a Meeting.

The Council Bluffs Transmississippi Exposition association executive committee held an adjourned meeting yesterday evening and Secretary Judson of the committee of officers on incorporation, reported that the question had been talked up and had met with general favor, but on account of other business the committee had been unable to hold a meeting and take any definite action in the matter. The committee was given further time.

Prof Sawyer referred to a previous resolution of the association ordering a circular printed setting forth the advantages of Council Bluffs as a convention city, and stated that the work had not been done. He offered a motion ordering 1,000 of the circulars to be printed today to be sent to C. H. Warren, who is now in Columbus, O., attending the national convention of the Union Veteran Legion. The circulars are to be distributed through the convention for the purpose of securing the convention for Council Bluffs in 1898. This convention would bring in several thousand people to Council Bluffs, and with the aid of the circulars it is thought the convention can be brought here. Some objection was raised as to the advisability of incurring any more expense until after the corporation had been formed, but on vote it was decided to have the circulars printed and sent, provided the work could be done today.

H. W. Binder of the committee on location submitted a number of rooms for consideration and recommended the renting of the room now occupied by Mr. Minnick in the south end of the Grand hotel, which can be procured for six months at $15 per month. On motion the report was accepted, the association concurring in the recommendation, which was left for further action. The association adjourned to Thursday evening, September 30.

Nevada Waking Up.

Governor Sadler of Nevada tas​ taken action to put Nevada in line for making a display of her resources at the Transmississippi Exposition. A state commission to look after the state's representation has been appointed by the governor as follows: W. C. Grimes of Churchill; J. H. Dangberry, jr., Douglas; George Russell, Elko; J. A. Yerington, Esmeralda; Abram Laird, Eureka; J. A. Blossom, Lander; T. J. Osborn, Lincoln; D. C. Simpson, Lyon; Andrew Maute, Nye; John Wagner Ormsby; James H. Kinkead and Enoch Strother, Storey; J. B. McCulloch, Washoe; William Burke, White Pine.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Lincoln (Ill.) Press Drill company has taken 200 feet of space.

W. A. Maurer of Council Bluffs has made application for 800 feet of space for an exhibit of china and glassware.

R. H. Bloomer of Council Bluffs has applied for 240 feet of space in which to exhibit a wire fencing machine.

The T. A. Snyder Preserve company of Cincinnati, through its western representative, J. H. Jordan, has made application for fifty feet of space.

Commissioner Stokes of the New England states has forwarded the application of the Clinton Wire Lath and Cloth company of Clinton, Mass., for space for an exhibit.

A representative of the firm of John L. Nelson & Bro., Chicago, lowest bidders for the staff and plaster work on the Agriculture and Liberal Arts buildings, is in the city.

The Studebaker Wagon company of South Bend, Ind., is negotiating with the Department of Exhibits for 2,500 feet of space in which to make an exhibit of vehicles, etc.

President Wattles has received a letter from Governor Holcomb, stating that the chief executive and his staff, accompanied by W. J. Bryan, will visit the Tennessee exposition on Nebraska day, October 8.

W. S. Marshall, commercial agent for Australia, sends the Department of Exhibits a sample of maps and circulars he is distributing in his section, showing the location of Omaha and the surrounding territory.

 

E. F. Reil, San Francisco, makes application for twenty feet of space for an exhibit of French penholders, pencils and novelties; also a space 15x2 for a display of furniture made at Vernis Martin, France, and a space 10x15 for an exhibit of galvano plastic gilding.

Commercial Agent E. S. Hawley of the agricultural implement section has sent in the applications of the Morrison Farm Implement Manufacturing company for 200 feet, the Winona (Minn.) Wagon company for 200 feet and T. J. Northwall of Omaha for 200 feet for an implement display.

The Bureau of Promotion desires all persons having petitions to the Board of County Commissioners, asking them to submit a proposition to a vote of the people for the issuance of bonds in aid of the exposition, to return the petitions to the office of the bureau, in the Paxton block, as they must be collected and turned over to the county commissioners.

WILL HAVE ITS BUILDING

ILLINOIS WILL BE AT THE EXPOSITION

Chairman of the State Commission Will Reach Omaha Soon to Select the Site for the Structure.

Illinois will have a building on the exposition grounds which will cost in the neighborhood of $20,000. The exposition commission appointed by Governor Tanner has decided to expend this much of the $45,000 of the state appropriation for its erection. The commission will visit Omaha in the near future to decide upon the location of the building and arrange other details in that connection.

Chairman William H. Harper of the Illinois commission has written a letter to President Wattles containing the information of the action of the commission and asks the president to name a date when it will be convenient and desirable for the Illinois commission to come to Omaha and meet with the exposition management for conference regarding this state building. Mr. Harper also asks for advertising matter of all kinds with which to boom the exposition among the manufacturers and prospective exhibitors in Illinois.

FUNDS FOR CHILDREN'S BUILDING.

Omaha Citizens Pledge Support to the Enterprise.

The fund for the erection of the Girls' and Boys' building on the exposition grounds is beginning to grow and the outlook for raising the entire $5,000 required for the building is most promising. This matter formed one of the main topics of discussion at the meeting of the executive committee of the Women's Board yesterday and it was agreed that the building is assured. Vice President Kimball has taken an active part in all matters in connection with this building and she reported to the committee that she had started a list of stock subscriptions for the building. Four subscribers for $100 each had been secured in a short time and she said she felt confident that others would be secured at once. The four $100 subscribers were Thomas L. Kimball, Herman Kountze, J. M. Woolworth and Mrs. John A. Horbach. Other subscriptions to the building had been secured from the following parties in various amounts: J. R. Buchanan, J. W. Munn, A. C. Millard, Thomas Kilpatrick, Dora Cady, Harriet S. Heller, Alice Towne, J. A. Wakefield, A. H. Snyder, Ida V. Tilden, Arthur B. Smith, E. E. Bruce, Mrs. L. C. Cory of Lincoln, Walter and Emil Haubens.

The following committee of members of the Woman's Board was appointed to take charge of the collection of subscriptions for the Girls' and Boys' building: Mesdames T. L. Kimball, Omaha; Giffert, West Point; Munroe, South Omaha; Keys, Council Bluffs, and Cudahy, Omaha.

Nebraska Day at Nashville.

October 8 has been designated as Nebraska Day at the Tennessee Centennial exposition and arrangements are being made to have as large a delegation as possible go from Nebraska to Nashville on that occasion. President Wattles is endeavoring to organize a large delegation of Nebraska people in order that the proper appreciation may be shown of the interest of Nebraska people in the doings of other sections of the country. An effort is being made to secure special rates and there is every prospect that no difficulty will be encountered in this direction. Governor Holcomb and his official staff will be of the party and it is expected that they will be accompanied by W. J. Bryan.

Notes of the Exposition.

E. P. Loomis of Portsmouth, W. Va., has made application for space for an odorless steam cooker.

Prof. Albert Dasher has been appointed special commissioner for Belgium to represent the exposition.

Vice President Shurtliff of Utah will be at exposition headquarters Saturday of this week to make arrangements for space in three of the main buildings for the Utah exhibit.

W. N. Babcock, manager of the Department of Transportation of the exposition, has been appointed by Governor Holcomb as a delegate-at-large to the irrigation convention at Lincoln September 20-30.

The Page Woven Wire Fence company has made application for 400 feet of space for an exhibit of wire fences made by the company. It is proposed to make an enclosure with the fencing, within which will be kept buffalo, deer, bears, elk, moose, etc.

Prof. F. W. Taylor, superintendent of the Bureau of Horticulture, Forestry and Irrigation, writes from Nashville that he has secured applications for three operating exhibits, which he will file when he returns to Omaha tomorrow.

Secretary Mischke of the Colorado Exposition commission writes to the Department of Exhibits that Mrs. M. A. Shute, secretary of the Colorado Horticultural society, has over 200 boxes of fine Colorado fruits, which will be arranged in glass jars for exhibition at the exposition.

J. D. Powell, exposition commissioner for Mexico, notifies the Department of Exhibits that the sanction of President Diaz, allowing the Mexican Military band to visit the Transmississippi Exposition and take part in the exposition, will be issued very soon. The commissioner also says that the exhibit to be made by the Mexican government is now being prepared and will be very fine.

PLANS OF THE BUILDING

GOVERNMENT STRUCTURE AT EXPOSITION

Classic in Style, the Home of the United States Exhibit Promises to Be One of the Most Attractive on the Grounds.

The following is the official description of the building to be erected on the Transmississippi Exposition grounds by the federal government, the description being given out from the office of the supervising architect of the Treasury department at Washington:

The building to be erected by the United States government is to be situated at the west end of the grounds at the head of the lake and has the seat of honor of the whole exhibit, facing, as it does, the main group of buildings. It was designed under the general direction of Charles E. Kemper, acting supervising architect of the Treasury department at Washington, D. C., Edward A. Crane being the draughtsman in immediate charge.

The building will be used in the classic style, the Ionic order being used. It is to be arranged in three sections, that at the immediate center having a frontage on the lake of 208 feet and a height to top of balustrade over cornice of fifty-eight feet. It will have a depth of 150 feet. The main entrance facing the center of the lake will be reached by a broad flight of steps and through a colonnade. This entrance along with the entire center section of the building will be very richly treated in color. The entrance is flanked on each side by pavilions capped by richly decorated domes. The main building will be surrounded by a colossal dome, which will tower far above all other buildings on the grounds and will be a landmark for miles around. This dome will be capped with a heroic figure representing "Liberty Enlightening the World," and at night this figure will be lighted by electricity, and as the torch will be 178 feet above the ground, the beautiful effeet​ can be easily judged. The side sections, which are separated from the center portion of the building by colonnades connecting with the Agricultural building on one side and the theater on the other, each having a frontage of 148 feet and are 100 feet deep and have a height of forty-four feet to top of balustrade. This makes the total length of building 504 feet, and height at highest point 178 feet, and the floor space devoted to exhibits will approximate 50,000 square feet.

The building will be constructed out of wood and covered with staff on the outside.

NOW TENNESSEE GETS INTO LINE.

State Makes Application for Space at Exposition.

The list of states outside of the transmississippi territory which are to make state exhibits at the Transmississippi and International Exposition has been increased by the addition of Tennessee. The state which is now having an exposition of its own will be represented in the great exposition of the western section of the union by a display of its resources.

As an evidence that an exhibit of the resources of Tennessee will be made at Omaha, an application for 3,000 feet of space for an exhibit of the agricultural, horticultural and the many other resources of the state has been lodged with Prof. F. W. Taylor of the Bureau of Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry and Irrigation, who has been in Nashville in attendance at the exposition. This information was telegraphed this morning by Prof Taylor, who stated that the application was made by the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway company, which will make an extensive display.

Notes of the Exposition.

The time for the next meting​ of the Nebraska Exposition commission has been changed to October 5, for the reason that several of the members will be unable to attend the meeting next Tuesday, the time originally agreed upon.

The Department of Transportation is almost daily in receipt of circulars from the various freight associations of the country announcing special rates on goods intended for exhibition at the exposition. The latest of these is an announcement from the Chicago and Ohio River Freight association making a rate of full tariff on goods going to the exposition, with free transportation returning.

A telegram from Prof. F. W. Taylor to the Department of Exhibits makes the announcement that the Forestry convention which just adjourned its annual session at Nashville left the selection of the place for the next meeting to a committee. The telegram also states that a majority of this committee is already pledged to choose Omaha for the next meeting, so that this convention is assured.

IN AID OF THE EXPOSITION

DOUGLAS COUNTY ASKED TO VOTE BONDS

Citizens Petition County Commissioners to Submit a Proposition at November Election—Matter to Be Disposed of This Afternoon.

The petition to the Board of County Commissioners asking that a proposition for a bond issue of $100,000 in aid of the Transmississippi and International Exposition be submitted to a vote of the people of Douglas county at the coming election was laid befor​ the board at its regular meeting this morning. The petition contained the signatures of 1,391 voters of this county.

The exposition was represented by President Wattles and Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion.

The petition was read and the whole matter was then referred to the committee of the whole, it being agreed that the committee and representatives of the exposition should meet this afternoon and thoroughly discuss the matter.

The law requires that any bond proposition must be publicly advertised at least thirty days before the election at which it is to be submitted, and prompt action was deemed necessary for the reason that the next election occurs November 2, and the thirty days will begin to run the latter part of next week.

The commissioners adopted a resolution introduced by Chairman Stenberg, dividing South Omaha into four election precincts, to corespond​ to the four wards into which the city was divided in 1887 by ordinance, soon after the passage of the South Omaha charter. This resolution was accompanied by an opinion of the county attorney, to the effect that under the existing laws election districts in cities of the second class must conform to the ward lines inside the city limits and that the custom which has obtained in the past, of considering South Omaha as one big election district, having one assessor, was wrong, and should be changed to comply with the law.

The effect of the change will be to require each ward in South Omaha to have an assessor, instead of having one assessor for the entire city, as has been the custom. It is also probable that it will be necessary to elect a justice of the peace and two constables in each ward of the city.

When the resolution was read Commissioner Hoctor asked if it was necessary that any action along this line be taken by the board. He said some of the wards in South Omaha were small and had but few voters and these were dominated by a certain power which would make the work of assessment a farce.

Chairman Stenberg said it was absolutely necessary that the law be complied with since the discovery had been made that such was the law.

After some discussion between Mr. Hoctor and the chairman on the merits of the new departure the resolution was adopted.

PAY IN ONLY ONE CASE.

 

of the amount of money that each would require to prosecute the work that has been assigned to them. This led to a general discussion of the general finance question and to the passage of a resolution directing the finance committee to prepare to raise $5,000, $1,000 of which to be available not later

 

ROADS RECOGNIZE THE EXPOSITION.

Likely to Grant Concessions to Those Who Send Exhibits.

All indications point to a recognition of the Transmississippi and International Exposition by the railroads of the United States on the same basis recognition was accorded to the great Columbian exposition.

The Department of Transportation has opened correspondence with all the transportation lines, both land and water, which traverse this country or touch at its ports. These companies have been asked to extend to the Transmississippi Exposition the same courtesies given the World's fair in the way of special freight rates. Such replies as have been received warrant the assertion that the same rates will be made on exposition goods to Omaha and return as were made to and from Chicago during the World's fair.

In accordance with the request of the Department of Transportation the Southwestern Freight association announces a rate of full tariff charges on all exhibits from the point of shipment to Omaha, with free return to point of shipment, provided the goods have not changed owners in the meantime. This is the same rate that was made for the World's fair. The Southwestern Freight association includes in its membership all of the main lines of railway in the southwest territory.

Other freight traffic associations have not held a meeting since the Department of Transportation sent out its request for special rates for the exposition, but it is the opinion of those familiar with such matters that the other freight associations in the country will follow the lead of the Southwestern association and put in the same rate.

The department has also received a letter from the general freight agent of the Texas & Pacific railway stating that his road would not only make a rate of full tariff charge one way with free return when the goods do not change hands, but would also act as agent for foreign exhibitors shipping goods in bond over that road by seeing goods through the customs house at New Orleans and landing them in the bonded warehouse at Omaha without making an​ charge for these services.

Nevada's Vice President Resigns.

W. J. Westerfield, vice president of the exposition for Nevada, has sent his resignation to President Wattles. Mr. Westerfield states that his duties as state treasurer, together with his private business, make it impossible for him to give the exposition the time necessary to perform the duties properly. He suggests the name of Colonel [?] B. Maxson of Reno as that of a man qualified by experience to look after the interests of the exposition in Nevada and one who would give the necessary time to the work. Mr. Westerfield's letter will be laid before the executive committee at its regular meeting.

Notes of the Exposition.

The executive committee of the Women's Board of Managers is holding its regular meeting today for the transaction of routine business.

Adjutant General P. H. Barry of Nebraska called upon President Wattles of the exposition today to consult regarding the visit of Governor Holcomb and his staff to the Nashville exposition on Nebraska da, October [?]

 

MONEY FOR THE EXPOSITION

Douglas County Asked to Vote Bonds for the Enterprise.

WILL BE SUBMITTED AT COMING ELECTION

County Commissioners Decide Unanimously to Give the People an Opportunity to Vote Bonds for $100,000.

The Board of County commissioners, sitting as a committee of the whole, met with representatives of the Transmississippi and International Exposition yesterday afternoon to confer regarding the petition which had been submitted to the commissioners, asking that a question be submitted to the vote of the people for the issuance of county bonds in the sum of $100,000. It was decided that the proposition should be submitted at the coming election, but the exact form of the question to be submitted to vote of the people was not agreed upon, an adjournment being taken until Monday morning at 10.30 o'clock for further consideration of this matter.

The exposition was represented by President Wattles, Chairman Lindsey, Managers Rosewater and Reed and Director Wharton.

Commissioner Ostrom was made chairman of the meeting of the committee. The petition asking for the submission of the bond proposition was read and upon motion of Commissioner Stenberg was referred to a committee of two to examine the signatures and report whether the necessary number of signatures (1,000) appeared to the petition. The chair appointed as this committee Commissioners Stenberg and Hoctor.

After examining the document this committee reported that it found there were 1,391 signatures; it was also reported that very few duplications of signatures had been found, thereby making it certain that the required number had been secured.

Commissioner Stenberg then moved that it be the sense of the board that a proposition be submitted to the voters of Douglas county at the coming election providing for the issuance of the bonds of the county in the sum of $100,000, running twenty years, and bearing interest at the rate of 4½ per cent, payable semi-annually.

This motion was adopted unanimously after some discussion on the part of Commissioner Hoctor, who thought the bonds would sell well at 4 per cent interest, but it was the sense of the other members that the time was so short within which the money would be needed, if voted, that it would be unwise to run the risk of having to advertise the bonds several times before disposing of them on account of the sharp demand for money.

Commissioner Kierstead said it was most important that the bond proposition should be constructed in such a way as to inspire confidence on the part of the people in the disposition of the money in order that the proposition might be carried. He submitted a form of proposition which had been prepared by C. S. Montgomery, corporation counsel for the exposition. This was taken up by the board and gone over very carefully and deliberately, paragraph by paragraph, the county attorney and Mr. Wharton taking part in the consideration of this important document.

Before the proposition had been entirely formulated the meeting adjourned until Monday morning, when the proposition will be completed and finally acted upon at the meeting of the board Tuesday morning.

GRAFTS, GRAFTS, GRAFTS!

Exposition Pay Roll Like Falstaff's Board Bill--99 Per Cent for "Sack and Sugar" (Liquor) and 1 Per Cent for Bread.

$1,341.11 for Labor on Grounds, and $4,910.23 for Management--Some More of Geraldine's "Monkey Work" Exposed.

When it was proposed to hold a Transmississippi exposition at Omaha in 1898 THE WESTERN LABORER was in favor of it, because we thought it would revive business and give employment to the unemployed of this city and vicinity. When we say the "unemployed" we mean the laborer and mechanic who would be employed on the work, and who would change their wages in our stores for commodities, thus improving business and keeping the money subscribed and appropriated by the state and United States government circulating in our midst.

Under this head will be found the proofs of how well the "management" have kept the people's trust and how their money is being spent, and for whose benefit.

It is said that figures don't lie, therefore we have no comment to make upon the monthly report of wages—and "salaries" paid for the month of August. We merely ask the stock subscribers to read the hair-raising and paralyzing facts as they are presented in the official report. That will be enough.

Mr. Geraldine suspects there is a "leak" in the employes on the grounds and a number of the "suspects" were "laid off" this week, but Dion can never plug his "leaks" so tight that THE WESTERN LABORER cannot tap them.

Joe Schwartz, Geraldine's Indian and lackey, discharged Victor Kelner, a rodman, last week.

On Monday fourteen men were fired but Mr. Dailey, who finished the sewer contract let by Geraldine without contract or specifications, was on that day sweeping up chips on the bottom of the lagoon at $5 per day.

By the way there is something funny about the planking of the sides of this lagoon. The contract was "let" to Creedon & Mahoney for $5,936.50. This sum looks quite generous for "labor and nails," seeing that the exposition company did the piling and furnish the planking for the face of the lagoon. Three men puts on, on the average, 116 feet of plank per day—one man receives $2 a day, the other two $1.50, and one man assured us that he would like to take this $5,936.50 job for about $1,500. It will thus be seen that Creedon & Mahoney make about $100 a day on this job. But perhaps they have to divide with the Great Divider.

Joe Schwartz, Geraldine's Indian, is down as a "rodman" on the time book. He received 26 days' pay up to Sept. 1, but only carried a rod one day in August, and the rest of the time did nothing. When asked what his employment is, he replies, "My work is not commenced until the high buildings are up. I am a 'high decorator'—put up flags, etc," but if his work is   not yet ready he continues to draw a salary regularly. This fellow has been Geraldine's lackey for eight years, and the latter always keeps him on the (somebody else's) pay roll.

W. H. Tamm, superintendent at $4 per day, is the fellow whom Geraldine imported and put to work against the wish of the executive committee. He was dubbing around on the lagoon "job," but was removed for incompetency. He was then put on the administration building where the men engaged on it do as they please, knowing that the "superintendent" knows as much about the building as it does about him.

We are creditably informed that Templeton and Geraldine "are in" on the pile driving. A competent authority informs us that the piles can be driven for four cents a foot. Now, watch what this pile driving is going to cost the exposition company.

John F. Dailey was put on the lagoon as inspector or superintendent at $5 a day, and has nothing to do but sweep up chips, as above referred to. When the sewer laying job was to be handed out it was in the pictures that Dailey was to get the hand-out. It was discovered that the executive board had adopted a rule that no man could bid for contracts who was on the exposition pay roll. Dailey was on the pay roll, but a little thing like that didn't worry Geraldine. He took daily off the pay roll, ad then instructed him to build the sewer. Dailey built the sewer, and now he is back on the pay roll again. Do you see the point?

If our readers, the subscribers to stock and the Omaha business men will look at the wages and "salaries" paid for the month of August they will find how much the unemployed and business people have profited by the exposition enterprise so far.

Salaries and wages for August:

For labor wages on grounds and salaries in Paxton block, $6,251.34.

For labor on grounds, $1,341.11.

Salaries for management, $4,910.23.

How do the workingmen and business men like this presentment?

Should the directors not blush with shame at being parties to such rascality? Is it any wonder that THE WESTERN LABORER says that if the management were honest men and not knaves they would fire Geraldine and his fellow grafters in short order?

Following is the official pay roll of the Exposition company for the month of August:

THE MANAGEMENT.

General Expense—O. H. Snyder, storekeeper, $75; W. E. Johnson, boy, $5.50. Total, $80.50.

Ways and Means—John A. Wakefield, $208.33; John Rush, $100; W. F. Holmes, bookkeeper, $75; Emma Quick, stenographer; $32; Nannie K. McGough, stenographer, $40; W. W. Copeland, collector, $40; James Kiger, boy, $21.67. Total, $517.

Publicity and Promotion, (Press)—J. B. Haynes, $221; Max Adler, German writer, $60; L. D. Erion, stenographer, $70; C. A. Robertson, news writer, $60; O. H. Schons, stenographer, $40; Grace McFarland, stenographer, $40. (Promotion)—E. C. Hunt, $100; James Britton, special attache, $50; Mrs. F. M. Ford, sec. bureau of education, (½ salary) $41.67. Total, $682.67.

Exhibits—H B Hardt, $150; H C Creary, clerk, half salary, $15, F P McGough, clerk, half salary, $15; H M Eaton, sten., half salary, $20; Mrs. F M Ford, $41.68; F W Taylor, half salary, $83.34. Total, $325.02.

Concessions—Jay Burns, $100; H C Creary, $15; F P McGough, $15; H M Eaton, $20. Total, $150.

Transportation—John Owens, $75.

Walker & Kimball, $416.66.

DRAUGHTSMEN.

H Weatherwax, (over time, 58¾ hours, $58.75), $267.08.

E Jorgenson, (overtime 90¼ hours, $39.03) $129.03.

A L Merriam, (overtime 82½ hours, $35.68) $125.68.

C F Brown, (overtime 75 hours, $32.44) $122.44.

A D Baker, (overtime, 10 hours, $3.75) $81.7[?]

E [?] time, 90 hours, $32.40) $107.4[?]

J A Johnson (overtime, 75 hours, $27) 4102.

A R Van Dy[?] (overtime, 71¼ hours, $20.66), $80.66.

C A Pratt, 17 hours, $12.75.

J W McDonald, (overtime 45 hours, $10.80), $60.80.

J Nachtigal, (overtime 75 hours, $18) $68.

E Schroeder, (overtime 10 hours, $2.10) $45.43.

A J Tillson, (overtime, 11¼ hours, $1.40). $27.40.

H Stillson, $26.

Robt Potwin, boy, $8.66; Marie Brown, sten., half salary, $20; Miss E L Cochran, $40.

John A Templeton, $75.

A F Wilgocki, inspector, $10; C A Walrod, rodman, $16.50; F J Doyle, $5.55.

THE LABOR.

Buildings and Grounds—Dion Geraldine, $500; M S Ralls, engineer, $105; S H Meacham, instrument man, $55; F C Flickinger, inst. man, $52; Joe Schwartz, rodman, $39; Jack Culley, inst. man, $57; M Morrisey, rodman, (26 days, $1 per day) $26; V Kelner, rodman, (24¼ days $1 per day) $24.25; Allen Borgesson, rodman, $40.50; Joe Van Horn, inst. man, $39.50; A Artz, draughts- man, $65; M Montgomery, rodman (23¼ days $1 per day) $23.25; F L Burrell, engineer, $41.25; W F Hale, rodman, ($1.50 per day) $25.50; H W Jones, inst. man, $36; W H Tamm, superintendent, $60; E Blanchard, inspector, one day, $2.

Weekly pay roll ending Aug. 28:

F B Green, foreman and team, $21.90; A A Raymond, pile driver and crew, $87.50; James Dietrick, $30.85; John Hooten, eng., $21.90; T Ellison, $9.75; H Allison, $9.75; Wm Powell, $9.75; T Kennedy, $9.75; J Hastings, $9.75; Wm Avery, (1$ per day) $11.25; Oscar Kynor, $6.35; M L Broadhurst, $2.17; C Pieper, $5.70; Frank Morrow, $1.05; J H Wallin, $5; T Newman, $10; W K Lutz, $5; C Grasjean, $3; R S Pease, $3; C H Campbell, $1.50; L J Ecles, $2.25; A A Raymond, $4.50; O C Schwerin, $12; Dick Mattox, $9; Wm Dailey, $9, Ernest Mattox, $9; Fred Dellone, $18; Warren Rogers, $3; A S Forbes, $2; J Lundstrom, $10.20. Total, $343.37.

RECAPITULATION.

General expenses $ 80 50
Ways and means 517 00
Publicity and promotion 682 67
Exhibits 325 02
Concessions 150 00
Transportation 75 00
Monthly pay roll 3,080 04
Aug'st pay roll for labor on grounds 1,341 11
Total salaries $6,251 34

It will be noted that Geraldine is disobeying the $1.50 per day resolution that was adopted by the board of directors. H. Burnett, V. Kelner, M. Montgomery and Wm. Avery are on the pay roll as receiving $1 per day.

   

IN AID OF THE EXPOSITION

COUNTY SUBMITS A BOND PROPOSITION

Douglas County Voters to Have an Opportunity of Recording Themselves in Favor of the Great Show.

The Board of County Commissioners met in committee of the whole this morning to continue the consideration of the resolution which provides for the submission at the coming election of a proposition to vote $100,000 in bonds to enable the county to participate in the exposition. Commissioner Ostrom presided and the resolution was adopted by the committee after fully two hours of discussion. The board will meet in regular session tomorrow to adopt the resolution as unanimously recommended by the committee of the whole.

The preamble of the resolution quotes the petition recently submitted by more than 1,000 voters and the fact that a government and state appropriation of more than $200,000 has been made, as required by the law. It then provides for an issue of 4½ per cent twenty-year bonds, "to provide for the expenses of promoting the interests of said Interstate Exposition and by making at such exposition a county exhibit, and to improve and beautify the exposition grounds, and for the purpose of erecting or aiding in the erection of a suitable building therefor, and for maintaining the same during such exposition."

The resolution provides that a copy of the notice shall be published in The Omaha Evening Bee, the official paper of the county, for four weeks previous to the election.

The notice of the bond election, which is also included in the resolution, provides that the bonds shall be dated January 1, 1898, and that the interest shall be payable on January 1 and July 1 of each year. The amount necessary to be raised by taxation each year for the payment of the interest on the bonds is fixed at $4,500 and for the creation of a sinking fund with which to pay off the principal, $5,000 a year.

The discussion was mainly on the details of the resolution with a view to securing absolute accuracy from a legal standpoint. Commissioner Hoctor wanted a clause inserted that would definitely state the manner in which the money was to be expended, but it was suggested that this point was sufficiently covered in the law under which the proposition is to be submitted. The question whether the bond proposition should be placed on a separate ballot or added to the county ticket was also raised, but was left for future consideration.

ENGLAND LIKELY TO PARTICIPATE.

Lord Salisbury Says Board of Trade Will Render Assistance.

President Wattles has been furnished, by the secretary of state, with a copy of the letter of the prime minister of England to Colonel John Hay, United States minister to that country, replying to the letter of Colonel Hay, enclosing the invitation to the English government to participate in the Transmississippi and International Exposition. The letter of Lord Salisbury is somewhat lengthy and, after stating the decision of the government to not participate in the exposition officially, conveys the information that the Board of Trade, which is a government institution, will render any assistance in its power to private individuals or committees formed for the purpose of promoting the objects of the exposition. The letter also states that the Board of Trade will be pleased to distribute circulars and other matter relating to the exposition among Chambers of Commerce or other organizations interested in the matter, and to give publicity to such documents through the medium of the official publication, the Journal Tariff and Trade Notices.

President Wattles is also in receipt of another communication from the State department, enclosing a copy of a note from the minister of foreign affairs for the Netherlands, conveying the information that the government had decided, after due deliberation, to refrain from sending an official representative to the Transmississippi Exposition, but stating, further, that the government is quite prepared to do all in its power to disseminate information regarding the exposition and afford any assistance in its power to intending exhibitors.

More Applications from Ohio.

Commercial Agent Hodgin of Ohio has sent to the Department of Exhibits the application of C. O. Bartlett & Co. of Cloveland, O., for 960 feet of space for an exhibit of cereal mills and the manufacture of all kinds of cereal goods. The letter of Mr. Hodgin states that this firm proposes to construct a booth of glass in which they will operate their various kinds of mill machinery and turn out meal, and various edible products of barley, wheat, etc., and will dispense dainty dishes of the cooked products. He also states that the firm propose to expend about $5,000 or $8,000 on the exhibit and will require twenty-[?]

Hopes for Success in New Zealand.

G. T. Lowe, the New Zealand agent for the Department of Exhibits writes from Wellington, the capital of the country, that he has reached his destination, but finds that the premier of the colony is in England and will not return until next week. Mr. Lowe states that he is meeting with encouragement from the people of the country and he has every reason to believe that he will be entirely successful in securing a government exhibit. He will also endeavor to organize a company for securing a concession showing a New Zealand kangaroo hunt.

Pacific Coast People Coming.

Commercial Agent McAuslang of the Pacific coast has sent to the Department of Exhibits applications for space for exhibits from the following firms: H. Liebers & Co., furs; Empire Milling company, flour; Charles E. Moore & Co., machinery; Trenton Iron company, cables; Dow Steam Pump works, pumps; Washington Manufacturing company, olive oil; Alaska Cod Fish company, canned goods; California Condensed Juice company, canned goods; California Fruit Salt company, Pacific Coast Syrup company, Stockton Art Pottery company.

Bureau of Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry and Irrigation of the Department of Exhibits of the exposition, has returned from the Nashville exposition, where he went to secure a number of conventions to meet next year in Omaha. He stated this morning that one of the things that struck him most forcibly while there was the familiarity of the people of Nashville with the conditions in connection with the Transmississippi Exposition. "They know we are going to have an exposition next year," said Prof. Taylor, "and they know all about it. I had dozens of people to say to me that if their exposition had been as well advertised as the Transmississippi Exposition is being exploited all over the country they would be having a much larger attendance. They say that the Transmississippi Exposition is better known now than theirs was at the time the gates were opened.

"Nashville is making great preparations for Nebraska day," continued the professor. "They say they are going to give Nebraskans a sample of southern hospitality on that occasion and I should judge from all indications I saw that the whole country will be dyed a bright scarlet. Major Thomas, president of the exposition, told me that they were making extensive preparations to have Nebraska day one of the red letter days of the entire exposition.

"One of the principal things which attracted my attention in connection with the agricultural part of the Nashville exposition," remarked Prof. Taylor, "was the quality of the exhibits made by the various railroads. There were five roads having exhibits of the agricultural and mining products along their lines. These were arranged in an attractive way and each road must have expended at least $5,000 in making its display. The Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis road was the only one of the five having headquarters in Nashville, and I secured an application for 3,000 feet of space for a display to be made by this road. I expect to secure similar applications from the other roads, and if I succeed, Tennessee will be well represented."

Filling Agricultural Building.

E. S. Hawley, commercial agent for the Agricultural implement section, has filed the following applications for space, each being for 300 square feet: Margaret & Stevens, 1307 Jones street, Omaha, vehicles; Pekin (Ill.) Plow company; T. H. Smith & Co., wagons; Union Corn Planter company, Peoria, Ill.; Luedinghaus, Expenschied Wagon company, St. Louis, Mo., carriages; Timpkin Wagon company, St. Louis, carriages.

Goods Returned Free of Charge.

The Department of Transportation has received notice from the Southern Pacific Railway company that it will join with the Union Pacific Railway company in transporting goods for the Transmississippi Exposition free on the return trip, subject to the usual regulations. This rate covers foreign exhibits as well as those from the southern districts of California and intermediate points.

Notes of the Exposition.

The work of laying the water mains in the exposition grounds was commenced this morning by Contractor William Fitch. He is under bonds to complete the work in forty days.

The Gem City Stove Manufacturing company of Quincy, Ill., through its western representative, N. W. Norris of Crete, Neb., has applied for 800 feet of space for an exhibit.

The St. Louis Southwestern Railway company is negotiating with the Department of Exhibits for space for an agricultural display of the products raised along the "Cotton Belt Route."

Louis Wurtzburg of Chicago has filed an application for two spaces of 100 square feet each, in one of which he proposes to display silver-plated goods, and in the other fancy novelties.

W. G. Williams, representing the Excelsior Shoe company of Portsmouth, O., is in the city negotiating with the Department of Exhibits for 200 feet of space for an exhibit by his firm.

The Standard Oil company of Cleveland, O., has filed an application for space for a booth 12x16 feet on which the company proposes to expend $6,000, including the installation of a fine exhibit.

Governor Culberson of Texas has appointed Robert Bornefield of Galevston​ as vice president for the exposition to represent the Lone Star state to succeed Gustave Reymershoffer, who resigned on account of leaving the state.

Fleischman & Co. of Cincinnati, O., have applied for space for a pagoda in which the firm proposes to exhibit the use of yeast by baking bread and other edibles in which yeast is a component part, and distributing the finished product among the visitors to the exposition.

J. C. Selden, local agent for the Brunswick-Balke-Collender company, is negotiating with the Department of Exhibits for 1,600 feet of space in which he says his firm intends making an exhibit that shall eclipse their masterful effort in this direction at the World's fair.

WORK ON THE EXPOSITION

REMARKABLE HEADWAY HAS BEEN MADE

Work Had Reached that Point Where Results Were Not Readily Apparent, but Construction Will Soon Be Booming.

The impression is current in certain quarters that the work of constructing the buildings and grounds of the Transmississippi and International Exposition is not proceeding as rapidly as it should. People who hold to this impression point to the fact that but little progress seems to be making on the grounds and they argue from this premise that the whole matter is dragging along and that very little is being done.

Plausible as this argument may seem it is erroneous. While it is true that, to the naked eye, the work seems to drag, yet this is not the case. This apparent paradox is explained by the fact that the whole work is just at that stage where it is passing out of the chrysalis state into brilliant and forceful life. The apparent inactivity has really been a condition of inward exertion which has wrought marvelously and this will be apparent to every observer within a short time.

The whole situation as it now exists may be stated in a very few words, but they mean much: The supervising architects were appointed in March of this year. In the short period of less than seven months the arrangement of the ground has been decided upon, the grading has all been completed, the lagoon has been finished and is now being filled with water, the plans for all of the buildings on the main court have been completed and all save the Art building are under contract with bonds which guarantee the completion of all of them by February 1 next year. The magnitude of the work represented in this single sentence may not be grasped all at once, but Architect Dwight Perkins of Chicago, the architect for the Machinery and Electricity building, who was officially connected with the World's fair, is authority for the statement that as much has been accomplished on the Transmississippi Exposition in seven months as was accomplished on the World's fair in two years. Mr. Perkins explained that the preliminary work of arranging the general disposition of the site and deciding upon the location of the buildings usually consumes several months; then the preparing of the ground, especially where any waterways are to be constructed, consumes several more months, after which the finishing of the building plans uses up a few more months, and thus the time slips away. This method has been avoided in the case of the Transmississippi Exposition and all of the preliminaries have been disposed of without loss of time.

GRADING PRACTICALLY COMPLETED.

The grading of the entire grounds has been practically completed. What little remains to be done is insignificant in extent and is in such locations that it will not interfere in any way with the progress of the other work. The completion of the lagoon was, in itself, a task of no mean proportion, but it is finished and the water is now running into it. The Omaha Water company has generously offered to donate the water needed to fill the great hole and a special line of pipe will be laid from one of the large mains to the point selected for filling the lake. Within the next thirty days the lagoon will be filled to the point where it will remain and it will be kept full. Incidentally, it may be remarked that one of the fine skating rinks in the world will be formed when Jack Frost touches the surface of the water with his icy fingers.

The sewers for the entire grounds have been completed. With the exception of a very small portion of the work, these sewer systems are permanent and the surrounding property owners will derive substantial benefit from this work. The sewers were designed by the city engineering department and are laid in the alleys where they will be accessible to property owners after the exposition is over. By this thing alone the property owners in the vicinity of the exposition grounds escape taxation to the extent of about $12,000, as the exposition management pays for the sewers.

The pipe for the water system has arrived and Contractor William Fitch has been ordered to commence at once the work of   laying it. His contract requires him to complete the entire work within forty days from the time he is ordered to proceed. This means the completion of this work early in November.

It will be seen that the work on the ground itself has advanced to a point where the building contractors will not be interfered with in the least by the contractors for the underground work.

The conditions relating to the main buildings are fully as favorable as those surrounding the other work. As has been stated heretofore, all of the buildings surrounding the lagoon are under contract and every one of them will be completed by February 1, next year, ready for the installation of the exhibits. This latter statement is assured by the fact that the contract for each building places a limit on the time within which the building is to be completed and this provision is supported by a bond for a substantial amount conditioned on the contractor carrying out the terms of his contract and completing the work within the time specified. These bonds are signed by individuals or corporations whose financial standing has been rigidly investigated and found to be unquestioned.

CONDITION OF BUILDINGS.

The following brief statement of the condition of each of the main buildings will throw additional light on this subject:

Administration Building—The carpenter work on this building was let to Briggs & Cushman of Omaha July 8, to be completed within 120 days, or by November 5. The carpenter work is practically completed, a little finishing up here and there being all that remains to be done. The staff work was let to the Artistic Stucco & Modeling company of Chicago July 14, the staff and plaster work to be completed within thirty days after the completion of the carpenter work. The casting of the stucco work has been under way for several weeks and the greater part of the set pieces have been completed. The work has been going on rapidly on the building itself and an idea may now be obtained of the appearance of the completed building.

Manufactures Building—The contract for the carpenter work on this building was executed with R. C. Strehlow of Omaha July 21, to be completed within ninety days, or by October 19. Strehlow has been seriously hampered by delay in the receipt of his material, said to be due to the scarcity of cars in which to haul it from the forests. He is making good headway now, however, and the building is rapidly assuming form. It is probable that he will overrun his time limit. The staff and plaster work was awarded to Smith & Eastman of Chicago, to be completed November 4. Unless delayed by Strehlow, this firm will complete its contract within the time, much of the work being already cast and in shape to put in position.

Machinery and Electricity Building—The carpenter work was let to Hamilton Bros. of Omaha September 4, to be completed within 120 days, or by January 2, next year. The material has been ordered and is now on the way and the piles are being driven. The staff and plaster work was let to Smith & Eastman September 15, to be completed within thirty days after the completion of the carpenter work, or by February 2.

Mines and Mining Building—The carpenter work was let to William Coldie & Sons of Chicago, August 12, to be completed within ninety days, or by November 10. The piles have been driven and cut off. The work on the building proper has been commenced and the material is all on the ground. A complete planning mill outfit has been set on the ground ready to be installed in the building as soon as the floor is finished. The staff work was let to Smith & Eastman August 9, to be completed in 110 days, or by November 27.

OTHER CONTRACTS AWARDED.

Agricultural Building—The carpenter work was let to William Goldie & Sons September 17, to be finished within seventy days, or by November 26. The material has been ordered and is on the way. The staff work has not been awarded.

Liberal Arts Building—The carpenter work was let to Wallace H. Parrish September 20, to be completed in ninety days, or by December 19. The material has been ordered and is said to be on the way. Parrish has made a wager that the Liberal Arts building will be the first one of the large buildings to be finished. The staff work has not been awarded.

This completes all of the large main buildings which will face the lagoon and form the chain about the grand court, with the exception of the Art building. The plans for this will be completed this week and the building will be at once advertised.

The Auditorium, which is to be erected at the southeast corner of the main court, with entrances from Sherman avenue and Pinkney street, will will be ready for bidding by the middle of this week. Fisher & Lawrie of this city are making the plans and have them about completed.

The Horticultural building plans have been completed and this building will be placed before the contractors for bids within a short time.

This disposes of all of the principal buildings and it will be [?] that all of the delay has been in the [?]ation of the man who thinks that the [?]kind of progress is that which makes a great noise and bluster. In the opinion of those who speak from experience in exposition matters, the progress has been truly remarkable and the work of erecting the buildings is simply one of the finishing touches which are to be put on.

It will be seen by the above resume that all of the buildings will be completed by February 1, and this will give fully ninety days for the installation of the exhibits. This is regarded as a very wide margin by those familiar with such matters.

STATE FAIR FUNDS

STARTLING STATEMENT BY THE MANAGERS

Declare the Attendance Was Below that of Last Year.

FIGURES MADE PUBLIC BY STATE BOARD

Contention that There is a Very Large Deficit.

BUSINESS MEN ARE VERY MUCH SURPRISED

Street Railway People Hauled More People than Ever Before—Suspicion that Something is Wrong.

Omahans were much surprised to read in this morning's issue of The Bee the official statement of the attendance at the State fair, representing a positive decrease in attendance from that of a year ago. Not only does the official report contradict all expectations, but it shows that there were less paid admissions to the fair than the number of people the Omaha Street railway alone hauled from this city to the State fair gates.

S. C. Bassett of Gibbon, a member of the Board of Managers for the State fair, has given out the following report made by E. W. Searle, superintendent of the gates, showing the attendance at the fair last week, with a comparison with the attendance at the fair last year:

Paid Admissions— 1897. 1896. Inc. Dec.
Railroad coupons 15,651 13,479 2,172 ....
General admission tickets 19,142 37,064 .... 7,922
Concessioners' tickets 778 1,491 .... 713
Mercantile tickets 195 154 .... 49
Total paid admissions 45,676 52,188
Free Admissions—
Stock tickets 5,233 5,295 .... 62
Check passes 2,391 2,557 .... 166
Complimentary 4,784 7,221 .... 2,437
Pioneer 230 257 33 ....
Old soldiers 575 ..... 575 ....
Total free admissions 13,273 15,330
Total attendance 58,949 67,518
Dec. in paid admissions ..... ..... .... 6,512
Dec. in free admissions ..... ..... .... 2,057
Total dec. attendance ..... ..... .... 8,569

FIGURES IN COMPARISON.

