Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition

 
Scrap Book.
February 115th 1898
to
June 1st 1898.
No 01
 
Business & Industrial Department.
omaha public library REFERENCE BOOK
 

FOUNTAIN OF WINE A FAKE

NO SUCH FEATURE OF THE EXPOSITION

Fairy Story from California Still Gives Cause for Worry, Despite Repeated Denials from the Omaha Officials.

A joke which was perpetrated more than a year ago by a party of exposition officials and representatives which visited California and other western points in the interest of the exposition has come home to plague the officials who were mainly responsible for its existence, and who are now kept busy denying that there was anything more serious intended than a joke.

When the party referred to reached the southern part of California the wine growers of that region revived a scheme which had originated in the fertile brain of some native, and while exposition enthusiasm was on tap it was suggested that the wine producing districts of California should install at the exposition an exhibit of wine in the form of a miniature Niagara falls, with the pure juice of the grape substituted for water. It was stated that such an exhibit would require 100,000 gallons of native wine and the changes were rung on this old story, which no one took seriously, as it had been suggested in connection with the World's fair, the California Midwinter fair and other expositions, but had never been near realization.

After the return of the exposition pilgrims this story about the Niagara in wine was repeated for the delectation of those who stayed at home, receiving additions with every repetition, until it had become a tale to the effect that the California grape growers had paid for space and would instal an exhibit containing 100,000 gallons of wine, which was to be surrounded by beautiful gardens and enticing grottos with all the blandishments of beautiful women and soothing music and the young men and women who visited the exposition were to be invited to enter and drink of the wine, without money and without price.

This story was repeated with many variations in the "ready print" newspapers of the country and the result it​ that petitions have been circulated by all of the temperance organizations of the country, protesting against this wholesale destruction of the young men and women of the country and petitioning the exposition management to exclude this awful exhibition before it had wrecked thousands of happy homes, etc. These petitions have been coming into exposition headquarters at short intervals for several months and contain the signatures of thousands of persons. They are from all parts of the country, principally from the west, and are mainly the result of efforts on the part of the members of the Woman's Christian Temperance union. In addition to these petitions, letters have been sent to various officers of the exposition, asking them to authorize the use of their names in the denial of these stories, "if there is no truth in them," and this has invariably been given; but the flood continues and the exposition authorities are at a loss how to correct the impression, which seems to have become general in certain quarters, that the exposition is going to offer unlimited opportunities for the accumulation of "jags," delirium tremens and other old things.

It may be stated, on the authority of every officer of the exposition and the managers of the several departments which would have to do with any such exhibit, that nothing of the kind is contemplated, that no application for such an exhibit has ever been made, that none is likely to be made, that no such exhibit has ever been made, that none is likely to be made, that no such exhibit will be made on the exposition grounds and that there is no probability of any affair of this kind being in operation in Omaha during the exposition.

FLYING MACHINE FROM INDIANA.

Another Inventor Wants to Secure Space for His Own Device.

F. M. Groves, president of a company which has been formed in Evansville, Ind., for the manufacture of flying machines, writes to the exposition authorities to invite an offer for the construction and operation of one of these machines in connection with the exposition.

According to the letter of Mr. Groves and a newspaper article clipped from an Evansville paper, the flying machine in question was invented by Arcidas Farmer, a resident of that section. The machine is said to consist of a cigar-shaped balloon made of silk and inflated with gas. From this is suspended the car which carries the passengers and three gasoline engines of thirty horse-power, whose combined weight is 300 pounds. At either side of the balloon, about midway of the length, is a large propelling wheel like the wheels on a "sidewheel steamboat," and at the rear of the balloon is a propeller screw. Both wheels and the propeller screw are operated by means of the engines, and are to be made of aluminum.

The striking feature of the machine, and the one which the inventor claims is entirely different from the device used on any other flying machine, is a shell which covers about three-fourths of each of the side wheels. The inventor claims that by shifting this shell so that the open space comes at different points of the wheels he can cause the machine to ascend, descend, go ahead or back.

According to the newspaper clipping referred to, the inventor has never made a full sized machine, but has a working model which is said to work successfully. Mr. Groves says he will guarantee the machine will work if the wind velocity does not exceed twenty miles per hour. He desires to make an arrangement with the exposition management on the exposition grounds and operating it in connection with the show.

It has been several months since the exposition authorities received a proposition from any of the numerous inventors of air ships or flying machines and the last one has an air of novelty, but it is scarcely probable that any very great encouragement will be held out to the proposers.

Interest in Arkansas.

Special Commissioner R. W. Richardson, who has been in Little Rock and other points in Arkansas during the last two weeks stirring up an interest in exposition matters and the project of having a creditable exhibit at the exposition of the resources of the state, sends word that a delegation of representative men, members of the exposition commission recently appointed by Governor Jones, will be in Omaha Monday of nest week to look over the grounds and make arrangements for an Arkansas exhibit.

Notes of the Exposition.

Fred Smith, a well known brick manufacturer of Omaha, will attend the annual meeting of the National Association of Brick Manufacturers which meets in Pittsburg next week and will attempt to have the association hold a special meeting in Omaha during the exposition. He will go well supplied with advertising matter and official invitations from the authorities.

R. B. Owens, director of the bureau of electricity of the exposition, has notified President Wattles that the American Institute of Electrical Engineers will meet in Omaha during the exposition, at a date to be fixed later.

FOR THE INDIAN CONGRESS

WILL PROBABLY GO THROUGH THE HOUSE

Some Opposition May Develop in that Boyd, but Mercer Thinks He Can Steer the Matter Successfully.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 10.—(Special Telegram.)—The adoption by the senate today of Senator Allen's amendment providing for the holding of an Indian congress at Omaha between June and November of this year, and appropriating $45,000 therefor, gives the amendment a prestige which almost insures its final adoption by both houses.

Now that the amendment has been attached to the Indian bill it will depend entirely upon the conferees to say whether it shall become a law or not. On the part of the senate the conferees will be Allison, Pettigrew and Perkins. On the part of the house, Sherman, Curtis of Kansas and Little. It is within the house conferees that yeoman service must be done, but Mercer says his associates will be all right, in view of their interest in other measures affecting their own districts, and in which he is also interested. It is possible, however, that a fight may be made against the amendment on the floor, in which case the whole Nebraska delegation will take part in the discussion. There are several elements to be conciliated and these Mercer will look after, especially one or two members from Chicago districts, who, smarting over their inability thus far to secure a repeal of the law creating an Indian supply depot at Omaha, have thought it good politics to oppose the Indian congress measure. However, with the conferees favorable to the amendment it is believed that any opposition that may develop will be summarily disposed of.

Senator Thurston attempted to attach an amendment to the Indian bill appropriating $25,000 for an additional building or buildings at the Genoa Indian school as might be necessary in the judgment of the commissioner of Indian affairs, but Senator Allison made the point of order against the amendment, from which Senator Allen appealed, and in the call that followed the senate adjourned. In view of the handsome treatment accorded the Indian congress bill by the committee on appropriations, and also the Genoa school in the way of appropriation for steam heating apparatus, etc., it has been thought good policy to let any additional amount for Genoa go over until later.

PLASTER MODELS.

The last consignment of plaster models for the exterior finish of the Government building at the Transmississippi Exposition was today shipped to Omaha. James F. Early of this city, sculptor, who has charge of this work, said today that the colossal statue of the republic for the dome of the Government building will be completed and ready for shipment next week.

COLORADO SURE TO EXHIBIT

ENTHUSIASTIC MEETING AT DENVER

State Commission Reorganizes and Gets Ready to Make an Active Hustle in Behalf of the Great Exposition.

Exposition matters are in a most flourishing condition in Colorado and there is no longer a question about the Centennial state being represented at the exposition in a manner which will cause its citizens to swell with pride when visiting the great fair.

The Colorado commission held a spirited meeting in Denver Tuesday night and heard the reports of the representatives who had visited Omaha, Messrs. A. T. Macdonald and W. S. Ward, and then the position of the state commission towards the various county and district organizations was defined in the following motion which was offered by W. S. Ward and seconded by Mrs. Emma Homan Thayer, well known in Omaha and one of the exposition city's firmest friends:

The state commission extends to the several local organizations, such as the Arkansas valley counties, the western slope counties, the city of Denver and the northern counties, its hearty appreciation of their efforts in furthering the interests of the state in the coming Transmississippi and International Exposition and assures them of its heartiest sympathy and support.

And, that the secretary be instructed to inform the several organizations that the state board has in its possession assignments of space with regulations regarding them, together with plats and all information which is likely to be of service to local organizations, and suggests that they at once put themselves in correspondence with the secretary in Denver, in order that their own individual efforts may be expedited and simplified.

Governor Adams increased the state commission by adding three members, Deputy City Auditor A. T. Macdonald of Denver, Miss Grace Espy Patton, state superintendent of education, and C. B. Schmidt of Pueblo, a resident of Omaha for many years.

The resignation of George M. Mischke as secretary of the commission was accepted and A. T. Macdonald was elected to the vacancy.

It was announced that the horticulturists of the state have raised about $9,000 with which to make an exhibit of the horticultural resources of the state, and Mining Commissioner H. A. Lee announced that the state mining exhibit is stored in the capitol building and can be transported to Omaha at slight cost, with such additions as may be needed to make it one of the finest mineral collections in the west.

The exhibit to be made by the horticulturists will be under the general supervision of Mrs. M. A. Shute, secretary of the State Board of Horticulture; agriculture will be under the supervision of Messrs. Ellis and Allison, fine arts will be supervised by Mrs. E. A. Thayer and the educational exhibit by Grace Espy Patton.

The members of the commission were greatly pleased with the locations assigned Colorado in the main buildings, as shown by the report of Messrs. Ward and Macdonald, and the committee felt very much encouraged at the outlook for a fine exhibit.

Another meeting of the board will be held today to further advance the work of the commission.

WELCOMES ALONG THE ROUTE.

Hints at the Reception Waiting for the Nebraska Business Men.

From every section included in the itinerary of the coming tour of Nebraska business men comes the most cheering news. In reply to letters of Chairman Green announcing the route there have been received many replies which indicate the interest taken in the success of the exposition, under whose auspices this tour will be undertaken. W. G. Boyd, president of the Mercantile club of St. Louis, writes that the delegation will be met at the Southern   hotel by a committee comprising members of the Merchants' exchange, Business Men's league and Manufacturers' association, whence they will be escorted to the rooms of the Merchants' exchange, where addresses of welcome will be delivered by ex-Governor Stannard and ex-Mayor Walbridge, chairman of the Missouri commission. The communication refers to the wide publicity certain to be acquired through the medium of such a reception, and announces the fullest sympathy and interest in the great object, for which the tour was projected.

The Louisville Commercial club, through its president, T. L. Jefferson, announces that the delegation will be heartily welcomed. To those who have experienced the cordial character of Kentucky hospitality, the nature of this reception will be readily understood.

C. B. Murray, superintendent of the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce, writes that the visitors will be tendered a reception on the trading floor, where ample opportunity will be afforded to exploit the interests of the great exposition. By way of diversion a trolley ride through the city has been arranged, during which the delegation will view the beautiful surroundings of the great Queen City. This trip will include a view of the Ohio river from the magnificent new bridge, and a flying visit to Covington on the Kentucky side.

Mayor Linxweiler of Dayton, O. in his letter, says: "The citizens of Dayton will esteem it a pleasure to meet the people of your delegation, and bid them welcome to the Gem City of the West."

Hon. D. T. West, editor of the Sunday News of Springfield, O., writes: "We will see that you are properly received and given an audience. Not only will we throw open the gates of our city to the Nebraskans, but will garland our outer walls and strew your pathway with roses."

Mayor Taggart of Indianapolis announces that the Commercial club of that city has the matter in charge, and will extend a very cordial welcome to the delegation.

Mayor Anderson of Jackson, Tenn., after promising a hearty welcome to the visitors, says arrangements have been made to have Rev. S. Wright Butler of Omaha preach at the Presbyterian church in that city on the evening of Sunday, February 20.

Captain M. J. Saunders, chairman of the executive committee of the Harbor Improvement association at New Orleans, writes that the newly organized Progressive union of that city will have charge of the arrangements for entertaining the delegation. As the party will reach the Crescent City in the midst of the annual mardi-gras festivities this stop is looked forward to with pleasing anticipation.

APPROPRIATION MAY BE SMALL.

Legislature May Not Treat the Exposition with Liberality.

I. M. Treynor, from the committee on legislation, made a rather unfavorable report at the meeting of the executive committee of the Council Bluffs Exposition association last night. Mr. Treynor had been delegated to go to Des Moines in the interest of the larger appropriation asked from the legislature for the Iowa building and exhibit. He made a careful canvass of the members of the essembly​ and in his report last night he stated the exact position of every member of the Iowa senate on the subject of the appropriation. The report contained a statement from each member as to just what he would and would not do in the way of voting for an appropriation. A number of the senators did not favor any further appropriation, many of them favored an additional sum of $10,000, several from $15,000 to $20,000 and a few the full amount asked for—$47,000. He gave it as his opinion that the best that could be expected from the members of the senate was the further appropriation of from $10,000 to $20,000. There was a disposition in the house to treat the exposition more liberally, but as the senate would have the final say, he feared that the original plans of the Iowa commissioners could not be realized unless something unforeseen transpired to awaken state pride and make it felt in the senate. He said there was a strong feeling in favor of the plan of enacting special legislation for the purpose of permitting the counties of the state to make separate exhibits, and a majority of the members of the senate had assured him that they would vote for such a bill if Senator Pusey would introduce it.

The report was discussed at length by the members of the association, and it was decided in the event it became apparent that no large general appropriation could be hoped for to have the special bill passed authorizing the county boards throughout the state to make the necessary appropriations for the independent exhibits to be made in the state building. By resolution the legislative committee was instructed to confer with Senator Pusey and the Pottawattamie delegation with a view of premium amount to be appropriated by the counties, and this amount will be about what the larger counties in the state, like Pottawattamie and Polk, will be willing to set aside for the purpose.

Hon. Lafe Young, president of the Iowa Press association, submitted a suggestion that an invitation from the Council Bluffs committee would result in the State Press association holding its annual meeting here this summer. Mr. Young intimated that the association would like to meet about June 20, and after the work of the session was over spend a few days visiting the exposition and sightseeing in the two cities, and especially visiting the gardens and vineyards surrounding Council Bluffs. He said all the press association would expect would be the usual reduction in hotel bill extended to all members of large associations, and that the editors would pay their own bills. The committee on solicitation was instructed to promptly act upon the suggestion and extend a cordial invitation to President Young to hold the annual meeting here. Mr. Young says there will be about 300 editors present, and he thinks the free advertising the editors will give the exposition and Council Bluffs will be valuable and opportune.

The soliciting committees made a report of the subscriptions received during the two afternoons that they worked which greatly encouraged the association. The amount reported exceeded even the most sanguine expectations of the members. For the purpose of further strengthening the committees the chairman of each was empowered to impress any member of the executive committee he saw fit and have him aid in the work of soliciting funds. The reports of the committees showed that only a small portion of the work of canvassing the city had been accomplished and they were given another week in which to complete the work.

A request from the art department of the Woman's clubs that the association change the date of its meeting next week so as not to conflict with the Dickens party, which is to occur next Thursday night, was not granted.

Warren Hough of Crescent notified the association that he had recently received from a friend a valuable relic found on the Wounded Knee battleground which some Sioux brave had lost, and offered to contribute it to the curio department in the wigwam.

TWO GENTLEMEN FROM LOUISIANA.

Here to Arrange for a State Exhibit at the Exposition.

There are at present in the city W. C. Stubbs, Ph. D., chief of the government experiment stations of Louisiana, and Major J. G. Lee, head of the station at Baton Rouge, on business connected with the representation of that state at the exposition. If they are successful in making desired arrangements the Louisianians believe the agricultural exhibit from their state will lead all others in versatility and luxuriance of products. The legislature which meets in May is looked to for a suitable appropriation and Governor Foster is so assured that provision will be made that he has authorized the expenditure of $15,000 to set forth the resources of the state. Prof. Stubbs says, therefore, that he expects that a good showing will be made from "the most fertile 40,000 square miles in the country."

Prof. Stubbs and Major Lee are just now interested in the outcome of a constitutional convention which is being held in Louisiana and which they state is very incompletely reported in the papers. The convention was called by a heavy majority at the last election for the purpose of revising the constitution in the important regards of the elective franchise, the state judiciary and the school system. In speaking of the state government of Louisiana, Prof. Stubbs said last night: "The present constitution is a reactionary measure framed just after the war and too much in accord with the carpet-bagging enthusiasm of that period. It allows the negro rights which he is in no condition to accept and which result in an injury to the state and to all concerned. The proposed constitution will place upon the ballot the restraint of an educational qualification, or a property qualification, or both. The provision will probably be made that a man must be able to read and write and expound intelligently the constitution before he shall be eligible to vote. It may be added also that he must be possessed of from $200 to $500 worth of property to enjoy the privileges of the ballot. Thus, the negroes will be kept from the possession of the offices in the outlying districts of Louisiana, in some of which parishes they outnumber the whites by eight and nine to one. In the whole state they are only slightly in the majority, but the proportion of 225,000 whites in New Orleans to 75,000 blacks leaves them heavily in the ascendancy in the planting districts.

"In regard to the changes which will be made in the judicial system we expect that the whole plan will be revised. As the state courts are at present constituted they are most expensive and cumbersome. We have five supreme judges at an annual salary of $5,000 each, twelve appellate judges drawing $4,000 each and a large number of district judges with a yearly salary of $3,000, bringing a total yearly expense to the state of $250,000. The new plan contemplates the abolition of the appellate courts, when more business will fall upon the district courts, which will be enlarged. A probable educational feature of the new constitution will be that each school district will be empowered to vote taxes for the education of its children. It does not enjoy this privilege at present and districts which include an almost entire colored population are maintained by the taxes of outside taxpayers. Besides these there will be many less important changes, as for instance, the name of our 'parishes,' which is the old French term for 'counties.' The designation was first applied about 1840 and will now probably be changed to the modern title."

RAILROADS ARE ADVERTISING IT.

Spreading Transmississippi Information Broadcast Through the Land.

The railroads of the country, and especially those running into Omaha, are taking hold of the advertising of the exposition with a vigor which is bound to carry the news into every household within hundreds of miles of Omaha, that the greatest exposition this country has ever seen is to be held in Omaha during the summer. These roads are clamoring for advertising matter and requests are pouring into the office of the Department of Publicity and Promotion for the handsome framed posters which are designed to be hung in offices and hotels, and for pamphlets and other advertising matter, as well as for cuts of the buildings, which are to be used in the advertising matter issued by the roads.

The latest folder issued by the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railway company contains eight pages which are devoted to the exposition, including a nine-inch cut of the official bird's-eye view of the grounds. These folders are distributed all over the country in the railway stations and in places frequented by the traveling public.

The Wabash road devotes two pages in its latest folder to exposition matter, including cuts of the buildings, etc., and has applied for sixty of the large, framed posters, which it proposes to hang in its stations all along its lines and in its offices.

The Chicago & Northwestern road is about to issue several hundred thousand vast pocket memorandum books, in which several pages will be devoted to exposition matter, cuts of the buildings, a map of Omaha and copious information concerning the city.

The B. & M. road is about to issue a new official wall map, showing its lines and this will be flanked by half-tone cuts of the exposition buildings. Thousands of pamphlets are being distributed all along the lines of this road.

The Missouri Pacific is preparing to issue a pamphlet of its own regarding the exposition.

The Big Four has made requisition for a large supply of framed posters, bird's-eye views and pamphlets, which it wishes to distribute in its offices in the principal cities of the country.

General Passenger Agent Eustis of the Burlington road is used cuts of the buildings in the literature issued by that road.

The passenger departments of the Rock Island and the Milwaukee roads have applied for large supplies of pamphlets, posters, etc., to be distributed along their lines.

Minnesota's Commission Increased.

Governor Clough of Minnesota appointed as additional members of the commission to arrange for a representation of this state at the Transmississippi Exposition: V. Simpson, Winona; J. H. Rich, Red Wing; A. T. Stebbins, Rochester; Ed Weaver, Mankato; N. S. Gordon, Austin; O. H. Myron, Ada; E. G. Valentine, Breckenridge; C. H. Graves, A. D. Thompson, Duluth; J. L. Greatsinger, C. P. Noyes, Conde Hamlin, George R. Finch, R. A. Kirke, St. Paul; E. J. Phelps, Thomas Shevlin, W. W. Heffelfinger, L. C. Pryor, Minneapolis, and M. N. Leland, Wells.

 
REAL ESTATE
Special attention paid to Collection of Rents. Taxes Paid and Valuation for Assessment of Property looked after.
TRANS MISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION OMAHA 1898
W. A. Green,
Real Estate & Loan Broker,
Strictly Commission.
Room 302 Karbach Block.
REFERENCE: First National Bank, Omaha.
Omaha, Neb.
Dear Sir:

Please accept the enclosed Badge, with my compliments. It is the same style as will be worn by THE TRANS MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION BUSINESS MEN'S DELEGATION, on their eastern and southern trip.

Yours respectfully,
Chairman Expositions Business
Men's Delegation.
 

DOUGLAS COUNTY AND EXPOSITION.

Commissioners Will Meet Some of the Agricultural Society Men.

Next Monday morning George R. Williams, Bennington; J. R. Watts, Waterloo; Andy Kewitt and Omar Whitney of Omaha, a committee from the Douglas County Agricultural society, will meet the county commissioners for the purpose of conferring relative to the appointment of a commission to gather and look after a Douglas county agricultural exhibit for the exposition.

In reference to Douglas county and the exposition, the commissioners say that they are doing all that lays in their power to advance the interests of the big show. Chairman Kierstead says that of the $100,000 voted at the last election the county has turned over $50,000, and that the $25,000 will be paid as soon as the exposition people comply with the terms of the resolution adopted by the commissioners some time ago. "That resolution," said Chairman Kierstead, "provides that $10,000 additional will be turned over when the Horticultural building is under roof, $6,000 when the stock and poultry pens are built, $1,500 when the Apiary building is completed and $2,500 when the Dairy building is under roof. The remaining $5,000, held back for maintenance and beautifying the grounds, will be paid when the county commissioners see fit to draw the warrants."

Speaking of the balance of the proceeds of the bond sale, Chairman Kierstead said: "I don't think that we shall turn this money over to the exposition association. We will need this money in gathering and placing the Douglas county exhibit, and I consider it no more than right and just that we should hold it and expend it ourselves."

START SUITS ON THE STOCK

EXPOSITION SUBSCRIBERS MUST PAY UP

Directors Authorize Manager Lindsey to Take Steps Needed—Progress of Work Outlined by Men Having Charge.

The regular monthly meeting of the Board of Directors of the exposition was held yesterday afternoon and was a very animated proceeding. The financial question formed the most important feature of the meeting and it was decided that all subscribers to exposition stock to the amount of $500 or over who are delinquent on their payments in thirty days from this date and who are not "judgment proof" shall be sued for the amount of their subscriptions remaining unpaid. Smaller subscribers will not be allowed to escape the payment of their subscriptions and they, too, will be made to feel the weight of the law if they persist in remaining delinquent. A committee was appointed to visit the county commissioners and endeavor to persuade that body to pay over to the exposition the remainder of the $75,000 which it agreed to devote to assisting in the construction of buildings and preparation of the grounds. The charge was made that the Auditorium building on the exposition grounds is unsafe and liable to collapse when filled with a crowd and the architects-in-chief were directed to make a thorough investigation at once and report on the condition of this building. The matter of appointing a director general, or some other officer having general direction of the work of all departments of the exposition, was brought up, but no action was taken because so many of the members of the board had withdrawn on account of the lateness of the hour, that there was no quorum. The advisability of calling a special meeting to discuss this question was considered and this will probably be done.

Nearly an hour was consumed in waiting for enough members to put in an appearance to constitute a quorum and when the meeting was finally called to order there were twenty-seven members present.