The officers of the Omaha Street Railway company this morning characterized as absurd the statement given out by the Board of Managers of the State fair. The figures of admissions appeared to them so irregular that they decided to break their ironclad rule against giving out a statement of the number of passengers hauled. The following statement given out by the company this morning shows the number of cash fares actually collected each year between the city and the fair grounds. This does not include any fares of the return trip, or any passes used by persons going to the fair or returning therefrom:

1895 39,360
1896 45,130
1897 47,180

This shows an increase in the number of passengers hauled on the street car lines of 2,050 over last year and an increase of 7,820 over the year before.

It will be noticed that the total paid admissions, according to Mr. Bassett's statement numbered only 45,676. The street car company hauled 47,180 passengers to the grounds. According to the managers' statement the free admissions this year were 13,273, making the total number of admissions 58,948. As the street cars hauled 47,180 of this number, subtraction leaves but 11,769 persons who used the State fair trains of the Union Pacific and of the Missouri Pacific railroads and those who went to the fair in wagons, carriages, on horseback and on bicycles.

The railroad companies at noon stated that they could not yet tell just how many persons they hauled to the State fair. State fair trains of both the Union and of the Missouri Pacific did a good business throughout the week. Trains were run about every thirty minutes during Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. The Union Pacific carried big crowds from Omaha, South Omaha and Council Bluffs, especially on Wednesday and Thursday. The trains varied in length from five to eight cars, and on Wednesday and Thursday they were filled nearly all day. Railroad men who watched the movement of State fair visitors say that there were many hundreds more people drove to the fair grounds this year than ever before, the number of carriages going out from Omaha to the race course having been very much greater than last year.

ON TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES.

Officials of the Union Pacific, of the Missouri Pacific and of the Omaha Street Railway were greatly incensed this morning at the reflection of the fair ma[?]rs upon the transportation facilities to and from the fair grounds. Their excuse for the poor showing made in the statement of admissions was that the transportation facilities were entirely inadequate. This is strongly resented by the railroad and the street car men and denounced as pure fabrication. An officer of the Omaha Street Railway company this morning said: "We had a three-minute service to the fair grounds throughout the week. During the afternoon rush of Wednesday and Thursday more cars were placed in service and were run every two minutes. It was only for a very short time on Thursday afternoon that the care were overcrowded. We got over the jam in a very short time, and that was the only time there was any trouble."

The Union Pacific and the Missouri Pacific railroads offered better service to the State fair grounds than ever before. Both railroad companies ran special trains from their respective depots in this city directly to the State fair gates. In addition, the Union Pacific ran trains from South Omaha and from Council Bluffs. These trains afforded excellent service, the Union Pacific caring for the travel from the eastern part of the city and from South Omaha and Council Bluffs, and the Missouri Pacific attending to the wants of those who live on the north side of town and along the Belt line encircling the city, making stops at a half dozen different points on the Belt line. The trains were run every half hour and made the trip in short order, and for the nominal charge of 10 cents. The train service on neither road was interrupted and in order to prevent crowding as soon as a train was filled another coach would be put on so that all the passengers might find seats.

Speaking of the attendance report made by the State fair mangers, D. T. Mount of the Omaha Fair and Speed association said: "The figures given out by the officers of the State Board of Agriculture are surprising. I had nothing to do with the gate receipts and for this reason I am unable to say how many people were on the grounds. The crowds were enormous, and I supposed that the attendance was the greatest ever seen at any State fair in Nebraska."

SOME PECULIAR METHODS.

W. R. Bennett of the Omaha Fair and Speed association said: "There is something wrong somewhere, but where I cannot say. Everybody knows that the crowds in town last week were the largest seen, and the statement that the attendance at the State fair was less than in 1896 comes like a thunderbolt from a clear sky. This year the weather was fine and the conditions were perfect, while last year people were hard up and besides there was one rainy day that cut down the attendance very materially. I don't want to charge any one with stealing, but as I said before, there was something wrong and something that should be investigated."

Regarding the methods pursued at the horse gates, Mr. Bennett spoke as follows: "I drove out to the grounds Thursday. I had tickets for myself and family, and upon reaching the horse gate I was informed by the keeper that I would have to pay for my team. I started to get out of the wagon for the purpose of going to the box office to buy a ticket, but was informed by the gate keeper that I could give him the money. I paid this man 50 cents and drove in."

C. H. Walworth, residing at Sherman avenue and Burdette street, drove out with his family on Children's day. The carriage contained himself, his wife and three children, the latter aged 7, 12 and 14 years of age, respectively. Upon reaching the horse gate the keeper made Mr. Walworth pay 50 cents for his oldest child and $1 for his horse and buggy. Mr. Walworth told the gate keeper that he would go and buy tickets, but was informed that it was not necessary. He paid the gate keeper $1.50, and this individual put the money in his pocket without making any note of the payment.

County Commissioner Ostrom was in attendance upon the fair two days. Both days he drove out and both days he paid the keeper on the horse gate. Mr. Ostrom stated that when the demand was made upon him for payment for [?] horse to the grounds the gate keeper told him that it was not necessary to buy a ticket, that the cash would do as well as a ticket. Mr. Ostrom paid the fee, fifty cents each time, and each time the gate keeper put the money into his pocket.

James Walsh, general manager of the Douglas County Agricultural society, in speaking of the attendance at the State fair said: "I have been attending state fairs for twenty years and think that I can judge something of crowds. The attendance at the State fair last week was the largest that I ever saw. I feel certain that there were fully 50,000 people on the grounds last Thursday.

"I see that the managers state that the aggregate attendance only reached 58,949 for the week. Of course they have got the books and know how many people passed through the gates, but if their figures are correct, there is something wrong somewhere."

Andrew Kewitt of this city had the bicycle checking privileges and talked with the State fair managers Thursday evening after the close of the day's business. In that conversation Mr. Kewitt says the managers told him that the attendance for the day would reach close to 45,000 and that the fair was bound to be a grand success, as the attendance of the preceding days had been greater than during the corresponding days of any State fair previously held in Nebraska.

 

Notes of the Exposition.

Joseph Rawicz, United States consul at Warsaw, Russia, has written to the Department of Publicity to offer his services in aid of the exposition. He says, in reply to a letter sent him by the department, that he has spread information regarding the exposition about his district and has communicated with the editors of the leading papers of that section, receiving their promises of co-operation and assistance.

The Smith-Premier Typewriter company has applied for 180 feet of space for an exhibit, and the United Typewriter Supply company of Omaha has applied for 288 feet of space.

The Otto Gas Engine company of Philadelphia has applied for 480 feet of space for an operating exhibit of its make of engines. These engines will be operated by gasoline, the supply tank being buried in a concrete box several feet under ground at a point remote from any of the buildings, where there will be no danger from fire or explosion.

The Merchants' Despatch Transportation company will put one of its refrigerator cars into the Dairy building, where it will be used for the exhibition of perishable goods. The front of the car will be made of glass so that the entire interior will be visible and it will serve as a refrigerator, as well as being an exhibit of the car.

Mrs. W. D. Wilson of this city has applied for fifty feet of space for the sale of souvenir wares.

Montgomery, Ward & Co. of Chicago have notified the Department of Exhibits that the will commenuce​ work on their building about October 15. This building will be quite an elaborate structure, designed for the entertainment of visitors, but not for an exhibition buildin​. The firm has also offered to donate to the exposition the back cover page on one of thir​ handsomely lithographed catalogues which are distributed al​ over the country by the thousands and especially over the west. They will allow the exposition to insert in this space such advertising matter as it desires.

The piles for the foundatio nof​ the Nebraska building are being hauled on to the exposition ground and the work of driving them will be commenced tomorrow morning. The piledriver is on the ground and Superintendent Blake says he will commence building his carpenter shop tomorrow and will get the lumber and other material on the ground at once, so as to be ready to commence the erection of the state building as soon as the piles are driven.

The Mines building is being pushed by Goldie & Sons as fast as possible. The floor is being laid and the planing mill plant is being put into the building. The floor is finished on about one-quarter of the space an dthe​ joists in the remaining portion of the building are being put in place very rapidly by a large force of men. It is expected to complete the floor within the next two days, and work on the superstructure will be commenced at once.

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MEET.

Exposition Bond Question to Be Submitted to a Vote.

The Board of County Commissioners met

The resolution, providing for submitting to the people at the county election a proposition to vote $100,000 in bonds for coun[?] in the exposition, was reported by [?]mittee of the whole and unanimously [?]ed.

BILL CODY IS WILLING TO JOIN.

Intends to Help Make Nebraska Day at Nashville Hum.

LINCOLN, Sept. 28.—(Special Telegram.)—Governor Holcomb and staff are making preparations to go to the Nashville Exposition to be there on "Nebraska day," which is October 8. The trip will be made unless the spread of yellow fever in the south should make it inadvisable. Adjutant General Barry wrote to Buffalo Bill, one of the members of the governor's staff, inviting him to be with them at the exposition. An answer has just been received from Mr. Cody, who is now at St. Louis. He says that he will be at Nashville on the 7th and 8th with his show, and if the governor and his staff want horses, a band, regular army soldiers as escorts, or if he wants the whole show to turn out it is at his command. He desires to help make Nebraska day a big feature of the exposition.

Dies from His Injuries.

PREPARE TO DO THEIR SHARE

GERMANS WILL BE ON HAND AT EXPOSITION

Drawings of a Proposed Building to Be Exhibited at a Celebration to Be Held Early Next Month.

The German-American citizens of Omaha are making preparations to properly celebrate, on October 9, the landing of the first German settlers in Pennsylvania. The celebration will be held in Germania hall, commencing at 8 p. m., and will comprise a concert, participated in by the Orpheus Singing society, the Zither club and other local talent and a theatrical performance in German. During the evening a grand tableau will be presented, typifying the Transmississippi Exposition. The twenty-four states and territories in the transmississippi region will each be represented by a young woman and the entire group will be under the protecting arm of Columbia, personified by a well known Omaha woman. Speeches by Jacob Houck and Francis Martin, the latter the editor of the German Post-Tribune, will complete this portion of the entertainment, the whole concluding with a ball.

The German-American Transmississippi association will take an active part in the celebration, and steps will be taken to arouse the 30,000 German-Americans in the immediate vicinity of Omaha to the importance to them of the great exposition which is almost at hand. This association was organized and incorporated several months ago for the purpose of advancing the interests of the German citizens of Nebraska in the exposition and the society feels that the time has come to begin active work in enlisting the assistance and co-operation of the German settlers in this work.

Handsome drawings representing the building it is proposed to erect on the exposition grounds will be displayed at the entertainment for the inspection of those present. The drawings will show a building of irregular form, about 200 feet in length along its main front, and having a depth of about 100 feet. This building will represent the various styles of architecture seen among the historic buildings in the different quarters of Germany, faithfully reproduced with all the appearance of extreme old age. The interior of the building will be arranged to represent a characteristically German concert hall with a stage on which will be light entertainments such as are seen among the high class German resorts in the larger cities of the "Faderland." A restaurant for the dispensing of German delicatessen will be given space in the building and there will also be parlors and reading rooms for the use of visitors.

The committee having charge of the celebration of the landing of the first German settlers in Pennsylvania comprises Charles Kaufmann, Francis Martin, F. W. Koetter, Carl Rumohr and Frank Christman. This committe​ has sent invitations to all of the German societies in this city and the immediate vicinity and these societies have been requested to bring with them their banners to be used in decorating the hall where the celebration is to be held.

MUSIC AT THE EXPOSITION.

Executive Committee Considers the Director Question.

At a special meeting of the executive committee of the exposition yesterday afternoon Chairman Lindsey stated that he had called the meeting to take up the question of the music for the exposition. He called attention to the action of the committee several weeks ago in dividing the music into two classes, giving the Ways and Means department charge of all music furnished for which no admission was charged, or from which no revenue is to be derived; and giving to the Department of Concessions all music for which an admission is charged, such as oratorios, concerts, choruses, etc. Mr. Lindsey said he regarded this division as impracticable and said he had concluded, after a thorough investigation, that the whole business of music should be put under one department, regardless of what department might be selected. He advocated the election of a musical director and the organization of choruses, collections of singers for giving oratorios, engaging of bands and orchestras for the giving of musical performances of a high nature.

Mr. Reed, to whose department the concession features of the musical bureau had been referred, took a position diametrically opposite that of Mr. Lindsey and maintained that no director was necessary, that choruses should not be attempted and that it was only necessary to employ established musical organizations to furnish such entertainment as might be desired.

After some discussion the whole matter was referred to a committee consisting of President Wattles and Managers Lindsey and Reed, to make a recommendation as to what should be done with the music of the exposition.

Manager Kirkendall recommended the employment of Luther Steringer of New York City, an electrician of prominence, as consulting electrical engineer for the exposition. Mr. Kirkendall explained that Mr. Steringer was the electrician who designed the electrical fountains at the World's fair and who had charge of the electrical construction at the Chicago, Atlanta and San Francisco expositions. He said Mr. Steringer had consented to give his services in making the plans for the electric lighting of the exposition, and in acting in an advisory capacity during the installation of the work, making merely a nominal charge.

After a brief discussion the matter was laid over until the regular meeting Friday of this week.

It was decided that the time has arrived when the landscape engineer, Rudolph Ulrich, should be recalled to Omaha to take charge of the laying out of the grounds and the making of the necessary walks, preparing for the landscape features of the grounds, and planting such of the ornamental trees, shrubs, etc., as should be put in the ground this fall.

In this same connection Manager Kirkendall was authorized to employ two or three experienced men in this line to commence the work of laying out the walks and driveways along the lines contemplated by the plans of Mr. Ulrich, which were approved some time ago by the executive committee.

Architect Humphreys Well Pleased.

John J. Humphreys of Denver, architect of the Mines building, has been in the city for the last day or two consulting with the supervising architects of the exposition regarding the details for the Mines building. He visited the exposition grounds and conferred with the contractor for the Mines building and was greatly impressed with the progress which had been made. Mr. Humphreys brought with him a number of rough sketches of the decorations for the Mines building and conferred with Supervising Architect Kimball regarding these, in connection with other details. Before leaving the city Mr. Humphreys stated that the people of Denver and of Colorado generally are becoming greatly interested in the Transmississippi Exposition and have determined to be represented in a manner which will place Colorado in a position she should occupy in such an exposition by virtue of her great resources in both mineral and agricultural products.

Working for Another Convention.

The Women's Board of Managers has appointed a committee to secure the 1898 meeting of the Liberal Congress of Religions for Omaha. This body meets in Nashville, October 19 to 24, and the committee appointed by the Women's board will at once begin the work of laying the claims of Omaha before the members of that body. The committee appointed for this purpose is composed of Thomas Kilpatrick, Rev. Newton Mann, Rev. Mary Girard Andrews, Rev. T. J. Mackay, Rev. John McQuoid and W. H. Alexander.

NEBRASKA DAY AT NASHVILLE.

Indications that This State Will Have Representatives in Attendance.

Major T. S. Clarkson, president of the Omaha Board of Commissioners to the Tennessee Exposition, is exerting every influence to secure a large delegation of Nebraskans to go to Nashville on October 8, the day which has been set apart by the Tennessee Exposition management as Nebraska day, and for which the Nashville people are making great preparations.

Major Clarkson says that the indications are favorable for a party of fair proportions, but he urges upon the people of this vicinity the importance of taking an interest in this matter of securing a large attendance in order to stimulate interest among the people of that section in the Transmississippi Exposition.

Efforts have been made to secure a one-fare rate for the whole distance from the railroads, and the major states that he believes this will be accomplished. Governor Holcomb and his official staff and W. J. Bryan are going, and it is assured that a number of the exposition directors will be in Nashville on the day in question, but the party has not reached the magnitude Major Clarkson thinks the occasion requires.

Will Represent Colorado.

Governor Adams of Colorado has announced the appointment of Major S. K. Hooper to be a member of the Colorado Exposition commission. Major Hooper is the general passenger agent of the Denver & Rio Grande railroad and is one of the most widely known and popular passenger men in the west. It is conceded that his appointment on the Colorado commission has added greatly to the strength of that body, as the major is a man of great executive ability and force and wields a powerful influence in Colorado.

Plans of the Art Building.

Plans and detail drawings and full specifications for the Art building were turned over to the Department of Buildings and Grounds today by the exposition architects. This completed the plans for all of the buildings on the main court except the Auditorium and the Government building. The former will be completed within the next ten days and the advices from Washington are to the effect that the plan for the Government building will be ready for contractors to commence figuring by October 10.

 

Southern Republic May Come.

President Wattles has received from the president of Nicaragua a very cordial reply to the official letter of invitation sent through the Department of State of the federal government. The Nicaraguan president accepts the invitation and says he will at once take steps to secure an appropriation of sufficient size to allow the government to participate in the exposition in a manner which will be creditable to it and satisfactory to the exposition management.

FLOWERS FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Propagation of Plants Will Begin This Winter.

The Board of Park Commissioners met yesterday and transacted a considerable amount of business, most of which pertains to the adornment of Kountze park and the exposition grounds next year. It was decided that the work of propagating plants for the decoration of the park should be begun at the Hanscom park greenhouses at once and it was the sense of the board that the additional plants that would be required for the decoration of the grounds surrounding the park should be purchased from local florists in time for the florists to begin propagating them before winter sets in.

The committee on improvements and the superintendent were instructed to complete the addition on the west side of the greenhouse at Hanscom park to afford the extra room required.

The superintendent was also instructed to make arrangements at once to ship four or five carloads of the trees recently purchased from ex-Governor Furnas from Brownville to be set out on the boulevard and at the various parks as required. The same official was directed to raise a large quantity of evergreens at Hanscom park to be subsequently transplanted at Kountze park.

The board added a few more cages to the menagerie at Riverview park by accepting the gift of two prairie wolves, a Rocky mountain badger, a coon, eagle, owl, etc., from the Southside Improvement club. The gift of 100 black bass from Fish Commissioner May was accepted and the fish will be installed in the lake at Riverview park. The board also accepted two very handsome oleanders from Mrs. J. E. House, which are to be used to assist in the adornment of the exposition grounds. The watchman at Bemis park was discharged.

BREAK AWAY FROM CHICAGO ONCE

Fire Underwriters' Convention Comes to Omaha.

CHICAGO, Sept. 30—At today's meeting of the Fire Underwriters Association of the Northwest, S. E. Cate was elected president. Secretary Munn and Treasurer Kelsey were re-elected. The following board of directors was also chosen: S. E. Cate, Chicago; J. H. Lanham, Chicago; A. E. Pickney, Kansas City; J. C. Griffiths, Chicago; J. P. Sheridan, Saginaw, Mich.; J. A. Kelsey, Chicago; R. L. Reynolds, Omaha; M. W. Van Valkenberg, Topeka, Kan.; J. E. Davis, Racine, Wis.; S. C. Wagner, Chicago; E. V. Munn, Chicago; John C. Ingraham, Indianapolis; George H. Moore, Chicago.

A resolution was unanimously passed recommending Omaha as the next place of meeting. It will be the first time the convention has ever been held away from Chicago and the expression was not one in favor of the rotation of conventions through the northwest, but a mark of recognition to the Omaha people for the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in that city next year.

James F. Joseph of Cincinnati, H. R. Hayden, editor of the Weekly Underwriter, New York, and C. F. Mullins of San Francisco read papers of interest to insurance men.

The convention will close tonight with a banquet at the auditorium.

PUSHING EXPOSITION WORK

HUNDREDS OF MEN ARE BEING EMPLOYED

Lagoon Being Filled with Water—Administration Building Under Roof and Staff Workers Follow the Carpenters.

People who visit the exposition grounds during working hours now-a-days see a display of activity which removes any lingering suspicion that the work is not being pushed along. The Mines and Mining building presents the busiest scene of any place on the grounds. About sixty carpenters and about half as many laborers are employed on this building and every man is working as though his job depended on the amount of work he did. As a result, a good showing has been made. All of the joists have been put in place and about two-thirds of the flooring had been laid at noon today. The flooring is two-inch material, four inches wide, and tongued and grooved. It is being laid in a workmanlike manner and at a rapid rate. The work of rearing the superstructure will be commenced as soon as the floor is completed, the material being all at hand. As the work advances more men will be employed until nearly 300 men will be engaged on this one building.

The dome of the Manufactures building has been nearly completed and the framework of the building is being rapidly put up. A gang of men are at work laying the floor and have this branch of the work well advanced. The floor joists are nearly all in place and the flooring is being laid. This flooring is the same as that in the Mines building and when it is finished the work will be greatly expedited. Contractor Strehlow is still being hampered by the failure of some of his big timbers to arrive, but he is working on those portions of the building where these timbers are not required.

The piles for the Machinery building are slow in arriving and Contractor Hamilton is being delayed in consequence. The piles are being driven as fast as received.

Considerable difficulty is being experienced in getting a sufficient number of piles for use on the exposition grounds. Such a large number of these are required that the available supply near the city has been about exhausted, and as the distance from the city increases the time necessary to secure the sticks increases at a rapid rate. This fact threatens to interfere seriously with the buildings for which piles have not already been secured, including the Machinery, Agriculture, Liberal Arts and Fine Arts.

FILLING THE LAGOON.

The lagoon is rapidly assuming the appearance of a genuine lake. The bottom is completely covered from the extreme west end to a point east of Twentieth street, being a little over half of the whole lagoon. Little rivulets extend to the extreme east end of the lagoon, and it will be but a few days when the entire bottom of the canal will be covered with water. The sparkling fluid is flowing into the lake from three pipes located at different points and the steady flow from these comparatively small pipes is having a very perceptible effect.

The ditch for the water main on the grounds has been completed along the south side of the main court from Twenty-fourth to Twentieth street and a good start has been made all along the line from Twentieth to Sixteenth street. This ditch will be completed by tomorrow noon and the work of laying the pipe will be commenced at once. When this is done water will be turned into the lagoon from a larger pipe and a few days will see a marked change in appearance of the big basin.

The railway crossing on Sherman avenue has been completed at the south side of the main court and men are extending the track to the western end of the main court. This work will be completed tonight and the cars containing the water pipe will be switched onto this track and unloaded alongside the ditch prepared to receive it.

The intersection at Sherman avenue at the north line of the main court is all ready to put in place and the work of putting it in was commenced this morning. As soon as the track is completed on the south side of the main court the gang of track layers will be transferred to the north side and this track will be completed by the last of the present week, after which the carloads of lumber for the big buildings will be switched to the respective buildings and unloaded.

The Administration building is being put under roof and the staff workers are following the roofers closely with the ornamental cornice which is to decorate the lofty pinnacles that crown the airy structure. The highest pinnacle has been completely covered with the roofing material to be used on all the buildings, a new material known as rubberoid, having a surface which glitters like silver in the sun, the millions of minute particles of mice with which the entire surface is covered reflecting the rays of the sun in countless numbers, and the dainty little ornamental cornice joining the roof and the lower portion of the lofty lantern has been put into place. The finishing touches to the building are being rapidly put on and within the next ten days the building will be practically completed.

GIANT FROM THE PACIFIC COAST.

Editor Beckman Suggests a Washington Exhibit.

A novel suggestion in connection with the Forestry exhibit at the exposition has been made by Editor Beckman of the Pacific Lumber Trade Journal, published at Seattle. He suggests that in order to make a proper display of Washington's timber resources a log containing 10,000 feet, board measure, be shipped to Omaha and be left on board the car in the grounds for some time during the exposition. On a certain day he would have it announced that the log will be converted into a house. For this purpose it would be necessary to secure the co-operation of some of the numerous exhibits of saw mills in operation. After the log is squared the slabs could be converted into shingles and the sills, studding, siding, flooring and finishing lumber for a story and a half cottage could all be sawed from the big log, dressed in the planing machine and put into the house.

Mr. Beckman also suggests that the sawdust and other refuse of the log could be converted into paper by some of the pulp mills on exhibition and made into wall paper for the house. He further suggests that the other industries of the state might contribute toward the furnishing of the house and a practical demonstration be thus made of the resources of the state.

ANOTHER CONVENTION IS LANDED.

Northwestern Fire Underwriters Come to Omaha Next Year.

Another big convention has been added to the already long list of great associations which will make Omaha their meeting place during the summer of 1898.

The Northwestern Fire Underwriters association, now in session at Chicago, has broken the record of sixteen years and will meet in Omaha next year. This is the first time this meeting has been held outside of Chicago for sixteen years, but the persuasive eloquence of Captain H. E. Palmer and H. B. Coryell, the Omaha delegates to the meeting, was too much for the delegates and the time-honored precedent was thrown to the winds and the 600 delegates voted unanimously to meet in the exposition city next year. This body remains in session at each meeting several days, depending upon the amount of business to be transacted. The members are nearly all accompanied by members of their families and a considerable portion of the time is spent in social enjoyment.

IOWA COMMISSIONERS ASSIGNED.

Departments Over Which the Several Members Will Preside.

The several departments of the Iowa state exhibit at the Transmississippi and International Exposition have been assigned to the members of the Iowa Transmississippi and International Exposition commission as follows: Live stock, S. B. Packard, Marshalltown; horticulture, S. H. Mallory, Chariton; agriculture, dairy and apiary, F. N. Chase, Cedar Falls; manufactures and machinery, George W. McCoid, Logan; mines and geology, John H. Wallbank, Mount Pleasant; decorative installation, A. W. Erwin, Sioux City; press, Robert H. Moore, Ottumwa; forestry, Owen Lovejoy, Jefferson; music and photography, J. E. E. Markley, Mason City; education and fine arts, Sylvanus D. Cook Davenport; women's department, Allan Dawson, Des Moines.

Secretary Brigham is Coming.

Assistant Secretary of Agriculture Brigham is in attendance at the Irrigation congress in Lincoln and is expected to stop in Omaha on his way to Washington. Mr. Brigham is president of the Board of Control of the federal government of the Transmississippi Exposition, and he will probably stop in Omaha to confer with the exposition management regarding exposition matters. The meeting of the Board of Control, which was to have been held in Nashville October 4, has been called off and the time and place of meeting for organization will be determined by President Brigham. This meeting will be for the purpose of deciding upon the general plan of the government exhibit at Omaha, and will undoubtedly be attended by representatives of the exposition management.

Utah Commission Organizes.

The Utah Exposition commission has organized by electing officers and appointing heads of departments. These are as follows: L. W. Shurtliff, president; Heber F. Barton of Ogden, secretary; Don Maguire, in charge of the Mineral department; Thomas R. Cutler, in charge of the Manufactures department; Heber Bennion, in charge of the Agriculture and Horticulture department. The commission will endeavor to secure the co-operation and assistance of private individuals to make the state's display a creditable one. It is the determination of the commission to make Utah's mineral exhibit the finest and most extensive at the exposition.

Notes of the Exposition.

Prof. J. H. Gore, the representative of the Transmississippi Exposition at the Brussels Exposition and also commissioner for Switzerland and several other European countries, is on his way home to Washington.

The carpenter shop for the Nebraska building on the exposition grounds has been commenced. Some of the piles have been hauled to the grounds, and the pile driver is being put in place preparatory to commencing work on the building.

Bids for doing the staff work and plaster work on the Agriculture building will be opened by the executive committee at 5 o'clock this evening.

Art Director A. H. Griffith has issued a circular to interested parties, giving notice of the plan and scope of the art exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition. He states that it is proposed to show sculpture, paintings in oil and water colors, and also the modern reproductive processes. He states that the available space will allow the exhibit of only 1,000 paintings, and mentions the fact that mural paintings and sculpture, as applied to architecture, are especially desired.

New Jersey Gets in Line.

New Jersey is the latest state to fall in line for representation at the exposition and   swell the list of states outside of the transmississippi region which will be officially represented at the great show. It is reported from an authentic source that Governor Griggs of New Jersey is about to appoint Colonel Robert Mitchell Floyd of Trenton as commissioner-in-chief for the state. The New England Grocer, one of the principal trade journals of the east, speaks in terms of the highest praise of Colonel Floyd as a man especially fitted by training, experience, tact and education for the position for which he has been slated.

CHARGES TO BE INVESTIGATED.

Committee Will Look Into Geraldine's Conduct of Exposition Affairs.

At a meeting of the executive committee of the exposition held this afternoon the action of the committee yesterday afternoon in requesting the resignation of Dion Geraldine was rescinded, and Herman Kountze, Charles F. Manderson and John C. Wharton were appointed a committee to investigate the charges and report at a meeting to be held next Monday.

EXPOSITION FREIGHT RATES

TRANSPORTATION LINES HEARD FROM

Exhibits Will Be Brought In at Full Tariff Rates, but Will Be Returned Free of Charge.

The Department of Transportation of the exposition is daily in receipt of notices from railway and steamship lines stating that the lines named will extend to the Transmississippi and International Exposition the same courtesies in the way of special concessions in freight rates and other accommodations which were extended to the management of the World's fair. They make a rate of full tariff on goods en route to the exposition with return transportation free provided the goods have not changed hands in the meantime. Notices along this line were received this morning from the Occidental and Oriental Steamship company, with headquarters inn​ San Francisco; the Pacific Mail Steamship company of the same place; the Merchants' and Miners' Transportation company of Baltimore, the Maine Steamship company of Portland and the National Dispatch Fast Freight Line of Boston.

In addition to the special rates these lines offer to act as forwarders, free of charge, meaning that they will see the goods through the custom house, and act as the agents of the owners at the port of entry, thereby doing away with the necessity of sending men to the ports of entry to attend to the requirements of the customs collectors.

EXPOSITION AMUSEMENT FEATURE.

"Umbrella" Here and Ready to Begin Work.

R. E. Sherman and F. Lundin, representing the company which is to erect "Sherman's Umbrella" on the exposition grounds, arrived in the city this morning and have been in consultation with the Department of Concessions regarding the final details of the concession before taking steps to commence the actual work of erecting the machine, which is to be one of the striking mechanical novelties of the exposition.

Mr. Sherman is the inventor of the machine which bears his name and Mr. Lundin is of the company which is promoting the affair, besides being a member of the upper house of the Illinois legislature. They visited the exposition grounds this morning in company with Superintendent Burns of the Department of Concessions. Mr. Sherman stated that he was ready to commence active operations at once and would have the structure well under way within a short time. The company he represents proposes to expend about $80,000 in the erection of the machine, a considerable portion of this sum to be expended in the foundation and provisions for making the towering structure absolutely safe. The exact location of the tower has not been definitely fixed, and this was one of the things which occasioned the visit to the grounds this morning.

RATES TO NASHVILLE EXPOSITION.

Cut Made to Those Who Attend on Nebraska Day.

Commissioner Utt of the Omaha Commercial club this morning announced that the efforts to obtain cheap rates for Nebraskans who desire to attend the celebration of Nebraska day at the Nashville Exposition had been successful.

In order to obtain the advantage of the cheapest rate, $18 from Omaha to Nashville and return, it will be necessary to leave here on October 3 or 4, leave St. Louis on October 5 or 6, inspect the exposition before Nebraska day, and leave there for the return trip on the night of October 8. The rate of $18 from here to Nashville and return is made possible by the fact that a rate of $11.50 for the round trip from here to St. Louis will be offered October 3-9 inclusive, good for return October 11, and the fact that a rate of $6.50 will be in effect from St. Louis to Nashville and return, good going on October 5 and 6, to be used leaving Nashville not later than October 8. This arrangement will give the Nebraskans three days at the exposition. The rate will apply on all lines.

SHOW UP GERALDINE

HIS PECULIAR METHODS ARE MADE PUBLIC

Superintendent of Construction for the Exposition Must Explain.

RESOLUTION DEMANDS HIS RESIGNATION

Executive Committee Holds an Interesting Session on This Topic.

MANAGER ROSEWATER STARTS THE BALL

He Calls for Geraldine's Dismissal and Presents a Series of Memoranda Upon Which He Bases His Reasons.

The murmurs of dissatisfaction which have been heard in all quarters for the last three or four months against the arbitrary methods and peculiar practices of Dion Geraldine, superintendent of construction for the Department of Buildings and Grounds of the exposition, broke out at the regular meeting of the executive committee yesterday afternoon when a resolution was introduced providing for the summary discharge of Geraldine for cause. This resolution was accompanied by a written memorandum setting forth at length a few of the reasons why Geraldine should be let out at once. This resolution was made the special order of business at a special meeting of the executive committee to be held at the exposition headquarters at 8 o'clock this evening, at which time Geraldine will be given opportunity to be heard if he has any explanation to offer for the many questionable transactions laid at his door.

The resolution in question was introduced by Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion and was laid before the committee after the regular business of the meeting had been disposed of. It was as follows:

"Resolved, That the services of Dion Geraldine as superintendent of construction be dispensed with from and after this date in the interest of economy and for cause, as shown by the memorandum herewith submitted."

SOME CHARGES MADE.

Attached to this resolution was the following written statement, which may be regarded as charges and specifications on which the demand for Geraldine's discharge was made:

Early in July proposals for sheet piling on the lagoon were advertised under plans and specifications prepared by Thomas Shaw, formerly an assistant of the city engineer. Bids were received under these plans and specifications and opened by Mr. Geraldine, but no bidder was present. These bids were all rejected by the executive committee. The day following their rejection one of the bidders, J. P. Connolly, called on Mr. Geraldine and was informed that his bid was altogether too high. Mr. Geraldine also asked Connolly to submit another bid, which was to be subdivided so as to make proposals for the labor only, while the exposition would furnish all the material. At the same time Mr. Connolly was asked to submit proposals for the labor only, while the exposition would furnish all the material. At the same time Mr. Connolly was asked to submit proposals for material and labor on a different plan, viz.: Instead of driving the sheet piling two and a half feet, as designed in the original plan, he was allowed to dig a trench two feet deep and drive the piling six inches. Connolly submitted two bids, one for all the labor and material on the latter proposition, $7,100, and one for the labor only, $2,100. Under the original plan his bid was for materials and labor $7,900. Under the last proposal the specifications were verbal.

On August 13 a contract for sheet piling was made with Creedon & Mahoney for the sum of $5,936.50. The last bid of Connolly for $7,100 included the pile driving. Creedon & Mahoney's bid did not. The value of the piles, from Mr. Geraldine's own estimate, was $700. Added to the bid of Creedon & Mahoney that would have made the cost of the sheet piling $6,536,50. In the reduction of the size of lumber under the revised plan, which Creedon & Mahoney were allowed to carry out, there was a saving of about 60,000 feet of lumber, which, at $14 per 1,000 feet for yellow pine, would amount to $840, making the total cost on the revised plan equal to $7,376.50, as against $7,100 bid by Connolly. In addition to this there was omitted from Creedon & Mahoney's work all the iron work, worth at least $200, making a total of $7,576.50. In substituting yellow pine of second quality for white pine of first quality, there is a difference of $4 per 1,000 feet. Estimating the quality of lumber used at 170,000 feet, this would make a saving to the contractor of $680, making in all $8,256.50 as against $7,900 as originally bid under the first plans and specifications by Connolly.

Instead of making the trench two feet deep, as was required of Connolly under his second bid, Creedon & Mahoney were allowed to make this ditch only twelve inches deep, thus saving twelve inches of digging and one foot of lumber all around the lagoon.

DONATION TO THE CONTRACTORS.

Another and very extraordinary feature of this contract was this: Early in June the exposition was induced to contract with the Cady Lumber company for an invoice of yellow pine lumber which in the aggregate was to cost $3,000. It was represented by Mr. Geraldine that this purchase would save the exposition several hundred dollars, as the lumber was furnished at a cut rate, much below the prevailing market price. When the contract to Creedon & Mahoney was awarded this invoice was turned over to the contractors at the instance of Mr. Geraldine, and thus Creedon & Mahoney were given the advantage, as then represented, of about $1.50 per 1,000 on the yellow pine which they purchased, equal to a donation of $250. Mr. Connolly, who was competing with Creedon & Mahoney, had no such offer, and it is doubtful whether any bidder besides Creedon & Mahoney had the slightest intimation that he would have the privilege of taking this lumber off the hands of the exposition at the cut rate at which it was bought.

The specifications of Creedon & Mahoney's contract provide that cement is to be used at each sheet piling, but may be omitted at the option of the exposition. The cement was omitted, by order of the superintendent, but no allowance whatever was made by the contractor for this omission. Mr. Geraldine, when asked about this, stated that the cost of cement is no greater than the tamping of the dirt.

Conolly's bid under the supplementary specifications was $7,100
Deduct from this difference in quantity of lumber, 60,000 feet white pine at $18 per 1,000 $1,080
Deduct for iron work 200
Difference in cost of white and yellow pine, 170,000 feet at $4 per 1,000 680
Cost of sheet piling 700
Total deductions $2,660
Balance $4,440

The exposition paid Creedon & Mahoney $5,936.50, thus paying $1,495.50 more than it should have paid had the contract been awarded on an honest competitive bid. This is not taking into consideration the advantage of not less than $250 which was given to Creedon & Mahoney by turning over to them the lumber bought by the exposition at cut rates. It also transpires that the woodwork on the lagoon still remains unfinished and will require a great deal more lumber and carpentry work.

EMPLOYMENT OF AN ASSISTANT.

On August 27 a request for the employment of H. W. Tamm as assistant superintendent of construction was made by Mr. Geraldine through President Wattles, at a salary of $100 per month. The executive committee declined to grant the request by refusing to take action. At that very time, August 26, Mr. Tamm was on the payroll at $4 per day and he was allowed $60 for fifteen days in August, which would make his salary equal to about $112 per month, counting twenty-eight days for the month of August. In Mr. Tamm's salary voucher he was designated by Geraldine as superintendent of construction, and Mr. Geraldine must know that he is the superintendent of construction, and two men could not well keep the same position at the same time.

On August 28 a contract was awarded to John F. Daly for the construction of a sewer, the amount being $809.35. Mr. Daly has previously been employed as inspector on the ground at $5 per day, while city inspectors for the same work only receive $4 per day. The contract for this sewer was let without plans or specifications and no bond was asked or given. After Mr. Daly had completed the contract notice of awarding the contract to him at the price named was filed, with the city specifications for sewerage pinned to the same. Since Mr. Daly completed the contract he has been re-employed by Mr. Geraldine at $4 per day, under the title of inspector. During the week in September in which Daly was pretending to act as inspector he was raking up shavings at the bottom of the lagoon, which work was paid for by the exposition and was to have been done by the contractor under the specifications.

Soon after Mr. Geraldine was appointed the exposition made a contract with Mr. Ulrich, an eminent landscape architect, to lay out the exposition tract and make ground plans for the same. Mr. Ulrich came to Omaha and prepared the plane, which were concurred in by Mr. Geraldine and the supervising architects and approved by the board. It now transpires that the ground plan of the bluff tract has been entirely changed by Geraldine from the plan made by Ulrich. This change has been made without the knowledge of the manager of the Department of Buildings and Grounds, and without concurrence of the board. In making this change Mr. Geraldine took it upon himself to employ two men in his office to make the new ground plan for this tract. This arbitrary action is doubtless largely responsible for the vexing delay in the preparation of sketches of the ground plans.

 

NEGLECT OF DUTY.

Gross negligence of his duties was shown by Mr. Geraldine in permitting the erection of a planing mill within a few rods of the principal exposition buildings, when he could and should have prevented it. The construction of such a structure adjacent to the exposition buildings will endanger the buildings and materially increase the rate of insurance upon them, if they can be insured at all. Inasmuch as Mr. Geraldine has been negotiating for months with the parties that have erected this planing mill he could not have been ignorant of their intentions, especially, also, as he had arranged to leave a gate close to the new building.

During the reading of the document Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Buildings and Grounds shifted uneasily in his seat and when the reading was completed he said he would not pretend to contradict some of the statements made therein, but he said there were some of the statements which were false and malicious and he asked that Geraldine be at once sent for and given an opportunity to explain.

Other members of the committee objected to remaining longer at that time and then Mr. Kirkendall insisted that nothing should be made public regarding the matter until after Geraldine had been heard. Messrs. Lindsey, Reed and Rosewater opposed any attempt to keep a matter secret which came up in the regular course of business before the committee. Mr. Lindsey remarked that Geraldine's actions had been the subject of criticism in all parts of town and from all classes of people for months, and the executive committee had been severely criticised for not taking action sooner. He opposed any secrecy in the matter and said Geraldine should be given every opportunity to explain, but it was a matter in which the general public was interested and there was no necessity for secrecy.

It was finally ordered that Geraldine should be furnished with a copy of the resolution and attached statement and be given an opportunity to appear before the committee tonight.

Before this matter was brought before the committee an extended session was held at which considerable routine business was transacted.

WHAT THE WOMEN WANT.

The first thing to come before the committee was a communication from a special committee of the Lady Board of Managers appointed to recommend certain matters in regard to the artistic features of the exposition. This committee consisted of Mrs. Harford and Mrs. Keysor, and they recommended to the executive committee that steps be taken to secure for the decoration of the exposition grounds works of art of permanent material which would remain after the exposition closes and be permanent ornaments for some of the public parks. The committee especially urged that an arrangement be entered into with Captain Edward Kemys, the renowned sculptor of wild animals and Indians for work in permanent material for the decoration of the grounds. The woman's committee suggested statues of animals and Indians, and especially an Indian equestrian statue as being particularly appropriate for a western exposition. The whole matter was referred to the Department of Buildings and Grounds.

A letter from S. S. Beman of Chicago, architect of the Manufactures building, was read. Mr. Beman called the attention of the committee to the fact that the plan for the Manufactures building provided for three large panels in the entrance dome, in which it was designed to place three large paintings illustrating the manufacturing industries. He said these were as essential to the completeness of the building as any other part of it, and he urged that action should be taken at an early date to provide for these paintings. He said they should be done on convas​ and removed from the building after the exposition closes, making valuable souvenirs to be placed in a museum for future generations. In this connection Mr. Beman suggested an artist of wide reputation whose services he thought could be secured for this work at a merely nominal figure, but he urged the necessity of making early arrangements, as the work would require several months for execution. The matter was referred to the Department of Buildings and Grounds for recommendation.

Manager Kirkendall reported that Smith & Eastman were the lowest bidders on the staff work for the Agriculture building, their bid being $12,753. He recommended that the contract be awarded to them. His recommendation was adopted.

The matter of adopting a brand of cement plaster made in Laramie for making the staff and stucco work was discussed and the matter was referred to the architects for investigation and report.

Manager Kirkendall was authorized to make arrangements with Luther Steringer, the electrician who designed the electrical effects for the World's fair, California exposition and numerous other large enterprises, to make plans for the Transmississippi Exposition and act as consulting electrical engineer.

Manager Bruce announced that he would send W. L. May, the Nebraska fish commissioner, to Washington to confer with W. deC. Ravenal, in charge of the fish exhibit to be made by the government, regarding the consolidation of the government and the exposition fisheries exhibits.

WHAT NEVADA WILL DO.

Colonel H. B. Maxson, the newly appointed vice president of the exposition for Nevada, appeared before the committee and discussed the part his state will take in the exposition. Colonel Maxson explained that his state had made no appropriation for making a state exhibit, but said he believed that local pride was strong enough to bring about a display of the resources of the state tah​ would be creditable and satisfactory. He called attention to the fact that Nevada is not by nature an exclusively mining state, but has over 73,000,000 acres of land suitable for farming. He said that if the politicians ever let go their grip on the state it would advance and that the people out there lived in the hope that they would see the day when this would come about. He said there are now persons appointed in each county to assist the vice president in collecting material for an exhibit and assured the committee that the state would make a mineral exhibit that would be second to none at the exposition.

After Colonel Maxson had withdrawn Manager Bruce brought up the subject of the condition of the mining exhibit in general, to which reference had been made at the last meeting, when the statement was made that the work of securing exhibits was dragging. He made a statement showing that considerably more than half of the space in the Mines building has already been applied for and that a number of states which are known to be making preparations for a mineral exhibit have not yet made formal application for space. In this connection Manager Bruce referred to the suggestion of Prof. David R. Day, representative of the Geological survey, regarding the placing of the Mines building under the control of the survey. Mr. Bruce said it was impracticable to put the entire building under the direction of the government.

SUGAR BEET'S SHOW.

Prof. Taylor, superintendent of the Bureau of Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry and Irrigation, reported regarding an interview he had held with J. H. Brigham, assistant secretary of agriculture and chairman of the Government Board of Control for the exposition, in which Mr. Brigham had manifested considerable interest in the idea of making the sugar beet a prominent feature of the government's exhibit. This idea met with favor on the part of the committee, but no action was taken.

President Wattles announced that the railroads had made a rate of one fare for the round trip, or $18, for Nebraska day at the Nashville exposition. It was also stated that Governor Holcomb and his staff would be transported free both ways.

The contracts for the concessions Shooting the Chutes and the Streets of Cairo, by the Omaha Chutes company and Leo Bonet, respectively, were approved.

A proposition was submitted to hold an ice carnival on the lagoon during the winter months. The matter was very favorably regarded by the committee and Mr. reed was empowered to enter into arrangements for making a contract.

The special committee appointed at the last meeting to consider the question of music for the exposition, consisting of President Wattles and Managers Lindsey and Reed, reported on a plan, which was adopted without discussion, by which the charge of the music will be divided between the Department of Ways and Means and the president of the exposition. By this plan the Department of Ways and Means will have control of all the music, fireworks and other forms of amusement intended for the general entertainment of visitors to the exposition, and for which no admission is charged. The president will have charge of the other music and the general program of the exposition, including designating of special days, musical entertainments for which admissions are charged, etc.

FROM MR. GERALDINE.

He Asks the Public to Suspend Judgment Until He Can Be Heard.

Omaha, Oct. 2, 1897.—To the Public: In accordance with the resolution adopted by the executive committee of the exposition that I be given an opportunity to make answer to the charges filed against me by E. Rosewater I prepared a written reply which I intended to present tonight. I consider it a complete refutation of the charges made and I think the public will so pronounce it. For that reason I regret that I failed to get the opportunity tonight to present it to the committee and through the committee to the public, which as yet knows only of the assault made on me and nothing of my defense. I dislike to rest, even for a day, under these charges without proper opportunity to make reply, but I deem it my duty to first present my reply to the committee or to the board of directors, and shall, therefore, wait for the meeting. Meanwhile I ask the public to suspend its judgment a few

THE BEE'S TAFFY

THAT SHEET TELLS A PRETTY FAIRY TALE.

It Says "Marvelous Progress" Is Being Made on Exposition Grounds, But It Is "Not Visible to the Naked Eye."

The impression is current in certain quarters that the work of constructing the buildings and grounds of the Transmississippi exposition is not proceeding as rapidly as it should. People who hold to this impression point to the fact that little progress seems to be making on the grounds and they argue from this premise that the whole is dragging along and that very little is being done. Plausible as this argument may seem it is erroneous. While it is true that, to the naked eye, the work seems to drag, yet this is not the case. This apparent paradox is explained by the fact that the whole work is just at that stage where it is passing out of the chrysalis state into brilliant and forceful life. The apparent inactivity has really been a condition of inward exertion which has wrought marvelously and this will be apparent to every observer within a short time.—Monday's Bee.

Executive Committeeman Rosewater, having to bear his full share of the public condemnation for the mismanagement and schemes of Geraldine and his "friends" on the directory now comes out with a cock-and-bull story of the "marvelous" progress that is being made in the construction of buildings, etc., on the exposition grounds and wants the public to believe that great progress has been made only that it is "not visible to the naked eye." If this assertion wouldn't give his readers one of Tibble's "conniption fits" then we don't know what would. He proceeds by way of apology for making such a ridiculous statement, to tell us that it is an "apparent paradox." We think it is, and he can no more make the Omaha public believe it, than the state fair management can make us believe that there were less visitors to the fair this year than in 1896.

Are we to take opera glasses, field glasses or microscopes with us to the exposition grounds in order to discover this "marvelous" progress, which is invisible "to the naked eye?" We have been there with two eyes—and Committeeman Rosewater has no more. How then did he see this "marvelous" progress, which is invisible to plain, two-eyed, every-day, practical men?

Will Mr. Rosewater kindly take a committee up there and lead them around from one "marvelous" structure to another and place their hands upon these "marvelous" buildings and works which are "invisible to the naked eye?" If we cannot see them nor he either, let us at least have the pleasure of feeling them along with him who believes them to be there, even though we are blind to their presence.

We don't believe in the existence of any invisible works under heaven and we demand that Mr. Rosewater produce the "ocular proof" of these invisible marvels.

He tells us the work is just about to "pass out of the chrysalis state into brilliant and forceful life—" Then we shall all catch butterflies. This is an old song from an old singer, who has been singing of prosperity and employment for every man who wanted to work for the last twelve months, and who now again says everybody   that can drive a nail as a carpenter will be at work in a week. He also says "the apparent inactivity has really been a condition of inward exertion (to arrange "grafts") which has wrought marvelously, and this will be apparent to every observer in a short time." This "inward exertion" has wrought marvelously well for Geraldine and his pals, but judging by the pay roll published last week in THE WESTERN LABROER, the share that has come to labor to be expended in the stores of our business men has been "marvelously" small.

Does Mr. Rosewater want the public to believe that $1,341.11 for labor and $4,910.23 for management in August is indicative of this "marvelous and invisible" progress? The people begin the fear that it is, and are not disposed to stand it much longer.

The truth of the matter is that Rosewater and others on the directory are getting ashamed of the whole management. The honest men on the directory feel that they have been buncoed by Geraldine. They feel that they have acted the part of as many geese from the start, and now Rosewater kindly comes to the front in their defense with his "invisible" improvements, imperceptible to the "naked eye."

We would suggest that Mr. Rosewater bring the county commissioners to see these invisibilities, as he asks them to vote $100,000 in bonds for more of the same kind. Perhaps the county commissioners are gifted with "second sight," like Mr. Rosewater, and can see this invisible progress which cannot be seen with ordinary eyes. The editor of the Bee is a wonderful man on paper. He can construct an exposition or fairy palace in a jiffy, and describe its points and beauties, but he cannot make THE WESTERN LABORER see through his eyes. We are not believers in miracles, and nothing short of the miraculous can induce the people to accept Rosewater's lame apology for the thimble-rigging and rottenness of the exposition management and until Geraldine is removed confidence cannot be restored be any fairy tales in the Omaha Bee.

The Omaha public knows quite well the amount of grading that was required to be done. The tracts selected were the very best for the purpose, and no grading to amount to anything was required except on the bluff tract, which was done with a machine grader. Of course the lagoon had to be excavated, but the lagoon is not the exposition. It is sheer nonsense to tell us how long it took to do this and to do that at the World's Fair. There is no similarity whatever in the two enterprises, and such twaddle will not serve the men who are responsible for the mismanagement and jobbery in our show.

The people have had enough of promises in the newspapers. They want to see something on the grounds selected for the exposition.

Last week a number of farmers called at this office. They said they came chiefly to see how the exposition was getting on. One of them said the country was all right; the Dingley tariff bill did it; wheat was $1 a bushel and everything was lovely; but he said that if he belonged to Omaha he would have had the exposition covered up with a blanket so the visitors couldn't see the "progress" that had been made, and they would have gone back to their homes believing what the newspapers said of the great attraction was true.

ART AT THE EXPOSITION

STATUARY PECULIAR TO WESTERN LIFE

Suggestion of the Woman's Board for Some Last Memento of the Exposition Favorably Received by the Managers.

The communication sent to the executive committee of the exposition at its last meeting by a special committee of the Board of Lady Managers touched the keynote of a sentiment which has been strongly imbedded in the minds of those who have been mainly instrumental in calling the Transmississippi and International Exposition into being, viz: to have something in the way of permanent buildings or decorations of a high order which may be preserved as lasting monuments of the great show.

This special committee of the woman's board consisted of Mrs. Keysor and Mrs. Harford, and they urged upon the executive committee the necessity of at once taking up the matter of making provision for securing works of art of a permanent nature which shall form a part of the decorative features of the exposition and which may be installed in Kountze park of some of the other public parks after the exposition shall have passed into history. The committee dwelt particularly upon the idea of securing statues of wild animals and Indians for the reason that in a western exposition, such as the Transmississippi Exposition will undoubtedly be considered, it will be particularly appropriate to have artistic representations of the former denizens of the boundless prairies, especially so as the originals of these ideal representations have well nigh disappeared and will soon be numbered among the things of the past.

In this communication the special committee suggested that arrangements be made with Captain Edward Kemys, the Chicago artist who has gained wide renown as the greatest living sculptor of American wild animals and Indians. It was suggested that Mr. Kemys be retained to make a number of statues of peculiarly western design, showing the American Indian as he was at the time when he roamed the boundless prairies undisturbed by the encroachments of the white man, and depicting, also, the American bison, that fleet monarch of the plains who has almost entirely disappeared. Some of the lesser animals were also suggested as suitable for decorative purposes besides serving as lasting examples of natural history. It was urged that these statues could be "done" in a permanent material at a slight cost compared with their immense value and utility as works of art of historic value, but the committee was reminded that work of this character required time for its preparation and steps should be taken at an early day to have the work commenced in order to insure its completion by June 1 next year.

MEMENTO OF THE EXPOSITION.

This communication from the Board of Lady Managers was very favorably regarded by some of the members of the executive committee. Manager Rosewater, especially, urged that decorative material of a permanent nature should be secured in order that the city may have something tangible to show as a memento of the great exposition, and he favored taking prompt action on the suggestion of the women. The matter was finally referred to the Department of Buildings and Grounds for recommendation.

The suggestion on the part of the Board of Lady Managers opens a wide field for securing permanent decoration for the public parks and the museum which is to be established in Omaha sometime. The scheme of decoration for the exposition offers plenty of opportunities for securing material of this kind. The arrangement of the main court now provided for statuary on the grand plaza surrounding the lagoon. At a point on the south side of the lagoon half way between Twentieth and Sixteenth streets, just between the Manufactures building and the Liberal Arts building, there is a sharp incline towards the east, necessitated by the difference in elevation between Twentieth and Sixteenth streets. A broad inclined plane occupies the middle of the plaza at this point and on either side will be a flight of broad stairs. Between each of these flights of steps and the inclined plane will be a broad pedestal upon which it is proposed to place a statue of some kind. At a corresponding point on the north side of the lagoon is a similar arrangement for carrying visitors from a lower to a higher elevation, the two furnishing pedestals for four statues of a large size. If no other opportunity offered here would be excellent points for the placing of striking figures such as gazed out over the lagoon in the court of honor at the World's fair. There are other points about the main court where opportunity is offered for the placing of such figures and the park on the bluff tract offers ample opportunity for the placing of an unlimited number of statues of wild animals peculiar to the west.

KEMYS AS A SCULPTOR.

In this connection a few words regarding Captain Edward Kemys will serve to recall him to the minds of many citizens of Omaha. He is best known here by his famous figure of a buffalo's head, which graces the Union Pacific bridge across the Missouri river at Omaha. This monster head of the former king of the plains is most unfortunately located for the inspection of visitors, however picturesque may be the idea which caused it to be placed where it is, typifying the resentment of the king of the beasts to the encroachment of the iron horse. This head was made by Captain Kemys, and is only one of the many proofs of his ability as a sculptor of wild animals. The pair of lions which guard the front entrance of the Chicago Art Institute are his work, and the piece recently placed in the Corcoran Art gallery at Washington, "Fighting Panther and Deer," is considered one of his best efforts. Mr. Kemys' work at the World's fair also attracted wide attention.

Captain Kemys is the founder of a school of art peculiarly his own. His knowledge of the form and habits of wild animals was gained by tracking the beasts to their lairs and studying them from a convenient covert. His knowledge of the American Indian was gained on the broad prairie, when the Indian roamed undisturbed by the white man. The result is seen in the accuracy and freedom which characterized his work, and which make him one of the greatest sculptors of the men and animals characteristic of America and which will soon be seen only in stone.

LOCATING THE UMBRELLA

AMUSEMENT FEATURE OF THE EXPOSITION

Mechanical Device and Engineering Novelty Will Be Placed Upon the Old Fair Ground Tract—Work to Begin Soon.

The preliminary details between the management of the Transmississippi Exposition and the company which is to erect on the exposition grounds the engineering novelty known as Sherman's umbrella have been completed and the work of erecting the giant toy which is to form one of the chief attractions of the Plaisance will be commenced within the next thirty days.

The plans for the mechanical device which is to be to the Transmississippi Exposition what the Ferris wheel was to the World's fair and the Eiffel tower to the Paris Exposition have been examined by engineering experts and pronounced perfectly feasible and safe. Before snow flies the huge skeleton framework of the tower will rear its lofty head above the exposition grounds and will form a landmark which may be seen for many miles in any direction from the city.

The location selected for the umbrella is on the west side of Sherman avenue, about 300 feet north of the south line of the old fair grounds tract. Here a space 250 feet square has been set aside for the purpose and the work of construction will soon be commenced. A hole thirty feet deep and about 100 feet in diameter will be excavated and the framework of the tall shaft will be firmly bedded in concrete. The "stick" of the umbrella will be an open framework of steel beams, crossed and braced in all directions after the manner of a steel bridge. The immense ribs of the tower will be bent out from the center at the bottom like the roots of a tree and these will be firmly imbedded in concrete at the bottom of the hole and then the whole excavation will be filled to the top with concrete, making the base perfectly rigid. The framework construction will be carried to a height of 350 feet at all points. It is said by competent engineers that this plan of construction will give a tower that will be perfectly rigid and capable of bearing all the strain which could be put on it.

The long ribs of the umbrella will be attached at their upper ends to a sliding collar which will be raised to the top of the tower, while the ribs themselves, carrying the carriages, will be raised to a horizontal position at the same time. When the top of the tower is reached the ribs will be fully extended, forming a circle 250 feet in diameter, after which the carriages will be slowly turned about in a circle and lowered again to the ground. When lowered the carriages will rest upon a platform twenty feet above the ground, which may be reached by means of steps. Each of the ten cars will contain forty people, making a load of 400 people at each trip.

The exposition management in general and the Department of Concessions in particular feel considerably elated over the fact that the arrangements for securing this decided novelty have all been completed, and they feel that the exposition has taken a long step ahead in getting out of the rut followed by all expositions since the World's fair in being compelled to rely on imitations of the celebrated Ferris wheel for an engineering attraction.

 

WISCONSIN COMMISSION AT WORK.

Organization is to Be Perfected This Week.

The Wisconsin Exposition commission will meet in Milwaukee Thursday of this week to organize for work. It is expected that at this meeting a definite plan of action will be decided upon and that steps will be taken to raise about $15,000 by private subscriptions for the erection and maintenance on the exposition grounds of a Wisconsin building. Wisconsin manufacturers have manifested a lively interest in the matter of making exhibits at the exposition and these interests are well represented on the commission having the work in charge. This commission is constituted as follows:

August Uihlein, John C. Koch, John E. Hansen, Ferdinand Kieckhefer, Alfred C. Clas, Colonel J. A. Watrous, Milwaukee; General E. E. Bryant, R. G. Thwaites, Madison; John Hicks, Oshkosh; Walter Alexander, Wausau; W. T. Lewis, Racine; J. H. Stout, Menomonie; Isaac Stephenson, Marinette; J. B. Treat, Monroe; C. H. Baxter, Lancaster; Thomas M. Blackstock, F. A. Dennett, Sheboygan; H. D. Fisher, Florence; Ernest Funk, Oconto; Mrs. Angus Cameron, La Crosse; Mrs. Leonard Lottridge, West Salem; Mrs. John Winans, Janesville; Mrs. Caroline H. Bell, Milwaukee; Mrs. True Goodrich, Oconto; Miss Ella Roberts, Waukesha.

WOMEN AND THE EXPOSITION.

Acceptance of Members of the Advisory Board.

The Advisory board to act in conjunction with the Women's Board of Managers is being formed slowly. The plan of organization of the Woman's board provides for an advisory board consisting of two women from each of the transmississippi states and territories and well known women in each of these states have been asked to accept the positions.

The two Minnesota women have accepted and the members of the board for that state of Mrs. T. K. Gray of Minneapolis, chairman of the educational committee of the Minnesota Federation of Woman's Clubs, and Mrs. C. T. Backus of St. Paul, principal of the Baldwin seminary.

For Iowa, Mrs. Ella Hamilton Durley of Des Moines, one of the proprietors of the News, has accepted.

Mrs. Julia Emory, one of the faculty of the State Agricultural college at Bozeman, Mont., will represent Montana on the board, These, together with the women representing Illinois and Texas, whose names were announced recently, constitute the Advisory board so far as it has progressed.

Nebraskans Go to Nashville.

The Missouri Pacific will carry Governor Holcomb and party to Nashville for the celebration of Nebraska Day at the Tennessee Centennial of October 8. The party will leave Lincoln tomorrow and will include the following: Silas A. Holcomb, P. H. Barry, R. B. Griffin, F. A. Miller, J. A. Maher, Walter Moise, Emil Hanson, Charles Bruan, C. J. Bills, J. P. Bratt, J. G. Painter, E. H. Tracy and D. D. Eager.

JENKINS DOES EXPOSITION WORK.

Expects to See an Exhibit from San Salvador.

A letter just received by the Department of Publicity and Promotion from Hon. John Jenkins, consul at San Salvador, expresses the hope that the southern republic will be represented at the exposition. Mr. Jenkins says that upon his introduction to the president of the republic, he suggested to the official that at some other time he would call to present the matter of the exposition and that the president at once expressed considerable interest in the enterprise.

Mr. Jenkins says he informed the president that an exhibit by the government was not all that was desired, but that it should show the advantages offered by the country to immigrants and the extent and character of its products and manufactures. At the present time the republic is embarrassed through financial troubles, and there is considerable excitement over the rebellion in Guatemala, which will make it difficult just now to get a hearing for the exposition. However, Mr. Jenkins thinks these clouds will pass away shortly and that the government will then take up the question of an exhibit.

Material Slow in Arriving.

Owing to a failure of the Cady Lumber company to deliver his material, Contractor R. C. Strehlow this morning laid off twenty-five of his men who were working on the Manufactures building. The work on this building has been delayed and hampered in every way from the very beginning by failure to get material. The material that is lacking is the heavy timbers to be used for uprights to form the sides of the building and the galleries, and also the flooring. The contractor has been compelled to work backwards from the start and has thus lost much valuable time. When unable to start on the framework, he commenced laying the floor, but this was not all delivered and work was stopped for lack of material. Being thus stopped at both ends the majority of the men employed were laid off until the arrival of more material.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Nebraska Exposition commission will meet tomorrow.

The bottom of the lagoon is now completely filled with water and the steady flow is gradually creeping up the sides of the big basin, which resembles nothing so much as a big bath tub since the bottom has disappeared from view and nothing is to be seen except the water washing against the vertical sides of the canal.

Another lot of piles have been received at the site of the Machinery building and they are being driven in their places.

The carpenter shop for the Nebraska building has been completed and the work of driving the piles has been commenced. About a dozen were put in this morning. The piles are being received very slowly and the entire first lot were rejected on account of their inferiority.

Owing to the temporary absence from the city of General C. F. Manderson, one of the special committee of exposition directors appointed to hear the evidence against Dion Geraldine, it is probable that the hearing will be postponed until Wednesday or Thursday of this week, when General Manderson is expected to be in the city.

DELAYED MATERIAL ARRIVES

WORK ON EXPOSITION BUILDING GOES ON

Big Force of Men on the Manufactures Building—Piles for Agricultural Building on the Ground.

The delayed lumber for the Manufactures building commenced to arrive this morning, and Contractor Strehlow is pushing the work again. He says he has enough long timbers on hand to keep him going this week and more on the way and he expects to receive it early next week. There is a delay in the arrival of flooring and nothing can be done in this direction for the present. As soon as the long posts are ready to be placed in position work on the building will proceed rapidly. Contractor Strehlow is now working about forty men. He says he will double his force within a day or two.

The piles for the Machinery building have arrived and they are being driven as rapidly as possible. Some delay in sawing off the tops of the piles along the front of the building is experienced by reason of the fact that the terrace at this point, which is all filled ground made with the earth taken from the lagoon, was graded about a foot too high, and the workmen have to remove the earth with shovels before they can saw the piles off. The same thing occurred at the southeast corner of the Manufactures building, where the site was filled nearly two feet higher than the floor of the building, necessitating the handling of the earth twice. No one seems to know who is directly responsible for these blunders.

The raft of piles for the Agriculture building has reached Florence and the logs will soon be landed on the exposition grounds. A number of them have already been delivered and the pile driver will soon be at work on this building.

The construction of the Mines building is delayed somewhat by failure on the part of the railway companies to deliver some of the material for the long posts forming the sidewalls of the building. The flooring is practically completed and the lumber for the roof is on the ground, but until the posts are received little can be done. In the meantime the saws and other machinery to be operated by steam are being set up and will be ready for operation within a day or two.

The Administration building is making good headway. The staff is being put on the plain surfaces and the ornamental work is being "pointed up." The building is taking on quite a handsome appearance and may be seen quite plainly from certain points down town.

The plans and specifications for the Arch of the States have been completed and turned over to the Department of Buildings and Grounds to advertise for bids. The plans call for permanent material in this structure, it being designed for stone. It is expected that arrangements will be made by which the cost of this building will be brought down to a low figure and a memento of the exposition secured in the form of a stone arch which will be a permanent feature of the Twentieth street boulevard.

INVESTIGATING DION GERALDINE.

Committee Reorganized and Will Begin Its Work Today.

A special meeting of the executive committee of the exposition was called yesterday afternoon at the request of President Wattles, who suggested that it would be well to postpone the regular meeting of the board of directors, which is to be held Friday of this week, until Tuesday of next week, on account of the fact that Friday is Nebraska Day at the Nashville exposition and a number of the officers and directors desired to go to Nashville on that occasion to represent the Transmississippi Exposition. After discussing the matter it was determined that the committee had no power to postpone the meeting of the directors, but it was decided to recommend to the board that it adjourn until next Tuesday.

The discussion on this matter turned on the hearing of the charges against Geraldine. Mr. Wattles said he had no personal interest in the matter except so far as his own acts while in charge of the Department of Buildings and Grounds were concerned and he said he had no fears on that score, as he knew that his acts would bear the most searching investigation, but he said he did not want to have a hearing to be held during his absence and his own acts brought into question and possibly condemned without his knowledge.

Mr. Rosewater said he had intended to insist on a speedy hearing in the matter. He said he had no personal feeling against Geraldine, but the duty of the committee was very plain and the charges should be investigated and disposed of without delay.

It was stated that General Manderson, one of the special committee of directors appointed to hear the charges, would not return to the city until Wednesday or later, and it was doubtful if he would serve at all; Mr. Wharton was reported to be too busy in court to attend to the matter, thus leaving Mr. Kountze as the only member of the committee who could serve. It was finally decided to select six directors, from which Chairman Lindsay was instructed to secure two to act with Mr. Kountze and take up the hearing of the charges at once. These six men were selected: G. F. Bidwell, Lucius Wells, Frank Murphy, J. H. Evans, H. A. Thompsen and C. E. Yost.

Upon inquiry it was learned that Mr. Kountze could not be reached in time to hold a meeting last night and the attempt to hold a hearing at that time was abandoned. The committee will be convened at 8 o'clock this evening and the charges investigated. Messrs. Bidwell and Wells will act with Mr. Kountze.

Nebraska Commission Tonight.

The Nebraska Exposition commission will meet at its rooms at 8 o'clock tonight. There is little business of importance to be transacted and the session will probably be brief. It is expected that Chairman Neville and Assistant Secretary Dearing will represent the commission on the trip to Nashville. It was anticipated that the committee appointed at a former meeting to make a report on the amount of money that should be devoted to the several interests in the state which are to be represented in the state exhibit would be ready to make a report at this meeting. Chairman Poynter of the committee, who arrived in the city this morning, said that the committee would not be ready to report at this time.

Black Hills Will Exhibit.

Every county in the Black Hills will be represented in the mineral exhibit to be made in the Mines building. The last county to take action is Pennington, the chief city of which is Rapid City. A meeting of business men and interested parties was called by Commissioner Hymer, who has charge of the interests of the other counties in the Black Hills, and it was decided that Pennington county should not be left out. A committee of prominent business men was appointed to raise the necessary money by private subscription, and the sentiment was freely expressed that the county would make a good [?].

DISCUSS HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS.

Matter to Be Taken Up with Exposition Management.

The thirty-five conventions that have been secured for Omaha for next year and the entertainment of the same received much thought of the members of the Commercial club's executive committee at their meeting this afternoon. The committee will take up the matter with the exposition management and endeavor to make arrangements for halls and hotel accommodations.

The first monthly meeting of the Commercial club of this season will be held on Tuesday, October 19. All the senators and congressmen in the state have been invited to be present and deliver fifteen-minute talks. The following are the subjects upon which addresses will be made: Indian Supply depot, Fast Mail service between Chicago and Omaha, the Exposition, Indian school at Fort Omaha, Improvement of Waterways and the Bankruptcy Bill.

GERALDINE'S QUEER WAYS

GIVES WORK TO FAVORED CONTRACTORS

One Firm Gets Information Withheld from Another and Secures a Job at Figures that Prove Very Profitable.

The investigation of the charges preferred against Dion Geraldine, the superintendent of construction of the exposition, was commenced last night at the exposition headquarters before a special committee of the directors appointed for that purpose. A part   only of the testimony was taken, occupying the time until nearly midnight, when an adjournment was taken until 3 o'clock this afternoon.

Geraldine's attitude before the committee was one of defiance and arrogance and he frequently interrupted Witness Shaw with charges that he was saying what was absolutely false. When it came time for him to meet the testimony produced by Mr. Rosewater in support of the charges he had made, Geraldine produced a long type-written document to which he frequently referred in making an explanation, which was verbose and evasive. He failed to touch upon the vital points in the charges, but spoke in an affected manner of little technical details and minor matters having no particular relation to the case in point. He admitted the truthfulness of several of the most important point covered by the charges.

When the session commenced the special committee, comprising Directors Kountze, Wells and Bidwell, were seated together and Geraldine took a chair directly in front of the court and facing it. Manager Rosewater, who had preferred the charges, Manager Kirkendall, head of the department with which Geraldine is connected, Managers Bruce and Reed and President Wattles occupied seats in the room. These constituted the entire party.

Secretary Wakefield read the lengthy charges for the information of all concerned. When the reading had been completed Mr. Kountze, who presided, said he supposed the next step would be for Manager Rosewater to produce the proof of his charges, after which Mr. Geraldine could answer the charges and make his defense if he had any.

Manager Rosewater suggested that if Mr. Geraldine had any statement prepared it might be filed.

Mr. Geraldine said he would prefer to hear Mr. Rosewater first before he offered any defense.

SOME QUEER METHODS.

The way being cleared, Mr. Rosewater asked Mr. Kirkendall if it was not a fact that the latter had asked the executive committee to authorize the purchase of a lot of yellow pine lumber for about $3,000, it being represented that it could be bought at $1.50 per thousand below the market price, saving several hundred dollars, according to a statement made to him by Geraldine.

Mr. Kirkendall said this was true.

Mr. Rosewater then asked if it was not true that the lumber had been purchased before the committee had been asked to authorize its purchase.

Mr. Kirkendall admitted that this was true.

Mr. Rosewater then called attention to the fact, which he said he was prepared to prove, that J. P. Connolly, a bidder on the work, had offered to do all the work on the sheet piling for $2,100, the exposition to furnish the material. He emphasized this point and called attention to the fact that if Connolly's bid had been accepted and the material purchased for $3,000, as stated by Mr. Kirkendall, the whole job would have cost but $5,100; whereas Creedon & Malonet were paid $5,936.50 for the work.

Mr. Rosewater charged that the plans and specifications on which bids had been asked had been manipulated and changed in the most arbitrary manner and that Creedon & Mahoney had been allowed to complete the work in a way which had saved over 50,000 feet of lumber as compared with the amount called for by the plans under which they were supposed to work. In this connection Mr. Rosewater read a written statement made by Thomas Shaw, a civil engineer of thirty-five years experience, who had been in the city engnieer's​ office for a number of years and who had assisted J. P. Connolly to prepare his bid. It also developed that Mr. Shaw was the engineer employed by Geraldine to make the plans and specifications on which bids for the piling were asked and was, therefore, thoroughly familiar with the details of construction called for by the plans. He wrote that he had visited the exposition grounds on other business, but had taken pains to examine the work, which was then (September 13) under progress. He made the following statements regarding the manner in which the work was being done:

SHAW MAKES A STATEMENT.

"I found the coping 8x4 inches instead of 12x4 inches, saving about 7,000 feet of lumber. Instead of having a front waling half way between the ground and coping, as shown on plans, 8x3 inches, they have put in pieces between piles on the back of the sheet piling 6x3 inches, saving 2,500 feet more, making a total of 9,500 feet of lumber saved in addition to what has already been reported to you, 58,500 feet.

"The circular coping at the ends of the lake was to have been of sufficient breadth to dress down to twelve inches in breadth all around, but they have just used the eight-inch coping, which, on being dressed to the curve, only leaves six inches of width at the center between piles. The piles are set further apart than the specifications called for, I estimated, from several measurements I made, that they have saved at least sixty piles by altering the spacing. Many of these piles are of very inferior quality, being absolutely rotten, and there is not 10 per cent of them of the size called for in the specifications—some of them are mere fence posts. The sheeting that is already put in place is of the thickness called for, but I noticed several thousand feet which apparently had lately been delivered on the ground and it is only two and one-half inches thinck​, instead of three inches. It looks to me that they are going to use it.

"The pile driving has been done in the most reckless and careless manner. To get the sheeting lined up properly some piles are cut more than half through. The tops of the piles in many places have been driven too low, necessitating the use of packing pieces to bring them to level of coping, contrary to the specifications.

"The sheet piles are tongued and grooved, but it is a perfect farce, as the tongue and groove is only three-eighths of an inch deep and they might as well have used plain joints for all the good it will do as it is. I did not see where they had used any white lead on the joints. There are no wood screws for securing coping to piles, are required by specifications, they are simply nailed to the piles with 50-penny nails; the nails should be 6-penny for nailing the sheet piling to the coping.

"Quite a lot of the lumber used is of very inferior quality and the workmanship all through is simply barbarous. I found joints from one-eighth inch to one-quarter inch wide on the completed work."

ESTIMATE BY BULLARD.

Following this, Mr. Rosewater said he had had a detailed schedule made showing the amount and kind of material used in the piling of the lagoon, and this schedule he had submitted to W. C. Bullard, of the firm of Wyatt-Bullard Lumber company, wholesale dealers in lumber, and also to an experienced builder. Mr. Rosewater submitted the estimates made by both parties. Mr. Bullard stated in writing as follows:

"The above bill of lumber any dealer in Omaha would have been glad to have filled from August 1 to August 15 on a basis of $13.50 per 1,000 feet, free on board cars at Omaha. The same bill, in white pine, would have cost $3 and possibly $4 per 1,000 feet, free on board cars at Omaha. The same bill, in white pine, would have cost $3 and possibly $4 per 1,000 feet more, as ten and eighteen-foot lengths of 3x12 in white pine are extremely scarce and cost from $1.50 to $2 more than sixteen-foot lengths, and nearly two-thirds of this boll is composed of these two items. August 13 the regular price for yellow pine dimension lumber was only $13 per 1,000 feet delivered in town in small bills. The regular price of 3x12, delivered in small quantities, was only $15 per 1,000 feet."

The estimate of cost as made by the builder referred to was the same as that of Mr. Bullard.

Taking these figures as a guide, as using Connolly's bid of $2,100 for labor alone, Mr. Rosewater argued that the whole job, allowing $500 for piling, should have cost but $5,600, whereas Creedon & Mahony had been paid $5,936.50, the piling had cost $700, making a total cost of $6,636.50, or an overcharge of $1,036.50 above what the work should have cost.

At this point Mr. Rosewater asked Mr. Geraldine if Connolly had been given an opportunity to bid on the work on the same conditions as Creedon & Mahoney.

Mr. Geraldine asked the committee if he was obliged to answer the question.

Mr. Kountze said he thought the question should be answered and all the facts brought out.

Mr. Geraldine said Connolly was not given the opportunity.

This closed the piling matter and the irregularity in the employment of H. W. Tamm, who has been on the pay roll since early in August at $4 per day, although the executive committee refused to authorize his employment was next taken up. Mr. Rosewater explained the details of this transaction.

Mr. Kountze asked if Mr. Geraldine had any authority to employ people on his own motion.

The rules of the executive committee were produced and showed that no authority of this kind had been granted. Mr. Rosewater said it was manifestly impossible for the executive committee to pass upon every laborer employed by the department, but he called attention to the fact that the action of Mr. Geraldine in asking the authority for Tamm's employment showed that he recognized the authority of the committee in that instance.

THAT SEWER CONTRACT.

Mr. Rosewater next took up the charge regarding the letting of a contract for sewer on the exposition grounds to John F. Daley at a time when Daley was on the pay roll of the Department of Buildings and Grounds. Daley's bid was $1.48 lower than the next lowest bidder. Mr. Rosewater said no specifications had been furnished the bidders and Daley had not signed any contract and no form of document had been signed until after the work had been completed and Daley paid for his work. In this connection Mr. Rosewater read two statements made by Contractor Sharpe, the bidder to whom the sewer contract was first awarded. The statements were to the effect that after the notice of the award to Sharpe had been printed in the papers Mr. Geraldine told Sharpe that no such action had been taken and that the contract had not been awarded to him. When Sharpe told Geraldine that he had seen the statement in The Bee, Mr. Geraldine said that "anything you see in that paper is a lie."

Regarding the sewer matter, Mr. Rosewater stated that within the last day or so, when it was desired to make a connection with this sewer, the Y for making the connection with the sewer could not be found. Daley was called in and he and the engineer on the grounds spent the whole day and dug up several feet of the sewer trench looking for the Y, but could not find it and were finally obliged to break into the sewer and rebuild a part of it in order to make the connection. Mr. Rosewater asked Geraldine what he knew about that matter, but Geraldine pretended ignorance of the whole subject. Mr. Rosewater said he was prepared to prove and would later call the engineer to prove the truth of this charge, although he said he wished it to be distinctly understood that the engineer had not given him the information.

In this connection Mr. Rosewater remarked, incidentally, that Geraldine had a complete system of spies on the ground and that the movement of every visitor whom Geraldine had reason to suspect might be watching for crooked work was watched by one or more of these spies and such visitors were followed all over the grounds and watched until they left the neighborhood, and their every act reported to Geraldine. Mr. Rosewater said he would prove this statement when the proper time came.

Regarding the planing mill erected against the exposition fence, Mr. Rosewater said that Geraldine should have known of it and notified the executive committee of what was going on.

The charge regarding the change of the ground plan on the Bluff tract was dismissed by Mr. Rosewater, who said he did not care to put the committee to the trouble of studying over the details of the plans.

GERALDINE AT THE BAT.

This completed Mr. Rosewater's direct presentation of his case and Mr. Geraldine was given the floor.

Taking up the charge regarding the contract with Creeden & Mahoney, Mr. Geraldine said the first bids were opened by himself and Mr. Kirkendall in the presence of one of the clerks of the department and rejected because too high. With reference to Kirkendall's admission that the lumber had been bought before authority was asked, Geraldine gave Kirkendall the lie by implication. He said Kirkendall went to a meeting of the committee immediately after it had been decided best to purchase the lumber and before the order had been given.

The first direct answer to the charges was the statement by Geraldine that it was untrue that the lumber used was second quality yellow pine. He insisted that the material was first quality. He then produced the bids for piling the lagoon together with a lot of bids he had received from lumbermen while he was figuring with them previous to asking for bids for the whole work.

Referring to these, it was shown that the price quoted for yellow pine was $14.50 per thousand. Mr. Rosewater asked Mr. Geraldine if he did not know that the open market price at that time, as shown by Mr. Bullard's statement, was $1 lower. Mr. Geraldine replied that he did not know it. He attempted to explain this by saying that this lumber was of a much higher grade than could be bought in open market and was one-fourth of an inch thicker than the usual run of lumber and was tongued and grooved after a special design furnished by Mr. Geraldine. He said the lumber was bought for about $3,000, and it was turned over to Creedon & Mahoney, they paying for it. In reply to a question by Mr. Wells, Mr. Geraldine said he had offered this opportunity to only Creedon & Mahoney and to no others.

Mr. Geraldine denied, point blank, that Connolly had offered to furnish the material and do all the work for $7,100, or do the work alone for $2,100. He read what he said was Connolly's bid, in which it was stated that the material would be furnished and work done for $7,800, or the work alone would be done for $2,800, with an allowance of $700 in each case if the piling was set in a trench without being driven and the dirt tamped about it. He then detailed his negotiations with Creedon & Mahoney and his recommendation that the work be awarded to them. With reference to the use of cement, Mr. Geraldine said that the tamping of the dirt about the bottom of the piling cost the contractor more than it would have cost to have cement and he said it was better.

DOESN'T LIKE TO ANSWER.

Before leaving the question of the lagoon piling Mr. Rosewater asked two or three questions regarding the plans. Mr. Geraldine refused to answer, saying he had said all he cared to and didn't propose to be quizzed.

Mr. Rosewater insisted upon a respectful answer to a pertinent question and said he didn't propose to be insulted by an employe. He then asked Mr. Geraldine if it wasn't a fact that one of the employes in   his office owned a piledriver which is in constant use on the grounds and is directly interested in contracts for piledriving on the exposition grounds.

Mr. Geraldine answered slowly that such was the case. He attempted to explain the by saying the machine had been hired from John Templeton, a clerk in his office, and was operated by a man named Green. He knew nothing about Templeton's interest in the machine. It was used in driving the piling for the Mines building and other contracts on the grounds.

He had intended to employ Thomas Shaw, the engineer who made the original plans for the sheet piling, as foreman on the work, but learned that he was associated with Connolly, and had decided not to employ him. He denounced the statements of Shaw regarding the manner in which the piling was done as absolute falsehoods.

At this point Mr. Shaw was called at the request of Mr. Rosewater to tell his side of the story. Mr. Shaw explained that he was not interested with Connolly at the time the bids for the piling were submitted, but had assisted him in making his bod and was familiar with the facts. He said after the bids were submitted Connolly called at Geraldine's office, but returned to say that Geraldine would give him no information about the matter except to tell him that he was "not in it, anyway." Connolly visited Director Hussie, who went to Manager Kirkendall, and Geraldine then treated Connolly with more consideration.

FAVORED THE WINNING FIRM.

Shaw denied most positively that either he or Connolly knew of any change in the plans until after Creedon & Mahoney had been given the contract. He said Connolly's bid was based on furnishing white pine at $18 per thousand, as he could not make a contract with a dealer to furnish yellow pine in time to complete the work at the time required. Mr. Shaw then explained the manner in which the work was done, stating that some of the piles were driven so poorly that it was necessary to cut them more than three-quarters through in order to straighten up the sheet piling, making these cut piles absolutely worthless in case any strain is put on them.

Mr. Geraldine denounced this statement as a falsehood, and Mr. Shaw invited the committee to go with him and he would be pleased to show the piled which had been so cut.

Mr. Shaw then explained to the committee the saving in lumber made by the changes in the plans under which the work was finally done as compared with the specifications bid on by Connolly. He read detailed figures, showing that the change made a difference of 49,639 feet, allowing a wide margin and giving Creedon & Mahoney the benefit of the doubt. He said Connolly was given no opportunity to take the lumber bought by the exposition and base a bid on that.

ATTENDANCE AT STATE FAIR

RAILWAY COMPANIES SUBMIT FIGURES

Contention that Several Thousand Admissions to the Big Show Are Not Accounted for by the Managers.

The State fair trains of the Union Pacific railroad, the Missouri Pacific railroad and the Omaha Street Railway company carried more people to the State fair grounds during the fair last month than there were total admissions, according to the statement given out by the board of managers of the State fair. Just what the several thousand people who went out to the State fair grounds but did not go in did to while away their time is not known, but it is presumed they stood about the fences and looked in.

Ever since the very remarkable statement of the State fair boards was made public a fortnight ago, Omahans have been inclined to believe that the figures of the admissions had been juggled with. This belief was confirmed this morning when the passenger department of the Union Pacific railway completed its count of tickets taken up on State fair trains from Omaha, South Omaha and Council Bluffs to the fair grounds.

Here are the figures that show that more people went to the grounds than there were total admissions, according to the State fair board's report:

Passengers hauled to the fair by the Omaha Street railway 47,180
Passengers hauled to the fair by the Union Pacific railway 8,995
Passengers hauled to the fair by the Missouri Pacific railroad 4,247
Total on State fair trains alone 60,332

The total attendance, including both paid and free admissions, as reported by the Board of Managers of the State fair, was 58,949.

THERE WERE OTHERS.

The 60,332 passengers hauled by the railroads to the State fair grounds exceed the number of total admissions reported by the State fair management by 1,383, and does not include the people who went to the grounds via other routes. It has been estimated by persons who were on the grounds throughout the week that at least 5,000 people went to the fair during the five days its gates were open by other means than steam or electric cars. It is considered a very conservative [?] were about the gates during the entire fair that the number who drove in from the surrounding country was larger this year than ever before.

Both the Burlington and the Elkhorn railroads brought people from their various lines into the State fair grounds direct. The number who went directly to the State fair grounds without entering Omaha was smaller this year than in previous years, but 2,500 is regarded as a fair estimate for this class by railroaders who looked after this travel. The Elkhorn's State fair coupons number something more than 3,200. An official of that road said this morning that he thought 50 per cent of this number went directly to the State fair grounds. This would by 1,600. The Burlington switched cars from incoming trains at Deerfield for the State fair grounds on three days of the fair, and 900 is considered a fair estimate for the people who went to the fair on the Burlington trains.

The addition of 47,180 hauled by the Omaha street railway, 8,905 by the Union Pacific, 4,247 by the Missouri Pacific, 5,000 who drove, rode and walked to the grounds and 2,500 who were taken directly to the grounds by the Burlington and the Elkhorn railroads makes a total of 67,832 people who were at least taken to the State fair grounds.

This number exceeds the number of total free and paid admissions reported by the State fair management by 8,883.

DION GERALDINE ON TRIAL

MANY EXCUSES FOR HIS SHORTCOMINGS

Evidence is All Submitted and the Committee Takes the Subject Under Consideration Before Deciding.

The investigation of the charges preferred against Dion Geraldine, superintendent of construction of the Department of Buildings and Grounds of the exposition, was concluded last evening about 7 o'clock after a session commencing shortly after 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. The special committee will hold a conference this afternoon to consider the evidence introduced and may defer its findings until after the return of President Wattles from Nashville, as his name as been mentioned in connection with several of the events connected with the matters referred to in the investigation.

The session yesterday was similar to that of the night before, the special committee, Messrs. Kountze, Bidwell and Wells, being present and the executive committee being represented by Managers Rosewater, Bruce and Reed, with Manager Babcock present a portion of the time.

When the session commenced Mr. Rosewater said he wanted to ask Geraldine a few questions in order to get the data all together.

Questions were propounded and answers were made as follows:

Rosewater—I want Mr. Geraldine to state as far as he knows the quality of the lumber purchased by the exposition and turned over to Creed & Mahoney. Geraldine—I don't recollect; I judge it was about 170,000 feet.