Reports of departments were the first thing in order and a financial statement was read by Secretary Wakefield, showing that collections since February 1 amounted to $14,385, making the total collections to date $318,573. The total amount of cash on hand was given as $49,600 and the total disbursements as $366,000.

CONSIDERING THE COUNTY FUND.

Manager Lindsey of the Ways and Means department called attention to the urgent need of money and offered a resolution calling upon the Board of County Commissioners to turn over without further delay the amount of $100,000 voted by the people of this country in aid of the exposition, which the board had agreed to contribute as the county's share of the expense of preparation. Mr. Lindsey referred to the situation which confronts the exposition and said the money is badly needed.

Director Hibbard had the impression that it was designed to persuade the county commissioners to turn over the full amount of the proceeds of the bonds and said he was opposed to this, because he had worked for the passage of the bond bill in the legislature and had told his friends that the proceeds would be devoted to showing the resources of Douglas county.

It was explained that it was not the intention to ask the county commissioners to turn over all the proceeds, but simply the part that had been covered by the resolution adopted by them some time ago, providing for transferring $75,000 to the exposition to aid in the erection of certain of the buildings and preparing the grounds.

After some further discussion to the motion was withdrawn and a committee of five was provided for, this committee to visit the commissioners and endeavor to accomplish the purpose covered by the resolution. The president appointed as this committee Directors Hibbard, Wharton, Webster, Lyman and Carpenter.

The discussion of finances being in order, Director Manderson said some radical action must be taken to compel those people who had subscribed large amounts to the exposition and who were able to pay, but who refuse to do so, to pay up and bear their share of the burden. He moved that the chairman of the Ways and Means department be instructed to commence suit within thirty days against every subscriber of $1,000 or over who is, in the opinion of the chairman, good on execution and who is delinquent at the expiration of the thirty days.

In the discussion which followed this motion the amount was changed to make the amount $500 or over and was adopted in this form. There was no opposition to the motion and Manger Lindsey said he would apply the same rule to subscribers of smaller amounts where such action seemed advisable.

WORK OF PROMOTION.

This ended the financial discussion and the Department of Publicity and Promotion was called for. Manager Rosewater made a verbal report of the working of his department, saying that when the Promotion department was placed in his charge but four states in the transmississippi region had appointed commissions and none of the eastern states had taken action. Since that time he said all of the transmississippi states except Washington and Oregon have commissions actively at work, and of the territories New Mexico has an active commission and Arizona will probably be organized within a short time. An agent of the department has been sent to Washington and Oregon and returns are expected from those states shortly. Of the states outside the transmississippi region Mr. Rosewater said Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, West Virginia and Wisconsin have commissions actively at work, and the governor of New York is now preparing to appoint a commission of prominent business men, the governors of Tennessee, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts and Rhode Island are greatly interested in the matter of having their states represented, while the indications are   favorable for Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and other states taking energetic action in the near future. Mr. Rosewater said he was convinced that when the exposition opens there will be fully thirty-five states represented, and he reminded the board that this was about ten more than were at the Centennial exposition in 1876.

Referring to the publicity portion of his department, Mr. Rosewater referred briefly to the articles which have appeared in the big eastern illustrated papers and magazines and the amount of news matter regarding the exposition which has appeared in the newspapers all over the country. He also spoke of the arrangements which have recently been made with persons of great prominence to write exposition articles which will appear in the great magazines.

SPRINGS A SENSATION.

For the Department of Buildings and Grounds, Manager Kirkendall submitted a written report, showing the progress of the work on the buildings and grounds, and the condition of the several buildings at this time.

When this report had been read Director Youngs caused a sensation by stating that he had been informed, by what he considered a good authority, that the Auditorium building on the exposition grounds was not properly constructed, and that it would not be safe to allow a crowd to enter the building for fear of it giving way. He said he believed that the building should be thoroughly examined before the construction had proceeded any further and every weak part strengthened in order to remove any suspicion of weakness.

Manager Kirkendall was on his feet in an instant to demand who had made such a statement. He said he had heard such a report and had made an examination with the assistance of Inspectors Tamm and Baker and had found the building entirely safe.

A dozen of the directors asked for the name of Youngs' informant, and he announced that Inspector Baked had told him about the condition of the building.

"That man is not fit to be in our employ a minute," exclaimed Manager Kirkendall, hotly.

"Hold on! Wait a minute!" exclaimed General Manderson. "I think a man is to be commended for making known such an important state of affairs, instead of condemned. Let us look into this thing. We cannot afford to allow any doubt to exist regarding the stability of a building which may be crowded with thousands of people. It might result in injuries to people which would cost the exposition thousands of dollars in damages."

When quiet was restored the matter was discussed calmly and it developed that Director Youngs had his attention called to the condition of the Auditorium and he had gone direct to Inspector Baker and demanded to know what he thought about it. Mr. Baker had told him that he considered certain portions of the building weak and unequal to support a heavy crowd. This had occurred about six weeks ago and it was stated that certain changes had been made in the construction of the building which might cover the defects spoken of by Mr. Youngs. In order to make certain that there was no weak spots left untouched, a resolution was adopted, calling upon the architects-in-chief to at once make a thorough inspection of the building and report the result to the executive committee.

EXHIBITS AND CONCESSIONS.

Manager Bruce submitted a written report of the Exhibits department, reviewing the work of that department since the last meeting of the directors.

Manager Reed made a brief report of the operation of the Concessions department, saying contracts have been made for the following: Scenic railway, to James A. Griffith; wild west show, to Mattox & Root; trained animal show, similar to Haegenbeck's at Chicago, to E. H. Sprague, A. J. Love and other Omaha parties; messenger service, to American District Telegraph company; official guide to Megeath Stationery company. He said that of the 4,500 lineal feet on the Midway there have been let concessions which will occupy 2,500 feet, leaving 2,000 feet, the income from which to date was $23,000. A number of concessions are under consideration and will be closed within a short time.

Manager Babcock made a brief statement of what had been accomplished by the Transportation department, saying favorable rates had been made on all railroad and steamship lines.

This disposed of all the departments, and Manager Rosewater brought up the matter of the appointment of a director general of the exposition. He made a forcible argument, showing that the time has come when such an office should be taken without unnecessary delay. He reviewed the conditions existing and asserted that no exposition has ever been successfully conducted without that form of organization.

DEBATE SOMEWHAT INTERESTING.

Manager Kirkendall took Mr. Rosewater's statements as personal and declared he was ready and willing to resign, and offered to double his subscription if he was allowed to do so.

Mr. Rosewater denied any personal motive, but said the Buildings and Grounds department was the one most concerned at this time and a man should be appointed to take full charge.

Mr. Manderson asked if it had not been decided back in November that the executive committee should appoint a superintendent at $200 per month to take full charge of all work.

Mr. Rosewater said nothing had been done under this resolution and there is no probability of anything being done.

Mr. Holdrege wanted to know if this matter was recommended by the whole executive committee or was recommended only by Manager Rosewater.

Chairman Lindsey said he for one was opposed to a director general because the committee had carried the thing along to its present stage and a director general might make the exposition a failure and the committee would then be responsible.

Mr. Manderson called attention to the fact that there was no quorum present and nothing could be done.

A general discussion followed, in which Mr. Rosewater suggested a special meeting to consider the matter along with the water question.

Director Manderson and others admitted the force of Mr. Rosewater's arguments and said something ought to be done at once. They insisted that the whole matter had been turned over to the executive committee and that body should act.

Mr. Rosewater insisted that the committee would do nothing. It had left the matter to Mr. Kirkendall and he had refused for over three months to do anything, and in the meantime the matter was dragging along and things were getting badly mixed up.

As there was no quorum present nothing could be done and the meeting dissolved with the general understanding that a special meeting should be called shortly to consider this proposition and the water question.

MORE DELEGATES FROM DENVER.

Two Car Loads Coming to Look Over the Exposition's Prospects.

Colorado is the next state which will send a large delegation of her most prominent business and professional men to "spy out the land" and imbibe exposition enthusiasm, which is always on tap in Omaha. This much was decided on at a meeting of the Colorado Exposition commission held in Denver Wednesday afternoon, it being decided that Governor Adams and Mayor McMurray of Denver should appoint representatives of that city and state sufficient to fill two special cars, and W. F. Bailey was appointed to make the necessary arrangements for the transportation of the party. According to the program, as far as arranged, the party will leave Denver in the afternoon of some day to be determined on later, and reach Omaha the next morning. They will remain in Omaha until the afternoon trains leave and reach home the next morning.

Commissioner Ward and Secretary Macdonald, who visited Omaha last week, filled the Denver people with enthusiasm regarding the exposition, and the rest of the state and Denver commissions are anxious to come and see what is being done.

WARNING TO THOSE LOOKING FOR JOBS

To even a casual observer Secretary John A. Wakefield of the Trans-Mississippi exposition has of late been showing evidences of a mental strain of no mean caliber. The secretary's friends have noticed that he seemed not only to have constantly that tired feeling, but his hair and flowing facial adornment were becoming rapidly streaked with white. In a man of the youth and energy of the secretary this seemed to quite a number as a sort of phenomenon, and during a serious conversation the other night by a party of his more intimate friends upon the cause of this change, it was decided that the writer should see Mr. Wakefield and try to obtain from him the cause of his apparent breaking down.

A few days later the writer called at the secretary's office, and seeing, when he entered the room, that Mr. Wakefield was busy, he seated himself where he could quietly watch the object of his anxiety.

In a few moments there entered the room a gentleman with a ministerial looking makeup, who inquired directly for the secretary, and, approaching that gentleman, he said: "I beg your pardon, but I am the Rev. Samuel Oscott. You have heard of me, no doubt. I came to ask if you could kindly intercede for me, that I may be better able to support my large and rapidly growing family. Down at Hoetown we had it on good authority that you were the man who gave out the situations at the great and glorious demonstration of the power of mind over matter that will form a portion of the attractions at Omaha the coming summer, or words to that effect, and, as I am an able receiver, I thought I would like some position at your show where my great powers of manipulating the nimble nickel, whether it be in the plate or in the box office, could be more thoroughly demonstrated. And—" Here the Rev. Oscott noticed for the first time that Mr. Wakefield had made his escape, and, as one of the office stenographers politely told the representative from Hoetown that he had better write out his application and send it in in the regular way if he wanted to be next on the list of applicants, the gentleman faded out of sight, and from the recesses of a dark closet there came in view the familiar figure of the secretary, with a look upon his visage which spoke louder than words: "Is it gone?"

Hardly had Mr. Wakefield taken his seat before in came two lads, evidently from the country side. They immediately came to the point and filed verbal applications for positions as ticket sellers at the gates of the big show. They started in to expand upon their aptitude for the coveted places and had gotten as far in their family history as a story about the settlement of their grandfather upon certain broad acres to the westward before the security of the closet referred to hid the secretary from their view.

In the course of half an hour the same scene was repeated nineteen times, and as soon as the soft or irregular footsteps of a stranger were heard along the corridor the dignified secretary would make a spasmodic motion toward the closet.

Between Mr. Wakefield's desk and the dark closet opposite the floor was worn so that the workmen were compelled to relay it with sheets of steel.

When the writer was able to enjoy a quiet talk with the secretary it was after closing hours and at his suggestion the doors were shut and locked. Then the secretary told of how the scene just described occurred daily, and that instead of letting up it was rapidly growing worse. There were hundreds of thousands of thousands more application than there were places to be filled, and every applicant for a position claimed to be particularly adapted for the place aspired to. Men, women, children, wives, mothers, sons, daughters, aunts, cousins, sisters, brothers, fathers and mothers'in-law, brothers and cousins-in-law, cousins-german, widows (both grass and otherwise), came with virtually the same story, until his slumbers and awakenings were so confounded and disarranged that his lifeblood was gradually being sapped by the awful strain and his inability to rest.

Thus was discovered the wherefore of the secretary's premature decline, and the matter was laid before the executive committee at the meeting Friday. Heroic action by them was at once decided upon, and as a result the secretary's office has been supplied with the very latest appliances for handling applicants for positions, which is said to be in every way an improvement upon the device now in use at the White house in Washington, D. C.

Trial of the machine was had Saturday upon an applicant for the position of whipper-in for the exposition. When the man showed his hand he was immediately siezed​ by an arm of the machine, lifted up through an aperture in the roof and hurled into space in the fraction of second, where, according to the most reliable authorities, he is making records at traveling which the oldest inhabitants on the planet Mars have never seen anything to equal.

But Secretary Wakefield has been saved.

WORK ON THE BLUFF TRACT

LANDSCAPE IS RECEIVING ATTENTION

Trees Transplanted After a Novel Manner and Grass Seed by the Ton Wasted on the Ground.

The statement made by Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Bulidings​ and Grounds of the exposition, at the meeting of the Board of Directors last Friday when the charge made by Director Youngs regarding the Auditorium was under discussion, has had the effect of most effectually sealing the mouths of all employes of that department and they are afraid to allude to anything that is not exactly "according to Hoyle." At that meeting, when Director Youngs said that Inspector Baker had told him the galleries of the Auditorium were weak, Manager Kirkendall jumped to his feet and shouted, "That man is not fit to be in our employ a minute!" The other employes in the depatment​ are "not so slow," and they have accepted this statement at its face value and wisely keep their own counsel regarding the things they see.

 

While this embargo applies to those who are in the employ of the department, there are numbers of people who are in positions to know what is going on, but who are not compelled to "keep it dark" for fear of being discharged. Some of these assert that it is not alone in connection with the erection of the buildings that some peculiar conditions have been noticed but they call attention to some of the strange proceedings in connection with the landscape work on the grounds, which they say is somewhat remarkable, to say the least.

A well known florist of this city, who has taken a great interest in the preparations being made for beautifying the grounds, from the nature of his business, calls attention to some of the things which have been done, which he says indicate that things are running at loose ends.

ULRICH'S DIRECTIONS IGNORED.

"You will remember," said this florist, "that Rudolf Ulrich, one of the foremost landscape men in this country, was engaged to supervise this part of the work. It is not necessary to refer to the changes made in his plans by Geraldine and the manner in which Geraldine, or some one else, attempted to get rid of Ulrich, but matters were finally fixed up about the time Geraldine 'resigned' and work was commenced on the bluff tract. Ulrich took charge of this work and laid out plans and gave explicit instructions just how the work was to be done. Then he went away with the understanding that he was to come back in about three weeks and supervise the transplanting of the big trees which are now standing along either side of the main promenade on the bluff tract. He did not come and no one seems to know whether he is coming again or not. I know, however, that his instructions have not been followed and the work has been done in a careless ignorant and slipshod manner. If those big trees live through the summer it will be nothing less than a miracle. They were not handled according to Urich's instructions, or according to the method employed by any reputable florist who knows his business. They were set out under the direction of a man named Hadkinson, who was brought to Omaha from Lincoln. I understood he acquired all his knowledge of tree planting from books and is a theoretical florist. He is in charge of the landscape work and I suppose he has been putting some of his theories into practice. The big trees were planted in holes about six feet in diameter and about five feet deep. Hadkinson had them filled in with live horse manure and the trees were set in this and then covered with the same material. Everybody knows that this kind of dressing is extremely hot and the result has been that these trees have "bled" nearly all winter; by that I mean that the sap has been running out of the ends of limbs where branches were cut off. How a tree is going to live without sap is a mystery to me."

There are a great many other things about the "landscaping" of this tract which have excited remarks from people who have very little knowledge of such matters, but whose curiosity has been excited by the methods employed. For instance, the full force of the gardener's department was employed for two or three weeks last October in sowing blue grass seed on this tract, a space of about twenty acres, the average being about 135 pounds to the acre. A competent florist who was asked about the matter said that fifty pounds to the acre would be a liberal allowance. But that is not so material as is the fact that there is scarcely a spear of grass to be seen at this time. The seed sprouted in the fall, but it was sown so late that the frost killed the tender shoots and there is absolutely nothing to show for the trouble. Besides this, roadways have been graded through this tract, buildings have been erected on it and material of all kinds has been piled all over the ground, so that it would have been impossible for any grass to grow on the tract if it had been started a year before. The money spent for seed and the wages of the men who sowed it have therefore been entirely wasted and still there is no grass.

REJOINDER FROM MR. YOUNGS.

Mr Baker's Letter to Mr. Kirkendall Calls Out a Hot Shot.

OMAHA. Feb. 14.—To the Editor of The Bee: In your Sunday issue I see published a letter from Inspector Baker to Mr. Kirkendall, manager Grounds and Buildings department, in which he denies ever making a statement to me in regard to the strength of the Auditorium building.

I have no wish or desire to do Mr. Baker an injury. At the last meeting of the directory, after Manager Kirkendall reported on the condition of the different buildings, I considered it my duty as a director to call attention to what had become a common rumor, and which had been verified, in respect to the faulty construction of the Auditorium building. I requested that the matter be looked into and if the building be found in a safe condition there would be no harm done; if found as reported, it could be placed in a safe condition before serious damage was done. Instead of taking these remarks in the proper spirit, Mr. Kirkendall got excited and demanded to know the name of my authority. On learning that it was Mr. Baker he jumped to his feet and exclaimed: "That man is not fit to be in our employ."

Are we to understand from this that men employed in the Department of Grounds and Buildings are under instructions to "keep it dark," and that their situations depend on their following these instructions to the letter? That certain members of the directory are barred from receiving information except such as is doled out at the pleasure of the heads of the departments? The developments in this case seem to point that way, for the next morning after the directory meeting Mr. Baker is "called down," and then appears his letter to Manager Kirkendall—which is kindly given to the press—in which my veracity is called into question, and which leads me to make this statement. Several rumors had reached me as to the instability of the Auditorium building and on the morning of January 12 I met Mr. Baker with Mr. Rosewater in the business office of The Bee. Mr. Rosewater was discussing the advisability of a director general and enumerated cases where money had been wasted through the lack of a competent man in general authority on the grounds. Mr. Baker made no dissent to these sentiments in the presence of Mr. Rosewater, but when Mr. Rosewater was called away the conversation was continued for some time between Mr. Baker and myself and was substantially as follows: Mr. Baker said there was no need of a director general, that everything was working smoothly and there were good men in charge of the different works. I then said: "Mr. Baker, on your reputation as a builder, would you say that the Auditorium building is being properly constructed?" He said: "No, I don't, and I called their attention to certain things in regard to that building, but was told that Mr. Tamm would attend to that. Afterwards Mr. Creedon, the contractor, came to me and wanted me to assist him in making certain changes to strengthen the gallery. I told him I would have nothing to do with the building." I am informed that Mr. Baker has said substantially the same to other parties also.

In Mr. Baker's letter to Manager Kirkendall he says: "Those minor matters you speak of have been attended to, which make the strength of the gallery doubly strong." This goes to show that there were defects and some one "of good authority" had pointed them out to Manager Kirkendall. If these defects have been corrected there could have been no harm in bringing the matter up at the directory meeting and a statement to that effect by Manager Kirkendall would have quieted any doubt existing in the mind of the public. I cannot see what good will result in the publication of a letter from an employe written under such circumstances.


FRED M. YOUNGS.

PLANS FOR THE PILING DISAPPEAR.

Another Important Document Missing from the "White Cottage"

The "white cottage" on the bluff tract of the exposition grounds, which is being used as the office of the Department of Buildings and Grounds, seems to be a popular resort for sneak thieves. Documents of various kinds have been in the habit of disappearing very mysteriously, and nobody seems to know what has become of them. Under the custom governing the employes who use the office as headquarters the building is supposed to be occupied by some one at all times. The night watchman is Joe Schwartz, a swarthy foreigner of uncertain age, who has been the body guard of Dion Geraldine for many years. He was brought here from Chicago by Geraldine and put on the exposition pay roll as a "rod man," and so carried for several months, although he did very little work in that line, being employed as an errand bot and spy for Geraldine. Since he has been acting as "watchman" for the cottage the place has been found deserted and the windows unlocked.

The latter part of last week the plan for the piling which is being done for the north viaduct across Sherman avenue was stolen from the white cottage and has not been found. The plan showed the location of each pile and on it the engineer, who supervised the driving of these piles, has noted the data which shows the force required to drive each pile, from which data is obtained the amount each pile will bear. This data had been duly entered on the plan for the information of the engineers and architects, but the entire thing has disappeared. The responsibility for the loss has not been placed and no information is obtainable at the office of the department, all the employes being afraid to open their mouths.

This is not the first time data which might cause contractors a little more work has disappeared from this office, but no steps have been taken to prevent a repetition of the occurrence.

ENTERTAIN EXPOSITION BOOMERS.

Given a Hearing by St. Louis Merchants' Exchange.

ST. LOUIS, Feb. 14.—Sixty-three members of a special traveling delegation, working in the interests of the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha, arrived today on a special train over the Wabash and are stopping at the Southern hotel. The delegation is composed of representative business men of Nebraska and Iowa, who are visiting all the larger cities for the purpose of arousing interest in the exposition, which opens next June.

At noon the delegates were escorted to the Merchants' exchange, where they were welcomed in an address by ex-Mayor Walbridge. E. J. Cornish of Omaha responded. He explained to the 2,000 members of the exchange the plan and scope of the exposition and made an urgent appeal to them to see that St. Louis was properly represented.

Conditions in Arizona.

Vice President Charles R. Drake of Arizona territory writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion from his home at Tucson that exposition matters are taking a more encouraging turn in his bailiwick. He says that the action of the legislature in refusing to make an appropriation for representation at the exposition has served as a wet blanket on all efforts to arrange for an exhibit, but matters have received an impetus recently through the efforts of Governor McCord, who called the attention of the mining men of the state, at a recent convention held at Phoenix, to the fact that the territory would not be represented by any exhibit unless private enterprise took hold of the matter and made the necessary provision. The governor suggested that the mining interests of the territory subscribe to a fund for making a collective exhibit of the resources of the territory and that an effort be afterward made to induce the legislature to reimburse the subscribers.

Mr. Drake says this suggestion of the governor is being agitated and he expresses the hope that something will come of it.

Congressman Knowles Inspects.

Hon. Freeman Knowles, one of the representatives of South Dakota in the congress of the United States, was in the city yesterday and made it a point to visit the exposition grounds. He was greatly pleased with what he saw and expressed his satisfaction at the substantial evidences of progress and the magnitude of the preparations which are being made. Mr. Knowles said he had been home on a short visit and was en route to Washington, where he said he would take great pleasure in lending all the assistance in his power to Representative Mercer in securing the passage of the Indian bill with the amendment providing an appropriation for the Indian congress in connection with the exposition.

Endorsed by Newark Board of Trade.

The meeting of the Board of Trade of Newark, N. J., last Wednesday night was addressed by Colonel Robert Mitchell Floyd, chairman of the New Jersey exposition commission, and E. O. Halstead, the New Jersey agent of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, both of whom presented the advantages which the people of that state would derive from making a fine showing at the exposition. At the conclusion of their talks a resolution was unanimously adopted endorsing the work and declaring it the sense of the Board of Trade that the state and its manufacturing industries should be well represented.

Design for One-Cent Stamps.

John A. Merritt, third assistant postmaster general, has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that Walter W. Pollock, the agent of the department in Wisconsin, has sent to the Postoffice department a photographic copy of Lamprecht's painting of Marquette discovering the Mississippi river. General Merritt says the photograph will be use din making the design for the 1-cent stamp of the exposition series.

Steamship Company Rates.

The latest advices received by the Department of Transportation are to the effect that the Johnson Express Steamship company and the United States Express company will transport exhibits from England and France, intended for the exposition at half the usual rates, charging full tariff rates on the going trip and returning the goods to the exhibitor free of charge.

Freight Claim Association.

John Nichol, president of the Freight Claim association, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to the association to hold its October meeting in Omaha. He says he will lay the matter before the association at its meeting in Denver, May 4.

BIRTH OF THE EXPOSITION.

WHERE HONOR OF ITS ORIGIN BELONGS.

Claimants for the Credit Come Fast to the Front—Advocated by The Bee Years and Years Ago.