Kountze—Mr. Geraldine, in order to make the point clear, did the association buy any lumber and pay for it, or did it simply make a contract for lumber and transfer the contract to Creedon & Mahoney? Geraldine—They made a contract for the lumber and transferred the contract.

Kountze—They never made the purchase? They never received the lumber themselves? Geraldine—No, sir.

Kountze—But they did make a contract by which they were to take a certain quantity of lumber, and that contract was referred to Creedon & Mahoney, and that was probably 175,000 feet? Geraldine—Yes, sir; in that vicinity.

Rosewater—Now, have you that contract? Geraldine—There was no contract. It was a verbal order, and a pencil memorandum for the amount of lumber required.

NO AGREEMENT IN WRITING.

Rosewater—Have you no agreement in writing by which the lumber company fixed the price at which that lumber was to be delivered for the exposition? Geraldine—No, sir.

Rosewater—You stated that the lumber was bought at $14.50 per thousand? Geraldine—Yes.

Rosewater—Was that all the lumber used in the lagoon? Geraldine—No, sir.

Rosewater—How much other lumber was there used? Geraldine—I should judge that—. I don't know how much. The contractor probably had to get more—probably 20,000 feet. I don't know.

Rosewater—Is that also yellow pine from the same yard? Geraldine—Furnished by the same people.

Rosewater—So that all in all there would have been 195,000 feet in the lagoon in its construction? Geraldine—Somewhere in the vicinity of 200,000 feet.

Rosewater—Now you stated that the piles and the driving of the piling was $779? Geraldine—Yes.

Rosewater—That, with the lumber got, was all the material used in that lagoon, was it not, and included the labor of driving the piles? Geraldine—I do not know as I understand your question.

[?] people and bought by the exposition, together with 195,000 feet of lumber which Creedon & Mahoney had purchased and supplied, was all the material used in that lagoon, was it not? Geraldine—No, I think not.

Rosewater—What was there besides? I am talking of material now. Geraldine—There were cables for anchoring the posts, the nails and the white lead or paint that was used.

Rosewater—How much white lead was used? Geraldine—I do not know. It was put on the west end of the lagoon for about half or two-thirds the distance around.

Rosewater—I notice that in this bill (I presume it is receipted) the amount charged as the cost of piles is $345.89, and the labor is $419.40. In round figures, then, the labor which the exposition has bought is equal to $400. Now, Mr. Geraldine, you stated yesterday that Connolly offered to do the labor for $2,800. Is that correct? Geraldine—I think the bid shows that.

SAYS THE BID EXPLAINS.

Rosewater—Did that include the work of pile driving and completing all that work? Geraldine—His bid will explain.

Rosewater—I have not examined the bid, and I want to know that because I want a clear idea of it. Geraldine—Yes, I think his bid included all the labor.

Rosewater—So that, deducting what you have paid already, say $100, there would have been only $2,300 to add for Mr. Connolly if he had done that work under his bid? Geraldine—I think there is about $80 of that that was paid for the use of the piledriver, or for repairing.

Rosewater—Is that charged to the labor? Geraldine—I think so; it is included in the complete work.

Rosewater—The reduction was about $80? That would make the computation of all the labor equal to $2,380? I am talking about separating the materials from the labor. The 195,000 feet at $14.50 per thousand would be equal to $2,827.50. To that should be added for piles and pile-driving together $779.93, and the estimated labor for which it could be done or bought of Connolly we would put at being equal to $2,380. I want to ask now how much in round figures, the value of the white lead, the nails and the anchoring would be, in round figures? Geraldine—About $400.

Rosewater—We will place that at $400. But you are aware, I suppose, that only a very small part of that work was leaded? Geraldine—No, I didn't say so.

Rosewater—That is the way it is represented to me. Geraldine—I did not represent it so.

Rosewater—Very well. We have then a general computation as regards what the cost of this work would have been had the exposition bought the material as it originally had done so, paid for all the labor and completed the work on its own account. Was the bid of $2,800 for labor made by Connolly on the original specifications or on the revised specifications? Geraldine—On the modified and revised specifications.

WANTED A SPECIAL DESIGN.

Recurring to the statement made to the executive committee by Manager Kirkendall that the exposition could save $1.50 per thousand by buying the lumber direct from the mill, Mr. Geraldine said there was a misunderstanding about the matter. He said he explained to Mr. Kirkendall that he (Geraldine) wanted lumber sawed one-quarter of an inch thicker than the regular stock and tongued and grooved to a special design. He did not explain just why ordinary three-inch lumber, tongued and grooved in the ordinary way would not answer. He said if the contractors had been asked to bid on this material they would have bid $2 or $3 higher per thousand. He explained how he called in a representative of the Cady Lumber company and gave him the order for the lumber.

In reply to questions, Mr. Geraldine stated that the lumber delivered on the grounds was dressed on one side and measured slightly less than three inches in thickness.

At this point, William Mulhall, an expert in lumber, who has been employed in local lumber yards for the past seventeen years, was called by Mr. Rosewater. He produced a short piece of planking, which he said he had measured a large number of planks and found them all of the same thickness and found the lumber to be a very poor quality of yellow pine, full of knots and cracks, and lumber that would not grade No. 2 in any market. He said the stuff was entirely too dry to use in water, and the knots were loose and would soon fall out. The lumber is of a kind that is not used for anything but inside of buildings and places where it is covered. He said it would not last more than two and one-half years in water.

When Mulhall had retired, Mr. Geraldine said the lumber used was the best lot he had ever seen. He said that yellow pine would shrink in the drying kilns and this lumber, when received on the ground, had measured two and seven-eighths inches. He accounted for the fact that the lumber is now only two and three-quarters inches by saying the shrinkage was caused by the sun. Regarding the life of the lumber in water he said it would last ten years or longer.

Secretary Wakefield, who was in the lumber business for several years, was called and testified that three-inch lumber dressed on one side would measure two and five-eighths inches in thickness, whether steam dried or air dried. If a special order was given to be furnished at a special time there would not be time enough, under the conditions governing in the case under consideration, to dry the lumber very much in the proper manner. He estimated the life of yellow pine in water at from twelve to fifteen years.

 

Mr. Geraldine then mentioned a number of details regarding the doing of the work and spoke of the white lead used in the work. He said he had caused white lead to be put in the specifications so it could be used all around if found necessary. He said he found that it would not be necessary to use the lead all around, but it had been used only about half way around.

MADE NO REDUCTION.

In reply to a question from Mr. Rosewater Mr. Geraldine said no reduction had been made by the contractor on this account, but it has been applied as an offset against claims made by the contractor for alleged extra work, and the contractor had been paid in full.

Mr. Wells, one of the investigating committee, asked if these facts had ever been reported to the executive committee. Mr. Geraldine replied that the matter had been talked over with Mr. Wattles, but had never been brought before the executive committee.

J. P. Connolly, the bidder on the piling mentioned by Thomas Shaw, was called. He substantiated all that Shaw had said and emphasized the fact that his second bid had been made on exactly the same specifications as the first bid, except that he offered a reduction of $700 if allowed to set the piles in a trench instead of driving them. He stated very positively that he was not told and did not know anything about the change in the use of wire for bracing instead of timber. He said his bid for doing all the work on the job, including driving piles and all other work, the exposition to furnish the material, was $2,800, with an allowance of $700 if allowed to set the sheet piling in a trench instead of driving it. (The latter method was the one adopted and used by Creedon & Mahoney.)

Mr. Connolly said if he had been allowed to bid on the plans on which the work was actually done by Creedon & Mahoney he would have offered to complete the work for about $7,200, using clear white pine of the first quality, making a reduction of $700 from his first bid on account of the saving in the amount of material used. He said if he had been offered the lumber at $14.50, the price Geraldine said the lumber cost he would have made a further reduction of $437.50. He stated most positively that he had not been given an opportunity to take the lumber bought by the exposition. Mr. Connolly said he figured his lumber at $18, as that was the lowest price he could obtain. He said he had this figure from the Wyatt-Bullard Lumber company and did not know that the Chicago Lumber company and Hoagland had offered to furnish the material for $14.50 for white pine and $13.50 for yellow pine, both tongued and grooved and dressed on one side.

Mr. Rosewater demanded of Geraldine why he had not told Connolly of the fact that he had ordered the lumber and give him an opportunity to bid accordingly.

Mr. Geraldine evaded this question and further attempts to make him answer similar questions were also fruitless.

DESIGNS ON CONNOLLY'S NECK.

Connolly then stated that the first time he knew that a change had been made in the plans for the lagoon piling was about two weeks after the contract had been awarded to Creedon & Mahoney. He happened to be in Geraldine's outer office and saw the changed plans and expressed his disgust in a somewhat loud voice, saying he was tired of having bids opened in private. Afterward Geraldine sent word that he would wring Connolly's neck.

Mr. Rosewater then questioned Geraldine closely regarding the lagoon contract and Geraldine admitted that if the exposition had paid for the lumber and taken Connolly's bid for doing the work about $700 could have been saved. Geraldine said he had stated this to President Wattles, who said there was so much objection to doing work without contracts that it was not advisable to do the work that way and it was then let to Creedon & Mahoney. Geraldine admitted that the pile driving on the lagoon had been done by the exposition without a contract.

The employment of W. H. Tamm as superintendent of construction was next taken up. Geraldine laid great stress upon the necessity of having on the ground a man whom he could absolutely trust, as it was necessary to see that the plans and specifications were complied with. He sent for Tamm and asked him what he would work for. Tamm wanted $7 per day, but Geraldine said he succeeded in geting​ him down to $4. He reviewed Tamm's history since the commencement of the World's fair, where both were employed. He followed Tamm's travel all over the country to the Chicago drainage canal, where he was in the employ of Geraldine, who had a contract on the canal. Mr. Rosewater insisted that the tale should be cut short. He said the committee and the others present had something else to do, while Mr. Geraldine could stay all winter as long as his salary went on at the rate of $18 per day.

Mr. Geraldine insisted that he had requested Tamm's employment of the committee the day before he was employed and had received no notice of any action by the committee.

Mr. Rosewater demanded to know why Geraldine has designated Tamm as "superintendent of construction," when that was his own title.

Mr. Geraldine said he had been employed as superintendent of the Department of Buildings and Grounds.

Mr. Rosewater insisted that this was not the case and said Geraldine had taken it upon himself to make contracts in his own name and carry on things with a high hand.

RECORDS AGAINST HIM.

Mr. Geraldine retorted that this was not a fact, and in reply to this Mr. Rosewater produced one of the early contracts executed by "Dion Geraldine, general superintendent," and made subject all the way through to his approval. This was passed around by the committee and examined by the members.

Committeeman Wells asked several pertinent questions of Manager Kirkendall regarding the authority given Geraldine, bringing out the statement that the latter had no authority whatever, but was supposed to submit everything to Manager Kirkendall for approval before taking any action.

The letting of a sewer contract to John F. Daley without plans, specifications, contract or bond, was next taken up and Geraldine made a statement regarding the matter. He insisted that complete plans and specifications had been furnished bidders. He reviewed the circumstances surrounding the opening of bids and said he considered the execution of a formal contract on a job requiring only ten days or two weeks for its execution as entirely unnecessary. He even deemed it unnecessary to have an inspector on the work, but inspected it himself. He said he did not consider it necessary to exact a bond because Daly asked for no pay until the work was completed. Geraldine said that Daley had been employed by the exposition as an inspector previous to his sewer contract, but was not so employed on the exposition work after the completion of his sewer contract. Geraldine praised Daley very highly as a competent man and a reliable inspector.

When Mr. Geraldine had completed his statement, Mr. Rosewater denounced the whole story as a very smooth evasion of the real issue and full of misstatements. He then reviewed the whole matter and showed that the Daly matter had been pushed through under whip and spur, and the wool pulled over the eyes of the committee at the instigation of Geraldine. He presented the alleged contract which had been executed and filed after the work was all completed, and dated back to the day the contract was awarded. He charged that in carrying out the work Daley had used cement belonging to the exposition. Further, Mr. Rosewater said, the contract had never been before the executive committee.

Mr. Kountze said the executive committee was censurable for not having the whole transaction before it before allowing any claims on the alleged contract.

This charge was discussed by the committee and then it was stated that the charge relating to the change in the ground plan of the bluff tract having been dismissed, this completed the whole matter.

Mr. Geraldine protested against allowing this charge to be dismissed as it had been preferred and made public and he insisted on having a hearing on it.

Mr. Rosewater said that he was satisfied to have the thing continued and said he was ready to file a large number of additional charges at once and produce evidence to support them.

Mr. Bidwell took the position that the committee had been appointed to investigate the charges heretofore preferred and not to hear testimony on any other charges.

The investigating committee held a short consultation and decided that it had heard enough. It was stated that it might be found necessary to await the return of President Wattles, who is in Nashville, as his name had been mentioned during the hearing, and if this was done the findings of the committee would be delayed until some time next week. The special committee will meet at exposition headquarters at 4 o'clock this afternoon to consider the evidence.

REPLY MADE BY GERALDINE

His Answer to Charges Filed Against Him by Bureau of Publicity.

The Evidence Was All Submitted Yesterday Afternoon Save What Wattles May Present.

Testimony Adduced at the Last Sitting Given in Detail—Result Awaited With Interest by the General Public.

The committee appointed to hear the charges against Mr. Geraldine, superintendent of construction of the exposition, resumed the hearing shortly before 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, and was in session until 6:30. The evidence is all submitted save the President Wattles may be asked to give. The committee will hold an executive session for conference this afternoon.

In the hearing yesterday much reference was had, as on Tuesday evening, to the written reply prepared by Geraldine. It was as follows:

GERALDINE'S ANSWER.

I will answer the charges in the order in which they are given as per copy of resolutions and memoranda hereto attached.

First, Contact for Sheet Piling—On July 24 bids on this work were opened by me in the office of grounds and buildings in the presence of Manager Kirkendall, Chief Clerk Templeton and others. Bids were as follows, originals herewith submitted:

Hamilton Bros. $11,542 00
A. A. Raymond 8,724 33
Creedon & Mahoney 8,161 10
James P. Connolly 7,900 00

The bids being considered too high by Manager Kirkendall and myself, were all rejected on his recommendation by the executive committee, and as it was desired to do the work by contract if possible I was instructed to confer with the lowest bidders and ascertain if a lower price might not be obtained. After a careful revision of the specifications and consulting with good authorities I decided to modify the specifications as shown in the contract with Creedon & Mahoney, copy of which is hereto attached. The principal changes being to sink a ditch one foot and drive six inches instead of driving two feet six inches. I also decided to set the anchor piles from twenty to thirty feet back from the main stay piles instead of ten to sixteen feet, as shown in the drawings, and I also changed the connection of these piles from stringers to galvanized wire cables, as shown. I then called in the two lowest bidders and asked them to submit new propositions. I suggested that both submit propositions to do the work and furnish no material, and also to do the work and furnish all materials or a portion of materials, and as they seemed to figure high on the furnishing and driving of anchor piles I suggested that they might leave that portion of the work out or give figures on it separately, my object being to get as much of the work under contract as the contractors might be willing to do at a reasonable figures or to give to each contractor such portion of the work as he could do to best advantage. For this reason I also called in A. A. Raymond, the third bidder, as I understood he was a practical pile driver, and asked him to make a figure on such portion of the work as he could handle to best advantage. He made a figure of 5 cents per foot on the anchor piling and 30 cents each for driving the sheet piling two and a half feet, or 20 cents each for the sheet piling on the modified proposition.

The same explanation was given both Connolly and Mr. Creedon; the same changes shown in all respects. If there was any preference shown in all respects. If there was any preference shown it was in favor of Connolly, who was the lowest bidder. As you are aware it is the custom in such cases to give the lowest bidder the preference on rejected bids. Both men were total strangers to me. They turned in the propositions herewith submitted, which are as follows:

PROPOSITIONS SUBMITTED.

Mr. Connolly offers to do the work for $7,800, refusing to deduct more than $100 from the original bid because of the changes suggested. He adds that if he is allowed to set the piling in trenches without driving he will deduct $700. As we required the sheet piling to be driven at least six inches this deduction could not be considered, which placed the lowest proposition I was able to obtain from Connolly at $7,800. Creedon & Mahoney offered to do all the work and furnish the material, exclusive of main stay piles and anchor piles, and work on the same, for $5,936.50. I estimated the cost of piling as between $700 and $800, as per my original entry on the bid of Creedon & Mahoney hereto attached. The actual cost of piling done by the exposition company amounted to $779.93, as per itemized statement hereto attached, which is a copy from the books of this department, making the total cost of this work $6,716.43, or $1,083.57 less than Mr. Connolly's final proposition, a saving to the exposition of over $1,000.

At the time of advertising for bids, or about July 15, I also asked several local lumbermen to make us a figure on the lumber for sheet piling, and the propositions I received are hereto attached. On the day bids were opened and found to be too high I explained to Mr. Kirkendall that the work of sheet piling should be done as soon as possible, and as there was a prospect of further delay in letting the contract I suggested that we order the sheet piling, for the reason I wished to have it carefully selected and thoroughly dried, tongued and grooved on a special design, which I would furnish, and all this would require considerable time. It was better therefore to order the lumber at once, and if we afterward let the work by contract to turn the order over to the contractor.

Mr. Kirkendall told me to go ahead with such arrangement, and he would bring the matter before the executive committee immediately, which he did and received authority for purchase.

Prior to this all question of using white pine for sheet piling had disappeared from our calculations for the following reasons: An examination of stock in the Omaha lumber yards and conference with lumbermen convinced me that white pine, suitable for this work, could not be obtained except by special order, which would take perhaps sixty days to fill and at a very high price. The white pine on which contractors were evidently figuring and which lumbermen proposed to furnish would not serve the purpose. By reference to the attached written proposals of local lumbermen you will observe that the prices given on white and yellow pine of the kind and dimensions required are very nearly the same. The lumber for sheet piling which we ordered   from the Cady Lumber company was under the following specifications: Carefully selected in timber so to grade No. 1 select, sawed three and a quarter inches thick so to dress down to scant three inches. (The ordinary three-inch plank would dress scant two and three-quarter inches thick), thoroughly dried by steam. Shipments to begin within two weeks. Because of these specifications I agreed to pay a higher price of $1 per 1,000 than would otherwise have been required.

E. ROSEWATER PRESENT.

After I received Creedon & Mahoney's last proposition, I asked Mr. Creedon what price he had figured on sheet piling (he not knowing that I had ordered the material), and he named a price 50 cents per 1,000 less than I had agreed to pay, and insisted that he could secure suitable lumber at that price if given time enough to get it here. I then showed Mr. Creedon the bill of lumber I had made out and ordered, which he agreed to accept after I had explained the specifications. I then sent the new proposition with the changes in specifications, etc., to the executive committee through the proper channel. I was called before the committee, explained the work, the changes, the drawings, the specifications, etc., and in my presence the committee voted unanimously to award the contract to Creedon & Mahoney in accordance with their proposition, and instructed me to drive the main stay and anchor piling ourselves. E. Rosewater was present.

Referring in detail to the charges made, I note the following: It is stated that Mr. Connolly was asked to dig the ditch two feet deep and drive the piling six inches. This is an error.

It is stated that Mr. Connolly submitted a bid of $2,100 for the labor alone and $7,100 for the entire contract. A reference to Mr. Connolly's propositions hereto attached will show the falsity of this statement.

It is stated that under the revised plan, upon which Creedon & Mahoney did the work, 60,000 feet of lumber was saved. This is untrue also. The change of back stays from timber to wire cables eliminated the stringers, amounting to about 16,000 feet, but substituted the cables, and both contractors figured on this in their revised propositions. I believe the cost in using cables is more than the use of timbers and bolts, remembering that the distance, doubled in the revising plan, made double the amount of ditching and refilling. The wire had to be spun into cables and spliced back at both ends, then twisted with turning rod to take up slack. The change in sheet piling from a depth of two and one-half feet to one and one-half feet shows the apparent saving of nearly 15,000 feet, but the fact is, the lumber was ordered on the original measurement, and as a result the one foot eliminated was partly sawed to waste and partly driven to a greater depth. An examination will show that a large portion of the sheet piling penetrates two and one-half feet and more instead of eighteen inches. Hence, the contractor would make little if any saving in lumber on this change. It is stated that Creedon & Mahoney were relieved of an expense of $200 on iron work. This statement is also untrue. The only iron work shown in original plans was for the back stays which we eliminated by the substitution of cables as before explained, and the lag screws for fastening waleing to main stay piles as shown in original drawings when it was designed to put the waleing on the front side of the sheet piling. In the Creedon & Mahoney contract you will observe that we reserve the right to place this waleing back of the sheet piling, and the contractor agreed to make no additional charge. This change was made and involved an extra expense to the contractor of at least $200 instead of relieving him of $200 as stated.

SHOWS FOR ITSELF.

It is stated that yellow pine of second quality was substituted for white pine of first quality, making a difference of $4 per 1,000. As before stated, a reference to bids of lumbermen hereto attached will show that the greatest difference made by any lumberman was 50 cents per 1,000 between yellow pine and white pine of the quality called for. The statement that second quality yellow pine was used is untrue. The sheet piling furnished is the finest lot of lumber I have handled for years. It speaks for itself; any one can examine it.

It is stated that Creedon & Mahoney were given a donation of $250 by turning over our order for lumber to them. This has been above explained; the statement is incorrect.

It is stated that a credit should be taken from the contractor for the omission of cement. I specified in contract that cement might be required if necessary. This was to provide against conditions which might be found where cement would be preferable; viz: sections or stratums of decomposed or porus material. Fortunately no such conditions were found in all the work; the clay thoroughly puddled and tamped, as was done, made a much better joint with the piling than could have been made with the use of cement. In any event, the extreme limit contemplated in the use of cement would not have exceeded $30 in value. The width of the ditch under the specifications would have been but two inches after the plank was put in. It was actually dug on an average of eight inches to a foot in width outside the sheet piling and thoroughly puddled and tamped to a perfect joint.

The labor of so doing exceeds in expense the use of cement as was specified. A reference to the specifications will show that no greater or less expense was contemplated in the reference to cement.

All this was explained by me to the committee before the award of contract, and E. Rosewater was present.

NO SPECIFICATIONS.

It is stated that the contract is still unfinished, though fully paid. This statement is also untrue. Reference is doubtless made to the east end of the canal, where the finishing of terraces and back walls, the putting in of platforms, steps, etc., is not done. This work was not contemplated in any of the drawings and specifications and was not included in the contract with Creedon & Mahoney. In fact, it has never been designed, and the supervising architects have not yet recommended how it should be finished, though the greater part of it will doubtless be done in cement and concrete. The piles which are driven to support the back walls behind steps were put in by the exposition and the waleing and coping thereon were also furnished by the exposition, but the work of anchoring and putting on the coping was done by Creedon & Mahoney without extra charge, or rather as an offset to some of my charges against them.

Second, Employment of Mr. Tamm—On or about August 12 it became necessary to put in a superintendent of construction upon the work. A superintendent had been detailed from the architect's office to superintend the work on the administration building and the manufactures building. This man suddenly left us without notice, and the conditions required the immediate care of a competent constructionist, it being impossible for me to look after the details, the more important affairs of the department taking all my time.

At this time I learned that the services of W. H. Tamm could be secured, he having finished work for Arthur Johnson & Bro. of Omaha. I sent for Mr. Tamm and secured his agreement to work for $4 per day, although he had been accustomed to receiving a much higher salary. I conferred on the matter with President Wattles, who was acting manager of grounds and buildings department in the absence of Mr. Kirkendall. Mr. Wattles assented and said that he would bring the matter before the committee at the next meeting. I at once placed Mr. Tamm on the work. Not from any desire or intention to ignore the committee, but from the pressing necessities of the case. Afterward Mr. Wattles told me that the committee would like to know more of Mr. Tamm; also if I could not use Mr. Daley instead of Mr. Tamm. I explained that the work required a technical man of training and experience, very different from that of Mr. Daley. I also procured from Mr. Tamm a statement of his experience, which I wrote down and handed to Mr. Wattles. Later he returned it and it is herewith attached. Observe, it bears date of August 21. I positively assert this matter was presented to the executive committee prior to the date of this memoranda and not as stated, August 27, for the first time. Had I waited until after August 27 subsequent events have shown that it would have cost more than two months' salary for Mr. Tamm would amount to. Mr. Tamm was employed at $4 per day, the lowest figures at which he would consent to enter our employ. I may have stated to Mr. Wattles that Tamm's salary would be about $100 per month; as there are on average twenty-six working days in a month, his salary would not exceed $104 per month. There were only twenty-six working days in August and not twenty-eight, as stated.

Mr. Tamm is designated as superintendent of construction because it is his proper title. And if anyone doubts his competency let him try, through contractors or otherwise, to have drawings or specifications evaded or any improper construction done on the grounds. I was not employed as superintendent of construction and the title does not apply to me.

DALEY'S CONTRACT.

Third, Daley's Contract—The contract was properly awarded Daley. He states that Daley had been previously employed at $5 per day. This statement is misleading. Mr. Daley was employed to take charge of the sewer building done by the exposition as both foreman and superintendent, and for his service he received only $3 per day. He also furnished tools for a gang of nearly fifty men, derrick and other appliances; also a horse and wagon, and for this he received $2 per day, making $5. This fact appears on all pay rolls where Daley drew $5 per day, and was well known to all interested. I have personally explained it to the committee.

He states that this contract was let without plans or specifications. This statement is untrue. No bond was asked because unnecessary. The job was a small one, requiring only two weeks. Mr. Daley asked no estimates; no obligation on part of the exposition until his contract should be entirely completed and accepted, and his work was thoroughly and skillfully done. I afterward employed Daley to superintend the sheet piling work, and was very glad to get him, owing to much trouble in my efforts to get the work properly done. Mr. Rosewater states that while "pretending to act as inspector, Mr. Daley was raking shavings on the bottom of the lagoon which work was said to have been done by contractor." This statement is untrue, misleading and malicious. Mr. Daley, while supervising the work or waiting the arrival of lumber (the delay of which caused frequent stoppages) busied himself in throwing out of the canal chips and pile heads left there by our own men who finished the stay piles and for which the contractor was not responsible.

Fourth, Changing Landscape Plans—The supplementary plan of the bluff tract, drawn by Mr. Ulrich, was designed at a time when more money was expected for landscape work than is now in sight. And as a measure of economy, I have been obliged to modify his plans with the full consent of Mr. Kirkendall; also Mr. Wattles, while he filled Mr. Kirkendall's place, and the supervising architects have approved the changes suggested. When they are completed they will be presented for approval to the executive committee. I have not expected to improve on Mr. Ulrich's work, for I consider him the ablest landscape architect in the world, but at the time his plan was designed no buildings were located on the bluff tract and his work could only be speculative or suggestive. His plan contemplated more than four times as many buildings as we now expect to materialize in state buildings, etc.

On his last visit here, Mr. Ulrich extended his acquaintance somewhat. As a result, he expressed to me his belief that any man who undertook important work for this exposition would be subject to malicious persecution and annoyances if he failed to pander to selfish local interests. Mr. Ulrich regretted that he came here, and intimated his desire to withdraw. Finally, August 7, he wrote to me his final resignation, which is hereto attached. I did not make this public, knowing that the withdrawal of a man like Mr. Ulrich would hurt the exposition. I hoped to persuade Mr. Ulrich to reconsider.

Mr. Rosewater states that I employed two men on this work of changing landscape plans. This is untrue. The changes have been made by Mr. Arts, who made the original plan for Mr. Ulrich. The two men who have been employed have been engaged on the floor plans of buildings and water service and on the plans of power plant, boilers, engines, railroads, electric, location of new buildings and changes of buildings. As to whether I am at fault in this matter, I respectfully refer to Manager Kirkendall and President Wattles.

Fifth, the Planing Mill—I knew nothing of the location of a planing mill near the grounds until the building appeared above the fence. I then found that a building permit had been granted some time before. Vogle Bros., who erected the mill, applied to the exposition for the privilege of erecting a mill on exposition grounds and the executive committee declined their proposition. Since which time I heard nothing of them nor from them until this building appeared. The gate on Seventeenth street alley back of the power plant site is a permanent one, the location of which was designated in April. However, had there been no regular gate in that vicinity, I should certainly put one in temporarily for the convenience of our contractors in reaching the mill.

As to the charge of negligence in permitting this mill to be erected: Has the city of Omaha been instructed to consult me before issuing its building permits? Am I expected to control the city in such matters, or the acts of citizens outside the grounds? It is true that I tried to stop the erection of the mill immediately on discovering it, but I had no power to prevent, and only succeeded in having it made less dangerous to the exposition.

As to insurance: There will be no use for this mill when this work of construction is finished and the objections of underwriters will disappear with the shutting down of same, which Vogle Bros. assured me would be done a month before the exposition opens.

Without further comment, I ask your honorable committee to carefully and thoroughly investigate all charges, and having done so, look beyond the charges for the motives that inspired them.

QUESTIONS GERALDINE.

Mr. Rosewater asked Mr. Geraldine how many feet of lumber the exposition bought and turned over to Creedon & Mahoney.

Geraldine said that the exposition contracted for about 175,000 feet, but the exposition did not pay for the lumber, Creedon & Mahoney assuming the order. The price was $14.50 per 1,000. Besides this, the contractor had to buy about 20,000 feet more of lumber to complete the job. So that in all about 200,000 feet of lumber were required. In addition to this, wire for the stay cables, nails and white lead were necessary. Geraldine said he did not know just how much lead was used. It was put on only at the west end of the lagoon.

At this point Geraldine questioned the stenographer and found that he was employed in Rosewater's department. He then asked leave to brinng​ in another stenographer. This was granted.

Geraldine, being questioned by Rosewater, said the value of the wire, the nails and the white lead was about $400.

Replying to a question from Rosewater, Geraldine stated that he had not said to Kirkendall that the exposition would save $1.50 per 1,000 in buying the lumber for the lagoon. He explained that it was urgent to get the lumber soon, of the quality described, and that while the price was $1 more per 1,000, he thought it would be cheaper for the exposition to get it then than after it was called for in the specifications.

Geraldine said the sheet piling was to dress scant three inches.

MULHALL'S TESTIMONY.

Mr. Mulhall, for many years employed in the lumber yards of the city, was brought in by Rosewater. Mulhall produced a specimen of the piling, showing that it was two and three-quarter inches thick, instead of three and one-quarter inches. He said that the piling was too dry to best serve the purpose to which it was put. He said the lumber was not even No. 2. It was low grade lumber. Much of the piling was knotty, and when it dried further the knots were liable to fall out.

Responding to a question, he said the life of the piling in the water would not be more than two and one-half years. It was not a quality of lumber normally used in water.

Answering Mr. Kountze, Mulhall said he had not had much experience in using lumber of this character, and none whatever in the use of it in water.

Geraldine repeated what he had said to the effect that the lumber bought was of the first quality, and he suggested that if there was any doubt about it a competent man should be sent out to see. With regard to the thickness of the lumber, Geraldine suggested that the specimen might be thinner on account of planing and to shrinkage due to stream and sun drying. He said yellow pine of the kind secured would last in the water from six to ten years.

Secretary Wakefield, as an expert lumberman, was asked about this. He said that three-inch lumber would come dressed two and five-eighths inches. He differed here with Geraldine as to the degree of shrinkage. He thought the life of this lumber in water would be twelve years.

Rosewater quoted the specification requiring white lead in the tongueing and grooving, and asked Geraldine how extensively white lead had been used. The reply was about one-half. He was asked if any reduction was made in the contract price on account of this omission, because the contractor had been subjected to delays and had done really more than the contract required.

Mr. Connolly, the unsuccessful bidder, was then called. He described his transactions with Geraldine regarding the bids. He said in making his second bid   he bid on the first specifications, except in the one particular of the change in the sinking of the piling, trenching two feet and driving six inches, instead of driving two feet six inches. He knew nothing about any other changes. He agreed to knock off $700 if allowed to trench two feet and drive six inches.

Kountze showed him that his bid had it in black and white that this reduction contemplated merely setting the piles in the trench, without any driving.

Connolly said that thought the bid might be that way, driving was contemplated.

QUITE A REDUCTION.

Questioned by Rosewater, Connolly figured a moment to ascertain how much of a reduction in his bid he would have made if he had been acquainted with the changes, as Creedon & Mahoney appeared to have been, sill​ using white pine. He would have been glad to reduce as much as $18 on every 1,000 feet he alleged that was wasted, that it, 60,000 feet, or $1,080. He said he proposed to use the best quality of white pine, which could not be bought for less than $18 per 1,000.

He could have done the job at a reduction of $3.50 per thousand on all the lumber he expected to use had he known he could get the lumber at $14.50 per thousand.

Questioned by Bidwell, he said he had no bid from Hoagland or the Chicago Lumber company. Hoagland, it was shown, had offered white pine, tongued and grooved, at $14.50 per thousand and yellow pine at $13.50. Connolly had his bid from Hoagland and said several other lumbermen quoted about the same figure, but none of the lumbermen would guarantee to deliver at a certain speedy date yellow pine lumber. Connolly was asked what difference he would make between white and yellow pine. He thought about $3. He was asked how he would explain these bids from Hoagland and the Chicago lumber company, wherein the difference was shown to be only $1. He said he could not explain it.

Rosewater asked why Geraldine did not let Connolly know that he could get the lumber from the exposition at $14.50. The question was not directly answered.

Wells asked Geraldine if he had asked Connolly what figures he was getting on lumber. Geraldine said he had and Connolly had answered $13 or $14.

DENIED THE STATEMENT.

Connolly broke in when this statement was made to say that it was absolutely false. He said he told Geraldine $18.

In response to the questions by Rosewater Geraldine said that he had computed that the exposition furnishing the material and accepting the bid of Connolly for labor the job could be done $700 or $800 cheaper than by giving the contract to Creedon & Mahoney. He still thought Creedon & Mahoney's bid too high. He told President Wattles so, but the latter said that $700 or $800 was only a fair profit for a contractor anyway; that a great deal of kicking was being done because more work was not being done on contract after bidding, and that therefore, in order to have as much work done by contract as possible, they better let the job go to Creedon & Mahoney.

The charge regarding Tamm's employment was at this point taken up. Geraldine supplemented his written statement by saying that the inspector who had disappeared had done some improper work; there were certain disputes with contractors and the necessity of having an instructor was imperative. He therefore sent for Tamm. He explained the situation to Mr. Wattles. The latter told him to go ahead and the matter would be placed before the executive committee. The next morning Tamm was set to work.

Kountze asked why Tamm was kept in employment after the executive committee had declined to authorize the employment.

OFFICIAL TITLE.

Geraldine said that he had informed Acting Manager Wattles that Tamm was at work and he received no order to discharge him. In the course of the questioning about this Rosewater asked Geraldine why he designated Tamm as superintendent of construction. Geraldine said that he so designated him because that was the position he was put in.

"What, then, are you?" Rosewater inquired.

"I was employed," Geraldine replied, "as general superintendent of the grounds and buildings department."

Rosewater stated that the records showed that Geraldine had been employed as superintendent of construction.

With regard to the Daley sewer job Geraldine said it was so small a job that he did not think a formal, written contract necessary and for the further reason that Daley asked for no obligation on the part of the exposition until after his work should be done and accepted. It was shown that the written order to Daley was signed by manager, per Dion Geraldine, superintendent, and by G. W. Wattles as president.

Rosewater presented the order and the specifications and protested that such a job should not have been awarded without a contract.

Kountze asked it the omission was not the fault of the executive committee.

Rosewater said the committee knew nothing about it.

BLAMES THE COMMITTEE.

Kountze said that as a business proposition he believed the executive committee was censurable for paying for the work, no contract having been entered into.

Rosewater had Wednesday night withdrawn the charge about changing ground plans.

Last evening Geraldine objected to this. He said the charge had been made and printed and he wanted to answer it.

"All right," said Rosewater, "I'll let it stand and make some more charges tomorrow and this committee can go into them." Turning to Geraldine he said: "And that will give you a chance to sit here a few days longer at $18 per day."

The members of the committee expressed the view that they could not properly hear, under the resolution for their appointment, any additional charges that might be filed.

Kirkendall said he hoped that it could be arranged so that the committee could hear additional charges, since his department was involved and he was anxious that there be a general clearing up.

The committee intimated that it might want to interrogate President Wattles and in that case it could not come to a decision until after the president returned from Nashville, which would probably be next Monday or Tuesday.

At 6:30 the committee adjourned.

EXPOSITION COMMITTEE MEETS.

Bird'seye View of the Grounds is Submitted.

The executive committee of the exposition held a short session at noon today at the Commercial club rooms and adjourned until tomorrow noon, as some of the members were unable to remain for the transaction of business.

Nothing except routine business was transacted, the only incident occurring during the meeting being the introduction of at bird'seye view of the exposition grounds drawn by A. J. Austen, an artist representing an eastern publishing house. The view depicted the appearance of the grounds as seen from an elevated point southeast of the bluff tract, showing the entire grounds in a most realistic manner, with all the details of the buildings and the many other attractions. The picture was pronounced most satisfactory and realistic by the members of the committee.

The work was done under the direction of the Department of Publicity, authority haveing been granted Manager Rosewater several weeks ago to have such a drawing made.

Montana Applies for Space.

Another state has made formal application for space in the exposition. Montana made application this morning for 1,600 feet in the Mines and Mining building, reserved the right to increase this space to 2,600 feet between now and January 1.

DELAYED MATERIAL ARRIVES

WORK AT EXPOSITION GROUNDS RESUMED

Piling that Contractors Have Been Waiting For Comes and Rapidly Being Put in Place—Condition of Lagoon.

Work on the main buildings of the exposition is progressing in a satisfactory manner, although there are a number of vexatious delays in some parts of the work, caused by delay in the shipment of material. On the whole, fair progress is being made.

The Manufactures building is going ahead after a delay caused by failure to get material. The long posts for the sides of the building have been received and the entire front of the structure has been raised. A very fair idea of the height and other dimensions of the building may now be obtained, as the central dome is far enough along to denote its general appearance. The material for the floor has arrived and is being put in place.

The Mines building is delayed by the nonarrival of the long posts. Goldie & Sons, the contractors, were notified this morning that eight cars of these posts were tied up in a wreck within ten miles of Omaha and would probably reach this city tonight. The floor of this building is finished and work has stopped completely to await the arrival of the posts. It has been found necessary to remove the planing mill and other machinery for turning out material to a separate building, which is being erected back of the Mines building. This was required by the insurance men, who refused to issue a policy on the building if the machinery, engines, etc., were installed inside the building as intended by the contractor. A temporary workshop had been constructed in the center of the floor of the Mines building and the machinery had beeen​ partially installed, but when this decision was announced all this work was taken away and a workshop is being erected several feet from the building. All the material except the long posts is on the ground.

About one-half of the piles for the Machinery building are driven and nearly all are dressed to the proper level and the sills put in place. Another delay has been caused by the remainder of the piles not being on hand. The pile driver was compelled to stop work this morning.

Five hundred piles for the Agriculture building have been received and the pile driver started to work on them this morning. The contractor anticipates that the remainder of the piles will be on the ground before those now on hand are driven. All of the material needed for the first floor of this building is now on the track in the exposition grounds and the rest of the material is on the road.

Eight cars of lumber for the Liberal Arts building are on the exposition tracks and the piles are said to be coming down the Missouri river. Contractor Parrish expects to start work on this building early next week.

The pipe for the water mains is strung all about the grounds and several carloads of pipe are standing on the tracks.

The lagoon is filling slowly, the water at the upper end being nearly one foot in depth.

ENGINEER STERINGER ARRIVES.

Will Have Charge of Exposition Electrical Work.

Luther M. Steringer of New York, the electrical engineer whom Manager Kirkendall was authorized to employ, is in the city and has made a number of trips to the exposition grounds in company with Architect Kimball.

Mr. Steringer had entire charge of the electrical work at the World's fair and acted in an advisory capacity at the Atlanta and Nashville expositions. He is highly recommended by electrical authorities as an expert of exceptional ability. Mr. Steringer expresses himself as exceedingly well pleased with the opportunity for elaborate electrical displays offered by the arrangement of the exposition grounds. He says that the arrangement of the main court especially will afford an opportunity for an electrical display which will eclipse anything ever before attempted in that direction. He has not yet perfected any plan for the lighting of the grounds and says he is not prepared to make public any suggestions in this direction.

COMMITTEE CONSIDERS EVIDENCE.

Examining the Charges Made Against Dion Geraldine.

The Geraldine investigating committee met at exposition headquarters at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon to consider the evidence taken during the investigation into the charges preferred against Geraldine, the superintendent of construction of the Department of Buildings and Grounds. The committee announced that its report would be presented first to the executive committee, and that the committee could do as it saw fit with regard to making public the nature of the report.

Directors Meet Next Tuesday.

A very few members of the Board of Directors of the exposition assembled at the meeting place yesterday afternoon at the time for the regular monthly meeting of the board, and an adjournment was taken until next Tuesday at 4 p. m.

Plants for Exposition Grounds.

Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Buildings and Grounds has had several conferences with florists of this vicinity regarding the propagation of plants which will be required for the beautifying of the exposition grounds. An immense number of potted plants of the more ordinary varieties will be required and also a large number of the better varieties. An investigation is being made under Manager Kirkendall's direction with a view to determining whether it will be best to contract with florists to propagate these plants and deliver them on the grounds as required, or whether the department should erect temporary greenhouses and do the work. Overtures have been made to the park board to cooperate witht he​ department in erecting greenhouses for this purpose.

 

DION GERALDINE CORNERED

The "Czar of Jackson Park" Discovers That Omaha Is Not Chicago.

His Decapitation Will Give General Satisfaction, and Confidence In the Enterprise Will Be Restored.

He Shows Himself to Be An Impudent, Arrogant, Bulldozing Bluffer While on the Stand.

"The Western Laborer's" Exposures Confirmed--The Bonds Have Some Show for Success Now.

Readers of the Omaha Bee who have read the charges of incompetency, gross negligence, favoritism and general crookedness with which its editor charged Dion Geraldine can now see that there was much fire where THE WESTERN LABORER saw the smoke four months ago.

The result of the investigation wherein every charge of Mr. Rosewater is proven (most of them on Geraldine's own admissions) is evidence that we know what we were talking about all the time when we charged the management with neglect and the superintendent of grounds and buildings with incompetency and waste of public money, to say the least about it.

People ask, now that Geraldine is convicted, what will the directory do?

We hope the directory will do its duty to the stock subscribers and the public just as they would act if the exposition work was there​ own private business, and we will not venture to say there is not a man on the board who, if he had hired a foreman or superintendent to look after his interests and he did it as Geraldine has handled the exposition work, would have kept him a minute in charge after such a discovery.

We have no suggestion to make to make to the directory with regard to Geraldine, the "czar of Jackson park," seeing that one of its members pooh poohed our charges as ONLY coming from THE WESTERN LABORER, and was only street talk.

It was street talk that demanded the investigation which has been held, and the result fully warranted the demand.

We now ask these smart business men if they think a directory of workingmen would have let Geraldine and his "friends" bunco them all these months?—buy material on his order, turn it over to a contractor and have the exposition pay for it, and then be satisfied when told, "yes; Wattles and I talked about it;" "I mentioned it to Wattles and he didn't object." We innocently ask, could Geraldine do anything to which Wattles would object?

We ask these "business men," has the management of the exposition conducted the work on business methods which meets with their approval, or would they conduct their own business as they have conducted the public business of permitted it to be conducted? We would expect them to say, "no! decidedly no! not by a d—n sight!" Why, then, has Geraldine been permitted to do these things so long?

The public trusted the directory because of their supposed business experience, executive ability, honesty and social standing. In fact there was a scramble to get on the directory. What was this scramble for? Was it to become the dupes of Geraldine, the "czar of Jackson park," and a few designing men and to present the public with the conditions of things that now exist?