There has been a great deal of talk, lately, about the "mystery" which is said to envelope the origin of the Transmississippi and International Exposition. Numerous claims have been made by various parties to the honor of being the first to conceive the idea of holding a great exposition at Omaha, which should exhibit to the world the resources of the great west. These claims have been especially numerous since it has become apparent that the exposition is to be a most gigantic affair and a credit to the originator. There are fully a score of men in Omaha who can relate authentic incidents showing where and when they conceived the idea that a great exposition should be held in Omaha and their claims are supported by circumstantial evidence that leaves little room for doubt as to their correctness, so that all that remains is to establish their relative dates and forever settle the controversy, on the theory that the man who first mentioned the matter and continued to [?]

 

The greater number of claimants for the honor of being the progenitor of the enterprise base their claims upon incidents occurring just prior to the passing of the resolution by the Transmississippi congress, which called the exposition into being. Some of these claims antedate the congress by a few days or a few weeks. Among these later are ex-Mayor Bemis, R. W. Richardson and L. H. Bradley. The two latter were appointed by Mayor Bemis as delegates to the meeting of the Transmississippi Commercial congress which was held in St. Louis in 1894 and were responsible for the selection of Omaha as the place for the meeting in 1895. It was through the efforts of Mayor Bemis and these two delegates that the Commercial club was induced to take hold of the matter of making preliminary arrangements for the meeting of the congress in Omaha. In November, 1895, just before the congress commenced to assemble, the idea of working up a sentiment among the members in favor of an exposition was discussed by these three and each is positive that he made the first suggestion.

WALSH'S EARLY IDEA.

James Walsh is another aspirant for the honor of being the originator of the exposition. He was a delegate to the congress and in a caucus of Nebraska delegates the day the congress met he suggested the introduction of a resolution providing for an exposition at Omaha, the buildings to be permanent and the show to be held once every five years. This suggestion finally culminated in the preparation of the resolution which was finally adopted by the congress, but the permanent features suggested by Walsh were eliminated.

At the last monthly banquet of the Commercial club President Wattles of the exposition said he had concluded, upon investigation, that Dudley Smith was entitled to the honor of originating the exposition, as he had suggested an exposition at Omaha while gazing upon the beauties of the California Midwinter fair at San Francisco during the winter of 1893-94.

This claim at once disposed of the later claims of Walsh, Richardson et al, although Walsh charges that Dudley Smith was not a member of the delegation to the Commercial congress and had absolutely nothing to say at that time about an exposition at Omaha and took no part in the discussion. Whether this be true or false matters not, for the reason that before the sound of President Wattles' voice had died out, after giving Smith the credit, Secretary Wakefield of the exposition put in a claim which ante-dated that of Smith. Secretary Wakefield related how, at the World's fair, in August, 1893, he was standing on the Midway Plaisance, talking with Allen B. Smith, Frank Brown and two or three other Omaha men, and the suggestion was made by some of the party, he is uncertain by whom, that an exposition would be a great thing for Omaha; that it would pull the money to the west instead of allowing it all to go east.

EARLIEST OF THEM ALL.

In the absence of any further showing this would entitle Secretary Wakefield, or some other member of the little party on the Midway at Chicago, to the palm, but all of these claims are swept aside by a claim which is several years older than the oldest of them and The Omaha Bee stands as the originator and consistent exponent of the exposition idea as relates to Omaha.

The claim of The Bee dates more than ten years prior to the meeting of the Transmississippi Commercial congress in Omaha at which the exposition was given form, and the files of The Bee demonstrate the fact that to The Bee and its editor belongs the credit.

The Nebraska State fair was held in Omaha from 1880 to 1884, inclusive, but was removed to Lincoln after the fair of 1884. At the time of this removal there was a spirited controversy over the action of the State Board of Agriculture in taking the fair from this city and a series of editorials appeared in The Bee at that time, taking the position that the fair, as then conducted, was of no particular advantage to the city and advocating the establishment at Omaha of a permanent exposition. There were a number of these editorials, appearing from time to time during the early part of 1885. The first approved in The Bee of January 22, 1885, immediately after the meeting of the State Board of Agriculture at which it was decided to move the fair to Lincoln, and was as follows:

THE STATE FAIR.

The State Board of Agriculture has decided to locate the Nebraska State fair at Lincoln for the next five years. While Lincoln may congratulate herself upon her victory, we do not hesitate to express our gratification over the action of the board. Omaha has outgrown all such artificial props as the State fair. She has the location, wealth and population for a permanent interstate exposition. Instead of contributing toward the enlargement, maintenance and repair of the buildings on the fair grounds she may as well devote her money and resources toward permanent exposition buildings, just as Chicago and other cities have done. The Driving Park association should at once be merged into an exposition society, whose business it will be to provide the ways and means for collecting and exhibiting nor merely the farm products of the Missouri valley, but the products of our factories, packing houses, mills and breweries. With the great cattle interests centering at our union stock yards, it will be an easy matter to organize an interstate cattle show in connection with the exposition, where the stock raisers of Wyoming, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa and Missouri may compete and participate. The cattle brought to Omaha for the exposition may be marketed on the ground and the owners will, therefore, have a double incentive in bringing them here. * * * * It is safe to predict that an interstate exposition such as we have outlined will not only be attended by thousands of Nebraskans where hundreds only would attend the State fair, but it will draw large numbers of people from all the surrounding states and territories.

The efforts of The Bee to establish an exposition in Omaha were not relaxed after the series of editorials referred to, but similar editorials appeared in the paper at intervals and Mr. Rosewater talked exposition to many citizens of Omaha. His ideas and suggestions were in favor of an interstate exposition in which the states immediately surrounding Nebraska should be interested. This idea was presented by him to George W. Lininger, as well as other people of prominence in Omaha, who recall the fact that such suggestions had been made from time to time.

In 1894 the last state fair was held in Lincoln. The revenues of the board had fallen off very rapidly for the last three fairs and Omaha interests commenced agitating the idea of removing it to Omaha. Committees were appointed and preparations were made to prepare a proposition to be presented to the State Board of Agriculture in support of the invitation to hold the state fair in Omaha. At this time the following editorial appeared in The Bee in the issue of December 6, 1894:

A POINTER TO THE COMMITTEE.

Before the committee appointed by the Commercial club, which is to report on the location of the proposed mile track and exposition grounds, takes action it would be well to consider the advisability and feasibility of location on one of the tracts recently purchased for park purposes. Take, for instance, Miller park, which has as yet not been materially improved and cannot be made available as a competitor of Hanscom park. Elmwood park or Riverview park for years. Miller park is almost level and could be readily converted into a driving park, besides affording abundant space for exposition purposes. If there is any need for additional ground on either side it can be secured by the right of eminent domain through the park commission at a fair price. The probabilities are, however, that no additional grounds will be needed, except for railway approaches. The roadway from the city to Miller park is a boulevard and if it was desirable the street railway would be extended from the fort to any point adjacent to the exposition grounds. All the railroads can without a very heavy outlay extend tracks to points within easy reach.

Quite apart from the advantage to be derived from the fact that the city already owns this park and no taxes will ever be collectible thereon, there is the further incentive that all improvements can be made with a view to a permanent exposition or a zoological garden on the plan of Philadelphia and Cincinnati. That would form an attraction all the year around and justify the acquisition. In its present aspect Miller park appears to be a municipal tree nursery which can only be made an attractive park by the expenditure of hundreds of thousands of dollars.

To expend money on leased ground is a reckless waste, besides being a barrier to the erection of sightly and substantial exposition buildings. The fact is every building for public use should be constructed with a view to stability and permanency. Even if Omaha should not get the state fair this project is feasible and would eventuate in an interstate exposition of the first magnitude.

The opportunity for putting the exposition idea into practical execution was presented when the session of the Transmississippi Commercial congress was about to be held in Omaha in November, 1895. This opportunity was taken advantage of and on the Sunday preceding the meeting of the congress, when many of the delegates were in the city and when the congress was the subject of much discussion, the following editorial appeared in The Sunday Bee of November 25, 1895:

A TRANSMISSISSIPPI EXPOSITION.

The construction of the transcontinental railroads gave the first powerful impetus to the development of the transmississippi country. Twenty-five years ago the population of the states and territories west of the Mississippi was 6,435,167, and the states and territories west of the Missouri were credited by the national census with a population of 1,492,896. In 1890 the transmississippi states contained a population of the states and territories west of the Missouri aggregated 5,917,213. In 1860 there were only twenty-one miles of railroad in the country west of the Mississippi. Today the railroad mileage in the same region exceeds 65,000 miles, of which 37,000 miles are boasted by the country west of the Missouri.

The marvelous resources of this vast empire were only in a measure displayed at the World's Columbian exposition. In fact, the exhibits of the western states and territories were to a great extent overshadowed by the international exhibits made at Chicago. Of the hundreds of thousands of people who viewed the World's fair comparatively few carried away with them a distinct impression of the productive industries of the transmississippi states. Even people who live in this section and who have contributed to its growth do not grasp their extent and magnitude.

The inspiration for the Cotton States' exposition now being held in Atlanta doubtless lay in the conviction that an interstate exposition would go further toward promoting the development of the south than any other single agency. That the judgment of the projectors of the Cotton States' exposition was eminently sound is attested by the success that has attended this great undertaking as regards both the number and variety of the exhibits and the financial management of the venture. Not only have the people of the cotton states displayed commendable zeal in contributing toward its success with displays, but several of the Atlantic states, notably New York and Pennsylvania, are creditably represented. The Atlanta exposition has drawn hundreds of thousands of visitors from every section of the country and will be the agency by which a vast amount of new capital will be transplanted into the south.

What has been accomplished for the south by the Atlanta exposition can be accomplished for the west by a Transmississippi Exposition. With a population of 15,000,000 to draw on and a country prolific in material wealth, a Transmississippi Exposition would be an assured success from its very inception. Such an exposition would give the impetus to the westward trend of population and capital for which the people of this section have been striving. It would make known to all the world the capabilities of the west and revive activity in every branch of industry and production.

The Transmississippi congress, which convenes in this city during the present week, is the proper body to take the initiative in formulating the plans for a Transmississippi Exposition. Its recommendation in this matter would have great weight with both the state and national legislatures. Without disparaging any other city ambitious to secure the location of such an interstate exposition. The Bee believes that the claims of Omaha are far superior to those of all other transmississippi points. Its location in the heart of the continent, midway between New York and San Francisco, makes it alike accessible to people east and west. Its railroad facilities in every direction are as perfect as those of any city in the Mississippi valley north of St. Louis. It is the center of the great agricultural belt and within a day's reach, by rail, of the mining region of Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota, and within two days' reach of the great mining states west of the Rockies. Omaha is as near to the Puget sound country as is St. Paul and nearer by 500 miles to San Francisco and southern California.

It is hardly necessary to add that whatever is required of Omaha or pledged for Omaha to make the Transmississippi Exposition a success the business men of this city will carry out to the letter.

CAIRNS' VIEWS ON THE EXPOSITION.

Railroad Man Predicts One of the Greatest of Shows.

On the recent trip of the "Chicago Special" from Omaha to Chicago The Bee reporter enjoyed the privilege of a talk with a number of people from various parts of the country regarding the Transmississippi exposition. C. A. Cairns, assistant general passenger agent of the Chicago & Northwestern said:

"While I do not attempt to deny that our interest in the exposition may have its selfish side, for the Northwestern will get even more than its share of the traffic, with quick time and improved train service, still we have in common with the rest of the western country, a real pride and pleasure in the affair. The view I obtained of the preparations for this great event in Omaha was a genuine surprise to me, prepared as I was to witness the evidence of a stupendous undertaking. Only those who have personally surveyed the site and the buildings in course of construction can fully realize the magnitude of the Transmississippi and International Exposition as projected by its ambitious management. Every place I go I hear nothing but praise of the work and its promoters. Omaha will become the show ground of America and cannot fail to reap a lasting benefit from this exposition, which will be second to nothing ever before accomplished on this side of the water, with the exception of the Chicago fair."

Many of the visiting newspaper men from the west, especially those from Denver, Leadville, Pueblo and other Colorado points, spoke in the warmest encouragement of the exposition and predicted its unqualified success.

Montgomery Ward & Co.'s Building.

Bruce Leffingwell, advertising manager for Montgomery Ward & Co. of Chicago, has submitted the drawings for the building which his firm will erect on the exposition grounds to the architects-in-chief for approval. Mr. Leffingwell will again come to Omaha as soon as the plans are approved and will at once let the contract. He says work will be commenced within ten days after the plans are approved. The building will be a very attractive affair, of classic architecture, and covered with staff. It will cost about $8,000.

Statuary for Nebraska.

Chairman William Neville and Members Poynter and Whitford of the Nebraska Exposition commission are in the city for the purpose of sitting as a committee to pass upon the models of the groups of statuary which are to adorn the Nebraska building. The statuary is to be provided by Kimball Brothers of Lincoln, the staff and plaster contractors on this building, and the models will be submitted to the committee for approval before work is commenced on the full-sized groups.

Miss Tucker of Texas.

Miss Forest Tucker of Galveston, Tex., is in the city as the representative of the Texas Exposition commission, and is engaged in making arrangements for exhibits of a novel and attractive nature which will form part of the display to be made by the Lone Star state.

 

NORTH CAROLINA'S INTEREST

Tarheel Territory Will Make a Display for the Public's Edification.

STATE TO SHOW SOME OF ITS WORK

Agricultural Experiment Station Arranging to Take Part in the Exposition—Extent of the Industries Concerned.

It now seems highly probable that North Carolina will be added to the list of states which will participate in the Transmississippi Exposition, and that the state will be represented by at least one of its state institutions, with indications favoring the participation of other branches of the state government.

Prof. W. A. Withers, director of the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment station located at Southern Pines, has applied for 800 square feet of floor space for an exhibit to be made by this institution. The experiment station in charge of Prof. Withers is supported by the state and comprises an extensive farm at Southern Pines, on which experiments in agriculture are conducted on an extensive scale. There are two departments, one devoted to vegetables and agricultural products and the other to fruits, etc. These products are cultivated in the most approved manner and experiments are made with various kinds of fertilizers, different ways of cultivating, and all the other investigations in the line of improvement which are of such vital importance to farmers, but which no farmer has the time or facilities for investigating for himself.

The application for space in the exposition is endorsed by a number of eminent authorities in agricultural matters, who commend the work of this station in the highest terms. Prof. F. E. Dawley, director of the Farmers' institute at Albany, N. Y., conducted under the Departmnet​ of Agriculture of the state, writes to the exposition authorities that there is "nothing of the same character for American farmers, either state or national, and it is doing the work that could not be carried on by the farmers themselves." Similar endorsements come from J. C. L. Harris, president of the Board of Control, which has charge of the station at Southern Pines; H. W. Collingwood, managing editor of the Rural New Yorker, a leading agricultural journal; H. E. Van Deman, former pomologist of the Department of Agriculture of the federal government; H. E. Stockbridge, professor of agriculture in the Florida Agricultural college, and Prof. B. W. Kilgore, state chemist of Mississippi.

This matter will be taken up by the executive committee at once and arrangements will probably be made for setting aside space for the exhibit.

DELAY IN MUSICAL MATTERS.

Mr. Armstrong of Chicago Comments on the Local Situation.

William Armstrong, musical editor of the Chicago Tribune, spent yesterday in this city, vainly trying to secure an interview with Mr. Kimball, musical director of the exposition. Mr. Kimball being in Lincoln he could not be seen. Mr. Armstrong has been much interested in the musical department of the exposition, and expressed himself as greatly surprised that it should have no representative here in Omaha. He was ready and anxious to give its plans publication in his paper and to aid in the upbuilding of the department in any possible way, but he could gain no information. Late in the afternoon he received a call from Manager Lindsey of the Ways and Means department, and as the result of his interview was forced to conclude that almost nothing has been accomplished in preparation for the five months of musical entertainments to be begun the first of June. Mr. Armstrong expressed himself as much disappointed at the prevailing condition of things and was apprehensive regarding the future. He said: "The exposition will be a wonderful show. It will draw crowds from all parts of the United States. It presents an opportunity for helping along the cause of music in this city and in this part of the country that will never come to it again; at least not while you and I are alive. I have seen enough of your city to believe that it is interested in music and that it has an art future to build and to be proud of. Now is the time to be up and doing. The music of the exposition should have been organized six months ago in order to fully cope with the gigantic possibilities that then existed. I am very much surprised to find the choral forces here in Omaha unorganized. They should be in active rehearsal preparing to take part in the great festivals which might form one of the chief artistic features of the whole exposition. At this late day surely not a moment is to be lost."

Mr. Armstrong returned to Chicago last evening, but will be in Omaha again later in the season, when on his way back from a lecture tour now being arranged to include the chief cities of the Pacific coast.

WILL COMMENCE SUITS PROMPTLY.

Manager Lindsey Announces His Intention on Stock Subscriptions.

Manager Z. T. Lindsey, who was instructed by the board of directors to take radical action against subscribers to large amounts of exposition stock who persist in remaining delinquent in the payment of the assessments on their stock, says that he will follow his instructions to the letter and will proceed to make preparations to commence legal proceedings at the end of thirty days against all those subscribers of $500 or over who have not paid their subscriptions in full at that time.

"The full amount of all subscriptions will be due and payable March 1," said Manager Lindsey, "and we need all the money we can get. This is the vital point in the progress of the exposition and those people who subscribed for stock should come forward and pay their assessments. We have gone along with the enterprise on the theory that these subscriptions were all as good as gold, and we must have the money to meet our obligations. Up to this time our finances have been in excellent condition and the delinquency on the part of some of the subscribers has not delayed us, but the time has now come when we need every dollar of the money and we must have it. I have not made a list of the delinquents since about the middle of January, and a number have paid since that time, so I am unable to state just how many are delinquent or the total amount of their subscriptions. The greater part of the larger subscribers have paid all except the last two assessments, and many have paid only one or two assessments, and some have paid nothing at all. They are people who are well able to pay and should be made to do well able to pay and should be made to do so. I intend beginning action against all of these people who do not pay up between now and March 12."

DRAWINGS FOR MINOR BUILDINGS.

Architects-in-Chief Have Nearly Completed the Necessary Details.

The architects-in-chief of the exposition are rapidly completing the drawings for the minor details of the exposition work which may be regarded as in the nature of finishing touches and the working drawings and specifications for this work will soon be in the hands of the Department of Buildings and Grounds and be advertised.

The two restaurants which will stand at the east end of the viaduct leading from the main court to the Bluff tract are completed and have been turned over to the department. Advertisements for bid will be inserted in the papers at once, and the construction of these buildings will soon be commenced. These restaurants will be tall structures, standing like sentinels at either side of the broad passageway across Sherman avenue. The architecture will be in harmony with the classic beauty of the main buildings and the height of the buildings will make them a feature of the general effect of the east end of the main court, as seen from the west. Each restaurant will comprise an enclosed portion on the lower floor which will be used as a dining room, above which will be a story open in all sides, the roof supported by classic columns, which will form a cool resort in the summer time, while above all will be a flat roof, suitable for a roof garden.

The working drawings for the south viaduct, leading from the main court to the bluff tract, will be completed early the coming week, and bids for the construction of this will be advertised at once.

The drawings for the Transportation and Agricultural Implement buildings are well advanced and will be completed by the last of the coming week.

DENIAL FROM INSPECTOR BAKER.

Letter to Manager Kirkendall in Regard to the Auditorium Building.

The episode in the proceedings of the Board of Directors at the last meeting, in which Director Youngs charged that the Auditorium galleries were weak, has called forth a denial from the inspector whom Youngs named as his informant. This denial was addressed to Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Buildings and Grounds, who furnished the copy for publication. It is as follows:

OMAHA, Neb., Feb. 12.—Mr. F. P. Kirkendall, Manager Grounds and Buildings Department, Omaha: Dear Sir—Your communication received. In reply, as to the strength of the Auditorium building on the exposition grounds, will say that I consider it perfectly strong and safe. Those minor matters you speak of have been attended to, which make the strength of the gallery doubly strong.

Have never stated to Mr. Fred Youngs anything at all about the strength of the Auditorium or any other building on the grounds, and pronounce his statement false in every particular.

As to the sheathing boards on outside, will say that the specifications call for them to be placed sixteen inches on centers, and they are so placed. Respectfully yours,


R. W. BAKER,
Inspector of Construction.

MINNESOTA WANTS TO EXHIBIT.

Governor Clough Expresses His Views Upon a Live Subject.

Governor Clough of Minnesota is in favor of a state exhibit at the exposition by his state and says publicly that it was a mistake on the part of the legislature that no provision was made at its last session for such exhibit. The St. Paul Pioneer Press of recent date prints the following interview with the governor on this subject:

"Personally, I think it was a mistake that the legislature did not appropriate a reasonable amount for an exhibit at the Omaha exposition. Now, the situation is, shall we not make an exhibit? It looks to me, however, as though certain individuals throughout the state were going to make an exhibit. There is quite a feeling in that direction, and I hope they will succeed."

"If these individuals make an exhibit," asked a Pioneer Press representative, "will the state legislature at the next session reimburse them?"

"Well, that is a matter concerning which, of course, nothing authoritative can be said now. Of one thing I am assured, and that is that the state should have an exhibit at the exposition. It can scarcely afford not to do so, and, as I said, I think it was a great mistake that the money was not appropriated for that purpose."

Activity in Idaho.

The Idaho exposition commission has issued an address to the people of that state, asking their assistance in raising funds for making an exhibit showing the resources of the state. The address sets out the general plan and scope of the exposition and the advantages which it will offer to the people of Idaho to show to the world, and especially to the farmers of the middle and river states, on whom Idaho must depend for immigration, the advantages which the state offers in agriculture, horticulture and other industries, as well as mining. It is estimated that $16,000 will be required for an exhibit and the people of the state are asked to contribute this amount, the commission expressing the opinion that the legislature will reimburse the subscribers at its next session.

Arrangements for Wyoming.

Arrangements for the space to be occupied by the Wyoming Exposition commission in making an exhibit of the resources of the state have been fully completed, the application made and accepted, the space allotted and approved by both the Wyoming commission and the Department of Exhibits, and all formalities fully disposed of. The exhibit will occupy 1,800 feet in the Mines building and 900 feet in the Agriculture building.

OFF ON A TOUR OF THE SOUTH.

List of the Business Men Who Will Go on the Trip.

A party of business men from all parts of the state will start from Omaha at 4:30 this afternoon to make a tour of the south in the interest of the exposition. Among the list are a number of men who were in the party which visited Texas early in December in the interest of the exposition. The party will be in charge of W. H. Green, who has been retained by the Department of Publicity and Promotion to conduct the party. Those who make up the party are: Rev. S. Wright Butler, Hon. E. J. Cornish, Hon. H. R. Corbett, A. L. Hardy, Omaha; B. M. Carlisle, Missouri Valley, Ia.; C. C. McHugh, O'Neill, Neb.; C. Orcutt, W. D. Edwards, R. J. Dinning, R. Purvis, H. F. Cady, G. F. Munro, J. J. Gibson, M. F. Sears, J. N. Frenzer, F. D. Wead, E. W. Arthur, L. J. Patterson, A. R. Edmiston, W. F. Lorenzen, Omaha; L. P. Davis, H. P. Victor, W. N. Rehlaender, Nelson C. Brock, F. B. Harris, Joseph Junge, Charles Newbrandt, Ernest Hopper, Herman Pobenz, J. Bowen, Lincoln; C. W. Conklin, R. A. Smith, E. W. Peterson, J. R. Sutherland, J. P. Latta, Tekamah; C. M. Sheldon, F. Johnson, L. Brown, Holdrege; G. B. Darr, J. L. May, E. M. F. Leflang, Lexington; Charles A. Pierce, A. O. Shaw, Tecumseh; Judge J. C. Crawford, L. Rosenthal, West Point; Z. T. Noyes, Missouri Valley; R. D. Phillips, S. A. D. Henline, Kearney; A. E. Hunter, G. L. Day, Superior; John Snodgrass, A. G. Burbank, Springfield; J. E. Smith, Beatrice; F. E. White, Plattsmouth; D. L. Heinshmeier, Glenwood, Ia.; Robert M. Peyton, Creighton; D. H. Frahm, Wakefield; P. O. Avery, Humboldt; E. A. Wickham, Council Bluffs, Ia.; J. H. Cooley, Kenesaw; Dr. S. G. Glover, Arlington; R. McConaughy, M. D., York; C. W. Kaley, Red Cloud.

The oratory with which the citizens of the many towns through which the party will pass will be regaled will be supplied by Rev. S. Wright Butler, Hon. E. J. Cornish and H. R. Corbett. They will expound the gospel of the exposition at every opportunity and the lay members of the party will distribute exposition literature in large quantities.

 

Arkansas Delegates Coming.

W. D. Mathews, secretary of the Arkansas Exposition commission, writes to President Wattles that the members of that body will visit Omaha February 16. The members will meet in St. Louis February 15 and proceed from that point in a body, leaving that city the evening of the 15th on the Missouri Pacific at 8:10 p. m., and arriving in Omaha Thursday at 12:55 p. m. The secretary says the party will travel in a special Pullman car from St. Louis and that there will be between twenty-five and fifty people in the party.

Enclosed in the letter to President Wattles is a circular addressed to the members of the Arkansas commission, notifying them that arrangements have been completed for a special sleeping car from St. Louis and requesting them to join the party at that point.

For the Labor Congress.

President Bell of the Central Labor union has selected the following committee to make arrangements for the proposed labor congress to be held in this city during labor week: William H. Bell, J. C. Russell, George Clark, F. A. Kennedy and F. M. Youngs. This committee will be reported to the Woman's Board of Managers of the exposition for appointment. The committee will work in conjunction with the convention committee of the woman's board.

Missouri and Exposition Bonds.

The county attorney of Buchanan county, Missouri, the county in which is St. Joseph, has rendered an opinion to the county court, or county commissioners, to the effect that the appropriation of $500 or any other sum by that body for the purpose of making an exhibit of the resources of the county at the exposition would be an illegal proceeding. Not satisfied with this, however, the county officials have asked the attorney general of Missouri for an opinion on the subject.

German Paper's Assistance.

The Louisville Omnibus, the leading German weekly newspaper in the south, devotes two full pages of its issue of February 6 to an article relating to the exposition which is illustrated with several two-column cuts of the main buildings artistically grouped. The Omnibus is one of the oldest German papers in the south, having been established thirty-two years ago. It has a large circulation among the Germans of the southern and middle states.

May Proceed Against Company.

At the meeting of the executive committee of the exposition yesterday afternoon, it was decided that in case the reply of the Omaha Water Works company to the demand made by the exposition officers for water is a refusal to comply, action will at once be brought in the courts to secure a mandamus against the water company to compel it to furnish the exposition grounds with water for all purposes.

Rock Island's Advertising.

General Advertising Agent Bonnell of the Rock Island railway was at exposition headquarters to consult with the officials of the Department of Exhibits regarding the booth to be erected in the Agriculture building by his road. He presented drawings showing the floor plan and the style of decoration of the proposed booth, indicating that the display to be made by this road will be of a most attractive character.

Kimball Will Inspect.

T. R. Kimball, one of the firm of architects-in-chief of the exposition, stated that he had received notice of the charge made at the meeting of the Board of Directors of the exposition to the effect that the galleries of the Auditorium were unsafe, and said he would proceed to make an examination to determine the exact condition of the building within the next few days.

ONE HEAD IS NEEDED

Necessity for a General Manager of Exposition Affairs.

SIX COMMANDERS FIVE TOO MANY

Many Stockholders and Directors Emphatic in Demanding the Change.

DION GERALDINE STILL A POTENT FACTOR

[?]Fine Italian Hand Shows Itself in Many Devious Ways.

[?]ION ON THE GROUNDS IS SERIOUS

Present Troubles Largely Due to the Peculiar Methods Introduced by the Great Director of Construction.

Exposition matters have taken a new turn within the last twenty-four hours. The action of the Board of Directors directing the manager of the Ways and Means department to commence suits against delinquent subscribers to exposition stock, coupled with the fact that the board took no action whatever in the way of making a change in the organization of the machinery of the exposition, has aroused the feeling of soreness and discontent which has been latent since Geraldine "resigned." Many complaints against the management of affairs are again voiced on the streets and in business houses.

Notwithstanding the fact that the Board of Directors did not take any action on the matter of appointing a general superintendent or director general at the last meeting the feeling is almost overwhelming among the members of the directory that some office of this kind should be created and some able man appointed to the position at once. The only reason action has not been taken before this has been a feeling on the part of some of the directors that the matter had once been referred to the executive committee and it might be construed as a reflection on that body to take the matter out of its hands at this time. The directors are agreed that such an officer is absolutely necessary and they are not backward about expressing this opinion, but they differ as to the manner in which the condition should be brought about.

Hon. Alvin Saunders, the venerable resident vice president of the exposition, is most emphatic in his declaration that business prudence demands that there must be a "head" to the exposition. "As matters are now," said the governor very emphatically, "no man appears to know whether a given matter comes in his department or not. As a result it is impossible to get a decisive answer to any proposition. I have had experience in this way and I know what I am talking about. This thing cannot go along like this much longer without striking a snag, and we must have a head to it. The executive committee should control this officer, but he should have full authority in matters of detail."

Director C. W. Lyman is equally emphatic in his opinion that a general manager of some kind should be appointed to take general charge of the work. He is of the opinion, however, that the executive committee should determine just when this appointment should be made. "If the committee wants to carry the load a little longer I don't believe the board should interfere with it. There is no doubt in my mind about the necessity for having an officer to look after all the details and if I was on the committee I should want him right away, but I believe the committee is the best judge of when that time has arrived."

Director G. W. Holdrege said: "I can see the necessity for a general manager, but I believe the executive committee should first take action in the matter as long as it has been referred to them."

WOULD RELIEVE THE COMMITTEE.

Thomas Kilpatrick, another director, said: "If it is thought best to appoint a general manager it should be done at an early day so as to help the exposition and relieve the executive committee and he should report to them on all important matters every day. While they would have control of all his actions yet, at the same time, so long as he conducted his departments with ability and honesty the chances are the executive committee would act towards him just as the directors act at present towards the executive committee. The members of the executive committee have done a great deal of work, but it seems to much to ask them to follow out all the details to the end of the exposition, and I think that the appointment of a manager to execute their orders would be a welcome relief to all of them, and it certainly would be no reflection upon their ability or the work they have done."

CAUSE OF DISAFFECTION.

The Department of Buildings and Grounds is the one which has attracted the greatest attention on account of the nature of its work. People who have any complaints to make do not mince matters, but make charges that are serious in their nature and indicate a looseness in the general conduct of affairs about the grounds that is somewhat surprising.

Among other things it is openly charged that Dion Geraldine is as much in control of the actual workings of the Department of Buildings and Grounds as he was in the palmy days when he signed himself, "general superintendent of the exposition." A subscriber to exposition stock who would probably be classed among "the little fellows"—a mechanic who has occasion to visit the grounds frequently—told a representative of The Bee recently that Geraldine is as much in evidence as ever. "He is on the grounds frequently," said this man, "and always has something to say about how this, that or the other thing should be done. He makes his headquarters at the Dellone hotel and nothing is done on the grounds without his knowledge. He pretends to be here to bid on exposition work and to support this pretense he put in a bid on the north viaduct across Sherman avenue. That bid was based on figures made by H. W. Tamm, the inspector in the employ of the exposition who was put there by Geraldine. Tamm figured too high, though, and Geraldine did not get the work. This contracting is simply a blind, however, because Geraldine is a partner in certain concessions which will form prominent features of the Midway. The whole thing is a close corporation and I don't feel disposed to pay my subscription as long as things go on as they have been going."

GERALDINE'S INFLUENCE.

A contractor who was standing by when these remarks were made joined in the conversation at this point. "Geraldine is not only interested in concessions," said he, "but he is a partner in contracts which are now being carried on. He owns part of the piledriver which this man Green is operating. John Templeton also owns a part of this same machine and Green is simply a figurehead under the direction of Templeton. Templeton is Kirkendall's chief clerk, but that don't prevent him from violating the rules of the exposition and owning an interest in the piledriving machine which gets all the work on the grounds. Green makes out his payrolls and Templeton pays them with his personal check. Geraldine doesn't appear on the surface of this deal, but when you remember that Green was brought out here from Chicago, where he was a plasterer, and put on the payroll at $3 per day and then suddenly blossomed out as a full-fledged piledriver with a machine and succeeded in landing contracts to drive piles when other piledrivers had already closed deals with these same contractors, you will see that he has pretty big pull. I know of one case where a certain piledriver had made an agreement to drive the piles for a certain building and had his machine on the ground. The contractor had a meeting with Geraldine downtown and the job was given to Green. I know the contractor did not see Green, because Green was on the grounds all the time between the time when the deal was made with the first piledriver and the time when the contractor notified the latter that he had decided to give the job to Green.

As an evidence that Geraldinism controls the department, parties point to the fact that the men placed on the department payroll by Geraldine remain there, regardless of their competency, while those who are believed to be opposed to Geraldine's "peculiar" methods soon find themselves out on the cold world. It is openly charged that the reason certain contractors are able to underbid all competitors on exposition work is that they are assured sham inspection and that they may use inferior material with impunity, while contractors who have no pull with Geraldine know they will be compelled to comply strictly with the specifications and use first-class material, costing a higher price. Many instances are cited which go to prove that these reports are based on more than idle talk.

HAS TAKEN TOO BIG A LOAD.

Some of the stockholders who talk about these things blame Manager Kirkendall for allowing this condition of affairs to exist; others are more charitable in their remarks and freely exculpate Mr. Kirkendall from any blame for these conditions. Among the latter is a director who was not present at the last meeting of the board. "'Kirkendall is a most agreeable fellow," said this director, "but he is inclined to be somewhat irascible. I have no doubt this is caused by the tremendous task he has assumed in addition to carrying on his large private business. He is a first-class boot and shoe man and has made a great success in his line, but what does he know about architecture, hydraulics, electrical plants, water works, drainage, and the laying out of grounds?   A man may be a first-class business man, but might not be able to run a machine shop or a hotel. The truth is, Kirkendall has taken a bigger contract than he is able to fill. He cannot be expected to show everything and has had no experience in the building business or in the many other lines which his department covers. I have watched matters pretty closely, and have known for some time that there was bound to be a big explosion. I thought it would come at the meeting last Friday and that is why I did not attend, but the inevitable must come sometime and the sooner some man is put in charge of the whole business who thoroughly [?]nds the details and can give all [?] it, the better it will be for the exposition and everybody concerned."

ABOUT A SUPERINTENDENT.

In line with the statements of the director quoted above it may be stated that things have been at loose ends on the exposition grounds for a long time. Just three months ago the directors authorized the executive committee to appoint a general superintendent of all the departments "who should be a practical builder." The directors left the naming of this man to Manager Kirkendall, but no man has yet been nominated for the position. About one week ago Manager Kirkendall notified the executive committee that he needed the assistance of his chief clerk, John Templeton, outside of office hours, and he asked that he be authorized to raise Templeton's salary to $125. Some objection was raised to increasing Templeton's salary again, as it had been twice raised already; once from $75 to $90 and then to $100, but the authority was finally granted. The next day Mr. Kirkendall appointed Templeton "superintendent of the Department of Buildings and Grounds," and notified the various inspectors, engineers, etc., by letters addressed to each, that he was to be obeyed and respected accordingly. This action brought on a controversy. Mr. Kirkendall denied that he had made any such appointment. Following this action the letters sent to the inspectors, engineers and other employes in charge of the different branches of work, notifying them of Templeton's appointment, were recalled by Mr. Kirkendall, and the following very adroitly worded epistle sent to each of them, dated February 9:

"I find it necessary to have someone on the grounds in whom we can center authority, and I have chosen Mr. Templeton in this capacity; so you will please report to him in all matters and receive from him such instructions as you may require from time to time. I wish you to understand by this that Mr. Templeton will have authority to answer for me on the grounds, relative to all matters pertaining to the various departments."

CENTRAL AUTHORITY BADLY NEEDED.

Previous to having a man in whom to "center authority" the affairs of the department had been in the hands of everybody connected with the work. Each inspector was supreme, likewise the engineer, the gardener and all the other employes who had the shadow of authority over any other person. The inspectors followed the whims of their own sweet wills, the engineer went ahead with his work regardless of the consequences, the gardener conceived schemes and carried them out without knowing or caring how they fit the whole scheme, and nothing but "bull-headed luck" kept things running at all. Even the man who is hired to watch the "office" at nights—another importation of Geraldine's, by the way—went away at night whenever he felt disposed, without securing the doors and windows. These have been found open by other employes, and various documents which would be of interest to certain parties have been missing. Of course no one reported these things, because every employe had always before him the awful fate of one of their number who conceived the idea that as long as he was on the payroll he ought to take as much interest in seeing that the exposition was protected as though he was the director of the department. Acting on this theory he reported some of the higher employes who had "looked on the wine when it was red," and were not attending to their duties. He was discharged almost immediately, and none of the other employes have experienced any desire to follow his example. They recognize the fact that complaints are not wanted, and they act accordingly, but this knowledge does not keep them from talking to others about the way things are being carried on.

These are some of the things the subscribers are talking about these beautiful winter days, and there are enough other details just as freely discussed to make a good sized book.

T. M. T. C. ANNUAL GATHERING.

Officers Elected and Plans for the Summer Generally Outlined.

The Traveling Men's Transmississippi club held its annual meeting last night in the parlors of the Commercial club. The annual election of the board of directors took place and these elected officers for the club. Besides this business the club laid some plans for the entertainment of traveling men who visit the city during the exposition which is the main object of the existence of the body.

The election of directors resulted in the selection of the following: Ed Drew, W. H. Butts, E. S. Streeter, M. Meyer, W. A. Stone, M. W. Rayley, C. W. Close, M. C. Howes, F. O. Fields. This board later elected the following officers of the club: E. S. Streeter, president; M. W. Rayley, vice president; W. H. Butts, secretary and treasurer; W. A. Stone, chairman of the Board of Directors. The president and secretary were re-elected, having held their offices since the organization of the club.

The most important matter decided upon in connection with the exposition was that club quarters should be maintained. They will be located in some prominent building and will be suitably fitted up. They are to be opened up shortly before the exposition, and if they are found to be successful they will be maintained until its close. All visiting themselves of the privileges of the quarters. The Board of Directors will meet on next Friday to examine several suites of rooms and will then make the selection. A suite on the first floor of The Bee building was very favorably mentioned. It was determined to invite any and all traveling men's associations in the country to take desk room in the quarters. This will be provided free of charge.

In order to raise the revenue for the maintenance of the quarters it was decided to make the dues of membership 50 cents a month. The first dues will be collected on April 1, by which time it is expected that the quarters will be opened and can be used by the members of the club.

Some arrangements were made for an entertainment to be given in the parlors of the Commercial club either next Friday or Saturday nights. The affair is to be of a social character. A program of music and speeches will be arranged. Later a banquet will be enjoyed. The entertainment will conclude with a dance and a card tournament. The arrangements are such that it is expected that the affair will be highly enjoyable and successful. Feminine friends of the traveling men will be invited to attend.

One of the very pleasant features of the meeting was the presentation of a handsome gold-headed cane to Secretary Butts as a mark of appreciation of his past efforts in behalf of the club. The cane was purchased by the club membership. The presentation speech was made by J. F. Hommel, who said in his remarks that the club members felt that Mr. Butts had done more than anyone else in building up the club. Mr. Butts made a brief and feeling response.

The Traveling Men's Transmississippi club was organized in last November. Its object is to promote fraternity and friendship among traveling men, to maintain club parlors for the use of its members and visiting traveling men and especially to provide headquarters and entertainment for all travelers' organizations and conventions meeting in the city during the exposition. Among the conventions it will look after is the annual meeting of the Travelers' Protective Association of America. The club membership is now 100 and it is expected that the 200 mark will be reached in the near future.

PLAN FOR A NEW JERSEY EXHIBIT.

Legislature is Likely to Make an Appropriation.

The joint committee on appropriation of the New Jersey legislature has agreed to report in favor of an appropriation of $20,000 for participation in the Transmississippi Exposition by that state. The committee gave a hearing to Chairman R. M. Floyd and E. B. Gaddis of the New Jersey commission regarding the advisability of making an appropriation.

The committee did not approve of the scheme to erect a building at Omaha that might later be removed to Sea Girt, but thought it would be better to utilize the money appropriated to further the New Jersey exhibit. The members admitted that something should be done for New Jersey manufacturers and trades people, and Colonel Floyd was asked to see to it that the state was well represented.

Idaho Man on the Grounds.

Mayor M. Alexander of Boise City, Idaho, one of the leading merchants of that thriving mountain city, was a caller at exposition headquarters yesterday. Mr. Alexander is en route home from an eastern trip and stopped in Omaha at the request of Governor Steunenberg to look over the exposition grounds and look after Idaho's interests. He learned what had been done by State Engineer Mills a few weeks ago and found nothing to add to what had already been done and spent the afternoon in looking over the exposition grounds. He was greatly pleased at the progress which had been made and the magnificent scale on which the whole affair was projected.

EXHIBITS BY GOVERNMENT

WHAT THE DEPARTMENTS WILL SHOW

Justice Will Have Some Curious Articles and a Display of Justices and Decisions—Educational Bureau's Plans.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion has received from Frank Strong, the representative of the Department of Justice on the board of control in charge of the exhibits to be made in the Government building on the exposition grounds, a brief statement descriptive of the exhibit which will be made by the Department of Justice in that building. This description is as follows:

The Department of Justice cannot, from the nature of things, rank with the other and larger departments as an exhibitor, yet we hope to present several interesting features on the same or similar lines followed at the expositions at Chicago, Atlanta and Nashville.

The portraits of eminent men who have occupied the position of attorney general of the United States from the time of Randolph, in 1789, will adorn the available wall space. As the law and Dame Justice herself are too intangible to be themselves presented, it will be necessary to show, in well bound calf, their printed edicts in the shape of statutes and supreme court reports, supported by the counterfeit presentments of well known judges, who for many years have leant dignity and honor to the bench and bar. We also hope to have on exhibition a group of photographs consisting of the photographs of the justice, Hon. David J. Brewer, circuit judges and district judges of the Eighth judicial circuit of the United States, which circuit comprises the states of Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Arkansas, Wyoming, Utah and the territories of New Mexico, Oklahoma and the Indian territory.

We also expect to add an interesting branch in the exhibition of photographs of views connected with United States prisoners and prisons, showing the principal institutions where federal prisoners are confined, the modes of employment and discipline, together with souvenirs illustrative of the ingenuity of men when in confinement and compelled to rely upon their wits and native ability for amusement and such relief from the terrible monotony of prison life as can be gained by carving trinkets in wood and marble. Keys, whittled from a broom handle, and which have actually been used by the marker to effect his release, dinner knives curiously made from small pieces of polished wood and horn, some the creation of Indian convicts—these and such like articles will, it is believed, prove interesting exhibits to everybody. This feature will serve to illustrate the lives of those to whom justice has been meted out, a class of unfortunates growing larger and larger every year, and whose care, maintenance, proper punishment, treatment and general disposal furnish a subject for the best thought and wisest judgment of all good citizens and patriots.

It is also proposed to exhibit, nicely framed and properly and intelligently labeled, a series of blanks showing the routine of the business of the Department of Justice, such as the blanks used in the office of the attorney in charge of pardons, showing the routine of an application for executive clemency from the time of its inception until it is granted or denied by the president; blanks from the office of the appointment clerk, showing the various forms used in commissioning officials of the United States courts; blanks used in connection with the supreme court of the United States, etc.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion has also received from F. W. Clarke, the representative of the Department of the Interior on the Government Board of Control, a description of the exhibits to be made by that department. From this it is gathered that this department will be represented by four of its bureaus, those of Education, Indian affairs, the Patent office and geological survey.

The exhibit of the Bureau of Education is mainly pictorial in character, illustrating the work of education, and wash drawings to illustrate various methods of punishment, the evolution of the modern school house, etc. A prominent feature will be the work of the bureau in Alaska.

The Bureau of Indian Affairs will be largely confined to showing the work of the several Indian schools conducted by the government. Specimens of work of the pupils in all lines will be shown, including carpenter and blacksmith work, shoemaking, tinware, wagons, harness, embroidery, bead work, etc.

The Patent office exhibit will include the usual exhibits of models of American inventions, classified in such a way as to show the influence of the Patent office on special lines of industry.

The Geological survey will exhibit minerals, fossils in rocks in great variety, a series of relief maps and geological models and framed illustrations from publications of the bureau.

 

ARKANSAS DELEGATES ARE COMING.

Business Men Want to See the Grounds for Themselves.

A delegation of prominent business men from Arkansas, including members of the Arkansas Exposition commission and representatives of the newspapers of that state, will arrive in Omaha tomorrow, reaching the Webster street depot at 12:55 p. m. It is expected that there will be between twenty-five and fifty people in the party. They come to visit the exposition grounds and learn at first hands the progress that has been made and the general plan of the enterprise in order to act more intelligently in preparing for the exhibit which Arkansas is to make of her resources.

The visitors will be met at the depot by a special committee appointed for that purpose by President Wattles, as follows: H. J. Penfold, W. D. McHugh, R. C. Peters, H. E. Palmer, G. W. Holbrook, H. K. Burket, Dudley Smith, W. F. Gurley, E. H. Scott, J. B. Sheean, R. W. Richardson, Euclid Martin and C. B. Havens. This committee will escort the party from the depot to the exposition grounds, where the buildings will be inspected, and the entire party will then return to one of the hotels, where luncheon will be served. President Wattles will represent the exposition, but the members of the executive committee will not be present, as the committee will be in regular session at the time.

The visitors will start for home in the evening.

Models for Government Staff.

The entire lot of models for the staff work which is to embellish the Government building have been received by Alexander & Son, the contractors for the staff work on this building. The full size models were made in Washington under the direct supervision of the architect of the Treasury department, thus obviating any delay in making inspection and approving the models, which would result if they were made here.

Contractor Alexander will put on a large force at once and push the work of casting as fast as possible. He enlarge his shop recently when it became apparent that the models would be delayed and is prepared to work a large force.

Will Have Two Buffalo.

The Page Woven Wire Fence company of Adrain, Mich., proposes to make an exhibit of its fences and in the enclosure thus formed they say they will place a couple of buffaloes. The larger and more corpulent of the pair will be dubbed "Grover Cleveland," and its companion will be called "Ben Harrison."

Applications for Space.

Among the recent applications for space which had been received by the Department of Concessions are the following: Macon, Mo., Shear company, exhibit of latest devices in shears; Roy Armstrong of Lincoln, Neb., exhibit of crayon portraits; Harrison Granite company of Adrian, Mich., exhibit of monuments; Emerson T. Abbott, St. Joseph, Mo., and G. B. Lewis & Co. of Watertown, Wis., space in the Apiary building for bee keeping appliances; Ripley Hardware company of Grafton, Ill., feed cooker in operation in live stock section; Q. & C. company of Chicago, exhibit of railway appliances.

ANNEX TO MANUFACTURES BUILDING.

Executive Committee Extends the Accommodations for Exhibitors.

The executive committee of the exposition took steps at its meeting yesterday afternoon to provide additional room for the constant growing class of exhibitors who want to occupy space in the Manufactures building, by ordering plans drawn for an annex to the Manufactures building in which will be placed the foreign exhibitors. This annex will stand to the west end of the big building, and will face west on Twentieth street. It will be extended as far north as may be necessary and will afford plenty of room for all exhibits in this class which may be accepted. The architects will at once commence the preparation of the plans for this annex and its construction will be pushed.