THE WESTERN LABORER believes "the half has never yet been told" and that double the number of charges could be made, but the trial committee say they "have heard enough."

We think so too, else we would tell them of their "splendid" sewer system, where a gang of men open hole after hole (60 feet long in one instance) in search of a Y connection and finding none decide to break the main pipe and put in a Y to make a connection. How could the men find connections that didn't exist? or how would a ground plan and specifications made and filed after the pipe was laid and the ditch filled indicate connections if none were there and the contractor couldn't point them out? But the work is all paid for and accepted and that is "business!"

The public owes Mr. Rosewater a debt of gratitude for his tearing down the blinds on this rascality instead of hushing it up.

Some have tried to ignore the public clamor, but the public will not be ignored, nor THE WESTERN LABORER pooh poohed. We were sure we were right. We went ahead for four months, and now what a damnable showing Rosewater has unearthed!

We don't think it necessarry​ to send another Diogenes into the [?] with a lantern in search of an honest man, though the state fair management would almost tempt us to do so.

There are honest men on the directory and we appeal to them to act with the subscriptions of the people given during these hard times as if it was their own, and do the best they can with it.

We all want the exposition to be a grand success, but something must be done to restore public confidence in the management or it is sure to be a failure.

We hold in our hands specifications of plants required by the grounds and buildings department which displays the usual idiocy. The specifications call for 100,000 plants. Assuming the estimate to be enough—which it is not by a long way—does any sane man think that a florist can enter into a contract furnishing a bond in double the amount of the accepted contract, raise the required number of plants and risk having them remain on his hands should the exposition be postponed another year from any unforeseen cause? What security has the florist from the superintendent of grounds and buildings who exacts double bonds from the florists? Then assuming that a florist accepts the risk he is bound to deliver the stock of plants on the exposition grounds between April 15 and May 24 "in pots" (to be returned to the bidders). The transplanting of these plants from the pots to their beds is to be a work of magic, as the exposition opens in June, and would give the plants about six days to take root and bloom in order to delight the eye of the visitors.

Verily, Geraldine's knowledge of horticulture is transcendent and does him as much honor as his knowledge of architecture and engineering.

Bah! fire him!

TWO WEEKS FOR THE BIDDERS.

Proposals for Erecting the Government Building Are Invited.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 9.—(Special Telegram.)—Advertisements calling for bids for the erection and completion of the government building at the Transmississippi Exposition were sent out from the Treasury department today. These proposals will be opened on October 29 by Acting Supervising Architect Kemper or the new supervising architect, if one is appointed by that time.

DEMANDS OF UNION LABOR

EXPOSITION WORKMEN OUT ON A STRIKE

Charge Made that Geraldine Brought in Scab Labor from the East to Break the Back of the Union.

The labor troubles which have followed Dion Geraldine's connection with the exposition culminated this morning in an open strike. All the men employed on the grounds who belong to labor organizations laid down their tools and the erection of the buildings in the main court is at a standstill. The carpenters and the staff workers all quit, except a few men employed by the Hamilton Bros. on the Machinery building, and a conference was appointed with them at noon.

Representatives of the labor unions charge Dion Geraldine with being directly responsible for this condition of affairs. They say that he has brought outside labor in to Omaha and has flooded the east with reports   that there are not enough carpenters, plasterers, painters and men of various other building trades in Omaha to do the work needed on the exposition, and that this has resulted in bringing into Omaha hundreds of men who are taking the work directly out of the hands of men who live in Omaha and have their families here, many of whom own property in the city. These men say there is no truth in the reports sent out by Geraldine to eastern contractors and trade journals, and that he had been actuated solely by a desire to "break the back of organized labor." They also say that Geraldine is directly responsible for the actions of the contractors in refusing to treat with representatives of organized labor.

DEMANDS OF LABOR.

At the last meeting of the Building Trades council a resolution was adopted demanding that organized labor be recognized by the exposition management and that none but union labor be employed on the grounds. This resolution was prefaced by numerous "whereases," reciting that all former efforts to secure recognition had failed; that scab labor from the outside had been brought into the city to take the work away from Omaha men; that a proposition to vote $100,000 of county bonds in aid of the exposition is about to be presented to the voters of Douglas county. The demand for recognition was followed by a resolution declaring that all the allied trades represented in the Building Trades council would do all in their power to defeat the bond proposition unless accorded recognition on the exposition work.

The adoption of this resolution was followed by a meeting of representatives of all the building trades' organization at Labor Temple yesterday afternoon, at which it was decided to inaugurate a strike on the exposition grounds. At this meeting the attitude of Geraldine came in for censure.

STRIKE IS ORDERED.

This morning the strike order took effect, and at the hour of commencing work the carpenters and staff men laid down their tools and walked out. The men demand that eight hours shall constitute a day's work; that carpenters shall receive 30 cents per hour, and that none but union men shall be employed. The men say that the contractors have been paying carpenters but 20 or 25 cents per hour and that they have been hiring laborers to do carpenters' work, such as laying floors, etc., and have been requiring all men to work nine or ten hours. All of the men employed on the Manufactures building walked out and absolutely nothing is being done about the building. The few carpenters working on the Administration building walked out and two or three lathers and one or two men employed in putting on the roofing material are all that are working about the building. The big Mines building was deserted, not a man being at work on it; a few men were engaged in setting up the boiler for the planing mill to be operated by Contractor Goldie for this building. The Machinery building was the only one where any work was being done, a force of fifteen men being at work. Of this number four or five were union men and a conference was agreed on between the union representatives and all of the men employed.

VIEWS OF CONTRACTORS.

Contractor Hamilton of the Mines building said he intended to go ahead regardless of what the union did. He said he was under bonds to complete the building at a certain time and would employ non-union labor if necessary. He said he was paying from 25 to 30 cents per hour, according to a man's ability, averaging about 28 cents per hour, and working ten hours a day. He also stated that the union would only allow one laborer to five carpenters and he said he could work a larger per centage of laborers to advantage.

Contractor Goldie said he intended to be governed by what the local contractors do in the matter. He said he was delayed by the failure of some of his long timber to arrive and could wait a few days without any loss to himself as soon as the matter is decided.

Contractor Strehlow said he had been employing union labor all along and expected to continue doing so.

The staff workers also have a few grievances and say they will take advantage of the present strike to have a few adjustments on their account. They complain that the staff contractors are employing green hands to do casting and other intricate portions of the staff work, paying them almost nothing and getting very inferior work. The staff men were recently organized into a union, and they say they are going to claim the protection and co-operation of the other unions.

WOMEN AND THE EXPOSITION.

Securing Funds for a Building for the Children.

The executive committee of the Woman's Board of Managers held a session this morning for the purpose of making a report of its doings to the board, which meets tomorrow. No business of importance was transacted, the meeting being devoted to the discussion of the things which have been announced from time to time through the newspapers. The special committee appointed to take charge of the collection of subscriptions for the Girls' and Boys' building reported what had been done in the way of securing permission from the Board of Education to canvass the public schools for subscriptions and the steps which have been taken to start active operations.

The woman's board will meet at 11 o'clock tomorrow and will probably conclude its labors in the afternoon.

Educational Committee is Coming.

The October number of the American School Board Journal, the official organ of the National Education association, contains on its title page a full page cartoon representing the contest between Omaha, Washington, D. C., Los Angeles and Salt Lake City for the next meeting of the association. The school superintendents of these four cities are depicted as wise men of the desert who have followed the blazing star seen in the sky on the face of which are the magical letters "N. E. A." Each "wise man" carries a miniature building emblematic of his city, Superintendent C. G. Pearse holding an exposition building in his right hand. A news item in another column conveys the information that Omaha and Salt Lake City will be visited some time during the present month by the executive committee.

WINTER AT THE EXPOSITION

NUMEROUS AMUSEMENTS ARE PLANNED

Sports Peculiar to Northern Climes Will Be Provided, and the Grounds Will Be Beautifully Illuminated.

The concession recently granted by the exposition management for the holding of an ice carnival on the exposition grounds during the coming winter gives promise of affording the people of Omaha and the surrounding country an opportunity for enjoying a season of winter sports which has not been possible during recent years, and it is doubtful if the oldest inhabitant can recall such a diversified entertainment as is promised by the concessionaires of the privilege just granted.

Omaha is fairly well supplied, for an inland city remote from any large body of water, with facilities for winter enjoyment, but no attempt has been made to have any extensive or organized movement involving an extended period of winter sports of all kinds. The concessionaires of this privilege propose to furnish the one thing needful and will supply the directing hand which has been the missing link heretofore.

The winter carnival will be held on the lagoon in the main court of the exposition grounds, commencing when the weather is cold enough to supply the necessary ice, probably early in January. By that time the buildings on the main court will be practically completed and their beauty will add very materially to the scene. The carnival exercises will be held at night and the main court will be brilliantly lighted by electricity. The lagoon will be filled to the top of the banks, presenting an unbroken surface of glistening ice; the ground surrounding it will be leveled off and arranged as it will appear during the exposition, furnishing a broad promenade entirely around the basin, and back of this will stand the beautiful main buildings, giving a setting to the scene that will require but little imagination to convey the impression of a winter scene in the beautiful city of St. Petersburg, where the winters are spent in continuous enjoyment of exhilarating sport on the ice and snow.

In this beautiful setting will occur a series of enjoyable events which will eclipse anything ever before attempted in this city, and which will attract to Omaha thousands of visitors from all parts of the country. Every kind of winter sport will be in full blast and the people of all the northern nations may come and enjoy themselves in their favorite national winter sports and games.

LONG TOBOGGAN SLIDE.

The program for this carnival, as arranged in a general way by the concessionaires, contemplates a number of features, among them being the erection of a huge toboggan slide at the east end of the main court, the summit of the chute being erected over Sherman avenue, directly east of the lagoon, with a chute of 350 feet to the ice, where there will be a slide of 1,000 feet, ending at Twentieth street. The latest devices for insuring safety and high speed will be used in the construction of this chute and it is promised that experienced men will be employed as starters, and the risk of accident reduced to the minimum.

This one feature of the carnival will undoubtedly be sufficient to inspire a wide interest in the event, and it is not unlikely that the immense popularity of tobogganing in the extreme northern states and Canada will be duplicated in Omaha, and that toboggan clubs, with their uncouth but attractive costumes made of gaily striped blanket cloth, will be a common sight on the streets during the carnival period. Tobogganing is one of the most favored sports in the north, but the opportunity has never been offered in this section for its enjoyment.

A ski chute will form another feature which will undoubtedly attract widespread attention, as much on account of its novelty as for the entertainment it will afford. Ski riding is almost unknown in America, but natives of Scandinavia will see in it a constant reminder of the old country. A ski is about eight feet long, and is used for descending long inclines much after the manner of a toboggan, the rider having ski attached to each foot. Contests will be held between experienced riders, which will afford amusement and entertainment of a novel nature. The ski chute will be constructed with a view of breaking the record for a long jump, which is about 104 feet.

Two or three curling rinks will be constructed, probably at the extreme west end of the ground, where there are several level pieces of ground which offer fine locations for such rinks. On these some of the most prominent curling clubs will be brought together and a number of local cracks at curling will be given an opportunity to demonstrate that they have not lost their cunning.

CONTESTS IN SKATING.

The portion of the lagoon lying west of Twentieth street will be devoted to a general skating rink. This will include the broad mirror, giving altogether about 250,000 square feet of surface or about six acres. On this broad sheet of ice will be held contests between the fast and fancy skaters of the country, and all comers will be given full swing in enjoying the exhilarating sport.

At stated intervals during the carnival bal masques will be given on the ice after the manner of the famous events which have made St. Petersburg celebrated all over the world. The skaters will be obliged to appear in costume and the stately procession will move about on the glistening ice to the accompaniment of inspiring music.

Should the weather permit an ice palace will be erected on the island occupying the middle of the channel at the intersection of Twentieth street. This will be brilliantly illuminated by electricity, forming a striking spectacle and adding a most beautiful feature to the gay scene all about. Many events will be made to center about this ice palace, such as a visit of the king and queen to the royal residence and a battle royal directed against the icy walls of the stately pile. When its usefulness has passed the palace will be burned in a blaze of brilliant fire works, affording a spectacle of great beauty, which will undoubtedly attract thousands of guests from all sections of the country.

PLAN A CARNIVAL.

A plan is under consideration for holding a grand winter inaugural ceremony on the exposition grounds during the carnival season. If this plan is carried out the event will be made an important one and everything will be conducted on an elaborate scale. The city will be appropriately decorated and an impressive program will be arranged for the ceremonies on the grounds. Excursion rates will be made on all railroads entering Omaha, and the entire affair will be conducted on a scale which will draw spectators from the entire section surrounding Omaha.

In addition to the features heretofore mentioned there will be a number of events out of the ordinary which will be put on at different times during the progress of the carnival, such as ice bicycle races, promenades on the ice of floats after the fashion of the Ak-Sar-Ben parades which have made Omaha famous all over the country and similar events of more than passing importance.

This carnival of enjoyment will be under the direction of Norris & Love, men who have had wide experience in the amusement business and who are thoroughly posted in the art of knowing what the public wants and filling that want. These men have been connected with several expositions in furnishing amusement for the public and have been remarkably successful financially as well as from a strictly artistic standpoint. The concession referred to is let on a basis which gives the exposition a substantial portion of the receipts, so that the affair will be in a measure a strictly exposition enterprise, and the exposition treasury will reap the benefit of the success which attends the carnival.

WISCONSIN AT THE EXPOSITION.

Present Plans of the Badger State Commission.

The organization of the Wisconsin commission for the Transmississippi Exposition has already been mentioned in The Bee, but the following account of the meeting from the Milwaukee Sentinel of October 8 gives an idea of the plans upon which the commission will work:

The Wisconsin commission for the exposition that is to be held at Omaha, Neb., from June 1 to November 1, 1898, met for the first time yesterday at the rooms of the Merchants' association, and the following named were in attendance: Ex-Mayor John C. Koch, John E. Hansen, Alfred C. Clas, Colonel J. A. Watrous, Eugene Wuesthoff and Mrs. Caroline H. Bell of Milwaukee; General E. E. Bryant and R. G. Thwaites, Madison; John Hicks, Oshkosh; W. T. Lewis, Racine; J. B. Treat, Monroe; H. D. Fisher, Florence; Mrs. Ella Roberts, Waukesha.

The commission organized by the election of John C. Koch as president, Alfred C. Clas as treasurer, and Walter W. Pollock as secretary.

On motion of H. D. Fisher of Florence it was decided that the Wisconsin commission shall use every possible effort to make a creditable exhibit of the products and resources of Wisconsin at the Omaha Exposition. The commissioners present were thus   afforded an opportunity to satisfy themselves as to what they should attempt to do, and the conclusion was that they should seek to interest the manufacturers and all people in the state in making as large and creditable an exhibit of their products as possible, and also to erect and maintain a Wisconsin building on the exposition grounds at Omaha.

Architect A. C. Clas offered to submit to the commission plans for a building without any charge for them, and to make the building one of the drawing features at the exposition. The building, he said, would be 40x60 feet, of a design that would appear unique and attractive, and its interior could be so fitted up as to draw all the people visiting the exposition. The exhibit of the Wisconsin Fish commission could be made one of the features of the interior, and fountains dispensing gratis Wisconsin delicious spring waters would add to the popularity of the building. The picture drawn by Mr. Clas seemed very attractive, and the idea of the fish exhibit met with the approval of General Bryant, the president of the fish commission.

The outcome of the discussion was the adoption of a resolution to raise by subscription and personal solicitation $15,000 to $20,000 for the erection of the building and defraying the expenses of the Wisconsin exhibit. A circular will be addressed to all well-to-do people in Milwaukee and the state, asking for subscriptions, and the sending out of the circular will be followed by personal solicitation. Circulars will also be addressed to the manufacturers and producers in general, urging them to participate by sending articles of their manufacture to the exposition. Because of the expense which these exhibits will involve, the commission will be lenient with the manufacturers, and will solicit the subscriptions for the $15,000-$20,000 fund from the people at large.

H. D. Fisher and A. C. Clas were appointed a committee to go to Omaha and select a site for the Wisconsin building, in as good a location as they can get. They will leave within a few days for the Nebraska metropolis, and will report to the commission at its next meeting.

After discussing various exhibition plans, among them to make a school exhibit, suggested by Mrs. Caroline Bell, the commission adjourned, subject to the call of Chairman Koch.

BOOMING DOMINION PROVINCES.

Officer of the Canadian Government Visits Omaha.

James A. Smart, deputy minister of the interior of Ottawa, Canada, is in the city. Before leaving he will have a conference with the Nebraska and Kansas agents of the Dominion government and prepare their work for the winter's campaign in the field of securing homeseekers.

Mr. Smart expresses himself as very satisfied with the results following making an exhibit of Canada's resources at the several western state fairs, and says it is not improbable that Canada will make a big effort at the Transmississippi Exposition.

The deputy minister is on his return to Ottawa from an official visit to the western provinces of the Dominion. He reports the farmers there as having done wonderfully well this year, the wheat crop averaging about twenty-six bushels to the acre, and from 75 to 80 cents per bushel being paid for it. The farmers there, he says, have gone largely into diversified farming and the cattle and dairy trades have developed to an extraordinary extent during the past few years. Further, he states that the country is now pretty well intersected by railways and more are being built to provide for the needs of the rapid development that is taking place and the influx of new settlers.

Work for Another Convention.

Coroner H. K. Burket leaves this evening for Milwaukee, where he goes as a delegate of the Nebraska Undertakers' association to attend the annual convention of the National Funeral Directors association. Mr. Burket is one of a committee composed of P. Heafey of Omaha; James Seaton, Lincoln, and John Bell of Norfolk, who will endeavor to have the next annual meeting of the body held in this city during the exposition. The organization numbers about 500 members. The prospects for Omaha getting the next convention are said to be excellent.

Commissioner for Maryland.

Mrs. Fannie Daily Markland of Oakland, Md., has been appointed by Governor Lowndes as commissioner for the state of Maryland to the Transmississippi and International Exposition, and has taken up the work of seeing that the state is creditably represented at the exposition.

Mrs. Markland is a sister of the wife of the late General George A. Crook and resided in this city a number of years when the general was in command of the Department of the Platte.

Advertising the Exposition.

An illustration of the proposed Agricultural building of the Transmississippi Exposition, accompanied by a half-column sketch of the same, is a feature of the October issue of the Corn Belt, the agricultural monthly of the Burlington railroad. In the crop report of the Corn Belt more space is given to the crop reports of Nebraska than to those of Kansas, Colorado, Missouri and Iowa added together.

Prof. Rummel Visits the City.

Prof. Rummel of Mount Pleasant, Ia., an applicant for the position of musical director of the Transmississippi Exposition, was in the city as the guest of Z. T. Lindsey of the Ways and Means department. Mr. Lindsey spent a portion of the day showing Mr. Rummel the city and in calling upon directors. Mr. Rummel has a conservatory of music at Mount Pleasant.

TIES UP EXPOSITION WORK

CARPENTERS AND STAFF WORKERS ARE OUT

Conditions Brought on by the Strike Continue, with Few Men at Work Upon the Buildings—Carpenters Union Meets Tonight.

There was but a slight change in the situation at the exposition grounds this morning, the strike order being still in force. Strehlow, the contractor on the Manufactures building, put a small force of men at work, consisting of about ten laborers and five carpenters, two of the latter being men who struck yesterday. The force on the Machinery building was the same this morning as yesterday, none of the men having yielded to the arguments advanced last night by the strikers.

A large crowd of men stood about the several buildings, some few of them being strikers and the others being men apparently looking for a chance to go to work. No attempt was made to interfere with the men who were working or to speak to them.

The long timbers which have been delaying work on the big Mines building arrived on the grounds this morning and the work of unloading them was commenced at once. While this was being done, there were fully 100 men standing around looking on and waiting for a chance to go to work. Contractor Goldie said he would make an attempt to start work just as soon as the material was unloaded, but didn't know whether the men would want to work or not.

The striking carpenters say that Goldie has been paying the union scale all along and working eight hours per day and that they have no complaint against him. Goldie himself stands by his statement, that he will be guided entirely by what the local contractors do in the matter.

The staff workers are still out and the carpenters are relying on this fact to have a strong influence in forcing a settlement in their favor as they argue that it will be impossible to complete the buildings without the staff workers, and they say that the competent staff men all over the country belong to the labor organizations and that, for that reason, men can not be brought here to take the places of the strikers.

The carpenters' union will hold a regular meeting at Labor Temple tonight and the strike will form the principle matter for consideration.

A mass meeting of the representatives of the organizations in the Building Trades council, the striking workmen and a number of representatives of unions not directly concerned in the strike was held at Labor Temple yesterday afternoon. The meeting was held behind closed doors and lasted all afternoon. When the meeting adjourned it proceeded in a body to the exposition grounds with a view of inducing the men working for Hamilton Brothers on the Machinery building to quit work. There were about sixty men who started for the grounds, and they walked out in small groups.

When the grounds were reached the men stood around in little knots discussing the situation, but made no attempt to interfere with the workmen. Perfect order was preserved and the strikers made no attempt to mix with the men who were working or annoy them in any way. They simply waited until 6 o'clock, when the men quit work for the day. Then the strikers approached those who had been working and talked and reasoned with them, endeavoring to secure their co-operation and assistance in the controversy with the contractors.

WOMEN TALK EXPOSITION MATTERS.

Take Up Questions of Funds for Girls' and Boys' Building.

The Woman's Board of Managers is holding a meeting at Exposition headquarters today. There is little business of importance to be transacted. The report of the executive committee, showing what has been done since the last meeting of the board, was laid before the board and formed the chief topic for discussion.

The special committee, consisting of Mesdames Towne and Whitney, appointed to visit the convention of Indian teachers held in Omaha during the summer, reported on observations made during the convention and this formed the subject of a desultory discussion.

The special committee of the Girls' and Boys' building, through its chairman, Mrs. T. L. Kimball, submitted a report of what had been done in Omaha in the way of raising funds for the erection of the building. Other members of the directory reported on the work done in their districts. All of these reports were of an encouraging nature and the movement was shown to be meeting with favor.

In connection with the work in Omaha it was reported that the executive committee had decided to appoint a patroness for each school building in the city, this patroness to have charge of the work of collecting subscriptions from the school children and to co-operate with the principals in arousing interest and enthusiasm among the children and inducing them to contribute toward the erection of the building. It was stated that the Omaha principals would meet Thursday night of this week to take up this matter and that it would probably be arranged that a day should selected, to be known as a rally day, when the matter would be presented to the schools and subscriptions collected.

Plans for Government Building.

Plans and specifications of the Government building at the exposition have been received in this city and are on exhibition in the office of John Latenser, superintendent of the United States court house, where contractors may obtain all information. The supervising architect of the Treasury department has issued a notice that bids for the construction of the building will be opened at his office in Washington, D. C., at 2 p. m., October 29.

Notes of the Exposition

J. D. Montague, commercial agent for New Mexico, has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he is engaged in working up a plan for an Indian village at the exposition, which will show some of the southern Indians from the warm climes of southern New Mexico.

Edwin Shepard Barrett, president of the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, has appointed a committee consisting of one member from each state to act in connection with the Transmississippi Exposition. The duty of this committee is to further the work of the department for the exhibition of colonial and revolutionary relics.

SURPRISES FOR THE COMMITTEE.

Geraldine Discloses Some More Important Information.

At the meeting of the executive committee of the exposition held yesterday afternoon at the Commercial club rooms the principal matter before the committee was a resolution introduced by Manager Rosewater designed to curtail the arbitrary authority heretofore exercised by Dion Geraldine, superintendent of construction of the Department of Buildings and Grounds, in the purchasing of large amounts of supplies and hiring of high-priced men without any authority or without the knowledge of the executive committee until the bills were received. The resolution provided that the authority granted the department to be limited to the purchase of supplies to the extent of $50 and the employment of day laborers.

Manager Kirkendall insisted that the department had never been granted any such authority and stated that he had never failed to lay all such matters before the executive committee before taking action. In reply to this Mr. Rosewater referred to the testimony given by Geraldine in his own defense when under investigation, in which he stated that he had understood that he had authority to buy supplies and hire men and had acted along those lines. Mr. Kirkendall stood by his former contention, but said he would not object to the portion of the resolution referring to the employment of day laborers.

The resolution was changed to eliminate all except the portion giving the department authority to employ laborers, and after some discussion it was withdrawn entirely.

During the discussion on this matter reference was made to the written defense made by Geraldine to the charges filed against him, especially that portion of the document referring to Rudolf Ulrich, the landscape architect, where Geraldine makes answer to the charge that the ground plan of the bluff tract, as prepared by Ulrich, had been changed by Geraldine without the knowledge or consent of the executive committee. In this statement Geraldine said that Ulrich had sent his written resignation to him (Geraldine) August 7, and he attached what purported to be Ulrich's resignation to the written defense. Mr. Kirkendall expressed some surprise at this portion of Geraldine's statement and admitted that he had known nothing about Ulrich resigning, although Geraldine stated that he had had the resignation for over two months.

In this connection Mr. Rosewater stated that he had written to Ulrich after he learned of the alleged resignation, and he produced a telegram he had just received in reply from Ulrich, reading: "I will do your work satisfactory. A letter follows."

The remainder of this portion of Geraldine's statement was also read to the committee, being to the effect that after Ulrich's resignation was received by Geraldine the latter came to the conclusion that the plan as drawn by Ulrich was too expensive and concluded to change it and had employed men for that purpose, stating, further, that when he had fixed it to suit him he had intended laying it before the executive committee.

The members of the executive committee were speechless after this display, and the matter was allowed to rest until the receipt of Ulrich's letter.

Manager Bruce announced the appointment of Edward Whitcomb of Friend as superintendent of the Apiary bureau. The appointment was confirmed.

Mr. Rosewater asked that the committee meet at noon today to take up the report of the special committee appointed to investigate Geraldine, provided it is ready to report, in order that action might be taken on the matter before the meeting of the Board of Directors at 4 o'clock this aftednoon​.

BIDS FOR FINE ARTS BUILDING.

Proposition of Hamilton Brothers is the Lowest.

Proposals for the erection of the Fine Arts building for the exposition were unsealed yesterday afternoon at 5 o'clock. The bids included figures on the entire construction of the building and all grading and finishing work. The [?] Hamilton Brothers, [?]

 

The figures submitted were as follows:

Hamilton Brothers, Omaha—For carpentry work, $25,414; deduct for piling, $950; time, ninety days.

Watt & Henderson—For carpentry work, $36,950; deduct for piling, $850; time, 120 days.

Smith & Eastman, Chicago—For staff and plaster, $11,911.

Westlake Construction Company, St. Louis—For carpentry, exclusive of piling and filling, $26,684; time, ninety days.

William Goldie & Sons Company, Chicago—For carpentry, $30,740; deduct for piling, $1,000; time, ninety days.

P. J. Creedon, Omaha—For carpentry, $35,420; deduct for piling, $1,700; deduct for painting and glazing, $5,368; time, ninety days.

WHITEWASH FOR MR. GERALDINE.

Investigating Committee Reports to Exposition Executive Committee.

The committee appointed to investigate the charges against Dion Geraldine made its report to the executive committee of the exposition today. It practically whitewashes Geraldine and leaves him free from any charge of wrongdoing.

The committee pays fulsome compliments to each of the departments and commends the marvelous work which has been accomplished toward building the exposition. It administers a very mild rebuke to Geraldine for violating the rules of the executive committee and suggests that hereafter he keep in closer touch with the head of the department.

FIND THE BIG GATES CLOSED

BAR VISITORS FROM EXPOSITION GROUNDS

Sightseers Not Allowed to Visit the Scene of the Great Show Without Permission from Dion Geraldine.

People who went up to the exposition grounds today to see how the work was progressing and to show their friends the sights, found the entrances to the Kountze tract all barred and locked. The two entrances on Sherman avenue were each guarded by a man, who admitted no one without a pass from the Department of Buildings and Grounds. If the applicant was persistent, he was referred to Dion Geraldine, and when he visited the office of this man in the Paxton block, he found that his passage was barred by a stout iron screen partition extending entirely across the outer office, the door through it being guarded by a clerk employed for that purpose. All further progress was prevented and he was told that Geraldine was too busy to be interrupted.

Members of the strike committee who were on the grounds yesterday afternoon were ordered off by Contractor Hamilton, who told them he had been instructed by Manager Kirkendall to order all strikers off the ground. The strikers left at once and made no further attempt to go inside.

The strikers state most emphatically that they have never molested any of the men employed on the grounds while they were working, but have invariably waited until the men quit before speaking to them. They freely admit that they have talked to the men after working hours and have used every argument to induce them to join the union. They say they intend to pursue this course regardless of whether they are debarred from going inside the grounds. Superintendent Tamm is authority for the statement that the strikers behaved themselves in the most becoming manner and made no trouble whatever. He says the strikers acted like men and made no attempt to molest the workingmen in any way.

GROUND FOR NEBRASKA BUILDING.

State Commission Holds Back on Its Payments.

The Nebraska Exposition commission has not yet paid for the space for the Nebraska building, although the warrant for the money has been in Secretary Dearing's hands for some time. The commission is trying to induce the exposition management to donate to the state a strip of ground thirty-six feet in width surrounding the State building, after securing special rates, very much below those which have been paid by all other states, the Nebraska commission asked for an amount of space which which its members knew was very much less than would be actually covered by the building without allowing for steps, buttresses, or other projections. When the exposition management objected and suggested that more space would be required, putting the total amount several feet inside the actual measurement of the building, as shown by the plans, the state commission consented to increase the amount asked for, although no member of the commission, architects of the State building nor the superintendent of construction employed by the state commission could figure the space down to the figures named by the exposition management. The application was then modified by increasing the number of feet to the amount named by the exposition people and a warrant ordered drawn in payment for this amount of space.

It was after this performance that Dion Geraldine assumed the authority to tell the representatives of the state commission that the state could have all the land surrounding the State building, about five acres in all, and could embellish it as the commission saw fit, as the exposition had no use for it.

It would appear that the state commission did not place much reliance on Mr. Geraldine's ability to carry out his offer of exposition property and application was made to the management for the space about the State building, but no offer to remunerate the management in any way for this additional space. No action has yet been taken by the exposition authorities on this demand on the part of the state commission and the warrant for the original space is being withheld.

FOR ELECTRICAL DECORATIONS.

Engineer Stieringer Ready to Begin Preparing Plans.

Luther M. Stieringer, who has been engaged as electrical consulting engineer for the exposition, says he intends to return to the east at once and make the preliminary plans for the electrical effects to be attained on the exposition grounds.

Mr. Stieringer has been in the city about a week, studying the general plans of the exposition, the arrangement of the buildings and other things necessary to know in order to decide upon the electrical work. He is most enthusiastic regarding the general arrangement of the exposition grounds and pronounces the effect as more artistic. The main court is especialy​ complimented and Mr. Stieringer says it will form a setting for electrical effects which is far superior to anything ever before furnished in any exposition. He says he will outline plans for electrical decoration which will secure results never before attainable in any exposition for the reason that such an apportunity​ for magnificent effects was never offered any electrician before. These outline plans will be submitted for approval in a few weeks and more details can then be stated.

Regarding the Musical Director.

The recommendation of Manager Lindsey that A. Rommell of Mount Pleasant, Ia., be appointed musical director of the exposition has raised a perfect tempest in a teapot among the local musicians. The day before the appointment was made a protest against it was filed which was signed by nearly all the musicians and music teachers in Omaha.

Some active log rolling has been carried on by certain of the musicians of Omaha during the past two months to secure the appointment of an Omaha man. The recommendations of Mr. Lindsey will be considered at the meeting of the executive committee tomorrow and in the meantime parties are actively pursuing the members of the committee to secure the defeat of Mr. Rommell.

Funeral Directors Next Year.

The National Funeral Directors' association, now in session in Milwaukee, has decided to make Omaha the place for holding the annual convention next year. P. C. Heafey of this city is attending the meeting and sent a telegram to The Bee this afternoon making this announcement.

Notes of the Exposition.

C. H. DeZevallos, president of the company which operates the giant see-saw at the Nashville exposition, is in the city negotiating with Manager Reed of the Department of Concessions for the privilege of operating the see-saw on the Transmississippi Exposition grounds.

C. Howard Walker of the firm of Walker & Kimball, supervising architects of the exposition, arrived in the city yesterday from Boston and has taken up the work of making the drawings for the bridges, viaducts and other miscellaneous accessories which are needed to complete the exposition embellishment.

Homer Moore has filed with the secretary of the exposition a second outline of his plan for the musical work of the exposition. He states that he filed a similar plan several months ago, but fear it may have been mislaid and he renews his application for the privilege of carrying out his plan in case it should be adopted.

VICTORY FOR UNION LABOR

EXPOSITION CARPENTERS SCORE A POINT

Contractor Strehlow Agrees to the Eight-Hour Scale and Decides that He Will Conform to Union Rules.

The striking carpenters on the exposition grounds scored victory No. 1 this morning when Contractor Strehlow capitulated and agreed to employ only union men and observe the union rules regarding working eight hours and paying 30 cents per hour to carpenters. The strikers regard this as only one step in the right direction and their attention will next be turned to Hamilton Bros.. and Contractor Parrish, who has the Liberal Arts biulding​. When these men agree to the union's terms, Contractor Goldie will follow suit and the attention of the strikers will then be turned to Smith & Eastman, the staff contractors.

A verbal agreement was reached with Strehlow this morning and a written agreement will be presented to him for signature. All of the union men who struck were taken back by Strehlow and the Manufactures building presented a busy scene with an increased force of men.

The victory was accomplished largely through the influence of Strehlow's foreman, Saunders, upon whom Strehlow was almost entirely dependent for the proper carrying on of the work of erecting the building. Saunders struck with the other men and Strehlow could not carry on the work without him and was unable to replace him with any other man. Being unable to proceed Strehlow was forced to give in.

No change has taken place in connection with the Machinery building. Contractor Hamilton has a small force of men at work, but is still waiting for more piles.

WILL BANQUET AT GRAND TONIGHT.

Council Bluffs Executive Committee of Exposition to Hold Eating Session.

The executive committee of the Council Bluffs Transmississippi association will occupy its new rooms in the Grand hotel this evening for the first time, and will celebrate the event by an informal little banquet. It will be the second of the fortnightly series of informal lunches that were suggested and heartily approved at the regular meeting held several weeks ago, but which have not been given for the reason that the committee was still in rather an unorganized condition pending the propositions to secure permanent headquarters and to incorporate under the state laws. Both of these objections have now been removed, and the committee will tonight meet as a regularly incorporated association in its permanent headquarters. The suggestions for frequent informal banquets and the regular mid-day lunch on Saturdays will now be followed and renewed interest in the work of the association will be the result.

The luncheon will begin at 8 o'clock sharp. After this conclusion the members will meet in the new headquarters in the room south of the main rotunda and go into a working session. The secretary and the officers of the association want it understood that members are not prohibited inviting interested friends either to the luncheon or the business meeting. The only object the association has is to advance the interests of Council Bluffs in the exposition and the exposition itself, and there will not be any objection to the presence of any man who desires to aid in accomplishing the same objects.

INTERESTED IN THE EXPOSITION.

Senator Warren Says Wyoming Will Have an Exhibit.

Senator Francis E. Watten of Wyoming spent yesterday in the city on his way to Washington. He was accompanied by his family and expects to place his children in an eastern school.

Speaking of his state in its relation to the Transmississippi Exposition the senator said that the lack of a state appropriation for the exposition did not express any indifference of the people in its regard. "It was simply a matter of finances," said Senator Warren. "The people felt that they really could afford nothing at all. I think that the hard times have been felt in Wyoming and the mountain states more severely than almost everywhere else. It is only now that the renewed energy is felt progressing from the east. I have spent part of the summer on my ranch and among stockmen and I have observed the attitude of Wyoming business men. So I can say with some authority that theirs is no passive interest and it will be shown in a substantial way when the time comes."

 

RETAIN GERALDINE

DIRECTOR'S SUPPORT THE COMMITTEE

Twenty-Two Vote Affirmatively and Twelve Vote in the Negative.

MANAGER ROSEWATER THEREUPON RESIGNS

Will Sever All Connection with the Exposition Friday.

INSISTS THAT CHARGES WERE CORRECT

Will Not Consent to Remain Where He is Powerless to Check the Pilfering and Wrongdoing Practiced.

At the meeting of the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi Exposition yesterday afternoon it was decided that Dion Geraldine should be retained as superintendent of construction in the Department of Buildings and Grounds in the face of open charges of corruption, collusion with contractors, juggling with contracts and general crookedness.

Following this decision on the part of the board, Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, who had made the charges, tendered his resignation and gave notice that he would sever all connection with the exposition after Friday of this week, because he did not propose to continue as a member of the executive committee and be compelled to see the pilfering and stealing which was going on all the time and not be able to put a stop to it.

This action was taken after a session lasting nearly two hours, the greater part of which was taken up by Mr. Rosewater in reviewing the evidence which had been given before the investigating committee and in making an argument based on what was shown by this evidence. Remarks were made on this subject by but one other member of the directory, and when the vote was taken on a resolution providing for Geraldine's immediate dismissal the secret ballot showed twenty-two votes in favor of Geraldine's retention and twelve votes in favor of his discharge.

As shown by this vote, there were thirty-four of the fifty directors present. In the lobby was the object of all the trouble, Dion Geraldine, while Architect Kimball, John Templeton, Geraldine's clerk, and several citizens and public officials were interested spectators.

GET DOWN TO THE ISSUE.

When the roll was called there were thirty-one directors present.

President Wattles said there was a report of a special committee before the board and he would ask the secretary to read it.

Mr. Rosewater raised the point that this report was addressed to the executive committee and was not properly before the board. He said he had a resolution which he desired to introduce and he would then ask for the reading of the report. The resolution was as follows:

Resolved, That the services of Dion Geraldine as superintendent of buildings and grounds be dispensed with from and after this date.

Mr. Rosewater said he had introduced almost the same resolution in the executive committee but with a different ending, providing that the discharge should be for cause. He said he had preferred charges against Geraldine and these had been investigated by a special committee. The report made by this committee, he said, omitted several of the most important points brought out in the investigation and if these points were not to be considered the conclusions of the committee were correct; but if these points were to be considered the conclusions were not correct, and these points would compel the adoption of the resolution. Mr. Rosewater asked that the report be read and said he would then ask the privilege of reading some of the evidence and would comment on the salient points.

The secretary then read the report of the special committee.

At the conclusion of the reading of the report Mr. Rosewater said it might be presumptuous for him to present different conclusions from those arrived at by the eminent gentlemen composing the committee. He said the committee had proceeded on the theory that Geraldine was indispensable to the exposition and he demanded in what particular thing Geraldine was particularly qualified. He asked what Geraldine had done that could not have been done by any one of twenty or thirty men in Omaha.

WHO IS DOING THE WORK.

The plans for the sewers, he said, had been made by the city engineer; the plans for the water pipes by the chief engineer of the water company; the plans for piling the lagoon by a former assistant to the city engineer; the plans for the electric work would be made by a man recently employed by the executive committee for that purpose; the plans for the landscape work had been made by a landscape man of experience brought here from the east; and the plans for the buildings by the architects employed for the purpose.

Mr. Rosewater declared that the only thing that Geraldine had done was to botch around and change some of the plans made by other men. He asserted that Geraldine had no special ability in any direction which would warrant his employment as an expert and he said he should be discharged as a measure of economy, as he was being paid $500 per month, while the management was paying another man $104 per month for doing the work Geraldine was employed to do.

Mr. Rosewater then proceeded to read copious extracts from the testimony given before the investigating committee, keeping up a running fire of comment on the points brought out. He read a quantity of the testimony given by Geraldine, calling attention to the matter in which Geraldine contradicted himself on important points a great number of times and showing, also, how Geraldine gave the lie to the strong statements of Manager Kirkendall to the effect that Geraldine had represented that the number for the lagoon should be bought by the exposition for the reason that it could be bought for $1.50 below the market price and money could thus be saved. The whole lumber deal was dissected, showing clearly that Geraldine's own testimony on the witness stand proved conclusively that he had lied, and Mr. Rosewater said he was firmly convinced that fraud and collusion existed through the whole matter, and that he would not believe Geraldine under oath. He said that if Geraldine were to testify in any court as he had testified in this investigation he could be sent to the penitentiary for perjury.

GIVING VERBAL ORDERS.

Mr. Rosewater continued to read portions of the testimony bearing on the silent points omitted by the committee in its report, commenting on Geraldine's method of buying large bills of materials, amounting in several instances to several thousand dollars, by simply giving verbal orders and without having any written evidence of the price or other protection for the exposition against a disposition on the part of the sellers to raise the price. He also commented on the transparent explanations invented by Geraldine to account for some of his peculiar transactions.

Mr. Rosewater took up the method pursued by Geraldine in the case of the sewer put in by J. F. Daley, in which case it was charged that the plans for the sewer had been made after the work was completed, and connections shown in the plans were proved not to exist under the ground, as was shown by the fact that the engineer on the grounds, the contractor who built the sewer and three or four men engaged for two and one-half days in digging up the sewer to find a connection which the plans showed should have been at a certain point, but which could not be found at all, making i[?] to break into the sewer to make [?] acted as though he owned the exposition and had insulted members of the executive committee in the most outrageous manner. He said that the general public had lost all confidence in Geraldine and believed him to be crooked. To such an extent had this feeling obtained that Mr. Rosewater warned the directors that his retention meant that all hopes of carrying the $100,000 in bonds proposed to be voted by Douglas county might as well be abandoned, as the voters of this city and county would not vote to turn $100,000 into the treasury of the exposition where it could be manipulated in any way by this man.

After Mr. Rosewater had taken his seat F. M. Youngs, the representative of organized labor on the Board of Directors, said a lot of evidence was unnecessary to convince him that Geraldine was incompetent. He said there had been plenty of people watching the manner in which things had been carried on and the feeling was general among all classes of people that Geraldine was not to be trusted. If an Omaha man of good standing in the community was put in charge of this work this suspicion would be allayed, but he endorsed what Mr. Rosewater had said, that Geraldine's retention meant that the exposition bonds would be defeated and that a large number of people in the city would refuse to pay anything further on their subscriptions.

No further remarks were made by any of the directors and the question was put on the adoption of the resolution. The "noes" made more noise than the "ayes," and a roll call was demanded. Then a vote by ballot was called for, resulting in 12 ayes and 22 nays.

MR. ROSEWATER RESIGNS.

Immediately following this action Mr. Rosewater handed to the secretary and had read the following letter:

Gurdon W. Wattles, President Transmississippi Exposition: Dear Sir—I desire, through you, to tender to the board of directors my resignation as member of the executive committee of the Transmississippi Exposition, to take effect from and after October 15, 1897. I am impelled to this step by my inability to sanction the retention in the service of the exposition as superintendent of grounds and buildings of a man who has usurped the powers and prerogatives of the executive committee and by his own testimony convicted himself of wilful deception, indefensible partiality to contractors, flagrant disregard of the interests of the exposition and expensive incompetency. In retiring from the executive board I do not yield to anyone in my desire to promote the success of the exposition, but in justice to the stockholders and the people who are taxed for this great enterprise I propose to discharge conscientiously and fearlessly the duties devolving on me as an editor.


E. ROSEWATER.

Mr. Rosewater moved the immediate acceptance of his resignation and his motion was seconded by Frank Hibbard. The president put the question and Hibbard's was the only voice heard in favor of the motion. A number of the directors voted against accepting the resignation and president declared the motion lost.

Mr. Rosewater declared that such an action was child's play.

Mr. Lindsey said Mr. Rosewater must be retained on the executive committee, as his experience was necessary in conducting the Department of Publicity and Promotion and in assisting the committee.

Mr. Rosewater said it was useless to talk of it; that he could not continue to work with the committee and he would not stay on the committee and see the pilfering and stealing going on all the time without being able to stop it.

Frank Hibbard suggested that while salaries were under consideration it would be a good idea to appoint a committee to adjust salaries, and if this committee found people who could as well be dispensed with its advice should be taken. He moved the appointment of such a committee, but there was no second to this motion, and a motion to adjourn was put and carried.

REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE.

Whitewashes Geraldine and Compliments the Managers.

The special committee appointed to investigate the charges preferred against Dion Geraldine by Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion of the exposition, submitted its report to the executive committee at its meeting at the Commercial Club rooms yesterday noon. The report is herewith given in full:

To the Executive Committee, Transmississippi and International Exposition—Gentlemen: Your special committee appointed to conduct an investigation of the charges preferred by Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion against Superintendent Geraldine of the Department of Grounds and Buildings, begs to report as follows:

Pursuant to call your special committee met in the office of the ways and means committee at 8 p. m. on Tuesday, October 5, 1897, and proceeded to hear the statements of the parties interested and of such other persons as they desired to be heard, from all of which we find as follows:

The charges made by Manager Rosewater were presented in writing and are attached hereto and marked "Exhibit A;" the reply of Superintendent Geraldine was also presented in writing and is attached hereto, marked "Exhibit B." The testimony submitted is hereto attached and marked "Exhibit C."

The first complaint is upon the contract for sheet piling around the lagoon on the exposition grounds. Upon the statements submitted to your committee upon this matter we find that the first bids submitted to the executive committee for doing the work in question were all rejected, as they were considered too high. The lowest bid was by James P. Connolly at $7,900. The next lowest   was by Creedon & Mahoney at $8,161.10. To save further loss of time it would appear that Superintendent Geraldine, with the advice and consent, if not by the direction, of the manager of the department, proceeded to negotiate with these two lowest bidders, as appears to have been customary in such cases, for the lowest price for the work.

HAD HIS OWN REASONS.

Superintendent Geraldine states that (for reasons which seem to be satisfactory to the Department of Grounds and Buildings) he changed the plans and specifications of the work in some minor particulars, and that both contractors were asked to make their new bids upon the modified or changed specifications. Mr. Connelly states that he knew nothing of the change in specifications and made his bid upon the same plans and specifications as the first one. It would appear to your committee that the difference of understanding between Contractor Connelly and Superintendent Geraldine is of a character which might and frequently does arise in connection with contracts. Contractors frequently take for granted things told them by others and fail to take due notice of things which may be placed before them, while others may grasp the situation more clearly from the same presentiment of the case.

However that may be, the bid of Contractors Creedon & Mahoney on the second letting was $5,936.50, inclusive of the stay and anchor piles. Connelly's bid, including the stay and anchor piles, was $7,800. The cost of doing the stay and anchor pile work was estimated to be between $700 and $800, and as a matter of fact did cost $779.93, which, added to Creedon & Mahoney's bid, made the cost of work on the bid $6,716.43, against Connelly's bid of $7,800. A deduction of $700 was made in Connelly's bid if he was allowed to set his sheet piling "in a trench instead of being driven," but it was required by Creedon & Mahoney's contract to drive the piles six inches and, as a matter of fact, they were driven six inches. It is difficult to see how this deduction could be considered by the superintendent. Mr. Connelly states that he meant to say in his bid that if allowed to set the piles in a trench two feet and drive them the other six inches he would deduct $700, but his bid clearly states that if he was allowed to set the piles "in a trench instead of being driven," he would deduct $700. We cannot see that the superintendent was chargeable with dereliction of duty in disregarding the deduction of $700, cloaked in the language in which it was.

MONEY WAS SAVED.

We think, therefore, that it is but fair to consider the case from this point, upon a basis of bids from Creedon & Mahoney of $5,936.50, plus the cost of driving main and anchor piles (including labor and material which was furnished by the exposition) amounting to $779.93, equals $6,716.43, against Connelly's bid of $7,800.

At this point a question in Manager Rosewater's charges presents itself: A bill of lumber for this sheet piling was contracted for by Superintendent Geraldine, amounting to 175,000 feet, under the order or approval of the executive committee. As to the purchase it is difficult to see how the superintendent can be charged with dereliction of duty, as the transaction was approved by the executive committee. Manager Rosewater, however, seems to have understood that the price of lumber was $1 or $1.50 per thousands feet below the market price for such material and the saving in making his purchase was to be realized in securing at the market price for ordinary material cut to standard thickness and design, a stock of material for this special work of special and unusual thickness and design. It would appear to this committee that the superintendent's intentions were clearly honorable and his judgment well founded, but, in any event, this contract seems to have been places in the name of the exposition among other things to save time, and put in process of manufacture while the bids and contracts were being adjusted, and in order that it might be had promptly in case the exposition failed to make a desirable contract and was forced to do the work itself.

LOSS TO THE CONTRACTOR.

As a matter of fact it appears that the contract was transferred to the contractors, Creedon & Mahoney, who assumed all the obligations of the exposition in the matter, but by Superintendent Geraldine's report it appears that this was not done until after the contract was awarded to them, they being the lowest bidder, and it does not appear to your committee that any loss was sustained by the exposition in the transaction, nor any gain to the contractors. On the contrary, it would appear from the statements submitted to your committee that the contractors took the lumber at a price above that they expected to pay other lumber dealers for it. There may be a question of loss raised in connection with the transaction on account of the the waste in the bill thus bought and transferred, on account of the change in the specifications made after this lumber was contracted for and before the contract was let to Creedon & Mahoney. If so, it would be a loss to the contractor and not to the exposition, and could be reasonably charged to error in judgment which might be noted in connection with other errors, or dereliction of duty.

In connection with this branch of the controversy something is said about the difference in value of white and yellow pine for sheet piling. Contractor Connelly's bid was made, as shown upon its face, based on a price of $18 per thousand feet for yellow pine, and $18.50 for white pine. Bids from reputable lumber dealers appear to have been made at or about the same time for this same material at $14 for yellow pine and $14.50 for white pine, and in one case the white pine was offered at 15 cents per thousand feet less than the yellow pine, so that in any computation to ascertain the loss to the exposition on account of the use of yellow pine instead of white pine it would not seem to be reasonable to estimate a difference of more than 50 cents per thousand feet.

It is stated that the wood work on the lagoon remains unfinished. It would appear that Superintendent Geraldine's explanation of this should be accepted as reasonable, to-wit: That the openings shown on the work are left for a class of construction not yet determined upon by the executive committee, and are not included in the work paid for.

SILENCE GIVES CONSENT.

The second cause for complaint against the superintendent is in reference to the employment of H. W. Tamm as superintendent of construction. The statement made to your committee would indicate that Superintendent Geraldine was acting under the tacit permission of the acting manager of the Department of Buildings and Grounds, if not of the executive committee, in this matter, and your committee intended to have cut Mr. Tamm off the list of employes, it should have taken affirmative action to the effect, and that it did not do so would reasonably be accepted bu the superintendent as tacit consent. Your committee would not endorse this method of treating such matters, however, but realizes that with a number of the members of the executive committee absent from the city on business of the exposition and otherwise during a greater portion of the summer, it was exceedingly difficult to transact the large amount of business to be considered and at the same time attend to the private business needing their care and attention, and abide by all the strict rules of the committee in each case.

The third cause for complaint is that Superintendent Geraldine let the contractor for a sewer amounting to $809.35 without plans or specifications and without bond. This would appear to be a transaction growing out of the exigencies of the situation. The statements made in reference to it indicate that it was a piece of work which required about ten days to complete. It was to be of the same general character as the city sewers. The city sewer specifications would govern. The letting of the contract was approved by the executive committee. No payment was to be made until the work was completed and accepted by the exposition, under which circumstances a bond would not carry the weight that ordinary cases would call for. The exposition could lose nothing on account of the absence of the bond, as no payment was to be made until the work was satisfactorily completed. It would appear to your committee that the superintendent should have secured, at least, the written approval or endorsement of the manager of his department to the letting of a contract in this form before putting it into execution.

ECONOMY IN DALEY.

It is charged that Mr. Daley was employed previous to the letting of this sewer contract by the exposition at $5 per day as inspector, while city inspectors only received $4 per day. It would appear, however, that in the $5 per day was included the use of a horse and wagon, which saved the expense of such tools, etc., to the exposition. and in fact worked an economy. The pay rolls appear to have shown this state of facts upon their face and were approved by the manager of the department. Subsequent to the construction of the sewer Daley is said to have been employed as an inspector at $4 per day, the regular rate, but while so engaged was raking up shavings, etc., in the bottom of the lagoon for which work the contractors were being paid. It appears that it was pile heads, etc., which Daley was cleaning up from the bottom of the lagoon, which were put there by the exposition itself, and therefore not included in the work to be done by the sheet piling contractors, and, therefore, Daley was working an economy for the exposition in performing such work and hardly subject to censure therefor.

The next cause for complaint is on account of changing the landscape plans of the grounds. Manager Rosewater withdraws this complaint, and it therefore does not come within the scope of your committee's labors.

The next cause for complaint is gross negligence of duty in allowing a planing mill to be built in too close proximity to the exposition buildings. It undoubtedly would have been a wise thing for the superintendent to have called the attention of the executive committee to this matter as soon as it came to his attention, in order that an attorney of the exposition might take steps to prevent its completion. It appears that a proper permit was issued by the city officials, and your committee is not advised as to whether it was within the power of the exposition to prevent its construction.

TAFFY FOR MANAGERS.

To sum up this controversy, your committee would make the following observations:

A prodigious task has been undertaken by the exposition organization. The time allowed for the consummation of its plans is short. That so much has been accomplished up to the present moment is a marvel to many, if not all, the directors.

The ways and means committee has shown remarkable wisdom, care and energy and the results are such as to quicken the enthusiasm of the most doubtful citizen.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion has ascomplished​ like marvelous results. Our exposition is the best advertised enterprise of its kind, in the judgment of your committee, since the world's Columbian exposition, even if it is widespread notoriety does not exceed that of that exposition in the same period of time.

The Department of Grounds and Buildings has likewise accomplished a great amount of work and has shown marvelous energy in its administration.

The Departments of Concessions, Privileges, Exhibits, and in fact every department has shown such energy as to merit the approbation of every friend of the exposition. The amount of work done and the results accomplished would impress fair-minded men, in the judgement of your committee, with the thought that even though there may have arisen internal differences of opinion as to detail, that the work has been well done and well administered as a whole, and that it would be a calamity to be deplored that the organization which has thus far produced these results should be disturbed.

As indicated in this report, there are undoubtedly methods in force at present that might and should be improved. All business organizations find the same situation constantly. Through reforms instituted under such circumstances our civilization progresses upward and in it our material strength lies.

MILD CHASTISEMENT.

It appears from all the testimony submitted to your committee that in his administration of the duties connected with his employment Superintendent Geraldine has not had that regard for the manager of his department and for the executive committee that would seem proper, by way of submitting general information concerning the work to his manager and to the executive committee through the manager, in order that the approval and endorsement of the manager of the department might be secured in advance of actual execution of proposed detail; but it would seem that this was a matter which could be remedied for the benefit of the service. If Superintendent Geraldine remains in the employ of the exposition he should in all cases adhere strictly to the rules of the department and the instructions of the manager. The subordinate employe should and ought to be willing to keep in close touch with and report fully to keep in close touch with and report fully to and act under clearly stated instructions of the department manager.

We are unable to discover any indications of dishonesty on the part of the superintendent or any employe connected with the exposition, and believe the controversy to be one of misunderstanding of motives and positive acts, which can readily be adjusted in future transactions by a union of heart and sentiment in the great work by all, under the guiding wisdom of the executive committee as a whole.

Your committee would extend its influence in its present relations as a special committee and recommends that such a result be arirved​ at.


HERMAN KOUNTZE.
LUCIUS WELLS.
GEORGE F. BIDWELL.

THANKS TO THE COMMITTEE.

After the reading of the report Mr. Rosewater moved that it be placed on file. This was adopted, as was also a motion by Mr. Reed, returning thanks to the special committee for its labors.

After this had been done Mr. Rosewater remarked that the report discredited every witness except Geraldine and ignored completely the most important points brought out by the testimony. He said he would bring the matter before the Board of Directors and would also publish the evidence so that the public might see that Geraldine's admissions of manipulation were sufficient to convince him without any further evidence. He charged that Geraldine's contradictions of his own testimony and his wilful misstatements while under examination were enough to convict him of perjury in any court in the land. Mr. Rosewater continued to recall numerous important points which the committee had failed to touch upon and referred to the changes which had been made in the ground plans of the bluff tract by Geraldine, which charge Mr. Rosewater said he had dismissed before he learned that Geraldine had been holding Ulrich's resignation for two months without the knowledge of any member of the committee.

In this connection President Wattles said he had ordered Geraldine to stop grading the bluff tract, as it would cost $15,000 or $20,000 to make it level, and he said that Geraldine had stated at that time that Ulrich had written him a letter saying he had decided to sever his connections with the exposition entirely. Mr. Wattles said he then told Geraldine to stop all work in carrying out Ulrich's plan and remarked to Geraldine that some local party could probably be secured to make a plan for this tract which would be cheaper to execute. Mr. Wattles denied most emphatically that he had authorized or instructed Geraldine to make any new plan for the bluff tract, but detailed a few small changes he had authorized made in the way of preparatory grading, which were in the nature of omissions from Ulrich's plan.

PUBLIC OPINION AGAINST IT.

Mr. Rosewater rather warmly denounced the methods which had been pursued by Geraldine and declared that the court of public opinion would not countenance such open disregard of business principles as had been admitted by Geraldine on the witness stand. He cited instances where Geraldine had admitted buying large lots of supplies and materials on verbal orders without contracts or other written evidences of prices or other necessary data and he charged that such loose methods of doing business might cause the loss of thousands of dollars. Mr. Rosewater declared that Geraldine was not an expert in any sense of the word and was no more competent to conduct the affairs of the exposition than hundreds of other men.

At this point Mr. Wattles interjected the remark that Geraldine had saved the exposition money by buying water pipe for $16.75 per ton, whereas the water company had said that it would cost at least $20 per ton.

In reply to this Mr. Rosewater said that the pipe purchased by Geraldine was such rotton​ stuff that the water company would never allow it to be unloaded if it was shipped to them. He said that fully 20 per cent of it was broken in shipment and that pieces of it in his possession showed that it was dear at any price. He also charged that the "specials" purchased by Geraldine and landed on the exposition grounds, the pieces of pipe other than the long straight pipe, were of a pattern and quality which had been rejected by the water company fourteen years ago, and which would not be used by the water company under any circumstances, so that the alleged saving affected by Geraldine was entirely imaginary.

This discussion was continued for some time, but no action was taken on the report by the committee other than to place it on file.

OTHER MATTERS CONSIDERED.

When regular business was resumed President Wattles stated that the governments of Bolivia and China had accepted the invitations to participate in the exposition, and the Costa Rica government had expressed the hope that it would be able to participate.

 

The secretary laid before the committee a document which, he said, had been handed to him by Homer Moore with the request that it be presented to the committee. It proved to be a letter written by Mr. Moore transmitting a petition, signed by seventy members of the Mondamin Choral society of Omaha, entering a vigorous protest against the appointment of confirmation of "one of Mr. Rommell as musical director of the exposition." As no appointment of Mr. Rommell, or any other person had been submitted to the committee, and as the matter of the appointment of a musical director had not been brought up, the protest was not considered.

Mr. Wattles reported that he had investigated the question of city taxes on the property being used for the exposition grounds and had found that the city authorities had no authority to rebate the taxes for this year, and he suggested tat the only remedy seemed to be for the management to pay these taxes and to endeavor to have the next Board of Equalization omit or reduce the taxes on this property for next year. The matter was referred to the Department of Buildings and Grounds for a statement of the amount of taxes due.

Manager Kirkendall submitted the tabulation of the bids for the erection of the Art building opened Monday night. He recommended that the contract for the carpenter work be let to Hamilton Brothers, the lowest bidders, for $26,414. This recommendation was approved. Mr. Kirkendall reported that the only bidder on the staff work was the firm of Smith & Eastman, the firm which had already secured four of the largest buildings on the main court, the bid being $11,911. Action on awarding this contract was deferred for future consideration.

The committee adjourned to meet at noon today.

Make way for the Grand Juke Geraldine.

"Keep it dark" has been Geraldine's motto.

Omaha will be too small from now on for the Geraldine, grand juke of the exposition.

The merchants who do the business are the merchants who do the newspaper advertising.

That Geraldine committee report was compounded of two parts of taffy and three parts of whitewash.

When an employe is given to understand that he is indispensable all control over his actions is surrendered.

The straw vote is again abroad in the land and, what is to be greatly deplored, he seems to know no quarantine lines.

The exposition board of directors has voted that Geraldine is indispensable. All contractors that do not stand in must govern themselves accordingly.

A leopard cannot change his spots, but they can be changed for him with a paint brush. That is how the exposition grand juke has been vindicated.

A vote of confidence in Geraldine is not needed to confirm Geraldine's confidence in himself, but it will take more than one vote to restore the confidence of the people in the exposition boss.

EXONERATING GERALDINE—INDICTING WATTLES.

The directors of the Transmississippi Exposition have endorsed the report exonerating Dion Geraldine from the charges of willful deception, indefensible partiality to contractors, flagrant disregard of the interests of the exposition and expensive incompetency. In giving Geraldine a vote of confidence by twenty-two out of thirty-four the board had acquitted Geraldine and registered an indictment of its president, Gurdon W. Wattles.

No other conclusion can be reached by any rational person who reads the report of the investigating committee. That report, in so many words, says that Geraldine, "for reasons which seemed to be satisfactory to the Department of Grounds and Buildings," changed the plans and specifications on the lagoon contracts and in settling with the contractor, who had been given special advantages in bidding and been allowed to omit materials valued fully $1,000 without any deduction, was acting in accord with the acting head of the department, Mr. Wattles.

In exonerating Geraldine from any blame for placing on the exposition pay roll a superintendent of construction without authority of the executive committee and in violation of its rules and in retaining this man on the pay roll after the executive committee had declined to sanction the employment the Board of Directors has voted an indictment of President Wattles. If Geraldine is blameless the blame must be laid at the door of Mr. Wattles, who was at that time temporarily at the head of the Department of Buildings and Grounds. It was Mr. Wattles who brought Geraldine's request for a superintendent to the executive board. Mr. Wattles was present when the board refused to sanction the appointment. If Geraldine tells the truth when he denies any knowledge of the action of the board then Mr. Wattles is not only guilty of withholding from the executive board the information that Geraldine's sub-superintendent was already on the pay roll before he asked permission to employ him, but also of inexcusable neglect in not informing Geraldine that the board had declined to employ him and seeing that his name was taken off the pay roll. As president of the exposition Mr. Wattles is in duty bound to live up to the rules and bylaws. He had no more right to violate these rules than Geraldine. The only ground on which Geraldine is excused by the investigating committee is that he acted under the direction of Wattles and with his full knowledge and consent.

In exonerating Geraldine for failure to require a written contract and bond from Sewer Contractor Dailey the directors have arraigned Mr. Wattles, under whose direction and with whose consent Geraldine claims to have acted. Inasmuch as President Wattles has not seen fit to contradict any of the statements made by Geraldine, which not only implicated him in the questionable transactions and in flagrant usurpations of authority vested exclusively in the executive committee, the inevitable inference is that Mr. Wattles is justly responsible for Geraldine's shortcomings and misconduct. The fact that Geraldine has been sustained by Mr. Wattles throughout and that Mr. Wattles has seen nothing improper in Geraldine's course would indicate that he is willing to share the responsibility.

The stockholders of the exposition look to the president to protect their interests by enforcing business methods in every department and honest compliance with contracts let on square competition. The failure of President Wattles to exercise the vigilance demanded by his position and his standing up for Geraldine can be construed in only one way, and that is that for some inexplicable reason he and Geraldine have linked themselves together.

PROOF OF CHARGES

BEFORE THE INVESTIGATING COMMITTEE

Stenographic Report of the Testimony in the Geraldine Case.

SOME THINGS THAT ARE NOT EXPLAINED

Committee Listens to Both Sides of the Case.

DISPOSING OF EXPOSITION CONTRACTS

Questionable Methods Adopted by the Superintendent Under the Department of Buildings and Grounds.

The following is a stenographic report of the testimony before the investigating committee of the exposition resulting from the charges filed against Dion Geraldine, superintendent of construction under the Department of Buildings and Grounds. This is the first installment of the testimony and will be continued in tomorrow's paper:

Kountze—I think the proper order is for Mr. Rosewater to show that these charges can be substantiated with proper evidence and after hearing that we will be pleased for Mr. Geraldine to give us his defense, if he has any.

Bidwell—I have no formal advice of the proceedings which have resulted in my being here tonight—simply an informal request by telephone to come up here—and I would like to know just what the matter is.

Kirkendall—At our last meeting this report of Mr. Rosewater's was brought in and was a perfect surprise to me. While I am supposed to be at the head of the department, I had never heard of it before. I thought that the courtesy was due to Mr. Geraldine that he should be heard on this subject, and so I made a motion to that effect.

Rosewater—I presume it is understood, at least I want to say in beginning that I stated at the time the resolution was presented that I wanted to grant Geraldine the widest latitude in making a showing; and I concurred at once in the motion made then to have the matter heard fully and in public, so that there could be no concealment. That motion was carried, but subsequently reconsidered and the board decided that they would call in three directors, who have no part in the management, and who would be, therefore, entirely and thoroughly disinterested and influenced by no prejudice, and have them hear and determine the property of carrying out the resolution, or vindicating Mr. Geraldine if they find there is no foundation for the charges. Now, inasmuch as I am called on to substantiate this matter first, I expected this: That Mr. Geraldine would file his response to these charges, and then the two sides would be before this house, and then I would proceed to substantiate it.

Kountze—You have not any response to make to the charges until after Mr. Rosewater has been heard?

Geraldine—I would prefer to hear him first.

Rosewater—I noticed in the World-Herald a card from Mr. Geraldine, which was called to my attention for the first time today, that he had a written response prepared. And that is the usual way. In starting a case the one party makes its charge and the other party brings in its general preliminary defense, and then the matter is heard and the evidence is brought in, and that way I can rebut any evidence that is brought in here. Otherwise I shall do so later. Of course this is not a law case. It is simply a question of fact, and the board probably will not pursue the course of introducing technical objections. My understanding is that they want to simply know all the truth.

Kountze—I think that is what the committee wants—to know all the facts in the case.

Rosewater—In the beginning, I will enter upon the first charge, that is, the charge relating to this contract. And before I proceed I will ask Mr. Geraldine to state whether it is not true that the board, at a meeting held some time in July, ratified the purchase of a quantity of lumber not to exceed $3,000. No information was given to us that any contractors would be given the use of this lumber at its cut rate, but were assured that we should have the benefit of the cut rate in case the lumber was used. It was also understood at that time that it might be that the board, having rejected the first proposals, we would probably let the work out and buy its own materials, just as Mr. Connolly's proposal asked for him to bid. He bid in the first place $7,900 to complete the work in white pine—clear white pine—and to do it in exact accordance with the plans and specifications. Later on he was informed that a change had been made in the plans and specifications and to divide his bids and that we, the exposition, would buy the piles and drive them and furnish that part of it; he to furnish the labor on the one side and the material on the other. He sub-divided his bids and proposed to do the labor for $2,100.[?]   yellow pine that was said to be offered to us at a cut rate and on which several hundred dollars might be saved to the exposition?

Kirkendall—I will state that it is a fact. Mr. Geraldine informed me that these bidders had offered the pine at something higher than we could buy it for—$1 to $2 or something of that kind. Upon that information I said I will go to the committee (I think it was the same day as the committee meeting)—I will grant the privilege of buying this lumber and then take it to the committee and explain it to them.

Rosewater—When this purchase was announced to the board the action had already taken place, Mr. Geraldine had already bought the lumber. We were asked to ratify the purchase made before we were asked to authorize the purchase.

Kirkendall—That is true.

Rosewater—Then we ratified it. And we were assured that we were saving from $1 to $1.50 per 1,000, and that the total would aggregate about $3,000 or somewhere in that neighborhood.

Kirkendall—It was about that, I believe. This is the amount as figured from various standpoints and from a number of bids, and I did not get all of it.

BOARD NOT ADVISED.

Rosewater—The board had no information about this matter of entering into bids. All we knew was that the lumber was bought. It is not material what it would cost us to do the whole other work. He proposed to do the whole thing for $2,100, including the piling. That was for the labor alone, without material. We had then bought about $3,000 worth of lumber, and I am ready and prepared to show that no more than $3,000 worth of lumber was used, and that if we had let that contract at $2,100 and bought our own materials we would have saved not less than $1,000. And it is further true and can be substantiated that the work is not done, that portion of it that relates to the pile driving is wretchedly done, that we have been cheated on the piles they have been putting in, and in that regard the work is very inferior to what the original plan contemplated as submitted to the contractors. And I want, in substantiation of this charge, to submit here a letter signed by Mr. Thomas Shaw. I will read it to the board. (Letter is read.)

I did not read this report until two days ago, since I preferred the charges, but I had a personal interview with this gentleman and from personal talk I had reached the conclusions that I embodied in these charges. Since I had the charges preferred I took the trouble to ascertain as near as possible exactly how much lumber has been used in that lagoon, and also to ascertain as near as I could the value of that lumber. I had a report in the first place of every stick that is in that lake, so that we would know what they were, and here they are described. I submitted the measurements first to Mr. Baker, our superintendent, who is a first-clas​ mechanic, and here is his statement. I submitted it also to the Bullard Lumber company, and there is their's, and they agree to a foot. The only mistake Mr. Baker made was in figuring sixteen here, instead of 160. But these figures as shown here are correct, representing this lumber. Mr. Bullard says this: (Reads.) So there was about 200,000 feet. He says the above bill of lumber any dealer in Omaha would have been glad to fill from August 1 to August 15 on the basis of $15.50 per 1,000, f. o. b. cars Omaha. The same white pine would have cost at least $3, and possibly $4, per 1,000 more, as these sizes in white pine reach from $1.50 to $2 more than the sixteen inch. Nearly two-thirds of the bill is composed of these two items. August 13, the day on which the contract was let, the regular retail price for yellow pine, dimension, was only $13.20 per 1,000, delivered in town in small bills, and the regular price of 3x12 delivered in small quantities was only $15 per 1,000 feet. I submit this letter to the board.

SOME FIGURES PRESENTED.

Taking a different summary from what I have presented there—and it is not material to the main point as regards the care that has been exercised to protect the interests of the exposition; it is not very material whether the first estimate is exactly in accord with this estimate showing about the state of affairs. I wanted to estimate it, knowing just what lumber has been used, what we could have done this work for if we had done it ourselves with our own lumber at the reduced price, or at a higher price, and also what it actually has cost. I put the summary in this form:

Est. 200,000 ft. yellow pine at $13 $2,600
Labor, according to Connelly's bid 2,100
Total $4,700

If the lumber was bought at $13.50, add $100; $14, add another $100. The difference in favor of Creedon & Mahoney, the exposition furnishing the lumber at $13 a 1,000, would have been $1,236.50; furnishing it at $13.50, $1,136.50; at $14 a 1,000 the difference would have been $1,036.50. That is substantially the basis and I want now to call upon the secretary to substantiate the figures as regards the contract. I do not suppose Mr. Geraldine will deny that the contract of Creedon & Mahoney was $5,936.50. If he does not deny it, then there is no need of controversy on that point, and every cent of that amount has been paid, although they have not completed their work.

Kountze—What is the amount?

Rosewater—$5,936.50. If that be true, and it is not denied, then we know what we have paid. We also know what the board was to have paid for that lumber. And now I want Mr. Geraldine to answer this question: Did Mr. Connolley have an opportunity to use the yellow pine turned over to Creedon & Mahoney? Was that opportunity offered him?

Geraldine—Am I supposed to answer this man's questions?

Kountze—I presume it would be right.

Geraldine—It was not.

Rosewater—Was any other contractor offered that opportunity?

Geraldine—No.

Rosewater—Then that part of it is substantiated. It shows, as I have alleged, that there was partiality in favor of Creedon & Mahoney was practically a preferred bid.

Kountze—In regard to this contract to Creedon & Mahoney, was that let by the board; did the board approve it?

Rosewater—The board approved it, but the board had no knowledge that Creedon & Mahoney were given the special preference. We were notified that the contract had been let and closed; that this lumber had been turned over to them. We did not know, either, what concession they made for it. What concession did Creedon & Mahoney make on the lumber which they received through this exposition?

Geraldine—What concession did they make?

Rosewater—Did they make any reduction from the amount of their original bid?

Geraldine—None whatever.

Rosewater—I have nothing further to say as regards this particular part. I will now proceed to the other case. I think the second charge is the Daly contract, is it not?

Wells—There is one point here. Something is said here about consent.

Rosewater—That matter is stated exactly and I don't think Mr. Geraldine will deny that the contract contained this provision, that cement shall be used at the option of the exposition, with the superintendent deciding whether or not it shall be. Now, no cement has been used there and I don't think anyone will contend that cement has been used, and I do not suppose that I will have to prove that no reduction has been made in the contract. Has there been any reduction?

Geraldine—There has been no reduction.

HERE TAMM COMES IN.

Rosewater—Now as to this other matter, I don't suppose there will be any dispute. The board had a session, I think, on the 27th of August, and in the absence of Manager Kirkendall the president, who had taken his place temporarily, presented a request from Mr. Geraldine to the board that Mr. Tamm be employed as an assistant superintendent at a salary of $100 per month. Objection was made to the employment and the matter was laid over without action. I think that is exactly what happened. Mr. Wattles made the request on the behalf of Mr. Geraldine. The request was not granted, but the motion was laid over and no action has been taken since that time. On the 1st of September, when the board of directors received its copies of reports, I, among others, received my notice of the names of the employes in the various departments and found Mr. Tamm's name on the pay roll of the Department of Buildings and Grounds, under direction of Mr. Geraldine, credited with sixteen days' work as superintendent of construction, $60. That, of course, as anyone can figure, is in excess of $100 per month. And it showed that at the very time when we were asked to employ this man he had already been employed as superintendent, under a title he had no right to, and he has been there since. He has been on the pay roll at $4 a day for September and on Saturday last the board, in order to enable him to draw his pay legally, as he had never been authorized, we had to legalize the action so far as his pay is concerned. The point I raise is that it is the duty of Mr. Geraldine to make his request in time for employing these men. If it was a proper subject for the board to act upon, having failed to receive the sanction of the board, he should have left the board the responsibility of anything that might happen by reason of that failure, and not to force upon us on the pay roll a man whose employment was not authorized. I don't think that requires any great amount of talk.

Kountze—I would like to know what Mr. Geraldine's authority is for the employment of men in the absence of any action being taken on the subject by the board; whether he is only allowed to employ men or assistants with the consent of the board; whether he has any discretion at all of his own that he could exercise.

Kirkendall—It is not intended that he shall use any discretion. The rules are that he can simply suggest or recommend.

Wattles—I will call your attention, Mr. Kirkendall, to a general rule that was adopted.

Kountze—Do I understand that Mr. Geraldine had any authority?

Wakefield—There was authority given in March for some work. Mr. Kirkendall stated it was necessary to put up a shop to keep the tools in and so on, and he was authorized to secure the material and employ the necessary labor to make the temporary building.

Wattles—Under what authority have all these men been employed since that time?

Wakefield—They have not had authority.

Wattles—Then do I understand that you have been paying these salaries without any authority whatever?

Wakefield—We have been paying the wages on the pay roll of the manager of the department.

OTHERS MADE REPORTS.

Rosewater—One thing is clear. There had to be some latitude given to Mr. Geraldine. We could not expect him to report every laborer he employed to the board. Under ordinary circumstances, in the case of a laborer, where a man is employed and may be laid off in a few days, I suppose there would be no action, but inasmuch as he asked this board to give its consent to the employment of Mr. Tamm, then he should have rested. You cannot do both things. You can't eat your pie and have it at the same time. That is not such a very serious matter, except that it does involve financial considerations in the long run. It involves discipline, too. In this way the board has no authority. It might just as well abrogate is power to its superintendents and men on the pay roll and let them do just about as they please. In every case I have had anything to do with I have had to report everything and have it approved by the board, even to a messenger boy.

Kountze—I was trying to ascertain just what authority had been given Mr. Geraldine for the employment of persons, or whether it took the action of the executive committee to employ anyone, unless it was an ordinary laborer.

Kirkendall—We considered at the time that the action of the board was necessary, although there have been several times when something was coming up when they granted me the authority to go ahead and do what was necessary to finish up the work.

Kountze—Then after the application was made for the approval of the board for Mr. Tamm's employment, was the board cognizant of the fact that Mr. Tamm was still retained?

Wattles—Yes, I think so.

Kountze—And was it with their silent consent, or knowledge, that he was retained?

Wattles—I know the matter was mentioned several times, that he was on the pay roll anyhow.

Kountze—And the board knew it?

Wattles—I think every member of the board heard it.

Rosewater—The first knowledge we had of it was when that pay roll that the secretary sends monthly to every member of the Board of Directors reached us.

Kountze—Mr. Tamm was employed by Mr. Geraldine and a report made, and a request that he be continued in employment?

Rosewater—That was not the way. The request was that we should authorize him to employ Mr. Tamm. We did not know he was on the pay roll, but after we had declined to act upon it the report reached us, three or four days later, that he had already been on the pay roll for twelve days before that request was made. That is the point. Of course in the absence of Mr. Kirkendall and the way things were running the matter was allowed to rest, as everything has been allowed to rest. There has been some talk about it, but it was not the right way to do business. We do not contend that Mr. Tamm was not earning his money. I don't know anything about that.

NEVER EARNED THE MONEY.

Now as to Mr. Daley. I won't dwell any length of time on him having $5 a day first. It simply shows that it was paying a man recklessly more than what was the standard for the same kind of work, as paid by the city. He never earned $5 a day in his life. But here was the fact. Plans and specifications were supposed to be drawn in the office of Mr. Geraldine for the sewer. Bids were advertised for and the bids were opened. On opening the bids we found that Mr. Daley was $1.48 below Henry Sharp, the next lowest bidder. In view of the fact that Mr. Daley had been an employe, or at least was known to have been on the pay roll, objection was raised that a man on the pay roll should bid for a contract. This objection was sustained by the board and the contract was awarded to Mr. Sharp. Two days later a meeting of the board was called and we were notified that there was a mistake; that Mr. Daley was no longer on the pay roll and had not been for some week or ten days and, as he was the lowest bidder, he was entitled to the contract. Thereupon the matter was reconsidered and the contract was awarded to him—to Mr. Daley. Mr. Sharp was in the ante room—I don't know but in this room—when the proposition was before the board, and after we had received it he was notified that he had no contract. He had been notified first, or had supposed from the announcement, that he had been awarded the contract. On the way down I inquired of Mr. Sharp how it could be that he could be within $1.48 on a contract of $809.35; how it could be within $1.48 of another bidder. And I asked him what plans and specifications he had had. He said, 'There are no specifications.' I was very much surprised. But I did not know much about it and supposed when the contract came for our ratification that the plans and specifications would be with the contract in some form. But no contract was ever submitted to the board, nor any bond, and at the end of some weeks—a couple of weeks—we discovered that Mr. Daley had finished his job and drawn his pay. I then went to the secretary and asked whether or not there had been such a contract and bond filed, and found there had not, but after the work had been completed a letter written by Mr. Geraldine to Mr. Daley, saying that his bid was accepted, and with the city specifications for sewer work pinned thereto, were filed with the secretary. It is not material to go through these specifications. But I want to show you how contractors are treated here. I saw Mr. Sharp this evening just before I came down. He came into my office accidentally and I asked him about this, and I will read you what he says. (Reads.)

This is what Henry Sharp stated to me and is willing to swear to: "I called in at the office and was introduced to the draughtsman, whoever he is, and he showed me the profile and grade of the sewer. I asked where the specifications were and he said   there were none. I asked if we should bid and use specifications such as we were in the habit of using here in the city bids, and he replied that he supposed so."

This is Henry Sharp's experience after the contract had been awarded: "I went in and stepped up to Mr. Geraldine and said: 'Mr. Geraldine, I understand that I had the contract awarded to me for that sewer work.' He said, 'I haven't heard anything about it.' I looked at him and said I had read it in the newspaper and had a clipping from The Bee to that effect, and Mr. Geraldine made the reply that 'anything you see in that newspaper is a lie.' That rather staggered me and I then said to him, 'Mr. Geraldine, you say that this has not been awarded to me,' and he said, 'not that I know of.' I said, 'in case it is awarded how shall I find it out?' He replied, 'I will notify you by mail.'"

Did Mr. Daley inspect a sewer that was built by the exposition on the exposition grounds? Was that the work he inspected?

Geraldine—He was formerly the superintendent.

GERALDINE DODGES ISSUE.

Rosewater—Now is it not true, Mr. Geraldine, that on Thursday of this last week Mr. Daley was asked to find the Y for a connection with a pipe in the sewer which he had superintended, and that he could not find it; that yards and yards of dirt were raked up and nothing could be done; that the engineers on Friday spent the whole day in trying to find this place, although they had their maps showing where it should be found, and that on Saturday morning they broke into the sewer to make that connection? Answer yes or no.

Geraldine—I never heard anything of the kind.

Rosewater—You can inquire into it then, and I will prove it by your engineer. I want to say now, though, that he did not communicate this, because he knows nothing about this, and I don't want him to rest under that suspicion. I know that spies are kept out there on the grounds and I know that our reporters cannot go through the grounds without being followed.

Now, taking up the next case. This refers to the erection of a planing mill in very close proximity, I am told within about eighty feet, of one of the main buildings. We had been informed by Mr. Geraldine months and months before that the erection of that mill was in contemplation and that he had been negotiating with the party to have it erected in that neighborhood, where, I did not know. I take, however, that he kept himself informed that he should have been notified at once, if he did not see it himself, when the first nail for that mill was driven. It seems that with reasonable vigilance if any notice had been served upon the board we could have gone to the city authorities and had that mill stopped; that is, either have prevented the issuance of a permit for its construction or have declared the building of such a concern a nuisance and dangerous to the exposition. I believe that even now we have a right and can go before the council, if we want to, and cause a fire limit to be established within two blocks or three blocks all around that exposition, to be good until the exposition closes, so that no more frame buildings can be put up surrounding that exposition. But this is not a part of my complaint. That should have been prevented and we ought to have been notified by Mr. Geraldine, who is supposed to be at the grounds every day, that the planing mill was to be built by those parties in that neighborhood.

GERALDINE'S STATEMENT.

As to the last charge, in order to save the time of this body and not to pester it with looking over maps and specifications, I will withdraw it. There have been alterations made, but it is not a material matter.

Wells—There is one point here that seems to have been passed over. It is regarding the changing of ground plan.

Rosewater—Yes, that is what I just referred to and I will let that go, at least for the present.

Geraldine—How would you like to have me deal with this matter?

Kountze—We gave Mr. Rosewater full scope to make his own statement and I think you would be entitled to the same.

Geraldine—On the evening of October 2 I received from the secretary a copy of the charges made by Mr. Rosewater and on that evening I dictated a reply to the executive committee, as I understood that my answer to the charges was to be heard by the executive committee. Since that time the matter has been changed. What I dictated then is here, in carbon copies, and while going over this matter verbally in detail I would be pleased to hand you each a copy.

The first statement here is that the plans and specifications were prepared by Mr. Shaw. Mr. Shaw was employed on this work for a few days. He made the drawings under my direction and prepared a rough sketch of the specifications, which I revised, as I also made some changes in the drawings. It is stated here that the bids on these plans and specifications were opened by me with no bidder present. The bids were opened in the office of the Department of Grounds and Buildings in the presence of Mr. Kirkendall, the chief clerk, and others. After opening these bids and finding them too high, as stated in this reply, I stated to Mr. Kirkendall that the work should be done soon, that we were behind on it then, having been delayed in the matter unexpectedly, and that the lumber for the sheet piling would take some time to procure and get the quality and the condition it required. At the time of advertising for the bids, on or about July 15, I also asked several local lumbermen to make us a figure on the lumber for sheet piling and the propositions I received are hereto attached. On the day the bids were opened and found to be too high I explained to Mr. Kirkendall that the work of the sheet piling should be done as soon as possible and, as there was prospect of further delay in letting the contract, suggested that we order the sheet piling for the reason that I wished to have it specially selected, and all this would require considerable time. It was better, therefore, to order the lumber at once and if we afterwards let the work by contract to turn the order over to the contractor and have the order that far under way. Mr. Kirkendall told me to go ahead with such arrangement and he would bring the matter before the exposition immediately, which he did and received the authority for the purchase. It is stated by Mr. Rosewater and confirmed, I think, by Mr. Kirkendall, that the lumber was purchased before any authority was given. There was a meeting of the executive committee on the evening of the day on which the bids were opened and Mr. Kirkendall went from my office direct to that meeting. The lumber was ordered at that time verbally with the understanding that unless confirmed by Mr. Kirkendall from the executive committee that it was not to apply. Prior to this time all question of using white pine has disappeared from our calculations for the following reasons: In examination of the stock in the Omaha lumber yards, etc. (reading from the written statement.)

It has been stated here that the difference between white pine and yellow pine was about $4. Here are two proposals which I received at that time from the lumbermen. I had proposals from nearly all, if not all, of them. I am unable to find them; I supposed that they were on file, but I find these only, and I would like to have the committee look at these.

WHITE AND YELLOW PINE.

Bidwell—I notice that white pine is quoted lower than the plain, yellow pine and that yellow pine dressed and tongued and grooved is quoted lower than the white pine.

Geraldine—The reason for that is this: Yellow pine is shipped from the south, a long distance, and the matter of freight cuts a very high figure in the price of lumber. If it can be ordered in time so that they can dress it, it removes that much freight and they are enabled to deliver it at a lower price. I might refer to that at this point to settle this question of the difference in cost of lumber. The No. 1 white pine in three-inch planks which I found in the yards of Omaha and which I conferred with lumbermen about is not as good quality as the yellow pine. It has more knots and defects and it is admitted from the northern classification, where it is not admitted by the southern. The only possible preference there could be for white pine is its durability in this climate. Yellow pine is much stronger and the element of strength is to be considered in this work. For that reason I wanted a plank that would dress fully three inches. In ordering this lumber from the Cady Lumber company, their wholesale dealers, a coal and coke company of Kansas City which controls the larger portion of the lumber supply over the new road from the gulf, was here. I wanted to get a plank that would dress on one side to three inches. They agreed to saw this lumber to three and one-quarter inches, or nearly three and one-quarter inches, and dress it to three inches, which would give the strength and thickness we required. They also agreed to tongue and groove it on the drawing that I submitted. It is stated here by some one that this tongue was only three-eighths of an inch; that statement is untrue. The tongue is fully one-half inch, made in V shape and is a special design particularly suitable for this work. In ordering that bill of lumber I took all those matters into consideration; I also called for No. 1 select lumber, the very best quality, and because of these specifications and the increased thickness I agreed to pay $1 per 1,000 feet higher than I could have got the common lumber at. It is stated somewhere in these charges that this lumber that we furnished is of second quality; that statement is absolutely untrue; I have not in my experience for years handled as fine a lot of lumber as was furnished for this purpose by the Cady Lumber company. The lumber is out there; anyone can examine it and it will speak for itself.

PENNELL INSTEAD OF ROMMELL.

Another Candidate for Musical Director of the Exposition.

At the meeting of the executive committee of the exposition, held this afternoon, Manager Lindsey of the Department of Ways and Means withdrew the name of A. Rommell of Mt. Pleasant, Ia., as a candidate for musical director for the exposition and substituted therefor the name of Thomas J. Pennell.