After wrestling with the matter for several months, the special committee of the executive committee, to which was referred the task of deciding upon the form of tickets, passes, etc., required for the exposition, submitted a report yesterday which was adopted. The committee comprised Managers Lindsey, Kirkendall and Bruce, and Manager Reed acted with them for the reason that the Concessions department is more or less interested in the matter. The committee report awarded the contract for printing the tickets, etc., to the following parties, each being awarded the items enumerated at the prices stated in each case: To the Security Bank Note company of Philadelphia, 2,000 season card passes at $33 per 1,000; 2,000 invitations or letters of transmittal at $55 per 1,000; 13,000 term card passes at $4.60; 2,000 term press passes at $4,60; 500,000, more or less, special day ticketc​ at $1.30; 1,000,000 concessions revenue stamps. To the Rees Printing company, Omaha, 5,000 photo full term lithograph books at $22 per 1,000; 5,000 photo employes' coupon books at $32; 7,500 photo commutation tickets at $17.50; 15,000 one-trip passes at $2.20; 1,000,000 single admission tickets at 15 cents per 1,000; 500,000 single admission night tickets at 15 cents; 300,000 single admission children's tickets at 15 cents; 3,000,000 concessions tickets at 12½ cents per 1,000; 500,000 concession restaurant checks at 12½ cents per 1,000.

For Furniture Exhibits.

Special Commissioner W. I. Kierstead, who is looking after the securing of exhibits of furniture and house furnishing goods, will go to Chicago and Grand Rapids to meet the representatives of several prominent manufacturing houses who desire to close contracts for space in the exposition.

Mr. Kierstead has filed with the Exhibits department an application made by Milton Rogers & Son, the agents for the estate of P. D. Beckwith of Dowagiac, Mich., for an exhibit of round oak stoves, ranges and furnaces. The exhibit will occupy 720 feet of floor space.

WHAT CALIFORNIA MAY YET DO.

Board of Trade Takes Hold of the Matter of Making an Exhibit.

The California Board of Trade has taken hold of the project of making an exhibit of the resources of the entire state and announces that it will take charge of the matter under certain conditions.

The board states that investigation shows that about $15,000 will be required to make a creditable showing, exclusive of any payment for space, and it will take hold of the matter provided the exposition authorities will donate 10,000 feet of floor space to the state free of charge and that the people of California will raise the necessary $15,000 by April 1. If these conditions are complied with the board will proceed to make an exhibit which it is announced will include the following showing:

First—California's mineral resources, including all minerals found here which are used in the mechanics and the arts. Second—Her building material, in woods, marble and stone. Third—The capabilities of her resources. Fourth—The full round of her agricultural products. Fifth—A complete detailed presentation of her horticultural and viticultural products. Sixth—Her illustrated geography, by means of relief maps. Seventh—Her manufacturing capabilities and existing manufacturing industries. Eighth—Her educational progress and advancement. Ninth—The attractiveness of her natural scenery. Tenth—The attractions of her health resorts. Eleventh—The salubrity and clemency of her climate, as illustrated by ornamental and semi-tropical growth and as presented also in thermal statistics; and, finally, by proper statistical facts, her present status and past progress, and the advantages and inducements this state offered as a place of residence.

The people of Los Angeles county have raised $10,000 for making an exhibit of the resources of their county and the Southern Pacific railway has offered to transport exhibits to Omaha for about one-third regular rates on the going trip and return them free.

No official communication has yet reached the exposition authorities in Omaha regarding the suggestion of the State Board of Trade that 10,000 feet of floor space be given to California.

HATCHET IS GROWING FAVORABLY.

Women Working Hard to Make it a Great Success.

The greater part of the time and energies of the Woman's Board of Manager of the exposition is being devoted to getting out the children's paper which is to be issued on Washington's birthday, February 22, for the benefit of the Girl's and Boys' building. The editorial and business staff of the paper, which was appointed some time ago, has opened an office in the Paxton block, and this is the Mecca of the members of the board and the numerous patronesses and the innumerable children who are contributing their services in many ways to help make the paper a success.

The design for the cover which will probably be accepted shows twenty small oval scrolls arranged in the form of a large oval covering the entire front page of the paper. These are twined with cherry blossoms and in each little oval will appear the head of "somebody's little darling." Just what will appear in the blank space in the center has not been definitely decided, there being a division of sentiment between an appropriate poem with etched illustrations and a photograph of a child. One novel idea will probably be adopted because it is a direct violation of all the precedents is to omit from the cover of the paper the name of the publication.

Encouraging reports are being received daily from canvassers for the paper and the circulation manager is rejoicing over the prospect for a big circulation.

Los Angeles Proceeds Independently.

The people of Los Angeles county, California, are going ahead with their arrangements for an exhibit of the resources of their county regardless of what may be done by the northern part of the state or by any of the other counties. They have reserved 2,000 feet of space in which they will make an exhibit, and the first payment for this space, required by the rules of the exposition, has been made.

Teachers' Committee at Work.

The executive committee of the Transmississippi Educational convention met at the Commercial club rooms this afternoon with all the members present except J. E. Utt. A preliminary circular was agreed upon and will be issued in about a week, setting forth the plan and scope of the convention.

The committee also considered the matter of an official badge, but no definite action was taken.

Notes of the Exposition.

A German manufacturer of cuckoo clocks proposes to install an exhibit which shall include thirty-six of these clocks, all of which will be so arranged as to chime every hour, making a chorus of musical sounds.

The lumbermen in the northern part of Wisconsin are seriously considering the necessity for making an extensive exhibit at the exposition in order to regain the trade of the west, which they say has been turned to the south during the last few years.

James P. Cooper of Arcadia, Neb., notifies the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he has a large black eagle, measuring seven and one-half feet from tip to tip, which he offers as a decoration provided it is returned to him in good condition.

The Vienna Tourist Gazette, a German paper having an extended circulation all over Europe, has asked the Department of Publicity and Promotion to furnish it with cuts of the exposition buildings and descriptive matter of the exposition which it volunteers to print in its columns.

Instead of giving a bond, Lewis Root, of the firm of Root & Mattox, that intends to put in a Wild West show at teh​ exposition, has given a mortgage for $3,000 on an eighty-acre tract of land. The conditions of the mortgage provide that if the show is put on and run according to the rules adopted by the exposition people governing such attractions the mortgage is to be void.

Mrs. Angus Cameron of La Crosse, Wis.,

MODELING THE STATUARY

SCUPLTOR ENGLESMAN VERY BUSY

Producing in Clay the Figures that Are to Surmount the Agriculture Building— Brief Outline of the Plans.

The statuary which is to add the finishing touches to the beautiful and stately Agriculture building is being modelled in this city by Sculptor Englesmann, who came here from St. Louis for that purpose. The general character of the statuary was briefly outlined by Architect Cass Gilbert before he started for Europe, and this has been amplified by Mr. Kimball, of the firm of architects-in-chief. From this data the sculptor is now making his clay models, which will be submitted for approval for work is commenced on the full size groups, which will appear on the building.

The central pavilion of this building will receive the greater part of the decoration. Over each of the entrance arches will be spandrels ornamented with figures, while the pavilion will be surmounted by a number of groups. Two groups will represent fountains, figures with water pots being emblematic of the rains which produce moisture for the ground. The signs of the zodiac will also be represented by other groups. Above all of these will be a large, central group, representing Prosperity, supported at either side by figures representing Labor and Integrity. The wide frieze over the entrance arch will be occupied by a figure symbolizing Abundance, and at either end of the frieze will appear the arms of the state and the nation.

On the end pavilions will be groups representing the seasons, Spring, being depicted on the east end and Autumn on the west. Reclining figures in these groups will represent the favorable winds.

Along the front of the building, surmounting the columns, will appear single decorative female figures, bearing cereals and other farm products.

ARKANSAS TRAVELERS IN TOWN.

Business Men Come to See the Exposition and Make Arrangements.

A big delegation of Arkansas business men arrived in Omaha at noon today to make a thorough inspection of the exposition grounds and buildings and learn what has been done to make the Transmississippi and International Exposition a reality. Before they return to their homes they will make arrangements for building an Arkansas building and installing in the main exposition building exhibits of the diversified resources of their state, which they say will equal anything that may be done by any other state in the union.

 

There are thirty men and one woman in the party, the latter being Mrs. McConnell, wife of Colonel E. T. McConnell, warden of the state penitentiary at Clarksville. The delegation was met at the Webster street depot by a special committee consisting of President Wattles, R. W. Richardson, Dudley Smith, E. E. Bryson, Fred Metz, H. K. Burket, R. C. Peters, H. J. Penfold and G. W. Holbrook. A special trolley car was in waiting and in this the trip was made at once to the exposition grounds, where they made the tour of the grounds. The visitors were most favorably impressed with the appearance of the buildings and the magnitude of the scale on which all the arrangements seemed to be projected.

After making a tour of the grounds the party was escorted to a hotel where luncheon was served, followed by short talks by representatives of the exposition and members of the visiting delegation.

The visitors will remain in the city until tomorrow afternoon. The following is a full list of the party: Colonel W. C. Vincenheller of Little Rock, state commissioner of Mines and Agriculture and president of the Arkansas Exposition commission; W. D. Matthews of Stuttgart, secretary of the commission; Mayor D. L. Cramer, Dr. C. W. Sillin, W. M. Price, sr., W. M. Price, jr., all of Stuttgart; M. R. Coffmann, W. H. Jones, F. P. Hall, M. F. Collier and Frank Meely, Paragould; H. G. Hanna, Pine Bluff; A. C. Hull of Little Rock, secretary of state; H. L. Cross, Bentonville; Judge W. D. Jones, Pine Bluff; B. L. Jones, Ozark; R. H. Jaynes, Mena; Gearge Sengel, Fort Smith; S. C. Dowell, Walnut Ridge; J. R. Harris, Springdale; J. H. Kell, Newport; S. L. Jeffers, Mulberry; J. J. Baggett, Prairie Grove; Frank Hill, Feyetteville; D. S. Helvern, Mammoth Springs; Rev. J. M. Lucey, Pine Bluff; Colonel E. T. McConnell, Clarksville; Lieutenant Elias Chandler, U. S. A., and Prof. J. F. Stinson, Fayettesville; J. T. Pomeray, Eureka Springs.

FOR ILLINOIS STATE BUILDING.

Colonel Hambleton Talks of the Plans of the Commission.

Colonel C. E. Hambleton of Chicago, the secretary of the Illinois Exposition commission, is in the city in the interest of the Illinois commission. He said he had come to look over the Illinois building and to confer with the exposition officials regarding a number of minor matters and would remain in the city several days.

"Our people are taking a great interest in the exposition," said Colonel Hambleton. "I have been going about all over the state a great deal for the last few months, stirring up our manufacturers to make a good exhibit, and I find that they are all thoroughly alive to the situation. The Illinois commission will not make any attempt to make a collective exhibit of the resources of the state, but devote its energies to social amenities after the exposition opens. Before that time comes we will do everything within our power to have the resources of the state well represented.

"We have been making some preparations for the decoration of the interior of our building," continued Colonel Hambleton, "and it probably be ornamented with handsome pictures. These will not be installed as exhibits, but will be simply for decoration. Among these will probably be several large paintings of the World's fair, 10x20 feet in size, which were painted by Mr. Key of Chicago."

Denver Commission Busy.

The Denver exposition commission is working industriously on the project of having Denver represented at the exposition by a city building and it reports that the idea is meeting with great favor. If this scheme is carried out Denver will be the only city in the country with a building on the grounds. The idea has been advanced by several cities, but has been abandoned by them, and the knowledge of this has spurred the Denver commission to renewed efforts.

The trip of members of the Colorado and Denver commissions to Omaha to inspect the exposition will be made some time this week. Governor Adams and Mayor McMurray of Denver have been invited to join the party and each county in the state has been invited to send a representative. In addition to these a number of prominent business men from different parts of the state will be in the party.

Denver's Visiting Delegation.

Secretary A. T. MacDonald of the Colorado Exposition commission has notified the exposition authorities that the excursion of business men from all parts of the state will start from Denver via the Union Pacific next Monday afternoon and will arrive in Omaha at 7:30 a. m. Tuesday. He says the party will travel in two Pullman cars and will be headed by Governor Adams and Mayor McMurray of Denver. Invitations have been sent by the governor to a number of prominent men in various parts of the state to join the party, and Mayor McMurray has sent similar invitations to a number of prominent Denver business men. Secretary MacDonald says that it is expected

(Continued on Sixth Page.)

A few witnesses, whose testimony was simply to show Hockenberger's official capacity at the time of the alleged embezzlement, were examined by the state last night and the court then adjourned to 9 o'clock this morning, the jury being kept in the charge of Bailiff Kleinkauf with the strictest orders.

This morning the witness sworn gave testimony in regard to the receipts Hockenberger signed as secretary of the Board of Education for moneys received from himself as treasurer of Hall county, the state aiming to show that after taking $3,000 from the county treasury and giving a receipt therefor he only turned over to the school treasurer $2,000 and retained the $1,000, while secretary of the Board of Education.

The members of the County Commissioners' association of Nebraska met in annual session in this city this morning and transacted the preliminary business of the session. A very disappointing feature of the affair is the fact that the members of the association of this county were not present to receive their guests and even when the delegates went to the hall they found it locked and no one present to attend to the matter. The fault seems to lie entirely with the members of the Hall county board. At the last meeting of the board it appointed a committee to receive the visitors and look after their entertainment every member of the board being a member of the committee.

Later in the day the members of the Hall county board arrived in the city and Chairman Ewing explained that owing to an oversight in the date of the meeting the reception committee had neglected matters. He assured the visitors that the matter was deeply regretted and at once the local commissioners set about to make it pleasant for the delegates from other counties. The visitors will be given a drive about the city tomorrow, including a visit to the sugar factory and Soldiers' Home. The commissioners will finish they business tomorrow.

WANT THE CASE DISMISSED.

Omaha Police Commission Matter Before the Supreme Court.

LINCOLN, Feb. 15.—(Special Telegram.)—In the supreme court this forenoon Attorney McCoy filed a motion for dismissal in the police commission case, involving the discharge of W. H. Shoop and others from the force, in which Judge Scott had restrained the board from putting the discharges into effect. The dismissal is asked for on the grounds that a levy has been made by the city council this year sufficient to maintain the entire force, and that the reasons for the discharge are no longer good. The motion was submitted.Attorney Day objected to the motion and said it was important that the court make a ruling that might apply in future emergencies. He wanted to find out whether the police board, or Rosewater, or Judge Scott, was running the police department.

The funding bond case and the Yeiser telephone case will be heard tomorrow.

Columbus Items.

COLUMBUS, Neb., Feb. 15.—(Special.)—Hon. W. H. Westover of Rushville, one of the judges of the Fifteenth judicial district, opened court here this morning, relieving Judge Marshall, who went to Fremont. Judge Albert of this city is holding a session of court at Chadron in Judge Westover's district. A number of cases of only local importance have been disposed of this week, and the docket is kept arranged a few days ahead and the cases are promptly called. Irvin Speice of this city is reporting this week, in the absence of Hon. J. G. Maher, Judge Westover's official stenographer.

The Platte County Democrat, published in this city by Duffy & Son, will be removed to Humphrey the first week in March, where it will continue under the same name. Humphrey is a town of 1,000 people, and has at present but one paper, while this city has six. The Democrat was started here last August.

Mrs. Albert Weissenflush, who lives near Duncan in this county, returned from Omaha yesterday, where she had been to consult a specialist in regard to a cancerous growth upon her right arm. She submitted to an operation and had the offensive member amputated above the elbow. She expects now to regain her usual health.

Fremont Court Notes.

FREMONT, Neb., Feb. 15.—(Special.)—In the district court today the case of the village of Dodge against the bondsmen of their defaulting treasurer is in progress. The claim is that Hoetfelker failed to account for $1,000 of the saloon licenses and $34 of other funds. The evidence introduced today showed that he received $1,000 more than he had accounted for. Hoetfelker was treasurer of the village of Dodge and also of Webster township, and a big man in that part of the county. In October, 1896, he skipped out, owing a large amount of money aside from his indebtedness to the village and township. His shortage with the county was settled by his bondsmen last fall. His present whereabouts are unknown.

gressman Mercer to be present and if possible secure a favorable report on the amendment. The committee consists of seventeen members as follows: James S. Sherman, chairman, New York; Charles Curtis, Kansas; Israel F. Fischer, New York; Frank M. Eddy, Minnesota; Alexander Stewart, Wisconsin; John F. Lacey, Iowa; Horace G. Snover, Michigan; Charles B. Landis, Indiana; Samuel J. Barrows, Massachusetts; Horace B. Packer, Pennsylvania, Charles E. Pearce, Missouri; John S. Little, Arkansas; William A. Jones, Virginia; Elijah B. Lewis, Georgia; John H. Stephens, Texas; William T. Zenor, Indiana; Macenas E. Benton, Missouri. Lately Chairman Sherman has been talking against making any more appropriations for the Omaha Exposition and has been outspoken in criticism of the proposed congress, but the friends of the measure hope to reach the chairman in time to report the amendment favorably. Congressman Lacey of Iowa is against the bill, which is exciting more comment than the opposition of any other member of the committee.

FORT CROOK BOULEVARD.

Either the commissioners of Douglas and Sarpy counties and the South Side Improvement club have been working on the boulevard between Fort Crook and Omaha, in a most mysterious manner, or else Captain Sam. R. Jones, assistant quartermaster, Department of the Platte, is just waking up from a Van Winkle sleep. Captain Jones, in a letter to Congressman Mercer, states that he has received a communication from the quartermaster general of the army in relation to a macadamized road from the garrison to Omaha, but is not able to report on the same. He asks Mr. Mercer who the promoters of the boulevard are and as he has consulted with several parties in Omaha about the matter and as no one seems to know anything about the contemplated work, he is constrained to ask Mercer for information so that he way reply to the quartermaster general's inquiry.

Secretary Cox of the government board said today that every department was actively at work assembling their exhibits for the Omaha exposition and that every member was enthusiastic in predicting the finest exhibition ever made by the government. It will take fifty cars to transport the government exhibit, exclusive of tank cars to haul the salt water aquarium. Representative Schneider of the Fish commission has returned from Omaha, where he went to locate the fish exhibit, and says he was greatly impressed with what he saw of the work being done. Lieutenant Commander Logan will assume charge of the naval exhibit March 1, succeeding Lieutenant Commander Patch, who will be transferred to another station.

SPACE FOR ARKANSAS SHOW

AMOUNT TO BE RESERVED AGREED ON

Delegates Confer with Exposition Managers and Come to a Happy Conclusion in the Negotiations.

The Arkansas delegation laid siege to the expoosition​ headquarters at an early hour and a lengthy conference was held with the officials of the Department of Exhibits. As a result of this space, aggregating 12,000 feet, in the Horticulture, Mines, Agriculture and Liberal Arts, buildings was reserved for that state. This space will be held foor​ Arkansas until March 1, by which time the commission will have decided whether to make the state exhibit in the several main exposition buildings or erect a building and install therein the many evidences of the resources of the state.

The members of the delegation gave vent to many expressions of firm determination to have a showing made by their state which shall be a credit, and they said they believed the revenue necessary to bring about this result could be raised without difficulty after they instill the people of their state with some of the enthusiasm they had imbibed since reaching Omaha.

The Arkansas party was increased this morning by the arrival of James T. Pomeroy of Eureka Springs, who stopped in Kansas City to attend the meeting of the Missouri Exposition commission and learn something of what Missouri intends to do. Mr. Pomeroy asserted most positively that the northwestern part of the state where he lives will be represented by an exhibit regardless of what the rest of the state may do.

"Our section is thoroughly aroused," said Mr. Pomeroy, "and we are going to have an exhibit. I accomplished the Missouri commission on its visit to Omaha and when I returned home and told our people of what the exposition was going to be they all agreed with me that we must make an exhibit and show the world what we have down there in the Ozark mountain country. We have made arrangements to reproduce one of our famous mineral springs and keep it supplied with the natural spring water during the entire exposition and we are also going to have an exhibit of the fruits and other products which are grown in our section. If the state makes a general exhibit we will join with it and do all we can in the interest of a fine exhibit."

 

After concluding arrangements with the Department of Exhibits the delegation went to South Omaha to inspect the packing houses. After returning from there the party went to the exposition grounds again and started on their homeward trip at 3:05 p. m.

KING CORN TO HAVE QUARTERS.

Special Attention to Be Paid to Its Proper Presentation.

Prof. F. W. Taylor, who attended the meeting held in Chicago in the interest of a movement to increase the demand for American corn as a food product, has returned from that meeting greatly impressed with the magnitude of the undertaking. He attended the meeting as the representative of the Department of Exhibits of the exposition and was largely instrumental in inducing the supporters of the movement to commence operations in Omaha by installing an exhibit at the exposition.

Prof. Taylor stated that the meeting was attended by about 150 or 175 representatives of manufactories of corn products, superintendents of experiment stations connected with agricultural colleges, and others interested in increasing the demand for corn. As a result of the deliberations it was decided to commence active operations at the Transmississippi Exposition by erecting a building to be decorated in a lavish but highly ornamental manner with corn, and install therein the various products made from corn, including the new corn flour about which so much has already been said and written. In connection with this exhibit there will also be established a cooking school at which the methods of preparing edible and attractive dishes of corn products will be demonstrated, and the preparations distributed to the hungry.

Some time in October a meeting of the organization given birth in Chicago will be held in Omaha and plans will then be perfected for an active campaign of education among the people of the United States, including exhibitions at future expositions, and following with a descent upon the countries of Europe, including an exhibit at the Paris exposition in 1900.

LIFE SAVING SERVICE'S SHOW.

Superintendent Kimball Will Make an Interesting Display.

The Philadelphia Item of recent date quotes Superintendent Kimball of the life saving service as saying that the display of life saving appliances at the Transmississippi Exposition will excel the one that attracted so much attention at the World's fair.

Everything that was at Chicago will be at Omaha, and there will be a number of new features. An interesting feature of the exhibit will be a 24-pound shot, the first fired in the United States, to carry a line to a wrecked vessel. It was thrown from an iron mortar to the British ship Ayrshire January 12, 1852. The life savers, volunteers, rescued 201 persons. Only one man was drowned, and he lost his life because he attempted to reach the shore by clinging to the outside of the car instead of awaiting his turn. The shot that carried the line to the vessel crashed into the cabin, sunk when the wreck went down, and for a generation was uncovered with sand. A great storm uncovered the wreck a few years ago; the shot was recovered and presented to Superintendent Kimball, who keeps it as a valuable souvenir of the service. He also has the mortar from which the shot was fired, and both will go to Omaha.

Amount Paid to Geraldine.

OMAHA, Feb. 16.—To the Editor of The Bee: Will you kindly state through the columns of your paper if, when Mr. Geraldine was discharged from service with the Transmississippi Exposition, he was paid his entire salary for the whole term of his contract, that is, the amount he would have received had he remained to the close of the exposition? Subscriber.

Ans.—Geraldine's contract with the exposition management was the same as that of every other employe who is or has been in its employ. He was subject to discharge at any time at the pleasure of the executive committee. Hence, when he "resigned" he was paid to the time when his resignation was accepted—October 30.

Tennessee Visitors.

Fred T. Cummins, a local commission broker who has taken a strong interest in the exposition and who has an extensive acquaintance in the south, has notified the exposition authorities that he has made arrangements for an excursion of Tennessee people which will start from Nashville the first of the coming week and reach Omaha Wednesday. He says there will be about fifty people in the party and they will come for the purpose of visiting this section of the country and seeing just what is being done about the exposition grounds.

Captain of the Gondoliers.

Captain Moretti, the Venetian who was in command of the gondoliers at the World's fair and afterward at the Nashville exposition, has reached Omaha with his company of gondoliers and is negotiating with the Department of Concessions for the privilege of operating the gondolas on the lagoon on the main court. The little party started from Nashville last October, intending to come to Omaha by water, but when St. Louis was reached the severity of the weather and the frozen condition of the rivers made it necessary for them to abandon the water route and they and their boats were brought to Omaha by the more prosaic, but expeditious, railway.

MISSOURIANS COME TO CONFER.

Special Committee Named at Kansas City Calls on the Managers.

The special committee appointed by the Missouri Exposition commission at its meeting in Kansas City arrived in the city and spent the day in consultation with the officials representing the various departments of the exposition. The committee was instructed, when appointed, to confer with the exposition authorities and learn definitely just what arrangements can be made as to space, the amount of space that may be secured in each of the main buildings, the conditions under which Missouri will be allowed to erect a state building and install therein its exhibits and such other information as may be necessary to a full understanding and intelligent decision. The committee was not authorized to enter into any contract or bind the state commission.

Those constituting the committee are S. A. Stuckey of Carthage, chairman; G. W. Watters of Canton, W. W. Morgan of Kansas City, W. J. Rouse of Monroe City, J. W. Damel of Jefferson City, J. Milton Turner of St. Louis.

The members of the committee say there is no doubt about Missouri being represented at the exposition in the most becoming manner. The state commission has already raised $26,000 for a state exhibit and building, and as much more is in sight, making it absolutely certain that the state exhibit will be a most creditable one.

San Francisco Gives Up.

A telegram from San Francisco announces that the committee appointed by the commercial and industrial bodies of that city to consider the feasibility of a California exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition has decided to report adversely on the project. The committeemen say that a general lack of interest has been manifested by the people of northern California regarding an exhibit and the absence of any assurance that free space to the amount of 10,000 feet would be donated to the state by the exposition management combined to impel the committee to the decision announced.

In view of this termination of the spasmodic efforts of the San Francisco people, the state will probably be represented only by the county of Los Angeles, the people of that energetic county having already raised a fund of $10,000 for the purpose of making a fine exhibit of the fruits and other resources of that section.

Montana's Exhibit Grows.

Vice President Sutherlin of Montana is receiving many specimens of minerals from the mining districts all over the state, according to the Helena Independent, and will soon have a collection which will equal any that can be made by any other state. These specimens are being stored in a warehouse in Helena and will be shipped to Omaha about the middle of March. Mr. Sutherlin is also endeavoring to bring about a plan for an exhibit of Montana horses and is negotiating with the Yellowstone National Park Transportation company to ship a tally-ho coach to Omaha with a full complement of Montana horses and operate it in and about the exposition grounds as a part of Montana's display.

Missouri's Minerals.

The State Board of Geology of Missouri has decided to co-operate with the exposition commission of that state in making an exhibit of the mineral resources of Missouri. All of the members of the board have been made members of the commission. State Geologist Gallagher says that he will be able to make a fine display of minerals.

Exposition Notes.

Alderman J. J. Wolf of Kansas City, special commissioner of the exposition for that city, is conferring with the exposition authorities regarding certain exhibits from his territory.

Prof. John T. Stinson, one of the Arkansas delegation and a member of the faculty of the Arkansas delegation and a member of the faculty of the Arkansas university, is a native of Red Oak, Ia., and will make a flying trip to that point to visit his parents before returning to Arkansas.

Messrs. J. K. Gwynne and R. M. Strother of St. Louis, representing the Liggett & Myers Tobacco company of that city, are in the city to make arrangements for an extensive exhibit which will be made by that firm.

The National Galloway Breeders' association has applied for 4,000 square feet of space in which to exhibit a fine herd of the cattle bred by that association. These cattle will be taken from herds owned by this company in Missouri and are said to be very fine specimens.

CURIOS FOR OMAHA'S SHOW

VERY FINE COLLECTION OF CURIOSITIES

Relics from the Battle of Wounded Knee and Geological Specimens from the Bad Lands and Black Hills.

CHADRON, Neb., Feb. 16.—(Special.)—Chadron will be represented at the Transmississippi Exposition and in a manner which will be bound to attract attention to this city. The exhibit will be in the shape of the Ryan collection of Indian curios, the largest collection of its kind in the United States, comprising, as it does, Indian relics, Bad Lands fossils, Black Hills rubies, wild west taxidermy specimens, wonderful petrifactions, beautiful minerals, magnificent beadwork, western curiosities of all kinds and a large collection of valuable ancient firearms, all collected in this city and vicinity by P. Ryan, while a resident of Chadron, during which time he has been employed as a brakeman on the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley railroad. Mr. Ryan left with his collection for St. Joseph the first of the week, where he will remain with it until the opening of the exposition. From a historic and educational standpoint the Ryan collection has no peer. It comprises 5,000 pieces of Indian manufacture, covering every article made by the Sioux tribe, and is an object lesson representation of Indian life from the cradle to the grave. Mr. Ryan's collection has long been an object of interest to every visitor to this city and was displayed in one of the largest shore buildings in the city. One of the articles contained in it which is of more than passing interest is the ghost shirt of Big Foot, the leader of the Sioux uprising of seven years ago. It is soiled and stained with blood, and was cut from Big Foot's body by Dr. J. H. McKnight of Long Pine, Neb., after it was cold and stiff in death on the battlefield of Wounded Knee. There are war bonnets, beaded leggings, vests, sashes, squaw's dresses; in fact, every article of Indian manufacture. In the collection of historical firearms, sabers and knives are some very valuable specimens, including some firearms about which are woven tales of daring and deeds of bravery on many battlefields in which the reds and the "paleface" waged war together.

The Ryan collection will be a conspicuous feature of the Transmississippi Exposition. J. F. Ballinger, Elkhorn agent at Rapid City, S. D., is associated with Mr. Ryan.

ARKANSAS COMING IN FORCE

STATE TO BE APPROPRIATELY REPRESENTED

Representatives Pledge Themselves to Make a Creditable Showing of the Wonderful Resources of Their Great Commonwealth.

Yesterday was Arkansas day and a big delegation from that state came to Omaha to imbibe exposition enthusiasm and make arrangements for an exhibit of the resources of that great state, which shall be put to shame some of the better known but less resourceful commonwealths in the great Transmississippi region. Like all the visiting delegations which have preceded them, they were literally carried away with the magnitude of the exposition, although their minds had been partially prepared for what was before them as they skirted the exposition grounds when entering the city via the Missouri Pacific railroad. They will spend today in Omaha, making full arrangements for the exhibit which their state will make and selecting the location of the Arkansas building, a magnificent structure of native wood, stone and marble, which will be erected on the bluff tract as a home for the weary travelers from Arkansas who visit the exposition grounds and examine it in all its glory.

There were thirty men and one woman in the party, which arrived at the Webster street depot at 1:15 p. m. yesterday. The woman was the wife of Colonel E. T. McConnell, warden of the Arkansas penitentiary at Clarksville. The delegation was met at the depot by a special committee, consisting of President Wattles, R. W. Richardson, Dudley Smith, E. E. Bryson, Fred Metz, H. K. Burket, M. C. Peters, H. J. Penfold and G. W. Holbrook. A special trolley car was in waiting and in this the trip was made at once to the exposition grounds, where they made the tour of the grounds. The visitors were most favorably impressed with the appearance of the buildings and the magnitude of the scale on which all the   arrangements seemed to be projected, and expressed themselves very freely in the most complimentary manner regarding the energy and ability which had compassed such a great work and advanced it so far toward completion.

After the main court and the bluff tract had been thoroughly inspected the party boarded the special car again and the return trip was made down town. The visitors were escorted to a hotel, where luncheon was served.

TALKING IT OVER.

After the cigars were passed President Wattles assumed charge of the gathering and welcomed the visitors to the city. He reviewed the history of the exposition, giving its origin and the work which has been done to bring the enterprise to its present advanced condition. He called attention especially to the fact that every state in the Transmississippi territory will be represented in the exposition, and a state with the magnificent resources of Arkansas should not allow this opportunity to escape when such great benefit will result from making a showing.

W. J. Vincenheller, chairman of the Arkansas Exposition commission, responded on behalf of the visitors. He said he had greatly enjoyed going over the exposition grounds and confessed to the greatest surprise at the progress which was everywhere in evidence. He promised his own hearty co-operation and pledged the assistance of his state. He spoke of the diversified resources of Arkansas, including the most extensive zinc deposits in the world, virgin crests, iron, antimony, coal and many other minerals, and predicted that every member of the Arkansas delegation will return home fully determined that the state shall make a good showing, notwithstanding the last legislature made no appropriation for that purpose. He promised an exhibit from that state which shall be a credit to the exposition as well as to the state.

Before taking his seat Colonel Vincenheller said that Governor Jones had wished very much to be of the party, but had been detained at home by the cares of state, but had sent along a representative in the person of the secretary of state, Mr. A. C. Hull.

GLORIES OF ARKANSAS.

President Wattles asked Mr. Hull to respond for the visitors as the representative of the governor. Mr. Hull said he had been requested by the governor to prepare a few facts with which to regale the people of Omaha, and in order to do properly he said he put them in writing and would read them. He prefaced his remarks as follows: "We are here as representatives of a great state for a purpose. We came in obedience to your very courteous and urgent invitation. You had a purpose in inviting our commission to visit your elegant city and your grand and magnificent exposition in preparation. You wanted Arkansas, with her varied and wonderful possibilities, added to your great enterprise, to the end that your exposition might be augmented in its attractions, and its success more complete. Indeed may I not say your "show" would not be complete without Arkansas? Again, we take, it, you wanted our state given a fair opportunity to be represented properly along with her sister states of the great transmississippi section.

I assure you, gentlemen, that we properly appreciate your kindly considerations of our interests, and also your very hearty reception of our commission and your characteristic western hospitality. But with all this I want to say we are here for business as well as to enjoy your generous entertainment, and we are here to look after the interests of our state somewhat ourselves, and I am sure you will not think us selfish for that. When we come to consider the possibilities of our state, its wonderful resources and its varied interests, we feel sure that we have nothing to lose, but everything to gain, by an exhibition of products at your coming exposition.

Arkansas has an area of 53,850 square miles. The topographical features of the state present along its southern boundary an undulating, hilly country, timbered with pine, oak and hickory. Going northward the surface is more and more hilly, although in central and northeast Arkansas are found large prairies. Crossing the Ozark mountain region to the north the traveler finds himself in a hilly, broken country, 1,500 feet above the level of the country. The large rivers, the Mississippi and the Arkansas, the one bounding the state on the east, the other dividing it almost in half, are navigable for steamboats. White river, the Ouachita and Red rivers are navigable for quite a large number of miles each. Railway transportation facilities have not kept pace with the progress of the country, being yet very inadequate to the development of our resources. In other states the railroads have pioneered settlement and development and civilization; in Arkansas they have succeeded settlement, and up to the present time we only have about 2,600 miles of railroad within the state.

All the manifold resources of the great state as a cotton producing, lumber producing, mining, grazing and manufacturing section were set forth in detail, with figures to support the statements, many of which must have fallen with surprise on northern ears not accustomed to hearing the actual facts in regard to the commonwealth now taking on its second growth.

PEOPLE DOWN THEIR ALIVE.

R. W. Richardson, special commissioner for the exposition to Arkansas, said the Arkansas people had been invited to come to Omaha in order that they might gain a more intelligent idea of the exposition than could be acquired in any other way. The speaker reviewed the pleasant experiences he had encountered when he went to Arkansas as the representative of the exposition. He had found the people alive to the importance of the enterprise to them and ready and willing to take hold of the matter with energy. Out of that feeling grew the visit of this delegation and he pleaded with the visitors to take advantage of the opportunity offered them to show the world the resources of their state, which have been almost unknown outside of the state. He advised the people of the state to sever forever the cords which bind them to the dead past and rise triumphant to greet the dawn of a new present, bidding farewell to the venerable Arkansas traveler while inscribing upon his antiquated saddlebags the filling legend, "Requiescat in pace."

Rev. J. W. Lucey of Pine Bluff, a Catholic clergyman, made a witty reference to the fact that "talk" is a staple article in Arkansas, and then discussed eloquently the effects of exposition upon commercial matters, saying that they are a strong factor in binding together the different commercial sections. He promised that his state would take part in the exposition and assist in making it a great success.

George Sengel of Fort Smith, president of the State Board of Trade, said the previous speakers had so thoroughly covered the ground that nothing remained to be said, but he proceeded to make an eloquent speech in which he sketched briefly the importance to the entire world of such a great exposition of the magnificent resources of the fertile west, demonstrating beyond all cavil that this great section produced within its borders everything needed for the comfort and luxury of man, and declaring that when this fact is proved to the commercial east the attitude of that section toward the west and south will be greatly changed.

VISIT TO THE BEE.

This closed the post-prandial exercises and the entire party proceeded in a body to The Bee building, where they called on the editor and inspected the building, afterward visiting the office of the Department of Publicity and Promotion and securing a large amount of literature relating to the exposition.

The visitors will remain in the city until this afternoon or this evening and will then start on their return trip.

About one-half of the visitors are members of the Arkansas Exposition commission, but all are equally enthusiastic regarding the absolute necessity of their state participating in the most extensive manner possible.

W. D. Matthews, secretary of the Arkansas commission, is an old resident of Nebraska. He was the founder of the O'Neill Frontier, one of the leading newspapers in this state, and was later register of the land office at that point. He is now the editor and proprietor of a newspaper at Stuttgart, and is a most enthusiastic exposition boomer. Speaking of the outlook in his adopted state for participation in the exposition, Mr. Matthews said: "We will be here with a good exhibit, but the exact extent of it depends somewhat upon the arrangements we will be able to make with the exposition management here. We will put up a state building and will make a state exhibit ,regardless of what happens, and we are going to make some of the other states ashamed of themselves. Our building will be a hummer and no mistake. We will have all the material donated by the various industries in the state and will have a fine place. It will be constructed of native woods, including some of our finest finishing woods, also several different kinds of building stone arranged in most effective and striking manner, and our native marbles. We have some of the finest building stone and marble produced in this country and we propose to show to the people who visit this exposition that we have about all the fine building material that is required to erect the finest mansion that may be conceived. We will get all this building material donated by the people who are in this business, as I have said, and all the cost incident to the erection of the building will be the labor of constructing it.

BY PRIVATE SUBSCRIPTION.

"We have no state appropriation," continued Mr. Matthews, "but we will raise the necessary money by private subscriptions. We have estimated that we will require about $15,000 to erect our building and make a fine exhibit and we anticipate no especial difficulty in raising that amount."

The following is a full list of the party: Colonel W. C. Vincenheller of Little Rock, state commissioner of mines and agriculture and president of the Arkansas Exposition commission; W. D. Matthews of Stuttgart, secretary of the commission; Mayor D. L. Cramer, Dr. C. W. Sillin, W. M. Price, sr., W. M. Price, jr., all of Stuttgart; M. R. Coffman, W. H. Jones, F. P. Hall, M. F. Collier and Frank Meely, Paragould; H. G. Hanna, Pine Bluff; A. C. Hull of Little Rock, secretary of state; H. L. Cross, Bentonville; Judge W. D. Jones, Pine Bluff; B. L. Jones, Ozark; R. H. Jaynes, Mena; George Sengel, Fort Smith; S. C. Dowell, Walnut Ridge; J. R. Harris, Springdale; J. H. Keil, Newport; S. L. Jeffers, Mulberry; J. J. Baggett, Prairie Grove; Frank Hill, Fayetteville; D. S. Helvern, Mammoth Springs; Rev. J. M. Lucey, Pine Bluff; Colonel E. T. McConnell, Clarksville; Lieutenant Elias Chandler, U. S. A., and Prof. J. F. Stinson, Fayetteville; J. T. Pomeroy, Eureka Springs.

MUSIC FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Director Kimball Secures Endorsement of His Detailed Plan.

The music of the exposition has at last taken definite form and the plan outlined by Musical Director Kimball some time ago has been approved by the executive committee and active operations under it will be commenced at once. A the time of his appointment, the latter part of last month, Prof. Kimball outlined his idea of the general plan on which the music of the exposition should be conducted, which was set forth in The Bee at the time. Since then Prof. Kimball has been endeavoring to make arrangements for the preliminary steps in carrying this plan to a successful issue, but the first step was only taken yesterday, when he first appeared before the executive committee and explained his plan at length and received the approval of the committee. He then named Thomas J. Kelly of Omaha to take charge of the work of organizing the local chorus and drilling it in the music to be selected for the occasion. This also met with the approval of the committee and Mr. Kelly was duly installed.

OUTLINES HIS PLANS.

After this was accomplished Prof. Kimball was seen at the Millard hotel and went more into detail in regard to his plan. "I propose," said he, "to have a series of choral concerts during the entire exposition and to invite the famous choral societies of all our western cities to come here and give complete works with the assistance of the best obtainable artists. As a nucleus for this work I wish to organize a local chorus composed of the singers of Omaha, South Omaha and Council Bluffs, to the number of about 200. There will also be engaged an orchestra which shall be thoroughly competent to do any work which it may be called upon to do and which shall be sufficient, in itself, to attract music-loving people by its concerts at stated intervals. In each branch of this orchestra there will be soloists of high artistic merit.

"Mr. Kelly will commence organizing the local chorus at once. The members of the chorus will be given instruction in the music they will sing and I shall come here occasionally, as my duties permit, and rehearse them, but the bulk of the work will fall upon Mr. Kelly up to the time the exposition opens. The members of the chorus will be given free admission to the auditorium on the days when concerts are to be given, and this will give then the great educational advantage of hearing more concerts and more great soloists in a given length of time than would be possible in any other way. For these advantages each member of the chorus will be charged a fee of $5 to defray some of the incidental expenses preliminary to the work.

"I wish to invite all the representative singers of this city to unite with this chorus. I hope that there will be hearty and prompt co-operation on the part of our home singers and that we shall be able to show to visitors and music lovers that home talent can vie with that of other western cities and with that of the most effete regions of the east.

"An exposition chorus book will be compiled for the use of the chorus and this will serve as an interesting memento of the occasion which every member of the chorus will wish to preserve."

CHORAL MASTER WELL KNOWN.

As organist and choir master of the First Methodist church and director of the Mondamin Choral society of this city, Mr. Kelly has been identified with the musical progress of Omaha during the last few years in a way that gives him a wide and favorable reputation among the music loving public. Mr. Kelly says he will commence at once with the organizing of the local chorus and a general meeting of singers will be held Monday evening of next week, at some place to be announced later, for the purpose of forming the organization. In the meantime Mr. Kelly said he would be glad to see anyone wishing to become members of the chorus at his studio, or those desiring to make inquiries by mail could do so by addressing him at exposition headquarters in the Paxton block.

Messrs. Kimball and Kelly will go to Chicago some time next week to conclude arrangements regarding the orchestra which is to be organized for the exposition. Negotiations have been pending for some time with one of the most prominent orchestral organizations in the country and these may be concluded at any time.

To Boom King Corn.

The Department of Exhibits received a telegram yesterday afternoon from Prof. F. W. Taylor, a representative of the department, who has been in Chicago attending the meeting called to take steps to put on foot a movement calculated to expand the market for American corn. The telegram read as follows: "The American Maize propaganda organized; it will start with a special corn palace at the Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha and will meet there in October of this year in the first annual convention to arrange for the expositions of 1889 and 1900."

 

WATER IS AT HAND

PRESIDENT WOODBURY MAKES AN OFFER

Head of the Omaha Water Company States His Position.

HOW THE EXPOSITION MAY BE SERVED

Terms Which All Parties at Interest Regard as Favorable.

WAIVES THE QUESTION OF EXTENSION

Matter of Supply Put on a Business Basis with a Liberal Reduction from the Schedule Rates.

There was another turn in the controversy between the exposition management and the Omaha Water company yesterday when President Theodore C. Woodbury of the later company arrived here from Portland, Me. Some days ago the exposition directory through a committee asked President Woodbury what terms the company would make in furnishing water to the exposition. Soon after his arrival here yesterday President Woodbury sent an open letter to the exposition committee naming the terms of the company. His letter is addressed to Gurdon W. Wattles, chairman of the committee, and others, and is as follows:

OMAHA, Feb. 17, 1898.—Gurdon W. Wattles, Chairman Committee, and Others: Gentlemen—As you know, a formal answer to your communication inquiring the terms under which the Omaha Water company would furnish water to the exposition has been delayed by the negotiations respecting the amount of water which would be required and the terms under which payment required and the terms under which payment would be made, in order to justify the expenditure which would be necessary to furnish it.

I now desire, having fully discussed with your committee those preliminary matters, to make you a formal reply.

In December last the water company made an offer to furnish the exposition company with free water and to take its plant at cost, provided the company was assured of possession of the property until 1908. This hope of the water company and of the exposition company having been frustrated by injunction, to which we were not a party, and in which it is evident we cannot be justly treated, must be abandoned.

During the pendency of these negotiations the water company has supplied the exposition with free water, to the value of over $10,000, and is still continuing to supply it.

To meet your request we shall need to expend a large sum of money. We are advised and believe correctly that we are under no legal obligations to furnish this water. But should we stand upon our legal rights we should be forced into a position of antagonism toward the executive committee and others with whom our relations have been harmonious and satisfactory, and we would injure the exposition, in the success of which we are concerned. Under these circumstances the water company will waive those questions and will connect its mains with those of the exposition company and furnish water to an amount not to exceed 2,000,000 gallons in any one day at 5 cents per 1,000 gallons, upon the following conditions:

The indebtedness due from the city to the company shall be first paid and all litigation in respect thereto dismissed and settled.

The bill of the Omaha Water company to the exposition company for water furnished shall be paid monthly.

If the city legally orders pipe and hydrants on streets where it is now laid on the exposition grounds the water company will take the same at its cost and cost of laying.

It is also understood as a part of this proposition that the exposition committee will see to it that the payments for water furnished will be duly made.

Meter to be furnished by the water company and one-half the cost paid by the exposition.

The lagoon to be filled first time by water company free of charge.

The charge for water at above rates to commence on May 1, 1898. Water for construction purposes to be furnished free of charge. Very respectfully,


THEODORE C. WOODBURY,
President.

ENDORSED BY CITY OFFICIALS.

The settlement of the exposition water controversy suggested by President Woodbury of the water company in his communication to the exposition officials is very favorably regarded by city officials. At least Councilman Stuht says it is all right, and, as he has come to be regarded as expert authority on water works questions, no one is inclined to dispute his position. Stuht says that as far as he has had an opportunity to consider the proposition it seems to be very reasonable. He says that all that he sticks for is to prevent any action that involves waiving the right of the city to purchase the plant and that aside from that he is willing to compromise on a reasonable basis.

Chairman Burnester of the committee on fire, water and police said that he had not read the letter, but if its contents had been correctly stated to him he is inclined to think the water company has made a very fair proposition.

Councilman Bechel takes a similar view, but suggests that of course it will be impossible for the council to take any official notice of the matter until the injunction that is now in force is dissolved. He thinks that the proposed arrangement is very equitable, as what the water company will receive from the exposition association will not aggregate enough to pay for the cost of the plant on the exposition grounds, to say nothing of the extra pumping facilities that will be required.

Mayor Moores did not express a decided opinion, as he had not had an opportunity to fully consider the proposition, but he said that at first glance it seemed to promise a very fair adjustment of the difficulty.

As far as the city is concerned the demand of the water company involves nothing beyond what has already been conceded. The city now owes the water company $43,373.60 for hydrant rentals during the last six months of 1896, and $87,040 for the same service during 1897. The 1896 bills have already been approved, the warrants drawn and the amount charged against the water rent fund. Before the warrants were delivered to the water company an injunction was granted and the warrants still remain in the hands of the comptroller. The 1897 bills have never been approved on account of the injunction, but there is no disposition to question them, and the prospective issue of refunding bonds is designed to cover this item. As the only thing that prevents these bills from being paid anyway is the injunction, the members of the council take the position that the water company is only asking from the city what is conceded to belong to it. There are a number of small bills pending for water furnished to the city hall and jail, which are not taken into consideration, and are the only bills on account of which there is now any controversy between the city and the water company.

EXPOSITION DIRECTORS PLEASED.

Herman Kountze, one of the Board of Directors of the exposition, who has opposed all attempts to make the extension of the water company's franchise a part of the deal whereby the exposition was to secure water, had this to say regarding the proposition: "I am inclined to favor the proposition substantially as Mr. Woodbury presents it. I am opposed to legal proceedings whenever they can be avoided. I also believe that all suits now pending to restrain the payment of indebtedness which the city owes the water company should be dismissed. The rate which the water company proposes to charge the exposition I believe to be a reasonable one, being one-half the legal rate, and the rate which I believe is charged the large interests in South Omaha. The question of extending the company's franchise does not enter into this matter and should have no bearing on it."