Mr. Pennell is now in Europe studying music. Mr. Lindsey said that he had been in correspondence with Mr. Pennell and that if paid $100 per month until the opening of the exposition and travelling expenses from Europe he would come at once and begin the work of formulating a plan for the music. No action was taken upon the matter, the committee referring it for consideration in executive session.

In withdrawing the application of Mr. Rommell Manager Lindsey also withdrew the plan that had been submitted for arranging the exposition music.

"THROW THE JONAH OVERBOARD."

The persistency of these attacks call for prompt attention. Mr. Rosewater has resigned. His resignation should be promptly accepted. His usefulness as a member of the executive board is at an end. If he is an enemy of the exposition because he could not rule in all things let him take his stand outside the breastworks behind which loyal Omahans are fighting the battle for their town.

A town that is not big enough to withstand the bluff and bluster of one man who bluffs and blusters because he cannot bring every other man to his own way of thinking is not a big enough town to successfully carry out a Transmississippi exposition.

Let Mr. Rosewater go—and help him with his going. Let it be established right now as an Omaha rule that he who is not with Omaha is against Omaha. Let it be written upon the outer walls of this city, where he who runs may read, that the opinion of every good citizen is entitled to all due weight, but that one-man rule is a thing of the past.—G. M. Hitchcock in the World-Herald.

On the eve of the campaign against prohibition in 1890 G. M. Hitchcock started on a pleasure tour of Europe. During his absence abroad his paper played fast and loose with the vital issue while The Bee was battling might and main to ward off the blight that was threatening the prosperity of this city and state. Returning from Europe in the very midst of the struggle, G. M. Hitchcock issued his famous manifesto, "Throw the Jonah Overboard." That frantic appeal of the man who has squandered a half million dollars in wrecking two newspapers was almost a duplicate of his present demand on the exposition board to let Rosewater go and help him with his going.

In 1897, as in 1890, the editor of The Bee did not seek the arduous task imposed upon him. As manager of the anti-prohibition campaign he labored night and day with pen and voice to achieve success, without pay and without reward. In spite of the Jonah cry and the backfire of imbeciles and malcontents he conducted the campaign to a victorious ending and buried prohibition by 50,000 majority.

The position which the editor of The Bee holds as one of the managers of the Transmississippi Exposition which G. M. Hitchcock covets was unsolicited and his work on behalf of the exposition has been performed with no other hope of reward than the promotion of the general public interest. The resignation of Rosewater from the Board of Managers is neither bluff nor bluster, nor an attempt to dominate the board. It is a positive declination to serve in the executive board so long as Dion Geraldine is retained in the service in the face of convincing proof that he has imposed upon the credulity of his superiors, confidenced the exposition and stood in with favored contractors.

The war on Geraldine and the censure of Wattles for convincing with him and usurping powers to the detriment of the exposition is not a war upon the exposition. On the contrary, it is an effort to reinstate the exposition in popular confidence, which cannot be regained so long as Geraldine is retained in charge of the work of construction. If The Bee succeeds in dethroning Geraldine and compelling President Wattles to carry on the business of the exposition upon business methods it will accomplish more for the success of the exposition than all of the backers and satellites of Geraldine have done or can do for this great enterprise.

So far as Rosewater is concerned he has asked to be relieved and does not ask to be retained. If his usefulness to the exposition is at an end, he has no desire to intrude himself upon the management when it is so plain that Mr. Hitchcock is itching to take the place and everybody knows that he will work in harmony with Geraldine and is sure to inspire faith in the integrity of his beneficiaries and side partners. All that is needed now for the success of the exposition is to take up Hitchcock's old cry, "Throw the Jonah Overboard."

 

BIRD'S EYE VIEW OF EXPOSITION.

Executive Committee Purchases Picture of the Grounds.

The executive committee of the exposition held a short session at 5 o'clock last evening at the request of Manager Rosewater, who recommended the purchase of the bird's-eye view of the exposition grounds made by E. J. Austen, an artist employed by the Werner Publishing company. The picture had been carefully examined by members of the executive committee and connoisseurs of such matters and was pronounced most excellent. The committee decided to purchase the picture at the price stated in the agreement, which caused it to be made, $300, it being agreed that the name of the artist was to appear on copies made from the drawing. The picture is a black and white wash drawing and shows the exposition grounds as seen from an elevation southeast of the bluff tract, showing the handsome main court to the best advantage and giving a faithful idea of the entire exposition grounds.

The committee decided to send Mrs. Ford, secretary of the Woman's board, to the annual meeting of the Liberal Religion congress, with a view of securing the next meeting of that body.

PROOF OF CHARGES AGAINST GERALDINE

Stenographic Report of the Testimony Taken by the Investigating Committee.

Following will be found a continuation of the testimony taken by the special committee which investigated the charges of corruption and collusion made against Dion Geraldine, superintendent of construction of the Transmississippi and International Exposition. In yesterday's issue was printed the testimony leading up to the admission by Geraldine that he had changed the specifications for the sheet piling at the lagoon. What followed here is given:

Kountze—I think there is a charge here that the specifications called for white pine.

Geraldine—Yes. And that in letting the contract preference was given to yellow pine, which was, according to the charge, a lower priced material.

Was that correct, that the specifications called for white pine?

BY AN OVERSIGHT.

Geraldine—The specifications called for white pine. The blanks for bidding submitted called for a bid on both yellow and white pine. If you will look over the bods you will notice that is called for in all cases. By the time the bids were received I had carried the investigation to that point and the summary of the bids that is given here and elsewhere was made entirely upon yellow pine, because at that time the qustion​ of yellow pine had entirely disappeared. By an oversight it was still left in the specifications and copied.

Kountze—But all the contractors had the information that they might bid either with yellow or white pine?

Geraldine—Yes, sir, and their bids are there on both kinds.

Rosewater—Are these the bids of the lumber dealers?

Geraldine—No, sir; the contractors.

Rosewater—Am I permitted to ask some questions as we go along here?

Kountze—I presume so, so long as you don't break in.

Geraldine—He has my full consent if he doesn't take too much time.

Rosewater—I simply want to know at what date these lumber bids were made or asked for?

Geraldine—The time of these bids, this yellow pine bid, was the 15th of July, I think—the 16th of July.

Rosewater—Why were these bids not submitted to the board—the bids for lumber?

Geraldine—Why were these bids for lumber not submitted to the board? Because it was not called for, and there was nothing to require it.

Rosewater—You said that you made a purchase. At what price did you buy this yellow pine and how many thousand feet did you buy?

Geraldine—The price of yellow pine purchased was $14.50.

Rosewater—And you thought at that time that that was $1.50 lower than you could buy it at any other place, from any other dealer?

Geraldine—I thought so.

Rosewater—Didn't you know that you could buy lumber at that time a dollar cheaper than $14?

Geraldine—These bids explain that.

Rosewater—Why did you not report this purchase—the quality, quantity and price—to the board at any time?

Geraldine—Mr. Kountze, I think these matters have been fully explained. There was no call for reporting all this. These bids were taken for information, not knowing whether we would be called upon to buy the lumber or not. When the bids were opened and found to be too high I then suggested that we purchase the lumber and have these bids as my authority as to where to go for it. The lumber was purchased on the 24th.

Why was not the contract or the order for that lumber filed with the secretary for the information of this board?

Geraldine—I was never instructed to file that order.

Rosewater—And you knew how many thousand feet you turned over to Creedon & Mahoney? How many?

HIS MEMORY DEFECTIVE.

Geraldine—I don't recollect.

Rosewater—You don't know how much lumber you bought?

Geraldine—I don't know exactly. My memory is not quite as retentive as that on all the details. The lumber that I ordered was somewhere, I think, about 170,000 feet.

Kountze—I presume the office has a record of the quantity of lumber that was purchased?

Rosewater—We have no such record here with the secretary. Have you ever heard how much was bought there?

Geraldine—There was never any occasion to turn any order over, because the order in a few days was turned over to the contractor and he assumed it. That is, the contractor paid the lumberman.

Rosewater—At what price?

Geraldine—At the price that I ordered it at—$14.50—$1 higher than I could buy it at the common size and common quality. This quality was the highest quality obtainable. It was sawed a quarter of an inch thicker than the ordinary size and tongued and grooved on a special design, for which the mill had to make their knives. For these reasons, in order to get the requisite thickness and quality, I agreed to pay $1 higher per thousand. Have I made that clear?

Kountze—The lumber that was furnished was of a higher grade than the lumber that these bids were put in on?

Geraldine—Yes, sir.

Rosewater—Didn't you say to Mr. Kirkendall that you were saving the exposition from $200 to $300 on this deal because the lumber was $1.50 cheaper than it could be bought for from any other dealer?

Geraldine—No.

Rosewater—We will let you settle that with Mr. Kirkendall.

Bidwell—As I understand it, the lumber which you purchased was one-quarter inch over stock size, so that it would dress down a full three inches. And this lumber which you bought, was that some which was manufactured for this purpose?

Geraldine—Specially.

Bidwell—Wasn't anything you found in stock?

Geraldine—No, sir, it was ordered from the timber.

Bidwell—I can understand readily how an extra thickness in the lumber would cost more, Mr. Rosewater, than stock size.

Rosewater—But we were assured that we were getting a great bargain in buying this lumber cheaper than anybody would sell it for, and we were never taken into the confidence of Mr. Geraldine as to how much he bought, at what price he bought it or how much he turned over.

Kountze—You said about $3,000?

Geraldine—That is about what it was. That is the approximate amount.

Kountze—As I understand it the association, as an association, never actually bought this lumber, never paid for it?

Geraldine—No, sir.

Kountze—The contractor simply stepped in and took the contract which you had the option upon?

Geraldine—Which I had already ordered at the time the contract was made and which was supposed to be under way.

Kountze—And he stepped in and took it off the association's hands at the same price at which you had contracted for it?

Geraldine—Yes.

Kountze—And which the association would have paid had they taken the lumber?

Geraldine—Yes.

Wells—And you submitted that proposition to turn over this lumber to only one of those bidders?

ONLY ONE BIDDER.

Geraldine—Yes, sir, only one, because it was not made until the final proposition. I was not foolish enough to tell those contractors that we had ordered the lumber and put myself in that position. The question was asked here some time ago. Now, after these bids were rejected, I was surprised to find them so high; supposed it could be done for less. I wanted to place it under contract. I went over the specifications and drawings carefully to see if I could cut out any expense here or there. I conferred with as good authorities as I could find on that class of work and I made some changes. It is not customary in letting contracts to reject bids and ask for bids again on exactly the same specifications, because I contractor is not expected to alter his bid under such circumstances unless a change is made. It is customary in such cases to call the lowest bidders. In this case the two lowest bidders were Connolly and Creedon & Mahoney. Connolly was the lowest bidder, having bid $7,900 on the entire job, as you will see by his original proposition. There was another bidder, the third, Mr. Raymond. I also called him in. If you please, I will read what I dictated here. (Reads.)

Now, it has been stated that Mr. Connolly turned in a proposition to do the work for $7,100. That statement is absolutely untrue. Here is his proposition. Here are all the propositions he has ever offered. It is stated here that he turned in a proposition to do the labor for $2,100. That is also untrue. I will read his proposition. (Reads proposition.) I explained to Mr. Connolly the changes that we made of changing the connection between the mainstay piles and the anchor piles to wire cables instead of stringers and of sinking a ditch one foot to be filled with clay and tamped and drive the sheet piling six inches.

Wells—By what authority did you change those specifications?

Geraldine—By the same authority by which I made them. I was authorized to do that work by Mr. Kirkendall. That is what I am supposed to be here for.

Kountze—All the bidders were aware of the changes in the specifications?

Geraldine—The three lowest bidders. The bids received were: Hamilton Brothers, $11,542; A. A. Raymond, $8,724.38; Creedon & Mahoney, $8,161.10; James P. Connolly, $7,900.

Rosewater—That is on the first proposition?

Geraldine—Yes.

Rosewater—He says that this is false, that Connolly bid $7,100 for this work, and that it is false that he bid $2,100 for the labor. Isn't it true that in his bid, on the face of it, you say that he offered to deduct $700 if he were allowed to do what you allowed Mr. Creedon to do?

Geraldine—That is not true.

Rosewater—You read it there?

Geraldine—It is not there. The modification we proposed for setting the piling in the ground was to sink a ditch one foot and drive the piling six inches, the idea being that by driving six inches we could get probably as good a job as by driving a greater depth. I also decided that instead of sharpening the piles as shown here, to sharpen them on the side so that they would form a wedge on the sides.

Rosewater—Who made these plans?

Geraldine—I must ask, Mr. Kountze, that this gentleman be required to sit down and wait until I get through.

Kountze—I think that Mr. Geraldine should have the right to make an explanation.

Geraldine—I explained that these plans were drawn by Thomas Shaw, Mr. Connolly suggested that instead of driving at all, if I would relieve him from doing any driving that he could put the piling in a ditch and fill it up so that it would hold water. I didn't think so, and told him I couldn't consider it. When he put in this bid, "if sheet piling is allowed to be set in a trench instead of being driven, deduct $700," it was on the proposition to do no driving at all, which we could not consider, and I distinctly told him so. He then said he could make no deduction on that score and his bid stands at $7,800, and he refused to do it for anything less. I had asked him the same as the others, to submit a proposition for the work, and for all the materials and the work, or for such portion of the materials as he could furnish to the best advantage. This was his proposition. There is the proposition I received from Creedon & Mahoney. (Reads.) After receiving that proposition from Mr. Creedon, I asked him what price he had figured on lumber. He said he had figured $13.50. I asked him if he could buy lumber of the quality called for. He insisted that he could; that he could get a good quality at that if he could have time to get it here. I then explained to him that I had ordered the lumber, explained the specifications under which it was ordered, the degree of thickness, the better quality and the special design of the tongue and groove, and asked if he would be willing to take that order off our hands at that price and still do the work at the figure he had made. He said he wanted time to consider that, went away, came back, and finally said he would do so. I then reported this matter to the manager of my department and recommended that the contract be given to Creedon & Mahoney at the figures named and under these conditions, and that the piling be let as a separate contract or done by ourselves. I explained that the lowest figure I could obtain was 5 cents per foot for driving the piling and the other prices mentioned for driving the sheet piling. Mr. Kirkendall asked me if I could do it for a less figure. I told him I thought we could. As a result of the conference I recommended that we do the piling ourselves, the contract to be let to Creedon & Mahoney. It went to the executive committee. There was some criticism offered on the specifications. It was on the day that Mr. Kirkendall left the city, I think. Mr. Rosewater and Mr. Lindsay came to my office to get the specifications. The criticism was offered, to which I replied and asked for a suggestion of something better, which was never offered. Later the same proposition was presented to the executive committee by the president, who, in the absence of Mr. Kirkendall, acted as manager of this department. I was called before the committee in regard to the matter, I was asked numerous questions in regard to it and explained every detail as far as was required. Mr. Rosewater was present and asked some questions about it; asked me in regard to the cement mentioned and other questions. I don't remember just what. But I do remember that I explained all this matter, much of which I am explaining now. In my presence the executive committee voted unanimously to award the contract to Creedon & Mahoney, and instructed the acting manager to do the rest of the work ourselves. I immediately proceeded with it.

Kountze—May I ask you—The cement was omitted in doing the work? Had the cement been used, would it have added to the cost of doing the work?

Geraldine—No, sir.

Kountze—The puddling of the trench cost the contractor as much as it would have cost him had he used the cement?

Geraldine—Yes, it cost him more.

Kountze—And the work without the cement is preferable to that with the cement?

WAS SOMEWHAT UNCERTAIN.

Geraldine—Yes, sir; I believe that it is. At the time I drew those specifications I was somewhat uncertain about the matter and thought that possibly the use of a small amount of cement there might aid in some cases. I   was fearful of finding decomposed strata of clay or porous material that would not puddle. In that case I also wanted to make a joint inside the sheet piling through this strata if I found it. There was one stratum of that material found higher up in the clay which made me apprehensive of finding more. I might explain that further. Here is the contract of Creedon & Mahoney. (Reads from contract.) You will observe that I state that the ditch shall not be more than five inches in width, the idea being that the narrower we made the ditch, without disturbing the clay at the bottom of the ditch, the better joint we could make. This ditch being five inches wide, the plank would fill three inches, leaving only two inches to be filled. I thought that possibly to fill the balance of that with American cement might be better than undertaking to tamp it. I found on more careful examination of the clay that it is what is called joint clay; that is, porous, having perpendicular pores; that to break those pores it was better to do it by puddling it and tamping it. Now, you will readily understand that if that ditch, two inches wide and only a foot deep, was to be filled with cement it would only require a small quantity of cement. The cement was never intended to apply in any place except where I might find decomposed material. The facts are that this ditch was dug a foot wide. I found that in going on with the work, testing it, that a better job could be obtained by digging a ditch wider, puddling it and tamping, which was done.

Bidwell—Was there any extra charge on the part of the contractor for that?

Geraldine—He was not allowed any.

Bidwell—Did he ask any?

Geraldine—He did and it was refused.

Bidwell—Was it refused before or after he did the work? Did he make his claim before he did the work.

Geraldine—He made it afterward. Is that matter of the cement satisfactorily disposed of?

Kountze—I think it is explained in a manner that is intelligently understood by the committee.

Geraldine—Are there any questions to be asked about it? It seems to be made a point in these charges. I should be glad to answer them.

Kountze—I think the question was asked whether the cost of doing it one way or doing it the other, which was the cheaper, whether there was any difference in the cost. And I think the answer was that the tamping cost more than putting in the cement. Is that correct?

Geraldine—Yes, sir. The work as done, in digging the ditch wider and tamping it thoroughly, as was done, is more expensive than putting in the cement. And the cement was never contemplated except in such places as might be found porous and might be put in as a safeguard.

FIGURING THE COST.

Kountze—I think it might be well perhaps to state to the committee what would have been the probable cost and quantity of cement that would have been required to have done the work if it had been done with cement instead of clay.

Geraldine—Well, the quantity of cement contemplated, the difficulties contemplated in encountering any of these stratas could not have exceeded more than $30 worth of cement in the entire job, under the worst conditions that we expected or anticipated. Now, as to any preference being shown these bidders. If any preference at all was shown it was in favor of Mr. Connolly. As to the cost of the entire job, there is a statement taken from our books showing the cost of the sheet piling.

Kountze—I understand, Mr. Geraldine, that on the question of these specifications you stated you drew them and you changed them. Or, they were drawn by Mr. Shaw under your direction and changed by you?

Geraldine—Yes, sir. And here are the changes put on. I have something to say in regard to Mr. Shaw.

Kountze—Were you authorized to change the plans or specifications on any work of this kind?

Geraldine—Yes.

Wells—Do you mean previous to the letting of this contract? For instance, here may be an architect or a landscape engineer engaged for a building or the laying out of grounds, etc. Now, what I wanted to understand was, whether, after these plans had been made by an architect for a building or a landscape engineer in the laying out of grounds, as the case may be, had Mr. Geraldine the right or authority to change this in any manner?

Geraldine—The changes made were submitted with the revised, the later propositions and the recommendation to let the contract, in the same manner in which the first drawings were presented, and the authority granted by the executive committee, the order given by them, referred to them the same as to the other proposition.

Rosewater—Did you re-advertise the whole of this matter? Did all these contractors have an opportunity to enter?

GROWS QUITE INSULTING.

Geraldine—I have answered that question two or three times here, and unless Mr. Kountze desires it—

Rosewater—I want to tell you that I am one of the managers of this concern, as well as one of the men who bring these charges. You are one of our employes, and I am not to be insulted by being told that I am some side-show fellow, like some cheap lawyer. I want the question answered so that for your own benefit you will have the opportunity to clear yourself.

Geraldine—I thank you that you are so much interested in my welfare, Mr. Rosewater.

Rosewater—If you did not advertise the plans to the bidders, how did they know there was to be any bidding? He stated that all of them were notified verbally to come and see these specifications. I have had conversations with one of the bidders (I haven't seen Creedon & Mahoney), and he may have lied to me. He stated to me that several changes were made, of which he knew nothing, and he certainly knew nothing of this lumber being changed. Now, I asked him as to the plans, for reasons. Mr. Shaw drew those plans. He is a civil engineer and is thoroughly competent to draw them. They have been radically changed, and not for the better. Now, what I wanted to ask is this: Why was it that the pile driving was done by the exposition rather than to leave it to any contractor under specifications that would require a fixed quality of work? I do not know whether you want to answer that question or not, but it seems to me it is a very important one, because I will follow it up with another question. Is it not true that in your office you have an employe and clerk who is drawing $75 a month who owns that pile driver and is doing pile driving on the grounds and is in partnership with another employe?

Geraldine—No, that is not true.

Rosewater—Well, we will prove it before we get through. Mr. Templeton does not make any secret of the fact that he owns that pile driver, does he?

Geraldine—I know that he does own the pile driver.

Rosewater—And that he does the work on the grounds. Isn't that true?

Geraldine—No, that is not true that I know of.

Rosewater—Who does it, then?

Geraldine—This work was done by our own employes entirely.

Rosewater—What does Mr. Templeton do, then, with his pile driver?

Geraldine—Would you like to have that explained.

Kountze—I think, as Mr. Rosewater has raised the question, it might be well to explain it.

Rosewater—I think Mr. Geraldine has said that the pile driving was undertaken on the part of the exposition because he found that the exposition could do it for a less amount than that which was called for on the bid of the contractors. In what way was this purchase of piles made, on contracts?

Geraldine—The piles were bought.

Rosewater—Did you make contracts for them?

Geraldine—I gave verbal order for them.

Rosewater—A verbal order?

Geraldine—In some cases a written order, as the case may be. I would like to explain that question also, as it has been raised. When it was found that Creedon & Mahoney made this low proposition, as before stated, and as you will find written in this statement, I asked the next man, A. A. Raymond, who was about the only regular pile driver who had appeared up to this time, to make a figure for driving the piles. He asked 5 cents a foot for driving the mainstay and backstay piles.

Rosewater—Does that mean furnishing the timber?

THE PILE DRIVER DEAL.

Geraldine—No, we were to furnish the timber. I thought we could do it cheaper as we had formerly been doing some pile driving on the grounds and had hired a pile driver of Mr. Raymond. After deciding to do so I looked for a pile driver to rent and using his in driving the piles for the Manufactures building. In making inquiries I learned from Mr. Templeton, one of the employes, that he had the greater part of a pile driver and owned the principal part of the machine. I asked what he would let the exposition have it for and he replied that if we would take it and fix it up, pay for whatever was necessary to make it run, that we could have the use of it for nothing. Or he would fix it up and rent it to us complete, as a first class machine for about $7 a day. I had the work done.

Bidwell—Did that include the engine?

Geraldine—Included everything. I had the work done and the cost of the pile driver on this job, or of repairing it, amounted to somewhere in the vicinity of $80. I do not remember just what, but can get it from the books. It is included, however, in the items given here. After finishing the work and turning over the machinery to Mr. Templeton what he has done with it is not a matter for me to be interested in. I understand that he turned the pile driver over to a man named Green and he has been bidding on the pile driving since. What is Mr. Templeton's interest in that pile driver I don't know and it has no bearing on the matter whatever.

Kountze—Is Mr. Green in any way connected or employed by the association in any other capacity than that of driving piles?

Geraldine—No, sir. He was employed a few days before that time. He was employed on the former pile driving when we drove the piles around the colonnade. I again employed to take charge of the pile driving around the lagoon. When he finished that work he left our employ. I offered him $3 a day to come back to our employ, which he declined, and he drove, as a contractor, the piling on the Mines and Mining building.

Kountze—As a competitive contractor?

Geraldine—I suppose so. I do not know.

Kountze—You have nothing to do with that?

Geraldine—No, sir, notwithstanding the fact that it has been stated in the newspapers that we did the work. As to the truthfulness of Mr. Connolly's statements, I understand Mr. Rosewater includes it in his charge; he stated that he made these proposals. The answer I have as to whether or not he is a truthful man in his written proposal there, which I ask you to examine and compare with the statement in the charges.

REGARDING THE LUMBER.

Now as to the quantities of lumber used. The order that I made for piling for this lumber is somewhat different in some dimensions from this drawing. This drawing shows a 3x10 for coping. I ordered a 4x8. If you refer to the specifications which I have been looking over, I see that it is specified in the original specifications as a 4x10. Now if we go by the drawings, which are 3x10 and which I distinctly remember is what we agreed upon, it would be different from what is stated in the specifications. In looking over the work I decided that 4x8 was ample, and ordered that from the Cady Lumber company. Now, as to there being a difference of 60,000 feet of lumber, that statement is grossly erroneous and untrue. You will observe that in the original drawings the connection; this shows the front side of the piling, where the water would be; that shows the sheet piling, there is the ditch and there is the six inches driven in. There is the pile driven to give strength to it; here is the anchor pile driven back a certain distance and fastened to this as an anchor; there is the excavation behind to be filled and tamped. In the revised specification, and you will notice I read to you in the contract, that we might at our option use wire cables instead of stringers, you will see that it is shown here that these piles are fastened together by a 2x8, the front pile fastened to the back pile by a 2x8. The change from 2x8 was made in the contract to galvanized wire cable. The amount of 2x8, as I roughly estimated it, which will be found nearly correct, necessary to make these connections as shown on the original drawings, would be about 16,000 feet. These were eliminated and a wire cable substituted. At the same time the distance between these was doubled. You will see here the distance is shown as fifteen feet here and twenty-four feet here, but the distance for which twenty-four-foot piling was to be used is shown here. There is the proportion that it bore to the whole job. This is the profile drawing, showing the various distances, heights and depths. A very small portion was made twenty-four feet. Now I changed the specifications to put these anchors back, none of them less than twenty feet, most of them twenty-six feet and some of them thirty feet.

Kountze—That was done before the contract was let on the revised plan and upon which both Creedon and Connolly bid, upon the same specifications?

Geraldine—Yes. Mr. Connolly both had that plan and both bid upon it.

Kountze—This change was not made, then, after the contract had been let to Creedon & Mahoney? And the cost of doing this kind of work instead of the other, was this way cheaper than it would have been?

COULD HAVE BEEN CHEAPER.

Geraldine—No, sir. It would have probably been cheaper had the same distance been maintained, but moving back double the distance doubled the labor of digging a ditch. The actual cost of doing the work, this was more than the other. This timber first contemplated was very cheap lumber; could be bought for $12 a thousand, so that, as you will find in my written reply, instead of being a donation to the contractor, it was an additional expense upon him. Now, it is further stated that the iron work was left out and the contractor was given a donation of $200 or thereabout in that manner. I will refer to the contract. The exposition reserves the right to change the manner of fastening the waling, to place the waling back of the sheet piling instead of in front and fastening to the piles by notching and mortising and toenailing, and the contractor agrees to make no additional charge should such a change be made. In ordering this lumber I had looked over the matter sufficiently and made this change in Mr. Shaw's plan, and instead of putting that waling on the front side, next to the water, I put it back of the sheet piling and turned it edgeways, getting the additional strength of turning the plank edgeways and mortising it in. Looking down from the top of the piling there is the sheet piling, there is the round pile and there is the waling, a diagonal mortise being put in from the back so that this waling was wedged in between every pile and would not come forward on account of the diagonal mortise and was toenailed in besides. Now, if you will look at this cavity behind the sheet piling for a moment you will see there it shows this waling edgeways and in some cases it went back much further, projecting back close to the bank. Now you will readily see that if this plank came back against the wall so much as it did in most cases that the earth behind there could not be tamped from above. Therefore it would be necessary for the contractor to do that tamping to excavate behind here so as to get down. That was something the contractor did not figure on. That is why I put in this specification in the contract about placing the waling timbers back of the sheet piling instead of in front and fastening to the piles by notching and toe-nailing if found advisable and the contractor agrees to make no additional charge should such a change be made. Now the fact is that the actual cost of putting in the waling in this manner as near as I can, estimate it was $200 greater than the original plan, including the iron work which is spoken of, and instead of being a donation to the contratcor​ was an expense of $200 or thereabout additional to him, for which he received nothing.

Kountze—There is another matter I did not quite understand. The coping, as I understand it in the specification, was 4x10, in the drawing 3x10, and subsequently there was substituted for the coping a 4x8. Now, [?]

 

ONE MORE OVERSIGHT.

Geraldine—Those changes were made before the contract was let. That change was made when I ordered the lumber, as I ordered it 4x8.

Kountze—That change was made, then, before the contract was let to Creedon & Mahoney?

Geraldine—Yes, sir; it was fully explained to both bidders.

Kountze—And both contractors bid on the same proposition?

Geraldine—Yes, sir.

Kountze—And the difference between the drawing and the specifications was fully understood by both of them?

Geraldine—Yes, sir.

Bidwell—As I understand it the specifications were originally drawn 4x10?

Geraldine—The specifications I find are written 4x10. I presume it is a mistake.

Bidwell—You claim that was an oversight?

Geraldine—Yes, that was an oversight. In making this contract instead of revising the entire specifications and noted here the changes we proposed to make and did not notice that the specifications read 4x10. I presume that is an error and the lumber actually furnished was 4x8. But that change was made before the contract was let and explained to both.

Bidwell—Is it customary where a contract is let that the drawings govern or the specifications?

Geraldine—They both govern, and if there is a discrepancy it is settled between the engineer and contractor. Now, I have a word to say in regard to Mr. Shaw, whose letter was read here. When I took up this work at the point of making drawings I made inquiry for a suitable man to help me with this work who might superintend it afterward. I inquired of Mr. Andrew Rosewater, who recommended Mr. Shaw. Mr. Shaw assisted me in this work and made these drawings. He wrote a portion of the specifications, which I afterward revised, and I discussed with him the propositions of taking charge of this work when it was let and intended to put it in his charge if he was an applicant for the work. On the day on which bids were received, or about that time. I was told that Mr. Connolly was bidding in connection with Mr. Shaw and was in partnership with him. This was later corroborated by a bid on the putting in of water pipe put in by Connolly & Shaw. I decided if that was the case and from my acquaintance with Mr. Shaw that I did not want him for superintendent on that work, and I did not employ him. I will, if you wish, take his letter and answer it in detail now or hereafter, just as you like. I simply wish to say that his statements as read by Mr. Rosewater are falsehoods.

Kountze—Should the committee decide later that they wanted a definite answer to Mr. Shaw's letter which is submitted here they will probably call for such further information.

Bidwell—Was there a distinct bid made by any of the contractors for this particular work?

Geraldine—All the bids I received are there.

Bidwell—What I am getting at is the cost of this work. Is there a bid on that?

Geraldine—No, I did not ask for a bid on that. I simply asked Raymond what he would do the work for. He said he would make me a bid on driving the piles and let me furnish them. His bid was too high. He asked five cents a foot and we drove them for less than 4 cents. He also made a proposition on driving the sheet piling, 30 cents apiece for two and one-half feet, or 20 cents apiece on the modified proposition. There are nearly 5,000 piles to be driven and you see what that would amount to.

Bidwell—There are none of these bids here that contain any figures by which you could compare the actual cost with what was paid.

Geraldine—Yes, sir; you will find it in my letter. I will read it to you, if you please. (Reads.)

Rosewater—You say that Mr. Connolley's bid was only $100 less than the original bid be made? The original bid was $7,900 and you say that after you made these changes on these specifications he was only willing to deduct $100, and you mean to state that when you changed from white pine to yellow pine and gave him the advantage of $3 per thousand he still would not deduct more than $100?

Geraldine—I mean to state the fact just as I have stated it. Mr. Connolley was not bidding on white pine. Mr. Connolley understood that yellow pine alone would be considered, Mr. Connolley's original bid shows prices on yellow pine.

Rosewater—I am saying that when he made his original bid he was bidding on white pine and that proposition was to make a first-class lumber enclosure. Now, then, you say he would not deduct but $100 in spite of the changing involving a difference of $3 a thousand on 170,000 feet of lumber. Isn't it a fact that you did not show him any of these specifications; that you told him verbally only of a few changes?

Geraldine—It is a fact that I had no specifications made at that time beyond what is shown here, and I showed him everything I had just the same as I showed it to Mr. Creedon.

Rosewater—I hope you will permit me to bring in the partner of Mr. Connolley and let him tell the story of what they were bidding on. He is right here, and it seems to me that before we close this question we might as well get right to the bottom of it. Of course his letter may be contradicted by statements.

(Mr. Shaw is introduced.)

Rosewater—Mr. Shaw, in your revised bid, what was your bid on the revised plan for this work?

PLANS ARE CHANGED.

Shaw—I will explain to you that at that time I was not a partner of Mr. Connolley, but I figured up his bids for him and understood all about them. It was just after the bids were put into the department here that he made a proposition to me to go into partnership with him, which I accepted, when we were trying to get this job. Now, to begin with, I made out the bid there, which amounted to $7,900. A day or two after the bids went in Mr. Connolley came up to my office and I suggested that he should go up and see Mr. Geraldine and see how we stood. Mr. Geraldine would not give him any satisfaction. That is the report he brought back to me. He was a little bit hot at Mr. Geraldine anyway; said he had up a $500 check there and thought he ought to be treated right and that Geraldine had about told him he couldn't get the contract anyway. That is the statement he came down to me with. I said: "You had better go and see some of the directors and we will try to get at this thing and see how we stand." He went to Mr. Hussie and Mr. Hussie went to Mr. Kirkendall. Mr. Kirkendall said he would see Mr. Geraldine, and I suppose he did. At least, when Hussie had seen Mr. Kirkendall he said: "You go and see Geraldine and he will treat you right." And Mr. Geraldine treated him first rate and used him as he ought to be used. I think it was the very same day, I am not very sure, but at any rate Mr. Geraldine told him to make over another proposition; to look it over and see if he could not cut down his original estimate. And the second proposition was, instead of driving the sheet piling, they would dig two feet and drive the six-inch point into the ground, and to give him a bid on that footing. And the third was to give him a bid for the labor only, the exposition company supplying all the material. Well, I went over everything with him again and we looked it up and I found that we could cut down probably $100 off our original bid, and I think we took off for the excavations and the driving six inches, so the bid stood $7,100. I forget just exactly what it was for labor. Now, that was all the information that I got from Mr. Connolley. There was nothing about the alteration of the plans; in fact we did not know that the plans were altered until we happened to go up to the office one day, I think it was when the sewer contract was to be let, and we walked into the draughtsman's room and there we saw the altered plan. We were thunderstruck with it and that was the first thing that we began to see that we had not been used right.

Rosewater—That was after the second bid was put in?

Shaw—After Creedon & Mahoney had got the contract.

Kountze—The time you speak of here as visiting Mr. Geraldine was at the time that your first bid had been under consideration, $7,900, was it not?

Shaw—I don't understand.

Kountze—You had a bid in, or rather Mr. Connolley had a bid in, for $7,900?

Shaw—Yes, sir.

Kountze—And it was the time the first set of bids were under consideration that Mr. Connolley visited Mr. Geraldine to get information in regard to his first bid?

Shaw—Yes, sir.

Kountze—When Mr. Geraldine told him that he wouldn't get the contract?

Shaw—Yes, sir.

Kountze—Subsequent to that new bids were taken from Mr. Connolley and from Creedon & Mahoney, and didn't I understand from you that when you put this second bid in for this work, or rather Mr. Connolley, that he did not know what he was bidding on?

BID WITHOUT SPECIFICATIONS.

Shaw—He was told verbally by Mr. Geraldine what to bid on. I said this, that he was told to look over his original bid and see if he could cut his estimate down somewhere. That we did by lowering that $100. He was told also to see what difference it would make instead of driving the sheet piling two feet six, as called for in the original specifications, to cut a trench two feet deep and drive the point six inches. Well, there was enough to cut off by doing that to bring the estimate down to $7,100.

Kountze—Are you quite sure?

Shaw—Positive.

Kountze—I understand you did not have any specifications when you put in this second bid?

Shaw—Nothing except the verbal explanation from Mr. Geraldine to Mr. Connolley, which Mr. Connolley brought to me.

Kountze—I understand, Mr. Geraldine, that the specifications had been modified when this gentleman bid on them?

Geraldine—Yes, sir, the modifications were fully explained.

Kountze—And did they have a copy of it, or was it simply verbal?

Geraldine—It was verbal. I simply explained to these bidders the changes that are embodied in this contract.

Kountze—Mr. Shaw, doesn't this appear in your bid? You say that in making your bid for $7,800 you bid to drive your piles six inches and to dig a trench and set them in?

Shaw—No, sir.

Kountze—What did you say?

Shaw—On the bid of $7,800 we were going to drive the sheet piling two feet and six inches.

Kountze—Well, but when you made the deduction of $700?

Shaw—When we made that deduction we were going to dig a trench two feet and drive the piling six inches, which made two feet six.

Kountze—Isn't this the condition of your bid? If sheet piling is allowed to be set in trench instead of being driven, deduct $700?

Shaw—That may be the language of it, but the intention was to drive them in the six inches.

Kountze—Wouldn't we have to assume that the bid was made and as written would be what you intended to do? We could not assume that you should do something different from what you bid for?

Shaw—Well, you can take it in that form. But the language there does not convey just exactly what was told us to be done.

Kountze—This fact is very explicit and certainly Mr. Geraldine or the association could not have required you to have driven those piles one inch under this proposition.

COULD HAVE BEEN BY CONTRACT.

Shaw—It could have been arranged in the contract easy enough, because it was a verbal understanding.

Kountze—Well, but you must hold to your proposition, not what you might have done under other circumstances, but what you actually bid for.

Shaw—There is no doubt that what I have given in black and white there is not just exactly what is wanted.

Kountze—It is exactly as you bid.

Shaw—I understand that, sir.

Kountze—And exactly as the association would have to consider it in drawing a contract for you to do the work, and, drawing it differently, I should judge that you would have been entitled to additional pay if they gave you additional work.

Shaw—Well, I don't think there would have been any dispute about that at all.

Kountze—Well, we will pass that. What were the other questions here?

Bidwell—Were your​ present with Mr. Connolley when he made this arrangement with Mr. Geraldine?

Shaw—No, sir; I was in my office. Mr. Connolley came down and reported to me.

Bidwell—You are simply stating what Mr. Connolley told you?

Shaw—Yes, sir; that is right.

Rosewater—Do you know in this $7,800 bid whether you counted to furnish white pine or yellow pine?

Shaw—White pine, and I will tell you why. We consulted with the lumber dealers here and we found that it was impossible for us to get yellow pine shipped in here in time to complete the contract at the date specified.

Rosewater—How much higher was white pine than yellow pine at that date?

Shaw—I won't say, because that is just the answer we got and we wouldn't go any higher for it. But yellow pine is cheaper than good white pine.

Rosewater—Have you any idea what the difference in price was or would have been?

Shaw—Well, I would say from $1 to $2 a thousand; that the yellow pine would be cheaper than the white pine, but I would not say exactly. But I will tell you that our bid from our lumber dealer was $18 a thousand for white pine.

Rosewater—The lumber dealers asked you $18 a thousand.

Shaw—That was the price made by them.

Rosewater—You figured on furnishing lumber that cost you $18 when you put in your bid for $7,800.

Shaw—Yes, sir.

Rosewater—Had you supposed you could get yellow pine, what would you have bid?

Shaw—We could not bid at all on yellow pine because they would not agree to deliver it to us at all in time to complete the contract.

Rosewater—Were you offered any lumber by the exposition association or by Mr. Geraldine?

Shaw—No, sir; neither Mr. Connolley nor myself.

Rosewater—What quality of white pine was this that you were bidding on?

Shaw—It was to comply with the specifications. The specifications did not call for any quality.

Rosewater—Will you explain the difference between the specifications as they are now, as you found them on the present work as done and what there was in the original as you drew it first and as you bid on it?

BAD WORK ON LAGOON.

Shaw—I don't know what the present specifications are, but I had occasion to go out on the works a couple of weeks ago to see this new patent pile driver, and while there I just made an examination of the works to see how things were going. And I found considerable alteration from what I intended. The sheet piling itself, instead of being down two feet six, ranged anywhere from one to two feet below the surface of the ground; none of it exceeding two feet. The coping should have been 4x12 and it is 4x8. The circular ends of that coping were specified to be broad enough so as to dress twelve inches wide all around, but even in the eight-inch stuff it has not been made wide enough to dress eight inches, all around, and you will find in the center of the sticks it is only six inches. There is no walling put on, the piling is being irregularly driven, so that they could not construct the work according to the plans I made. The piles are all zigzag, some out and some in. I saw several while there that were cut more than three-quarters through in order to line up the face of the piling and they are no good that way for if any pressure comes against those piles away goes the [?]   the irregular manner in [?]es had been driven and they [?]waling piece at the back of the [?]ng and made a kind of attempt [?]ve it into the piles, but it was the [?]test looking thing you ever saw. The rest of it was tacked in by a couple of nails, just nailed up. Now the piles were specified to be not less than twelve inches on the head and eight inches at the bottom. Seventy per cent of those piles don't run over nine inches on the head.

GERALDINE TALKS OF PILING.

Kountze—You made a remark, Mr. Shaw, a minute ago that the work is not done as you intended to do it.

Shaw—That is right, sir.

Kountze—Did you intend to do the work otherwise than called for by the specifications?

Shaw—As called for in the plans and specifications.

Kountze—Then you state that the work as done now by Creedon & Mahoney is not done according to the specifications.

Shaw—It may be according to the new specifications, but not according to the ones we bid on.

Kountze—How is that, Mr. Geraldine?

Geraldine—The only difference in the work as done now and as originally intended is what has been shown in the explanation I have given, with the exception that the piling is set uniformly ten feet apart. In the original design it was intended to be various distances apart, 9 feet 8 inches, 7 feet 8 inches, and in the very high portions 6 feet 8 inches. In going over the work I found that to be unnecessary; that there was sufficient strength without putting the piling in so numerously, and put it in uniformly ten feet apart. Don't know just what the difference would be, but probably would be twenty or thirty piles in all.

Kountze—What is there in this matter that Mr. Shaw claims, that the piles were so indifferently driven that in order to straighten up that work it was necessary to cut the piles down to such a condition that they lost their usefulness?

Geraldine—That statement is untrue. It is either the result of ignorance or willful falsehood.

Shaw—I would be glad to take you and show you Thursday, or your representative, where I saw the piles. I know where to go for them and Mr. Connolley was with me.

Geraldine—In driving this piling, you understand it is necessary to get it back to the proper facing and up from the wall somewhat, and in driving the piling at the bottom of the wall, as in this case, the displacement was greater at the front side on the level bottom of the ditch than against the high wall, and of course the inclination of the pile would be to go that way. Now, it is difficult to get the piling exactly lined in driving, so that sometimes to put a pile in the proper place it was necessary to incline it somewhat. Then when we come to put on the anchors the pile was drawn into line by being drawn into place. If it was too far this way it was turned with a jack and if it was too far at the bottom it was cut off.

Kountze—How many were too far at the bottom?

Geraldine—Very few. There was one pile set so far out that the box above it would nearly cut the pile off to bring it to line. After they had done this work I ordered them to remove the box because from its location the remaining part was sufficiently strong, and it was totally unnecessary to have anything more and it left a better finished job, by far, to cut it off. But the factor of safety provided in this anchorage is very high. It is probable, if it was not for the great length of waling, one pile every eighteen or twenty feet would be sufficient, but in order to get it absolutely safe and sufficiently strong I put the piling every ten feet.

Kountze—Have you anything further to state as to this?

MUCH MORE BAD WORK.

Shaw—I was just going to say this, that a lot of those piles were driven down below the level of the coping. I don't know how many, but a lot of them. And there were little pieces, maybe two inches thick, put on the top to bring it up to the level of the coping. In one case I saw two or three pieces put on the under side of the coping. The whole strain, if any of that clay should move at all, the whole strain comes on the coping and it is held ther​ by a little two-inch nail going into the pile. Those were specified to be wood lag screws and there was to have been none of those packing pieces at all. I will say this, that it is a very dangerous thing to have.