W. S. Poppleton, plaintiff in the suit against the city officials to restrain them from granting the water company any extension of its franchise, said: "I am pleased to see that the question of extension is waived in this proposition. I have been principally interested in that and it seems to me that the citizens have won a victory. I am also pleased to see that the water company agrees to purchase the pipes now laid on the exposition grounds if the city orders such mains laid, and also that the company agrees to furnish water at 5 cents per thousand gallons, which is less than the legal rate, and also agrees to furnish water free until May 1. I do not care to say anything further at this time."

INTEREST OF THE LITIGANTS.

John L. Webster, an exposition director and the attorney for J. E. Baum, the surviving plaintiff in the suit brought by Dan Farrell and J. E. Baum against the city to restrain the payment of hydrant rental to the water company, replied as follows to a question regarding his views of the situation: "I am disposed to favor the acceptance of the proposition of Mr. Woodbury as to the terms and conditions on which water shall be furnished to the exposition. Mr. Baum must speak for himself as to the dismissal of the injunction suit, but I believe he feels as I do, that an immediate settlement of this water question is desirable, and that concessions on the part of the water company should meet with reciprocal treatment on our part."

J. E. Baum, the plaintiff in the suit against the city heretofore referred to, was inclined to be reticent about what he would do in the matter of dismissing the injunction suit, saying he first wanted to consult with the others interested in the suit in the interest of the Commercial club. He also said that he believed the water company had used the exposition as a club to force concessions [?] the city and had failed in its efforts [?] declined to say whether he would or would not dismiss the suit.

COST TO THE COMPANY.

Manager Bierbower of the water company said the proposition submitted by President Woodbury meant the expenditure of at least $250,000 by the company in enlarging its pipes.

the water company in increasing its capacity in order to supply the demands upon it. "The details of the changes which will be necessary have not been fully decided on," said Mr. Bierbower, "but enough has been decided to settle the approximate amount which we will have to expend. We will require an additional engine at the Florence pumping station, which will cost about $75,000, and additional mains will have to be laid and other changes made, which will bring the total cost up to about the figure I have named. We will have to increase our capacity from Florence, but just how that shall be done has not been definitely settled. We will not put in another 36-inch main, but some change will have to be made to enable us to supply the large amount of water the exposition will require."

PRESIDENT WATTLES PLEASED.

President Wattles of the exposition expressed great satisfaction at the outcome of the efforts which have been made to secure a favorable proposition from the management of the water company. He and Manager Kirkendall of the Department of Buildings and Grounds were in conference with President Woodbury all day yesterday and the entire executive committee of the exposition, President Wattles and President Woodbury were in session at exposition headquarters last night until a late hour, a conclusion being reached and the reply of President Woodburg being formulated at that meeting. Mr. Wattles said he believed that the proposition submitted is a fair one, all things considered, and the rate offered the exposition for water is a very reasonable rate, being the same rate at which water is supplied to the South Omaha packing houses and other large consumers.

The members of the executive committee also expressed themselves as satisfied with the outcome of the efforts which have been made to secure water and fire protection for the exposition.

GALLERY OF STATE GOVERNORS.

One of the Features of the Nebraska Building.

Assistant Secretary Dearing of the Nebraska Exposition commission is making a collection of life size portraits of all the governors of Nebraska with which he proposes to decorate the Nebraska building on the exposition grounds. He has written to all the former governors and to Governor Holcomb and has asked each to loan to the commission a portrait of himself for this purpose.

In this connection it is an interesting fact that all but one of Nebraska's governors are now living and are residents of the state over which they once ruled as chief executive. Governor David W. Butler is the only one of the whole line who has been gathered to his fathers, the others being as follows: Robert W. Furnas, Brownville; Silas Garber, Red Cloud; Albinus Nance, Lincoln; James W. Dawes, Crete; John M. Thayer, Lincoln; James E. Boyd, Omaha; Lorenzo Crounse, Calhoun.

ULRICH IS COMING TO OMAHA.

Landscape Artist to Take Active Charge of the Exposition Work.

Manager Kirkendall of the Buildings and Grounds department says that Rudolf Ulrich, the landscape architect who has been engaged by the exposition to supervise the landscaping of the exposition grounds, will arrive in Omaha within a short time and take active charge of the work of preparing the grounds. The last letter received from Mr. Ulrich by Mr. Kirkendall announced that he would probably come to Omaha in company with Mr. Stierlinger, the consulting electrical engineer of the exposition, about February 20.

Coloradans Clamor for Space.

The Denver Rocky Mountain News says that applications for space in the exposition are being received in large numbers by the Colorado Exposition commission, the applications covering exhibits in fruit, minerals, manufactured goods of all kinds, etc. The State Beekeepers' association has asked for a large space and the News says meetings are being held all over the state by various interests for the purpose of arranging for exhibits.

Cafe and Vaudeville.

The Department of Concessions has awarded to Henry Willard a concession for a cafe and vaudeville show on the Midway. A very handsome building costing about $10,000 will be erected by Mr. Willard and in this will be conducted a high-grade cafe with a vaudeville entertainment continually in operation.

Offer from a Glee Club.

Dr. B. F. Lang of York has submitted a proposition to the Nebraska Exposition commission to bring the York Transmississippi   Glee club to the exposition for a season. He says the club includes soloists, both vocal and instrumental, including performers on the violin, trombone, cornet, piano, etc.

Applications from Nebraska Schools.

State Superintendent Jackson, who is in charge of the educational exhibit which will be installed under the director of the Nebraska commission, reports to the commission that applications for space have been received from 298 rural schools, 184 high and graded schools, eight state institutions, five private schools, five denominational schools and one chautauqua, representing 501 schools with a teaching force of 2,267. The superintendent says he is all ready to allot space as soon as the plan for the booths shall have been decided on and the exact amount of available wall space determined.

From Montana's Mountains.

Vice President Sutherlin of Montana writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he is collecting Montana's mineral exhibit and now has about seven or eight carloads which he will ship to Omaha early next month. Mr. Sutherlin says this exhibit will be one of the finest mineral exhibits ever seen in the west.

Collection of Curios.

Pat Ryan of Chadron, the owner of one of the most extensive private collections of Sioux Indian curious, fossils, petrifactions, minerals, taxidermy specimens and western relics in this section, is in the city trying to make arrangements with the Nebraska commission to give him space in the state building for the exhibition of his collection.

ARKANSAS PICKS ITS SITE

ARRANGEMENTS FOR EXHIBIT CONCLUDED

Delegates Decline to Start Home Until All Details Are Decided—Happy Termination to a Very Pleasant Visit.

The Arkansas delegation spent all of yesterday in fixing upon the arrangements for the exhibit to be made by their state and did not leave the city until 9:30 p. m., their car being attached to the regular Missouri Pacific train which leaves at that hour. Before leaving they settled definitely that Arkansas will erect a building and install therein its exhibit, including all lines except horticulture, which will be shown in the Horticulture building. A beautiful building of native wood, stone and marble will be erected and an exhibit will be made which will include the many products of the state. It is estimated by members of the commission that about $15,000 will be required to carry out this plan but they express the greatest confidence that this will be raised without difficulty.

The party had fully intended to start for home at 3:05 p. m., and their car was attached to the regular Missouri Pacific train which leaves at that hour, but just as the conductor was about to give the signal to start the members of the party concluded that they had better stay until they had fully determined just what should be done. Up to this time it had been generally agreed that an exhibit should be made, but it was not determined whether a building should be erected or not. In this uncertainty space aggregating about 12,000 feet had been reserved in the Agriculture, Horticulture, Mines and Liberal Arts buildings, and no definite location for a building had been decided upon. A number of the commissioners insisted that this was a very unsatisfactory outcome of their long trip and that more definite arrangements should be made. It was at this point that their car was disconnected from the train which at once steamed out of the depot.

SELECTING A SITE.

The exposition officials who were present announced that General Agent Phillippi of the Missouri Pacific would send for a yard engine and haul the special car of the party direct to the exposition grounds, where the visitors might select a location for their building. This was a delightful issue out of their difficulty and the delegation warmly thanked Colonel Phillippi. It was no sooner said than done, and the party alighted from their car on the bluff tract and proceeded to make a careful examination of the few desirable locations remaining unassigned.

A selection was soon made in the minds of the visitors and then the party returned down town and went direct to the exposition offices. Architect Kimball was summoned and an agreement was quickly reached, the visitors being given the site they most desired. They then released the space in the main buildings which had been reserved, with the exception of the Horticulture building, and all the preliminary arrangements were complete.

The site decided upon for the Arkansas building is about 200 feet north of the west end of the Horticulture building, one of the most desirable sites in the entire tract assigned to the state buildings. It will face one of the broad main avenues leading to the Horticulture building and will be between that building and the grand plaza, where people will enter the bluff tract from the main court. The site selected for the Missouri building is in a corresponding location near the east end of the Horticulture building.

The intervening time until the departure of their train was spent by the visitors in visiting the various exposition departments and acquiring all kinds of information. They were plentifully supplied with exposition literature by the Department of Publicity and Promotion and when they started for home they were profuse in their pledges of a fine exhibit from the "home of the razorback."

SENTIMENT OF THE VISITORS.

After all arrangements for the Arkansas exhibit had been completed Judge Jones of Pine Bluff, a member of the Arkansas Exposition commission, voiced what seemed to be the unanimous sentiment of all the party regarding the making of a fine exhibit. "We will have an exhibit, beyond all question," said the judge. "The extent of it will depend entirely upon the manner in which our people support our commission. I do not anticipate any difficulty in raising the amount we believe is necessary, about $15,000, for putting up a building, installing a fine exhibit and maintaining it during the exposition. We have very little time in which to make our preparations, but I believe we can do it. It is most unfortunate that our legislature made no appropriation for this purpose, but we can only make the best of it now. We have abundant resources from which to raise this money and we will be here this summer with an exhibit that will make people open their eyes."

The party was increased yesterday morning by the arrival of James T. Pomeroy of Eureka Springs, who stopped in Kansas City to attend the meeting of the Missouri Exposition commission and learn something of what Missouri intends to do. Mr. Pomeroy asserted most positively that the northwestern part of the state where he lives will be represented by an exhibit regardless of what the rest of the state may do.

"Our section is thoroughly aroused," said Mr. Pomeroy, "and we are going to have an exhibit. I accompanied the Missouri commission on its visit to Omaha and when I returned home and told our people of what the exposition was going to be they all agreed with me that we must make an exhibit and show the world what we have down there in the Ozark mountain country. We have made arrangements to reproduce one of our famous mineral springs and keep it supplied with the natural spring water during the entire exposition and we are also going to have an exhibit of the fruits and other products which are grown in our section. If the state makes a general exhibit we will join with it and do all we can in the interest of a fine exhibit."

CALL FOR FIRST CHORUS MEETING.

Prof. Kimball Eager to Begin on the Exposition Organization.

A meeting to organize the Exposition chorus will be held Monday evening of next week. The first meeting will be held in Hayden's music hall, at Sixteenth and Dodge streets, but permanent quarters will be secured in time for the next meeting. This first meeting will be in the nature of a rally and all who desire to join the chorus or assist in making the music of the exposition a success are invited by Musical Director Kimball to be present at that time and make their desires known. Prof. Kimball will be present at the meeting and will explain the details of the plan on which musical work of the exposition will be based. He wishes it understood that singers in Omaha and Council Bluffs, South Omaha or in the surorunding​ towns who will agree to attend the rehearsals and comply with the requirements of the rules will be admitted to membership in the chorus and made welcome.

"The executive committee of the exposition has just consented to a little detail I have been urging for some time," said Prof. Kimball, "and that is to agree that arrangements shall be made whereby people may gain admission to the Auditorium building to hear the concert without first paying a fee to get into the exposition grounds. I believe this is a strong point in one respect. At the World's fair this little detail raised a great storm of protest, and I believe it injured the attendance at the concerts. I think we can secure more of an audience at the concerts by this means than would otherwise attend, as they will not be compelled to pay double fee when they wish to only hear the concert and go away again.

"The people should not lose sight of the fact that the Auditorium is to be supplied with the finest organ in this part of the country. The exposition authorities made arrangements some time ago with an eastern company to construct one of its finest organs and place it in the Auditorium building. This instrument will have 2,700 pipes, three manuals, fifty stops, and will be used in connection with the orchestra. It will also be used for organ concerts and arrangements will be made with some of the most eminent organists in the country to come here and give recitals on it.

"I am now carrying on negotiations with the well known Theodore Thomas orchestra and expected to close an engagement for that organization to come to Omaha.

"The time is short in which to accomplish the great amount of work which must be done in order to make the music of the exposition a credit to the great enterprise, but with the hearty co-operation of the musicians of Omaha, South Omaha, Council Bluffs and the surrounding territory we will have a Musical department that will be a credit to any musical center. The time has come when no mere personal impulse should be allowed to interfere with the carrying on of a project which is bound to reflect credit on the entire community if properly supported. The result accomplished by these cities will be taken as a criterion by which the musical culture of Nebraska and Iowa will be judged and personal pride should impel every singer in this entire section to put his shoulder to the wheel and give all the assistance in his power."

WORKING FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Process of Raising Funds is Progressing Satisfactorily.

The executive committee of the Council Bluffs Exposition association held its regular meeting last evening. The reports from the committees on soliciting funds showed that the business portion of the city had been quite well canvassed, with the exception of South Main street, and it was suggeste dthat​ the work be extended to other parts of the city beside the business portion, as considerable funds could probably be secured in this way. None of the committees had entirely finished their work and from the interest manifested and the amounts already subscribed the prospect looks bright for the carrying on of the work as previously laid out.

The Council Bluffs buttons have not met with as ready sale as was at first hoped for, but quite a number are being sold. It was decided to ask the women of the city, who are at work in the interest of the children's building and the wigwam, to assist in selling the buttons, as a portion of the money raised by them goes to the children's building fund and a part to the fund for the wigwam. The committee on grounds reported that the grounds could be had free of charge, provided that no competitive exhibit be made, in which case the site would cost $1,000.

A report was circulated yesterday that the proceeds of the Dickens party given last evening by the art department of the Women's club was to benefit the Council Bluffs Exposition association, but such is not the fact. Secretary Judson stated that he was daily receiving quite a number of names and addresses of persons wishing to entertain guests during the exposition. Prof. Hisey stated that in the homes of the children that attend the Bloomer school about 2,000 guests would be entertained, all being friends or relatives in the homes. The children of this school represent about one-tenth of the school enrollment of the city, and a conclusion can easily be drawn as to the number of families in the city that will entertain company outside of the strangers that will seek lodging here.

Tennessee Visitors.

Fred T. Cummins, a local commission broker who has taken a strong interest in the exposition and who has an extensive acquaintance in the south, has notified the exposition authorities that he has made arrangements for an excursion of Tennessee people which will start from Nashville the first of the coming week and reach Omaha Wednesday. He says there will be about fifty people in the party and they will come for the purpose of visiting this section of the country and seeing just what is being done about the exposition grounds.

A greeting from the glorious West,
Louisville, Oh, Louisville.
With beauty, wealth, and bluegrass blest,
Louisville, Oh, Louisville.
When once the button we have pressed,
Old Louisville wil​ do the rest,
Best city of the Central West,
Louisville, Oh, Louisville.
The town puts on its best apparel,
Louisville, Oh, Louisville.
The latch-string hangs outside the barrel,
Louisville, Oh, Louisville.
We'll light and hitch, or forge ahead,
The town is ours, we'll paint it red,
You told us so—that's what you said,
Louisville, Oh, Louisville.
We've come to add to other joys,
Louisville, Oh, Louisville.
We know Kentucky loves the boys,
Louisville, Oh, Louisville.
She makes our laddies feel at ease,
And bids them do as the​ — — please,
We'll all grow young in times like these,
Louisville, Oh, Louisville.

THE TATTLER.

Oh, welcome from the glorious West,—
With cyclones, wealth and sunflowers blest—
When once the button you have pressed
Old Louisville will do the rest—
Come on, Nebraska.
The town puts on its best apparel,
The latch-string hangs outside the barrel—
Just light and hitch or forge ahead—
The town is yours—go paint it red—
Come on, Nebraska.
Come on, and add unto your joys—
Kentucky dearly loves the boys—
She makes the chappies feel at ease,
And bids them do as they darn please—
Come on, Nebraska.
 

BAUM WILL DROP HIS SUIT

AIDS IN SETTLING WATER CONTROVERSY

Injunction that Restrains City from Paying Its Bills to Be Withdrawn and the Warrants Issued to Compnay​.

There is every indication that the long-pending controversy in which the water works company, the city, the exposition association and several individuals have been more or less involved will be settled at once. J. E. Baum will withdraw the injunction proceedings against the city, the city will pay the back bills of the water company, and the latter will reciprocate by preparing at once to furnish the exposition with water.

The first positive statement with regard to the withdrawal of the injunction proceedings was authorized by Mr. Baum this morning. He said that the stipulations had already been prepared and the suit would in all probability be dismissed some time today. In speaking of his action, Mr. Baum said that as far as his individual interests were concerned he would prefer to stand pat and fight it out with the water company. He contended that the city had not received the service that it was entitled to and that the business men had been compelled to pay exorbitant insurance rates and support a more expensive fire department on that account. Moreover, as he looked at it the concession of the water company was no concession at all, as it simply proposed to furnish water for the exposition. But as the contention for an extension of the right of purchase had been waived and the exposition could not wait for the end of a continued litigation, he had decided that it would be the better policy to drop the suit and allow the controversy to be settled. While the rate at which the company proposes to furnish water for the exposition was no better than was given to other equally heavy consumers, it was probably the best that could be obtained, and since the proposition had been endorsed by the exposition directory he was not inclined to stand in the way of a settlement.

READY TO MAKE CONNECTIONS.

Manager Bierbower stated in reply to an inquiry that connections between the mains of the company and the water system of the exposition grounds would be made just as soon as the conditions of President Woodbury's proposition are complied with. "We are ready to make the connection at once," said he, "and it remains for the exposition management and others interested to carry out the conditions named. As soon as connections are made the exposition grounds will have fire protection and our company will proceed to make the alterations necessary to carry out our part of the agreement and furnish the water required for the exposition. The connections already made with the grounds supplies all the water required to keep the lagoon at its present level and supply water for construction purposes. This water has been supplied by us free of charge since the commencement of work on the grounds."

President Wattles has been authorized by the executive committee of the exposition to enter into a contract with the Omaha Water company for supplying water under the conditions imposed in President Woodbury's letter, and a contract carrying out this agreement has been drawn up and is awaiting his signature. He said he would sign the document as soon as it had been examined and found in proper form and this would close the matter as far as the exposition is concerned.

NEBRASKA'S GREATEST MAN.

When Old Gabriel sounds his trumpet on the morning
Of the final day when all the dead shall rise;
When the graves of ages yawn at Gabriel's' warning,
And their occupants shall hasten to the skies—
Grim St. Peter then will set the gates to swinging
Wide for those who hold their passports in their hands,
And the golden harps of heaven will be ringing
Out a welcome to the pilgrims from all lands.
But St. Peter, as he watches at the portals,
Little heed will give unto the marching throng;
For St. Peter's seen enough of common mortals
As through the pearly gates they've marched along.
He will watching be for one real modest captain,
The modestest since nature first began,
And spying him, St. Peter'll have him wrapped in
Royal robes, for he's Nebraska's Greatest Man.
No, the saint who watches o'er the gates of glory
Will not need to turn the index to the R's,
For St. Peter is familiar with the story
And has written Rosey's name among the stars.
Well St. Peter knows that through all times and ages,
By the aid of reincarnation's plan,
Has Rosewater been all poets, soldiers, sages,
And has likewise been Nebraska's Greatest Man.
Many mortals may believe the olden story
How the sun was bid to stop by Joshua,
But St. Peter knows full well that battle gory
Was not won by Josh that long extended day.
Peter knows Rosewater stopped the sun's rotation,
Knows that Rosey quick reversed Old Nature's plan;
And St. Peter will be filled with exultation
When he gazes on Nebraska's Greatest Man.
Peter knows that Homer, Milton and Longfellow,
Shakespeare, Tennyson, M. Zola and Mark Twain,
Don Quixote, Falstaff, King Lear and Othello,
Really only lived in E. Rosewater's brain.
Well he knows that Hannibal and Julius Caesar,
Xenophen, Adonis, Mars, Cyclops and Pan,
Were in fact disguises donned by this Geezer,
E. Rosewater, who's Nebraska's Greatest Man.
And St. Peter knows who whipped the coward Hessian
After crossing o'er the ice-packed Delaware;
And he knows who planned the civil war's suppression
By his daring, skill and presence everywhere.
Well St. Peter knows, despite all loud contentions
Since the first steam engine over moved and ran,
That rosewater gave us all our great inventions,
And today is hailed Nebraska's Greatest Man.
Peter knows, and knowing, credit gives according,
That Edison and Tesla and old Morse
Do not in the very least deserve rewarding,
For they owe their fame to Rosewater, of course.
Music, war and art, philosophy and science,
In fact, the whole thing since the dawn of time began,
In Rosewater put their utmost reliance,
For he stands today Nebraska's Greatest Man.
And when Rosey dawns upon St. Peter's vision
The latter will hand over all his keys;
And Rosewater, acting then with quick decision,
Will proceed to run the place just as he please.
For himself he'll order wings a whole lot brighter,
And flying all through heaven he will scan
Every angel just to see that none are whitter
Than himself, who was Nebraska's Greatest Man.
Stop and think! ye folks who live in fair Nebraska,
And consider well, for on it rests your fate;
What shall we do without Rosey, let me ask you,
When he takes command inside of heaven's gate?
Who will manager all our politics and trading?
Who will carry out the exposition plan?
Woe betide us when from out our sight is fading
E. Rosewater, who's Nebraska's Greatest Man!
But when Rosey goes to run the courts of heaven,
Leaving us behind to grope in darkest gloom,
One bright thought our lump of sorrow will then leaven
As we gather to strew flowers on his tomb—
We will know that Rosey, through the heavens flying,
All our struggles on and up will closely scan.
So upon the stone 'neath which his bones are lying
We will write:
HIC JACET
ROSEWATER,
NEBRASKA'S GREATEST MAN.
 

FOSTER IS THE MAN

General Superintendent of the Exposition is Elected.

ACTION TAKEN BY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Scope of the Authority of the New Official.

IN FULL CHARGE OF CONSTRUCTION WORK

Will Direct and Oversee Completion of the Buildings.

MAJOR CLARKSON SECURES ONE PLUM

Appointed to Assist the President in Entertaining Visitors and to Officiate on Ceremonial Occasions.

Now the exposition has a general superintendent who has executive authority over the affairs of the gigantic enterprise and will carry out the policy outlined by the executive committee. A. C. Foster, a well known citizen of Omaha, is the man and he was appointed by the executive committee at its meeting yesterday afternoon. He is to take possession of the new office at once.

The Board of Directors of the exposition at its meeting on November 15 adopted the report of a special committee to which had been referred a resolution providing for the appointment of a director general. This committee reported that it found the situation did not warrant the appointment of director general at that time, but it recommended the appointment of a general superintendent in these words: "The work of all departments might be energetically pushed, perhaps more satisfactorily than by any other arrangement, by the apointment​ of a general superintendent, a practical builder, at a maximum salary of $200 per month, whose office and headquarters shall be upon the exposition grounds."

In order to meet the emergency which then existed the special committee defined specifically a part of the duties which should devolve upon this officer by providing that he "should be placed in charge of all work in the line of construction of any or all of the departments, with the express duty of overseeing and pushing all such work to energetic completion."

MEETS WITH APPROVAL.