Geraldine—At one point on the lagoon there were several piles driven below the required level, but they were not driven below the point of anchorage.

Kountze—Not below the point that the pile is anchored back?

Geraldine—No; in these cases I authorized the spiking of pieces on the top and pieces of planking were put on the top and spiked on and the coping was spiked to that. Now, the coping goes in this manner. (Describes coping from drawing.)

Kountze—What is the fact, Mr. Geraldine, about using the spikes instead of lag screws, as Mr. Shaw says the specifications called for?

Geraldine—The specifications called for lag screws when we designed to put the waling on in this manner, on the front. There is the end of the waling, and there is the lag screw holding it to the pile. In this case all the protection the sheet piling would have would be the hold of those lag screws in the soft pile. In the other case the waling is put in in this manner, mortised from the back side, so that it cannot move forward without bringing the piling with it. In the other case it would only be necessary for it to pull the lag screws. This is the more expensive method.

Kountze—What is the fact in regard to fastening the piling to the coping. Would it be possible to drive that piling in in the manner which Mr. Shaw spoke of?

Geraldine—No, sir?

Kountze—The manner of your construction would not allow the catastrophe that Mr. Shaw indicated here?

Geraldine—No, sir. Let me state that is this was loose earth with its natural slope, instead of the solid bank that it is, the pile is strong enough to hold it. I was obliged to figure against the thrust of a loose bank of earth for this reason, that in the freezing and thawing this winter a portion of the bank might be sluffed​ off in that manner and the piling forced to receive the entire thrust of that loose earth. Therefore, I provided for that. I found in looking over Mr. Shaw's drawings that he had designated only ten feet to put these anchors back. Now, the natural incline of a sluffed​ bank of loose earth would come in this manner to the bottom of the lagoon and would go beyond where he proposed to place the anchors. For that reason I changed his plans, putting the anchor piles further back.

Shaw—You will find it further in the longer piles.

Geraldine—That is correct, but it is not sufficient in the short piles. The anchor, to be safe, should go beyond the point at which the earth would crumble if it was loose; otherwise it would be no protection.

SHAW PRESENTS FIGURES.

Shaw—I figured, gentlemen, that the lumber which was being saved from the method in which the work has been constructed and the plans we bid on are as follows: On the backstays there is 21,333 feet. On the short sheeting—that is to say, they did not put it down two feet and six inches—that it amounts to 15,000 feet, and if it had been two feet it would have been more. For the coping, it was originally 4x12 and it is now 4x8.

Kountze—I understood you, Mr. Geraldine, to say that it was 4x10 reduced to 4x8.

Geraldine—The specifications show it.

Kountze—It would have taken twelve-inch lumber, then, would it, to give you the curve and finish ten?

Geraldine—Yes, on the curve. On the straight there would be nothing cut away.

Shaw—The saving on the coping is 6,664 feet. The waling, instead of being 3x8, is 3x6 and that saves 1,666 feet. The mortise and tenon are only three-eighths of an inch and I don't think they are much good. You might just as well have straight joints. The plan shows them an inch and the saving on that alone is 5,1016 feet, making a total, with the cutting of a foot off the sheet piling, of 49,679 feet, and if you cut another foot off, which I believe it will stand, it is close to 60,000 feet.

Kountze—Mr. Shaw, in your bid of $7,800 did you bid on a different specification from that on which Creedon & Mahoney bid?

Shaw—I don't know. We bid on the specifications that were there for the bidders.

Kountze—Was there more than one specification?

Shaw—I don't know. I prepared the specifications myself and Mr. Geraldine looked them over and altered some things in them.

Kountze—Mr. Geraldine, was this piling which Mr. Shaw claims he figured on a foot longer than that which Mr. Creedon furnished?

Geraldine—The sheet piling?

Kountze—Yes, sir.

Geraldine—No, sir; Mr. Creedon furnished the same length of piling that the original plan called for. This is the sheet piling, you understand, that I ordered from the Cady Lumber company, and was the piling actually used. That was ordered and the estimate made on the first plans.

Kountze—And was of the same length that Mr. Shaw bid on?

Geraldine—Yes, sir; that is, you understand that there is very little of this that was put in full length. It was ordered in long lengths and short. A great deal of the piling was cut at ten feet, eleven feet, twelve feet, and thirteen feet, according to the depth of the lagoon, or rather according to the depth of the bank.

Kountze—Was there a different class of lengths furnished by Creedon & Mahoney than was contemplated in the original plan upon which Mr. Shaw claims that the original bid of $7,900 and subsequently $7,800 was made?

Geraldine—No; that was ordered before the distance of eighteen inches was decided upon for sinking the piling. The greater portion of it was driven to the full depth and some lower, so that this piling is driven on an average more than two feet.

Kountze—The piling that is now in?

Geraldine—In some places, there is a curtain location where it is short, where in cutting the lengths of piling to get the required slant that it was short and only went in the ground sixteen inches. I found some that only went in sixteen inches, but there were very few pieces and in that case we required very careful work in the puddling and tamping to avoid leaking rather than incur the delay of waiting for more lumber.

THOUGHT SOMETHING WAS WRONG.

Kountze—Creedon & Mahoney were offered that lumber? Shaw was not offered the lumber, or Shaw & Connolley? Now what was the advantage to Mr. Creedon in getting the benefit of your contract over what Mr. Connolley could have bought the lumber for?

Geraldine—None, whatever. What Mr. Connolley could have bought the lumber for I don't know. As to what the lumber would have been furnished in the market for, giving Mr. Creedon an advantage, when I asked Mr. Creedon what price he had figured on for lumber, he quoted a price lower than he actually paid for what he used.

Kountze—Mr. Shaw, you say the price quoted to you for white pine for this work, tongued and grooved, was $18?

Shaw—Yes, sir.

Kountze—Who was your man who was offering the lumber?

Shaw—The Wyatt-Bullard company.

Kountze—Did you try any of the other lumbermen?

Shaw—I don't know whether Connolley did or not, I did not. I was going to say, gentlemen, that in addition to the lumber bill I have given you, there will be fully forty-five piles saved in that job.

Kountze—What was the value of each pile driven?

Shaw—Oh, it was worth a dollar, anyway; at least that. And the bolts were done away with, and I figured up that the price of that wire and putting it on would not cost as much as the bolts and boring of the holes for putting the bolts in.

Kountze—Mr. Shaw, wasn't Mr. Connolley informed that the change had been made substituting wire instead of wood, and that he bid with that in view?

Shaw—I will tell you honestly, I don't believe it, because Mr. Connolley and I, the first information we knew of it, was when we went up into Mr. Geraldine's room there to look up the sewer contract. We walked in to the draughtsman's table and there was the plan with this new section on it, showing this wire and everything else that we had never seen before; never knew a thing about it before. That is what made us begin to think there was something wrong.

Kountze—That is, you did not know when you put in your revised bid that this wire binding to the stay-tie was to be used instead of wood?

Shaw—We did not. Did not know it. Was never thought of at the time. All the alteration that we bid on was to cut that trench two feet and drive six inches, instead of driving two feet six inches. That was the only thing we ever knew about the alteration of the plan.

Geraldine—The statement is untrue; absolutely false.

Bidwell—Your dealer bid on white pine lumber at $18 a thousand, and that was the basis of your bid of $7,800? If you had known that you could have bought lumber, white pine lumber, tongued and grooved, for $14.50, would that have made a difference of $3.50 per thousand on your bid?

Shaw—Yes, sir. We bid on the basis of $800 profit on that bid of $7,900.

Bidwell—If, as a matter of fact, you had called for a bid from Mr. Hoagland and had received an offer to furnish this lumber, white pine lumber tongued and grooved, at $14.50 instead of $18, you would have reduced your bid that much?

Shaw—Yes, sir. We were content with that margin of profit and we could have reduced our bid.

Bidwell—As a matter of fact Hoagland did offer to furnish the offer for that money?

Shaw—He did, but we did not know it.

Rosewater—Were you aware that this work was to be done in yellow pine, could you have taken that contract at that time and filled it by September 10, as proposed, in yellow pine if that had been accepted?

Shaw—We could not get the Wyatt-Bullard company to say that they could get us the stuff in time to finish the job. We had an option to bid on yellow pine, but we did not do it.

Rosewater—And you did not know anything about the purchase the exposition made from the other lumber company and that was turned over to Mahoney & Creedon?

Shaw—Did not know a thing about it, neither Mr. Connolley nor myself.

PURCHASE, BUT NO CONTRACT.

Rosewater—I want Mr. Geraldine to state as far as he knows, expressed in quantity by feet, of lumber purchased by the exposition and turned over to Creedon & Mahoney.

Geraldine—I don't recollect. I judge it was about 170,000 feet.

Kountze—Mr. Geraldine, in order to make that point clear, did the association buy any lumber and pay for it, or did they simply make a contract for lumber and transfer the contract to Creedon & Mahoney?

Geraldine—They made a contract for lumber and transferred the contract.

Kountze—They never made the purchase? They never received the lumber themselves?

Geraldine—No, sir.

Kountze—But they did make a contract by which they were to take a certain quantity of lumber, and that contract was referred to Creedon & Mahoney, and that was probably 175,000 feet?

Geraldine—Yes, sir; in that vicinity.

Rosewater—Now, you have that contract?

Geraldine—There was no contract. It was a verbal order, and a pencil memorandum of the amount of lumber required.

Rosewater—Have you no agreement in writing by which the lumber company fixed the price in writing at which that lumber was to be delivered for the exposition?

Geraldine—No, sir.

Rosewater—You stated that the lumber was bought at $14.50 per thousand?

Geraldine—Yes.

Rosewater—Was that all the lumber used in that lagoon?

Geraldine—No, sir.

Rosewater—How much other lumber was there used?

Geraldine—I should judge that—I don't know how much. The contractor had to get more—probably 20,000 feet. I don't know.

Rosewater—Is that also yellow pine from the same yard?

Geraldine—Furnished by the same people.

Rosewater—So that, all in all, there would have been 195,000 feet used in the lagoon in its construction?

Geraldine—Somewhere in the vicinity of 200,000 feet.

 

Rosewater—Now you stated that the piles and the driving of the piling was $779?

Geraldine—Yes.

Rosewater—That, with the lumber got, was all the material used in the lagoon, was it not, and included the labor of driving the piles?

Geraldine—I do not know as I understand your question.

Rosewater—The piles driven by our own people and bought by the exposition, together with 195,000 feet of lumber which Creedon & Mahoney purchased and supplied, was all the material used in that lagoon, was it not?

Geraldine—No, I think not.

Rosewater—What was there besides? I am talking of material now.

Geraldine—There were cables for anchoring the posts, the nails and the white lead or paint that was used.

Rosewater—How much white lead was used?

Geraldine—I do not know. It was put on the west end of the lagoon for about half or two-thirds the distance around.

Rosewater—I notice that in this bill (I presume it is receipted) the amount charged as the cost of piles is $345.89 and the labor is $419.40. In round figures, then, the labor which the exposition has bought is equal to $400. Now, Mr. Geraldine, you stated yesterday that Connolley offered to do the labor for $2,800. Is that correct?

Geraldine—I think his bid shows that.

Rosewater—Did that include the work of pile driving and completing all that work?

Geraldine—His bid will explain.

Rosewater—I have not examined the bid, and I want to know that because I want a clear idea of it.

ADDITIONS AND DEDUCTIONS.

Geraldine—Yes, I think his bid included all the labor.

Rosewater—So that, deducting what you have paid already, say $400, there would have been only $2,300 to add for Mr. Connolley if he had done that work under his bid?

Geraldine—I think there is about $80 of that that was paid for the use of the pile driver or for repairing.

Rosewater—Is that charged to the labor?

Geraldine—I think so. It is included in the complete work.

Rosewater—The reduction was about $80? That would make the computation of labor equal to $2,380, the whole labor. I am talking about separating the materials from the labor. The 135,000 feet at $14.50 per 1,000 would be equal to $2,827.50. To that should be added for piles and pile driving together $779.93, and the estimated labor for which it could be done or bought of Connolley we would put at being equal to $2,380. I want to ask now how much, in round figures, the value of the white lead, the nails and the anchoring yould​ be in round figures?

Geraldine—About $400.

Rosewater—We will place that at $400. But you are aware, I suppose, that only a very small part of the work was leaded?

Geraldine—No, I didn't say so.

Rosewater—That is the way it is represented to me.

Geraldine—I did not represent it so.

Rosewater—Very well; we have then a general computation as regards what the cost of this work would have been had the exposition bought the material as it had originally done so, paid for all the labor and completed the work on its own account. Did this bid of Connolley's of $2,800 include the original specifications or was it on the modified specifications?

Geraldine—Will you repeat the question?

Rosewater—Was the bid of $2,800, for labor, made by Connolley on the original specifications or on the revised specifications?

Geraldine—On the modified and revised specifications.

Rosewater—Now the contract that was made by this exposition right here does not show anything as to the depth of the sheet piling to be driven or the changes that were made, does it?

Geraldine—All that is shown on the plans. In lieu of driving the sheet piling as shown in specifications, the contractor is allowed the option of sinking a trench one foot in depth and not more than five inches wide on the line of said piling, the piling to be driven six inches below the bottom of this trench.

Rosewater—Now, was there any change made in this contract at all? I mean, this is the contract exactly as it was made, is it not? No change made after that?

Geraldine—No, sir.

Rosewater—In here it says the material to be used was to be white pine; was no change made?

Geraldine—That was explained last night. If the committee wishes me to go over the ground again, I will do it.

Rosewater—I have examined this today and the specifications call for white pine clearly.

Kountze—I believe the reasons were given last evening why yellow pine was substituted for white pine. If it is material Mr. Geraldine can state it again.

Rosewater—It will probably appear, then, because you will have a copy of all that was said.

CONCERNING PINE LUMBER.

Geraldine—Perhaps a little more enlightenment on that might be well. Mr. Rosewater stated that the specifications called for white pine, clear. Sheet piling to be of white pine, sound, free from sap, loose knots, shakes or cracks. That is not clear. Clear white pine would be worth from $18 per 1,000 feet upward, as near as I can recollect. In order to get clear white pine it would have to be made a special order, which would take considerable time to fill. It could not be dried by steam, as the southern pine is dried, because they do not use that process in the north, and to air dry it properly would take a month. Besides it would be too expensive and the only advantage gained in using this clear white pine would be its durability. Now, No. 1 yellow pine, which is under the same classifications here, the restrictions as to quality are more severe and it is a better class of material as far as defects are concerned. And after specifying white pine and looking up the matter very thoroughly I found, as before stated, that it was undesirable to use it at all and at the time I settled the question it was out of consideration altogether. We considered it at all times, as appears in the form of bid as given to contractors to bid on, in which they were requested to bid on yellow pine. Now, there may be some misunderstanding as to the prices quoted here last night.

Wells—If it was understood that they were bidding on yellow pine, why was the contract filled in calling for white pine?

Geraldine—The specifications as first prepared called for white pine.

Wells—I understand this is the contract made subsequently.

Geraldine—In the contract it does appear, but in correcting the old specifications first made that was overlooked and was not taken out. But it was not considered at any time and these bids will show you that we took the figures on yellow pine as the basis of the bid. Now, for instance, here is Creedon & Mahoney's bid. Notice in the tabulation of the bids we give their figures as $8,161. That is the figure on yellow pine, as you will notice by the tabulation, and in the other tabulations we took the figures on yellow pine only; did not consider the figures on white pine quoted; no intention of using it, and there was not a contractor who figured on this work or talked about it afterward but what thoroughly understood that yellow pine was what we intended to use.

Wells—May I ask you whether it was understood by Connolley that he was to use yellow pine?

Geraldine—Yes, sir, and he bid on yellow pine. His last proposition was on yellow pine.

Wells—That was the proposition under which the contract was let?

Geraldine—Yes, sir.

Rosewater—Are you not mistaken about that? I asked you whether you were not mistaken about that statement that Connolley's bid was on yellow pine.

Geraldine—I have made that statement distinctly here several times, and I am not apt to be mistaken in a positive statement of that kind.

Rosewater—You made the statement here also that this purchase was made of the Cady Lumber company with the idea that we were saving $1.50, or about that, per thousand?

Geraldine—I made what statement?

Rosewater—Was it not stated to the board at your instance that we were saving at least $1.50 per thousand in purchasing that lumber?

Geraldine—It was stated by you that I had said so, but it was not true. I did not make that statement.

Rosewater—You did not make that statement to Mr. Kirkendall? Mr. Kirkendall invented that story?

EVADES THE QUESTION.

Geraldine—Now there seems to be a misunderstanding in regard to that matter as far as Mr. Kirkendall is concerned in it which I wish to make clear to the committee. In my written statement here, if you have read it over, you will recollect I stated that the bids were opened and rejected. I explained to Mr. Kirkendall that it would be wise to order this lumber in order to get it under way, as I wished to get a perfectly clear quality of lumber, the best we could get of yellow pine. I wished to have it specially prepared, on a tongue and groove design I would furnish. I wished to have it thoroughly dried by steam, wished to get a perfect quality, and I wished to have it sawed one-quarter of an inch thicker than the regular stock, in order to get the fullest strength of the three-inch plank. I said that in order to get this special order through in time it would be necessary to order it now, at the time. I also stated that if I put that in the specifications or asked the contractor to furnish material of that particular kind it would probably add two or three—if I remembered correctly, add considerably to their figures in estimating, while I believed, and corroborated that belief by calling up the Cady Lumber company (he and the representative of the wholesalers at Kansas City came to the office and discussed the matter there) that they would furnish this lumber on that special order for $14.50 per thousand. To get that lumber ordinarily or get it through a contractor's bid would probably cost $2 or $3 more on a special order. But by ordering it now and getting what we wanted at that figure, which was the common price, it would be a considerable advantage to the exposition and would make a material difference in the cost of the work as compared with calling for new specifications. The saving to the exposition company was there. It is possible Mr. Kirkendall may not have gotten that idea clearly, or he may have expressed as a saving to the exposition of $1.50 per thousand, which would be correct, but not in the market price of lumber; but in the quality and dimension.

Rosewater—Was that lumber planed on both sides?

Geraldine—No, sir.

Rosewater—What was the dimension of that lumber when delivered here at the lagoon?

Geraldine—Scant three inches.

Rosewater—I will now bring in a gentleman and present you with a sample of the lumber to show the board just what we did get. I will introduce Mr. Mulhall, who was formerly employed for a great many years in Mr. Hoagland's lumber yard.

Mulhall—I was in the employ for the last seventeen years or more of Gray, and Mr. Hoagland part of the time.

Kountze—Was Mr. Mulhall brought here as an expert in the lumber business?

Rosewater—No, I told him to go out there and get a piece of that lumber, and I wanted to show him that he went out there and that he compared it with the other lumber in the lagoon as to its size.

Kountze—We will hear what Mr. Mulhall has to say.

Mulhall—All that I have to say is that I measured it and compared it, and that is what I would call one of the best pieces I saw. There were not many pieces around. I was requested to bring in a piece and I was also requested to measure it. I was told it would measure three and one-fourth inches and here it is only two and three-fourths. Another thing I wish to say about it, that for that purpose this lumber is too dry. We sold out of Mr. Hoagland's yard down there; we supplied the bridge company with this kind of lumber for their floor in the Council Bluffs bridge, but it was not tongued or grooved in any shape or form, and the life of it then, even with the sap in, is only from three to four years with the wooden block on top of it, even after being tarred and felt laid on it. And the life of this for the business this is used for out in the lagoon, it is not the kind of material that should be used at all in my estimation for the use against the water there. With the sap in it, it would be a great deal better. The tongue and groove of course is in addition to that, but it would be also better if it was undressed for that purpose, in place of being dressed. And then if it is like what I have seen there in the face of it, it is very knotty and it would not be taken, it would not be allowed, it could not be used for any other purpose except there. I would not call it No. 2 even. It wouldn't be accepted; it could not be sold in any market in the country only at a lower grade than what it is there. That is all I can say.

POOR QUALITY OF LUMBER.

Wells—That is an average piece in thickness?

Mulhall—It is just two and three-quarters as it is now. I took a square from one man and measured it.

Wells—Is that the average?

Mulhall—That is the same thickness of all the lagoon, I went along the edge and took a square and measured the tops of the planks and they all only measure two and three-quarters. I have no interest in the matter in any shape or form, but was simply asked to go out there and asked to bring in a piece for this inspection.

Wells—I understand you to say that that is better than the average?

Mulhall—No, I took a saw, sir, and cut that off a piece that was there.

Wells—Didn't you state that the average lumber there was not as good as this piece?

Mulhall—No, sir, that is, it is not free from knots. But you go along the face of the lagoon down and you will find that the lumber is very knotty and when it dries out a little those knots are apt to loosen and fall out. Then there is another thing in relation to putting it in there in water. These grooves here should have been all leaded. They should at least be painted inside, or white-leaded inside just as they were put in.

Wells—What would be the life of that in the water after being leaded?

Mulhall—I would not swear to it, but I would not put the life in water at over two years, or two and a half, for it is dry and as soon as it takes the water it will rot very quickly. There is no sap in it in any shape or form and when the sap is out of it, in the water it is of no use. It is never used in the market for cisterns or anything of that kind. It is all right for inside work, but where it is exposed to the sun or the weather outside, or water, it soon warps and gets all out of place. It is good enough for flooring inside when it is kiln dried, or anything like that. The majority of this stuff is used to cover areaways or the like of that brick, perhaps, is put on top of it or where there is stone. It is sometimes used to go over sidewalks in areaways.

Kountze—What has been your experience in that class of timber? Have you had any?

Mulhall—Sir?

Kountze—What has been your experience in using this lumber?

Mulhall—No experience, only what I have seen. I have seen it in the bridge, as I say, down here, fully three inches thick, undressed, and I have observed the life of it there, where it is covered with wooden blocks and tarred and tar felt put on it. The life is only from three to four years. None of these firms ever kept a large supply of this on hand, for there is no call for it. Mr. Hoagland supplies the bridge company with it, but he only keeps a small supply on hand.

Kountze—If placed in water would that cause it to decay quicker?

Mulhall—Yes, sir.

Kountze—Have you had any experience?

Mulhall—No experience.

Kountze—Then you do not know, except what you heard?

Mulhall—I never saw any of it used in water in that way.

Kountze—That is simply an impression without any knowledge? It is simply your belief?

Mulhall—It is only a very few years in the market here, inside of the last eight of ten years, that this yellow pine has come into the market at all. Very few of these western firms here carried it until the last eight or ten years and none of this grade   or thickness. It is used now for drop siding and for flooring and inside finishing, but none of it for outside work.

Kountze—Didn't you state that to place that material in the lagoon in the water, that it would last only two years, or three at most?

Mulhall—That would be my opinion, seeing the life of it here in the bridge.

Kountze—You have had no experience with this timber placed in such a position as this is placed, have you?

Mulhall—No, sir.

SAMPLE BETTER THAN AVERAGE.

Bidwell—How does it come that there is no corresponding tenon on this side of that stick?

Mulhall—No what?

Geraldine—It is only a portion of the plank. If it was a full sized sample it would be twelve inches wide.

Bidwell—Why didn't you cut off a piece of the full width?

Mulhall—There was none there. There was not a short piece at all that I could find to cut any off from. There is none around the lagoon that is anywhere near the width of that in the lagoon. This is the only piece I could find. I could have fished out a wet piece, but I had nothing to do it with. I went all around and then borrowed a saw from one of the carpenters to get this. It was the only stick I could find, and as I was asked to bring a piece, I brought it. I measured the others to compare with the thickness of this, and it compares in thickness; is the same thickness all along. It is all two and three-quarters.

Bidwell—That is a fair sample, then, as to the thickness, and you think it is a fair sample as to the quality of the plank?

Mulhall—It is an extra sample as to quality, I would call it. It is better. That is, it looks better than the most of it that is in the lagoon to see the face of it just as it is put up, for you to take this stick all through and it was free from knots, and there is a great deal of it that is knotty. And then it is cracked, just the same as this is.

Geraldine—Do you know whether this is a piece of lumber that was shipped here on the first order, or a piece of the portion that was supplied to fill up the deficiency afterward?

Mulhall—I don't know anything about that. All I know about that is that I went out there today at 2 o'clock and got this on the grounds there; cut it off of a stick that was there and fetched it in.

Wells—I would like to have you state whether the contractors, Creedon & Mahoney, knew at this time that three and one-quarter inch lumber was expected to be used.

Geraldine—They did not. It was not mentioned in the contract.

Wells—What was the date that you made this purchase of the Cady Lumber Company?

Geraldine—The 24th of July the verbal order was given subject to the approval of the committee.

Wells—What was the date of advertising for bids for this work?

Geraldine—I do not remember, but it must have been about ten days prior. I should judge that it was about the 14th that we advertised for bids. Then after advertising for the bids, receiving the bids, finding them too high and recommending their rejection, to prevent further delay, knowing that it would take considerable time to get the lumber, I then recommended the order to be given, with a view to using it if we put the lumber in ourselves or turning it over to a contractor if we contracted the job.

Wells—What was the date, do you remember, these bids were opened?

Geraldine—The 24th of July.

Wells—And five days later, I believe, the contract was let?

Geraldine—The 13th of August the contract was dated. It was some time before that it was let. Now, a word about this lumber. You will find in my written statement I say that this lumber is the best lot of lumber I have handled for years. If the committee wish to be satisfied on that I should suggest that they examine it or send some one on whose evidence or knowledge they can depend. As to the thickness of the lumber, it shows. Yellow pine lumber when it is cut green, prior to the process of drying by steam, will shrink under that process on a three-inch plank ordinarily a quarter of an inch. This lumber, I should judge from examining it when it came, at the time it was run into the steamer and kilned would have measured fully three inches. When it came here I measured numerous pieces of it. It measured scant three inches. Scant three inches in anything over two and seven-eighths inches. The ordinary lumber put through the same process, of the ordinary dimension, that this has gone through would measure a quarter of an inch less. That is the difference that was to be made in the sawing.

Kountze—Then would I infer from that, Mr. Geraldine, that this beam, two and three-quarter inches, is not a piece of the lumber that was taken under the first contract?

CANNOT ANSWER THIS.

Geraldine—I am not prepared to say whether it is or not.

Kountze—This measures only 2¾ inches?

Geraldine—That is all. I could not say whether that was the lumber that was used to fill out with or whether it was a piece of the original stock.

Kountze—Was there any difference in the thickness between the lumber that was given under the contract made by you and that which was furnished to supply the deficiency?

Geraldine—Unfortunately, there was about a quarter of an inch.

Kountze—Then the lumber in the lagoon is not all of a thickness? It is either heavier or lighter?

Geraldine—There are two classes in the lagoon, one thicker than the other. I an inclined to think that that is a piece of the original order. I do not know whether it is or not. I cannot say. But it has been very thoroughly sundried after being steamed and is shrunk to its smallest contraction.

Kountze—Now, Mr. Mulhall stated that that lumber in water, as it would be placed in the lagoon, the life of it would be only two or three years. Have you any experience with lumber of that class under those conditions?

Geraldine—Yes, sir; I have handled yellow pine lumber and used it in engineering works for a great many years, used it as long as twenty years. This lumber placed in that lagoon as it is now will last for ten years in the water. It will last longer. There was a prejudice, and there is yet a prejudice against the use of yellow pine in this country, which was promulgated and encouraged by those interested in the sale of white pine, and it only came into this trade when white pine became so scarce as to give it the advantage. Being used more and more every year, that prejudice is fast disappearing.

Rosewater—I want to ask Mr. Wakefield, as he is an old lumberman and understands, I want to ask him whether this sized lumber is what is classed as three-inch measure lumber. It has been stated here that this lumber originally was 3¼ inches; that it has been ordered as such and delivered as such, but it is now 2¾ inches. Now, what do you know as to the probable shrinking and planking?

Wakefield—I have no means of knowing what it originally was, but if it is 2¾ inches it need not have been over 3 inches to dress 2¾. But if 3-inch lumber were ordered without any further designation, that is to say, 3-inch lumber, dressed on one side, then it would come 2 5-8 thick, because 2-inch lumber comes 1 5-8 and 3-inch lumber would come 2 5-8.

Geraldine—After what kind of a drying process?

Wakefield—Either air drying or steam drying.

Geraldine—Did you ever handle any steam dried?

Wakefield—Yes, sir.

Geraldine—And was it thoroughly dried?

Wakefield—Yes, sir.

Geraldine—What did you find the shrinkage to be in a three-inch plank?

Wakefield—I could not say, because I did not handle it until after it was dried and dressed, and then it came to me. Then, I say, a two-inch plank, as it comes to this market, after being dried and then dressed, measures one and five-eighths inches.

Geraldine—Shrinks three-eighths of an inch.

Wakefield—Three-eighths. Whether it shrinks or it is the dressing I cannot say.

Geraldine—That is two-inch.

Wakefield—Yes, sir. If you would order a three-inch plank dressed one side without further designation than just that order you would not get it thicker than two and five-eighths inches. If it had to be a special thickness it would have to be so specified.

Geraldine—On three inches there would be a greater shrinkage than on two inches, and you say—

Wakefield—I don't say anything about shrinkage. I say what two-inch lumber is in this market or what three-inch lumber will be in this market.

Geraldine—Is the ordinary stock lumber that comes from the south dried by steam before shipping?

Wakefield—Most of it is either air dried or steam dried. You would not on a special order, as this would be, ordering a lot of specially cut stuff to be shipped in a specially short time, it would not permit of the drying process to a sufficient extent to get the shrinkage out of it.

ON DRYING LUMBER.

Geraldine—How long would it take to thoroughly dry it by steam?

Wakefield—By steam? Well, it would not take so long by steam. you can dry it by steam in twenty-four to thirty-six hours of you have the proper process. A three-inch plank it would take five days.

Geraldine—I wish to state of this lumber, that there was not any of it in the kiln less than two weeks. Ten days was first decided the manufacturers time but they kept it in for that length of time. I wish to explain something about steam drying. You can take yellow pine lumber as it comes from the mill, put it in a southern steam drier and dry it so severely as to greatly deteriorate its strength. You can dry it rapidly or dry it slowly by steam. By drying it slowly and thoroughly you maintain the strength, don't destroy the fiber, but you give it greater strength. That was what I called for in this case.

Wakefield—That statement is correct.

Kountze—Have you any knowledge, Mr. Wakefield, of the life of yellow pine lumber in washed earth and in water?

Wakefield—Some little. My experience has not been very extensive.

Kountze—What would be your judgment of a piece of yellow pine lumber, dried as that is, in water?

Wakefield—In water it will last twelve or fifteen years, at least. The place where it would decay the quickest in my judgment would be, if the water was kept at a certain stationary height, at that point and higher up is where it would decay the quickest; not under the water.

Kountze—What would be the difference in time it would be likely to decay between the green pine, not dried, and dried pine? Which would decay the quickest?

Wakefield—There would not be any difference about that.

Kountze—One would decay as soon as the other?

Wakefield—I think so. I don't think there would be any difference about that. But if you were going to make a tight piling, of course it is better to have it dry when it is put in, because then the absorption of the water and the consequential swelling would make it perfectly tight and keep it tight. Whereas, if it was full of water when it was put in there would be no room for swelling to make the joints swell tight and remain tight.

Wells—In your judgment, should that groove have been cemented?

Wakefield—Now, Mr. Wells, that is a question in practical politics that I don't feel competent to testify on.

Geraldine—I would like to furnish an explanation. On the west end of the lagoon there is a variety of soils and substratums. At the extreme west end I found the soil black to a great depth, in fact, we never got to the bottom of the black soil, and near the bottom we found a composition where it was turning into black gumbo. Further up, at the east side of the basin, we found there had been a heavy fill made in some places and a variety of conditions. I was doubtful to some extent as to whether I could make that soil hold water or not, and I therefore desired in putting in the piling to make that watertight if possible. For that reason I specified paint in the tongues and grooves.

Wells—At the west end?

Geraldine—I specified it in the contract without reference to how far it should go. I was disposed, if I found it necessary, to use it the whole length. Took more pains to drive the sheet piling at the west end closely together and to use nothing but what was as near perfect as possible, and to see that the joints were well painted. I did not succeed in that very well—as well as I expected. The idea of putting paint or white lead between the joints is to pull them close enough together so they do not separate at all and glue them—cause them to adhere to one another. Now, my idea in that was to get that work done as quickly as I possibly could, get the water in it as quickly thereafter as possible and start those planks swelling by the action of the water as soon as I possibly could. I was defeated in that by several causes. The railroad construction was interrupted and the lumber failed to arrive that was expected. We had to stop work on this sheet piling many times to wait for lumber, which the Cady Lumber Company was trying hard to get up here, but was defeated in delivering owing to the famine of cars. Now, when we got out of that part of the work and further up the lagoon, fully one-half the distance, lineal feet, I found that the clay that we were puddling and packing hard behind the sheet piling, it was satisfactory to me—it was watertight. I saw no further use for using the lead or paint, because it did not seem to effect the purpose I was after, and I did not think it would be necessary. So I discontinued the use of the paint.

KOUNTZE TELLS OF THE SOIL.

Kountze—I will explain here in regard to the soil, having owned that property for a long while, that when I first knew that territory up there the west end of the lagoon was a swamp, commonly known as a slough, and at times was entirely immpassable​; could not drive through it. As you went further east it was at a greater elevation and the soil was good. About the time of platting Kountze Place I graded a good many of the streets and the surplus earth that I had was filled about half way between Twentieth street and Twenty-fourth street, and that accounts for that loose earth that you encountered going through there.

Geraldine—Yes, to counteract that effect I had pure clay drawn by wagons and strung along the lagoon to fill in back of the piles and tamped.

Rosewater—The specifications call that white lead shall be liberally applied to the tongue and groove joints before driving. Now, you stated that it had been omitted in the actual work to a considerable extent. To what extent has it been omitted or what proportion of it?

Geraldine—Approximately one half.

Rosewater—Was there any reduction made for the white lead and the work from the contract price?

Geraldine—We settled at the contract price. In the construction of this work the contractor was required to do more than the contract calls for. The exposition company was responsible for the delivery of the lumber and the contractor was obliged to stop several times to wait for it. At the east end of the work the foreman for the contractor put the waling and caps on the sheet piling that was driven against the back walls and terraces. It now stands there. It was not a part of the contract. The contractor had several claims of that kind which were discussed and considered and finally agreed to settle the matter by settling at the contract price. I deducted nothing for the omission of the paint and he received nothing for the extra work that his men did or the expensive delay caused by our failure to deliver the lumber.

Rosewater—Were these facts reported to the executive committee or to Mr. Kirkendall?

Geraldine—No, sir, they were discussed verbally with Mr. Wattles, who was acting manager of the department at that time, but no written report was made.

Rosewater—I want to call Mr. Connolly.

Rosewater—You were one of the bidders for the work on the lagoon?

Connolly—Yes, sir, I was one of the bidders.

 

Rosewater—And you submitted a bid under the first advertisement for the lagoon?

Connolly—Yes, sir.

Rosewater—And that bid, with all the others, was rejected.

Connolly—Yes, sir. That is, I was told it was rejected.

Rosewater—After your first bid was rejected did Mr. Geraldine ask you to make a revised bid, and on what conditions?

Connolly—Yes, sir; he did. I called on Mr. Geraldine, I believe it was the following day, or probably the second day, to ascertain who was the low bidder on this work, and he told me at that time that I was not. He said for me to make up another bid, and he asked me for a bid on what I would do to provide all the labor for driving the piles and sheet piling, provided that the exposition company would furnish the materials. He also asked me at that time to make another bid, to bid in another way. That is, the same way really, only instead of driving the sheet pile two feet six inches in depth, to dig a trench around the lagoon and set the piling, the sheet piling, into this trench and drive them six inches. Instead of two feet six inches, just drive them six inches, and what my figures would be on that basis. I did that. So he also asked me at that time to make a bid between the difference in yellow pine and white pine. I told him then I did not think I could give him a bid on yellow pine, for the simple reason that I could not get any figures from the lumber dealers to guarantee to me that they would deliver the lumber by September 10. I told him if I was not pinned down to the 10th day of September then I thought I could give him a reasonable figure. But he warned me at that time to do nothing unless I could stand by it, and I concluded I would not do that, because the lumber people claimed they could not get it here. I put a bid in on it that was probably a little high, but I could not furnish the lumber at that figure.

NO TALK OF CHANGES.

Rosewater—If you had been given to the 20th day of September could you have done that work?

Connolly—Yes, sir; I could. One week was all I wanted on the yellow pine and on the white pine there was no question about doing the labor in that time, because I had lots of time and time to spare.

Rosewater—When you made your second bid did you complete your bid and make your estimates on the original plans and specifications, excepting so far as you have stated here in relation to the depth to which the sheet piling was to be driven?

Connolly—Yes, sir. There was no other plans or specifications to bid from at that time, only the original, only just this verbal conversation that Mr. Geraldine and I had about digging a trench. That was the only difference at that time. There was no difference in the specifications or plans.

Kountze—There were no other modifications at this time between you and Mr. Geraldine than simply the question of digging the trench and setting the sheet piling instead of driving it?

Connolly—No, sir; there were no other modifications of the contract considered or spoken of. Not at that time nor any other time. The only difference was that originally the sheet piling was to be driven two feet and six inches and in this a trench was to be dug and the piles were to be driven six inches—set in the trench and driven six inches.

Kountze—There was nothing said about any other changes, nothing said about using yellow pine, nothing said about the manner of tying the piling back with wire, as was done?

Connolly—No, sir; no indeed.

Kountze—No drawing to show?

Connolly—No drawing. No sir; I will tell you when I found that out. The plans were identically as drawn at that time.

Kountze—Being no difference whateevr​, excepting as to the matter of the trench?

Connolly—Yes, sir; just the trench. The only difference was in driving the piling, or in setting in the trench and then driving six inches.

Kountze—And your bid in the second instance was for setting the piles in the trench as indicated by Mr. Geraldine, and driving them six inches?

Connolly—Yes, sir. There was both ways. I bid to do the work according to the plans and specifications as originally drawn, and also on that bid, then put in another bid, really as one bid, stating that if allowed to dig this trench and set the piles in there and drive them six inches, that I would knock off $700.

Kountze—Are you quite sure, now, that your bid provided for that?

Connolly—Am I sure? Yes, sir.

Kountze—For the driving of the piles six inches?

Connolly—Well, now, as far as driving the piles I don't know. Probably it was not in the bid, but that was the instruction that Mr. Geraldine gave me, and according to that instruction I bid. If it is not in there it was meant for that. There was no way to get out of it at all. That was the instruction very explicitly laid down by Mr. Geraldine.

Kountze—It does not appear in your bid.

Connolly—It doesn't? Well, that was the intent of the bid. The object was in driving them six inches; there is a bevel on the piling so that when you drive it this bevel will wedge it up against the next pile as it comes into the ground.

Kountze—Your bid explicitly provides that it was not driven. If sheet piling is allowed to be set in the trench instead of being driven, deduct $700.

Connolly—Instead of being driven two feet and six inches.

Kountze—You don't so explain it in the bid.

Connolly—The plans and specifications do. I bid from the plans and specifications. My bid reads, I believe, "according to plans and specifications," and the plans and specifications provide for that.

PROVISIONS OF THE BID.

Rosewater—Did you have at any time when you were making out your bid, or after delivering it, any information that there would be any change made in the plans and specifications over those in the plans on which you bid $7,100?

Connolly—No, sir. I had no indication whatever, or any idea, that there would be any change made.

Rosewater—Your bid for labor as you made it included all the labor and included also the driving of the piles, did it not?

Connolly—My bid provided for driving the mainstay piles, driving the sheet piling, driving the backstay piles and performing all the labor that was attached to the job complete. And my bid for the labor, if the sheet piling was driven two feet and six inches, if I recollect it right, my bid was $2,800. But if the sheet piling was allowed to be set in a trench, which was to be excavated two feet, and driven six inches, then my price on the labor was $2,100, making a difference in that trench of $700 for labor for me.

Kountze—Mr. Connolly, you have a foot note here in your bid. Will you please explain it? You say, the timber to be delivered to me on railroad in the exposition grounds?

Connolly—Providing that the exposition would furnish me the material I would perform the labor and they were to deliver the timber to me on the ground. If I was to do the labor and not furnish the material, then I wanted the lumber delivered to me there, but if I had got the contract for furnishing the labor and lumber then I would have to provide my own material. But that provides that if the exposition company would award me the contract for performing the labor I would expect them to furnish the lumber to me at the track at the grounds.

Bidwell—That foot note, then, applies to your bid for $2,800 and not to your bid of $7,800?

Connolly—That is all. To the $2,800 and the $2,100. Just for the labor.

Kountze—Was the question of the trench determined at the time that you made this bid? That is, that it should be only a foot in depth and six inches driven, or was that done after?

Connolly—No, at no time. The only difference was, Mr. Geraldine told me the day I was in his office that if he allowed a trench to be excavated two feet in depth what deduction will you make from your original bid? That was all. He told me to make a bid on that basis, that we dig a trench two feet deep and set our sheet piling in there and drive them six inches, to keep them solid and fast at the bottom; that is all.

Rosewater—If you had been allowed to furnish white pine on the specifications as they were executed out here, could you have made any material deduction from the price that you did make? You know what has been done out there?

Connolly—Yes, sir.

Rosewater—And you know what the difference is between the work as done now by Creedon & Mahoney and the way you were bidding? If you had been allowed to bid for the work as it is now done, have you any idea what difference it would be in value and what deduction you would have made from your original bid?

Connolly—Well, now, I could figure it up in a moment. I would say (this is not as near as I could give it exactly) that I could have made $700 difference.

Rosewater—Seven hundred dollars difference in what? In the price you quoted the second time or the first time? You made the total amount of work and total amount of material at $7,900 in white pine on your first bid. Now, you mean you would have done it for $7,200 with white pine, the way it stands there now?

Connolly—Yes, sir, I do. Yes, sir, I believe even I could go lower than that. I tell you, gentleman, I would have been glad to deduct $18 a thousand for every thousand feet of lumber that was saved on that job, and still I would have a profit left. My bid was on white pine of the first quality, which cannot be bought for less than $18 per thousand.

Bidwell—Now, do you know?

Connolly—Well, I cannot buy it. I bid according to the figures that were quoted to me, that's all.

Rosewater—First quality, you mean?

Connolly—No. 1; yes, sir.

Rosewater—Now, let me ask you this. If you had been offered this lumber for the work as now done at $14.50 per 1,000, how much reduction would you have made from your bid?

WOULD HAVE BID LOWER.

Connolly—You say if I was offered the lumber at $14.50? Well, the difference between $14.50 and $18, $3.50 per 1,000.

Rosewater—It is computed that there are 195,000 feet of lumber all told in the lagoon, and you say you would have reduced from that $3.50 per 1,000 if you had been offered that opportunity?

Connolly—Yes, sir.

Rosewater—Were you ever offered that opportunity by Mr. Geraldine? Did he ever offer you any proposition or suggestion as to where you could buy white pine lumber or yellow pine lumber at $14.50?

Connolly—No, sir; he did not at any time. He did not give me much of a reply at any time,and seemed to want to cut me off very short.

Rosewater—Mr. Geraldine said he favored you more than he did Creedon & Mahoney, and showed every disposition to help you out. In what way did he show that disposition? Did he give you any indication or intimation that you could go to any lumber yard in this city and buy lumber at $14.50?

Connolly—No, sir; he did not.

Rosewater—You had on the face of your bid, you had there that you figured lumber at $19 a 1,000?

Connolly—Yes, sir; I was figuring a little profit for myself. I was buying it for