Since this section on the part of the Board of Directors there has been considerable discussion of this matter and a growing demand for the appointment of some well known and capable man to fill the position. This strong sentiment on the part of the general public and many members of the Board of Directors has been referred to in the columns of The Bee a number of times. The appointment of Mr. Foster meets with the general approval of people of this city. Although the appointment was not made until late yesterday afternoon, it was soon known on the streets and public opinion was freely expressed. Mr. Foster is well known in this section, having been connected with the Swift Packing company for a number of years as general manager.

CLARKSON DRAWS A PRIZE.

The executive committee also made another appointment at the meeting yesterday, Major T. S. Clarkson drawing a prize in the shape of an appointment to assist the president in entertaining distinguished visitors and officiating on ceremonial occasions. The appointment was made at the request of President Wattles and the salary was fixed at $100 per month till June 1 and $200 per month after that date.

Manager Reed turned over to the executive committee a job lot of trouble in the shape of fifteen propositions for the concession to sell roast beef sandwiches on the grounds. This concession is in great demand and the fifteen applicants have been making life a burden to Manager Reed for several months. He asked the executive committee to relieve him of the responsibility of dciding​ between the numerous applicants and the matter was made a special order for the meeting of [?]

Manager Kirkendall reported several bids for the construction of the two restaurants at the east end of the viaduct across Sherman avenue from the main court to the bluff tract. The bids were considered too high and action on them was deferred until tomorrow.

PUSHING WORK OF CONSTRUCTION.

Good Progress Being Made on the Exposition Buildings.

The pleasant weather which has prevailed in this section for some time has been taken advantage of to the fullest extent by the contractors and all others having to do with the work of preparing for the great exposition which is to be opened to the public June 1 of this year, and the result is that the building on the grounds are in an advanced state, which removes any doubt as to the exposition being opened on time.

The Mines building is ready for the reception of exhibits. This building has been finished for some time, all that remains to be done being a small amount of staff work around the exterior near the ground, which cannot be completed until all the frozen debris lying about is removed.

The Machinery and Electricity building will be in the same condition as the Mines building within a very few days.

The Manufactures and Agriculture buildings are in an advanced stage of completion. The staff work is almost completed and rapid progress has been made during the favorable weather.

The outside of the Auditorium building is nearly covered with staff and plaster and will be finished within a few days. The interior is lathed and plastering will be begun nside​ very soon.

The Liberal Arts building is making rapid progress. The staff on the outside is nearly all in place and plastering is proceeding rapidly on the inside.

The Art buildng​ is ready for the staff workers. The woodwork of the east section will not be finished until after the plasterers shall have completed their work on the inside, and the west section is in almost the same condition. The roof is finished on both sections and the skylight covering has been put in place.

The Government building is making more rapid progress than any of the other buildings and is completely under cover, except in the center, where the dome will appear. Engineer Farnan is in charge of the work and is pushing it with all possible speed. "You may say that this building will be ready on time," said Mr. Farnam most emphatically yesterday to a Bee representative.

BAUM WILL DROP HIS SUIT

Principal in One of the Suits Will Drop His Prosecution.

AIDS IN SETTLING WATER CONTROVERSY

Injunction that Restrains City from Paying Its Bills to Be Withdrawn and the Warrants Issued to Company.

There is every indication that the long-pending controversy in which the water works company, the city, the exposition association and several individuals have been more or less involved will be settled at once. J. E. Baum will withdraw the injunction proceedings against the city, the city will pay the back bills of the water company, and the latter will reciprocate by preparing at once to furnish the exposition with water.

The first positive statement with regard to the withdrawal of the injunction proceedings was authorized by Mr. Baum yesterday morning. He said that the stipulations had already been prepared and the suit would in all probability be dismissed some time today. In speaking of his action, Mr. Baum said that as far as his individual interests were concerned he would prefer to stand pat and fight it out with the water company. He contended that the city had not received the service that it was entitled to and that the business men had been compelled to pay exorbitant insurance rates and support a more expensive fire department on that account. Moreover, as he looked at it the concession of the water company was no concession at all, as it simply proposed to furnish water for the exposition. But as the contention for an extension of the right of purchase had been waived and the exposition could not wait for the end of a continued litigation, he had decided that it would be the better policy to drop the suit and allow the controversy to be settled. While the rate at which the company proposes to furnish water for the exposition was no better than was given to other equally heavy consumers, it was probably the best that could be obtained, and since the proposition had been endorsed by the exposition directory he was not inclined to stand in the way of a settlement.

READY TO MAKE CONNECTIONS.

Manager Bierbower stated in reply to an inquiry that connections between the mains of the company and the water system of the exposition grounds would be made just as soon as the conditions of President Woodbury's proposition are complied with. "We are ready to make the connection at once," said he, "and it remains for the exposition management and others interested to carry out the conditions named. As soon as connections are made the exposition grounds will have fire protection and our company will proceed to make the alterations necessary to carry out our part of the agreement and furnish the water required for the exposition. The connections already made with the grounds supplies all the water required to keep the lagoon at its present level and supply water for construction purposes. This water has been supplied by us free of charge since the commencement of work on the grounds."

President Wattles has been authorized by the executive committee of the exposition to enter into a contract with the Omaha Water company for supplying water under the conditions imposed in President Woodbury's letter, and a contract carrying out this agreement has been drawn up and is awaiting his signature. He said he would sign the document as soon as it had been examined and found in proper form and this would close the matter as far as the exposition is concerned.

Pictures of the Babies.

Owing to the failure of numerous Omaha babies to "look pleasant" the Woman's Board of Managers of the exposition has concluded to postpone their celebration of Washington's birthday for a few days. It was decided some time ago to have the front cover page of The Hatchet embellished with the counterfeit presentments of twenty Omaha youngsters and to have the text of the sheet likewise ornamented at frequent intervals. There was a flood of applicants for these positions, but it developed that every loving mother decided that "her darling" must have a new picture "expressly for the Hatchet," regardless of whether the birth anniversary of the nation's paternal ancestor would have to be postponed to await the pleasure of mamma, the youngster and the photographer. Of course this argument was unanswerable in the minds of the managers of the paper, and the father of his country will have to wait until the fates decide that the proper time has come. It is announced at the headquarters of the Hatchet that the delay will be for a very few days only and that the paper will be issued shortly after the time first fixed.

An Exhibit from France.

The Department of Exhibits is receiving most encouraging reports from France of the preparations which are being made there by manufacturers and others who will make exhibits at the exposition, and there is every indication that the French section of the great enterprise will be one of the most extensive and attractive portions in the entire grounds. Frederick Mayer, the special commissioner of the department at Paris, writes to the department that great interest is being taken in the matter by the people in France and a commission has been formed, comprising fifty of the most prominent manufacturers in the vicinity of Paris. This commission, he says, meets at the rooms of the Chamber of Commerce and has received official recognition from that body. The most energetic preparations are being made for exhibiting their wares and Mr. Mayer predicts that the exhibit will be an unusually fine one. He says the prospective exhibitors are making elaborate preparations, preparing booths, cases and other attractive means of making the exhibit a memorable one.

The Commercial club of West Superior, Wis., has appointed a committee to arrange for an exhibit at the exposition.

Vice President W. H. Sutherlin of Montana has notified the Department of Exhibits that he will be in Omaha in about ten days to make further arrangements regarding Montana's exhibit.

The drawings and specifications for the Transportation and Agricultural Implement building have been completed by the architects and turned over to the Department of Buildings and Grounds to advertise for bids for its construction.

The Utah Exposition commission is completing its arrangements for extensive exhibits of the diversified resources of that state and is collecting the materials at Ogden, preparatory to shipping them to Omaha. The secretary of the commission reports that the exhibit will be a very representative one.

The millers of Minneapolis are agitating the plan of making an extensive exhibit of flour at the exposition in an attempt to offset the large exhibit of Nebraska made flour which is to be made by all of the millers of Nebraska, in connection with which will be a cooking school where the excellent quality of Nebraska flour will be demonstrated.

 

The Nebraska Ceramic club has been assigned space in one of the most desirable locations in the Liberal Arts building gallery and the application of the club for 320 square feet of space, signed by Mrs. S. G. Lund, president, and Mrs. M. F. Morrill, secretary, has been accepted. A committee of the club members spent several hours at the office of the Exhibit department making the selection of a desirable space and finally settled upon the location referred to.

Mrs. Emma Homan Thayer, a member of the Colorado exposition commission, and the commissioner in charge of the fine art exhibit to be made by the artists of the Centennial state, was present when the Nebraska women selected their space and she at once applied for and was granted the 640 square feet of space adjoining that selected by the Ceramic club. Mrs. Thayer says the artists of Colorado will make a fine exhibit of ceramics, paintings in oil and water colors and many other articles of exceptional excellence.

F. R. Anson, secretary of the Chamber of Commerce of Salem, Ore., has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that a movement is on foot in that state to make an exhibit at the exposition and offers his assistance in helping it along. Special Agent C. E. Llewellyn of the Department of Publicity and Promotion is in that state endeavoring to awaken enough interest among the business interests to insure an exhibit. Oregon and Washington are the only two states in the entire transmississippi region which are not making active preparations to be well represented at the exposition. Surface indications appearing within the last week or so point to an effort of some kind to make a showing.

PLANNING THE WORK FOR MUSIC.

Director Kimball and Assistant Kelly Laying Out Their Campaign.

The Musical department of the exposition has gotten down to work and reports matters as coming along finely. A large attendance on Monday night, at the annex of Hayden Brothers' music room, Sixteenth and Dodge streets, is confidently looked for. President Wattles is expected to address the meeting, and Mr. Kimball, director of the Music department, will speak on the general plan and scope of the music of the exposition, followed by Thomas J. Kelly on the immediate object in view, and the future of Omaha in choral work. All interested in music are invited to attend this meeting.

Director Kimball, accompanied by Choral Conductor Kelly, will go to Chicago on Tuesday evening and while there will arrange the detail plans of the exposition music as to programs, orchestra and soloists as far as possible.

Mr. Kelly has been asked about the expense to the chorus members in addition to the $5. There is none, he says. The gowns of the young women will not have to be concert gowns, but simple white or light colored summer dresses, such as they would wear on the porch at home. The men will be asked to wear blue serge coats, and white duck trousers, a suit which has been the popular thing for the last few summers. The fee of $5 can be paid by installments, if necessary, although the committee prefers to have it paid in advance. However, no barrier will be placed in any one's way, in this regard. The sum of 35 cents per week paid or saved from now on to the exposition opening, and 50 cents on exposition day will admit members free of charge to all musical entertainments in the Auditorium for five months. No fee will be necessary to get into the Auditorium, as a separate entrance has been provided adjacent to the street car line. The local chorus will be heard evenings.

Director Kimball is enthusiastic over the action of the executive committee, and he expects to have a department that will reflect credit on the western country. Mr. Kelly expects to come back from Chicago with a stock of fresh choruses for immediate use. Rehearsals will be pushed vigorously when once begun.

If enough people come over from Council Bluffs for the organization meeting, the choral conductor will arrange to have special rehearsals at Council Bluffs in order to save the additional journey to the members.

MINNESOTA COMMISSION REPORTS.

Surprised at the Magnitude of the Enterprise.

The Minnesota Exposition commission has made a report to Governor Clough on its recent visit to Omaha to look over the exposition grounds and learn the status of the whole matter. Regarding the impressions received during the visit the commission has the following to say:

The exposition association has well advanced toward completion a group of buildings beautiful in architecture and magnificent in their proportions, which promise to exceed in capacity, as well as in the architectural effect, anything offered to the public in the United States, with the single exception, perhaps, of the White City, which dazzled millions during the year 1893 in Chicago. These buildings are but a part of the preparation now being made for an exposition which there is abundant evidence will be second only to the Columbian exposition of 1893. The plans of the management are upon so comprehensive a scale, the responses from the various states in the transmississippi district have been so cordial and the co-operation of the United States government, as well as many foreign nations, has been so prompt and liberal that it is certain that the exposition will be greater than any that has preceded it in this country with the possible exception of the Centennial exposition and the World's Columbian exposition, to which reference has already been made. Any idea which any one of our people may have entertained [?] in character or even confined to a few of the western or northwestern states was quickly disabused by the evidence which was produced and what we found had already been accomplished. We desire to impress upon you that the work of the management has been so well done as to leave no shadow of doubt that the exposition will be all that is claimed for it.

We found that, with the exception of our own state, and possibly a few of the other remote western states and territories, provision had been made for state representation, either in the buildings or by buildings to be erected by private subscription, or by funds provided by legislative appropriation in some of the states where legislation has been possible. We believe that Minnesota with her varied products, her almost limitless wealth of resources, should not fail to be represented in some way at this exposition.

After setting forth some of the reasons why Minnesota should be represented in a proper manner the report continues:

We believe, therefore, it is of the utmost importance that some steps be taken to adequately represent Minnesota as this exposition, and, therefore, appeal to individuals, communities and organized bodies throughout the state to give support to such effort as may be made by the commission already appointed by his excellency the governor to take this matter in charge.

Great Art Exhibit Promised.

Paul Charlton, chairman of the committee of the Western Art association, which has in charge the Art building and exhibit at the exposition, announces that matters in that department have reached a stage where he is able to say with authority that the art exhibit of the exposition will be on a very high plane of excellence and that the paintings which will be exhibited will be of such a class as to place the art exhibit of the Transmississippi Exposition among the most renowned exhibitions of this country. He says he is not yet ready to make an announcement of the pictures which will be on exhibition, but gives the assurance that when this announcement is made the most critical will have no reason to complain. There will be only about 600 or 800 pictures in the entire collection and the number of desirable works available will be sufficient to allow of the most careful discrimination in choosing pictures for the exhibition.

Mr. Charlton also says that the sculpture which will embellish the Art building will be of a high order. The designs for this were prepared by Eames & Young of St. Louis, the architects of this building, and the figures are being modeled by Sculptor Bringhurst of St. Louis under the immediate supervision of the architects named. Each of the eight pediments of this building will be surmounted by a draped female figure eight feet in height, and each pediment will enclose a group of figures of artistic and appropriate design. At the base of each flag staff will be figures of cupids and the wide frieze which will appear in the panels will bear colored figures in high relief.

Applicants for Space.

Among the applications for space which have been received by the Department of Exhibits within the last few days are noted the following:

Benjamin B. Manchester of Kansas City asks for space in which to exhibit six "nickel in the slot machines" of a mechanical nature, showing working models in full operation of a full rigged ship, a railroad engine, electric plant, water plant, etc.

The Barber Asphalt Paving company has applied for 417 feet in the Mines building in which to exhibit a full line of asphalt as used for street paving purposes, including all the stages from the digging of the raw material from the famous "lakes" in the island of Trinidad to the finished pavement.

The F. & E. Sanborn company of Omaha asks for 250 feet in which to show the stock food manufactured by it; the Union Sewer Pipe company of Minnesota applies for forty-eight feet; the Ashgrove White Lime association of Kansas City asks for forty-eight feet; the Blue Valley Plaster company and the Omaha Coal, Coke & Lime company, both of Omaha, each apply for forty-eight feet; Max Geisler of Omaha applies for forty-eight feet for showing his system of dress cutting, and H. S. Albright & Co. of Ogdensburg, Pa., wants eighty feet for a display of boots and shoes.

Plan for Securing Flowers.

E. C. Erfling, a local florist, has submitted a novel scheme to the Department of Publicity and Promotion for securing a desirable lot of floral exhibits from the southern portion of this continent. He suggests that an advertising car be sent toward the south, plentifully supplied with advertising matter to be thoroughly distributed all through that section on the outward trip, and that the objective point of the trip be Mexico, where the car, which should then be empty, should be filled with some of the many fine specimens of cacti, century plants and other tropical plants which grow in profusion in that region and can be had in any quantity for nothing. For the purpose of ensuring beneficial results, he advises sending two or three florists with the car to assist in distributing the advertising matter and to attend to the securing of plants. He says any number of most attractive and desirable plants might be secured in this manner at little cost and transplanted in the exposition grounds for embellishment.

FOSTER AND CLARKSON BEGIN

NEW EXPOSITION OFFICERS TAKE HOLD

General Superintendent Assumes Control at the Grounds and Will Devote His Time to Work Out There.

General Superintendent A. C. Foster, the new executive officer of the exposition, has assumed the duties of his position and spent the day in familiarizing himself with the many complicated details of the work of the Department of Buildings and Grounds. Manager Kirkendall turned over to Mr. Foster the huge pile of correspondence relating to various matters connected with the department and accompanied him to the office of the department on the exposition grounds. For the present Mr. Foster will devote himself to pushing the work of construction and preparation at the grounds and will spend almost his entire time there.

Major Thaddeus S. Clarkson, the newly appointed chief of the entertainment bureau of the exposition, has assumed the duties of his position in looking after the entertainment of visitors and distinguished guests, including the making arrangements for the celebrations which will form an important part of the exercises connected with the exposition. The appointment of Major Clarkson to this important position has been the subject of extended comment since the action of the exposition management became known, and the concensus​ of opinion has been that no better selection could have been made. The major's extended acquaintance, together with his experience in military matters, are regarded as giving him especial qualifications for filling this position with credit to himself and to the exposition. As soon as the necessary arrangements can be made, Major Clarkson will be assigned an office on the sixth floor of the Paxton block, where he will make his headquarters.

CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR DESIRES.

Western Delegates Want to Spend a Sunday in Omaha.

C. E. Brainard of Ogden, Utah, transportation manager for the national organization of the Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor, proposes a plan to President Wattles which indicates that that organization has no particular sympathy with the movement in certain quarters which has for its object the closing of the gates of the exposition on Sundays.

Mr. Brainard urges that arrangements be made with railroads whereby the western roads passing through Omaha will give stopovers to all delegates en route from the west to the meeting of the national society of the Christian Endeavorers which meet in Nashville, Tenn, July 6 to 11. He suggests that the time when these western delegates leave their homes should be so arranged that they would be able to spend Sunday, July 3, on the exposition grounds, that a meeting night be held there and the delegates given an opportunity of seeing the exposition, and that the delegates might remain in Omaha until the evening of July 4, thus arriving in Nashville in ample time for the opening session of the convention.

Mr. Brainard says the Omaha branches of the societies have signified their approval of the plan he suggests and he says he has also received letters of approval from other societies in the west. He also states that John Willis Baer, the general secretary of the society, living at Boston, has favored the plan.

A plan similar to this was followed last year when the convention of the organization was held at San Francisco. The railroads granted stopover privileges at Salt Lake and Ogden, and the delegates gladly took advantage of the opportunity of varying the monotony of a long trip. Mr. Brainard urges President Wattles to confer with the railroad authorities regarding the granting of the stopover privilege and predicts that a very large number of the delegates will take advantage of it. The president will give the matter his immediate attention and endeavor to have the necessary arrangements made in order that the program suggested may be carried out.

TO ENTERTAIN THE COLORADOANS.

Major Clarkson Names a Committee on Reception.

Colorado will visit the exposition tomorrow in force, a delegation of about thirty representatives of the Chamber of Commerce, Mining Exchange, Real Estate exchange and other commercial bodies of Denver, as well as prominent and influential residents of other portions of the state, being due to arrive in the city on the Union Pacific train which reaches Omaha at 7:30 a. m. This party will be led by Lieutenant Governor Jed Bush and Mayor T. S. McMurray of Denver. About one-half of the party will return to Denver on the Burlington train tomorrow evening and the others will remain until the following day, returning on the Rock Island.

 

Preparations for the entertainment of these visitors are in the hands of Major T. S. Clarkson, chief of the Entertainment bureau of the exposition, who has appointed the following committee to assist in looking after the visitors and escorting them about the city: Governor S. A. Holcomb, Mayor F. E. Moores, Dudley Smith, W. S. Poppleton, E. P. Peck, F. H. Davis, G. M. Hitchcock, J. H. Hussie, A. C. Smith, H. A. Thompson, H. S. Weller, J. C. Wharton, H. J. Penfold, Judge W. D. McHugh, Luther Drake and M. T. Barlow.

The visitors will be met at the train and escorted to the Millard hotel, where the entire committee will meet them at 10 o'clock and escort them to the exposition grounds in special street cars. After returning from the grounds the party will be entertained at luncheon and a business session will follow.

Cosmopolitan Concession.

The Department of Concession has just concluded the execution of a contract with Gaston Akoun for a concession which is designated at Cosmopolis, but it is thought this name will be changed. This concession will occupy a space of 100 feet in width on the Midway and 400 feet in depth. In the cen- will be a reproduction of the Parthenon, in front of which will be given celebrations of Olympian sports and games and from this will radiate streets representing sections of various prominent cities of the old world, including a street in Paris, a street in Seville and a section from the Island of Malta. These streets will be constructed to represent in a graphic manner the original streets in the cities named and the inhabitants will depict the daily life, manners and customs of the people. Each street will be supplied with shops and stores, in which the wares peculiar to the countries represented will be manufactured and sold and there will be a typical French restaurant, photograph gallery, where tintypes of visitors will be made, fortune telling booths, barber shop and many other places. A vaudeville show where all the nationalities will perform their specialities will form one of the attractions and a carnival of Grecian games will form a drawing card.

Enlarging Manufactures Building.

Superintendent Hardt of the Exhibits department says it will be necessary to extend the annex of the Manufactures building to the full limit allowable in the space chosen for the location of this building. The annex will be built as a wing to the Manufactures building, extending north from the west end of the building, and space is available for a building nearly 700 feet in length. Mr. Hardt says the rate at which applications are coming in for space for foreign exhibits, together with the number now on hand, make it imperative that immediate provision be made for making as much room as possible.

FEATURES OF THE MIDWAY

ONLY THE BEST ATTRACTIONS BOOKED

Propositions Are All Carefully Considered Before the Concessions Are Granted—Some of the Promised Shows.

There is one department of the exposition which has been working to add to the attractiveness of the great fair, but which has made very little noise up to this time, presumably on the theory that when the results of its labors are realized they will constitute the noisiest section of the entire entertainment. The department referred to is that which has to do with concessions, which in these latter century days has come to mean, when applied to an exposition, a part of the "Midway." It may be remarked that the name "Midway" seems to be accepted as the proper designation of that particular section of the exposition which is devoted to amusements which are out of the ordinary. Several attempts have been made by the management of the Transmississippi Exposition to change this name, but no other has been found which seems quite so apt, and it will probably be called by that name to the end.

It is not customary to close contracts with features for the Midway far in advance of the opening of the exposition, as few of them are of such a character that they require a great deal of time for the erection of their building and installation. For that reason it is only recently that the closing of contracts has commenced in earnest, and but a short time will elapse until the entire composition of the Midway will be definitely known. Up to this time the main object of the department has been to secure proposals from desirable parties who desire to install attractions.

As propositions have been received which seemed especially desirable contracts have been entered into with the projectors and in this way a number of concessions have been let which form an index of the probably nature of the attractions which will make the Midway one of the most popular spots on the exposition grounds. It may be stated with authority that the Midway of the Transmississippi Exposition will be one of the most complete and attractive resorts of the kind which has ever formed a part of the [?] be lacking which the pampered taste of connoisseurs decrees is necessary in this modern addition to great national fairs and some of the finest and most artistic effects will be seen that were ever installed at any exposition.

BEST OF ATTRACTIONS.

Owing to the policy heretofore referred to, there are not a great many contracts which have been closed, but the character of these, together with the character of those which are being considered, indicates that the Midway will be occupied by the high class attractions which the experience of other expositions has demonstrated to be the best.

There will be several villages, but only those which have proved to be desirable. Previous Midways have been encumbered with alleged villages which proved unremunerative and a nuisance, but the villages on the Transmississippi Midway will be of a high class. Contracts have been closed for the Moorish village, Streets of Cairo, African village and Chinese village. The architecture of each of these will be of the class peculiar to the nationality depicted and this, of itself, will be a most instructive feature.

The Moorish village will be one of the most extensive concessions on the grounds. It will show a group of Moorish houses with native inhabitants and illustrating the modes of living peculiar to the people of that land. The paraphernalia will be gorgeous and correct, depicting the Oriental richness peculiar to its people. In addition to this feature of the village there will be several adjuncts, including a "mirror maze," a palace of illusions and a wax gallery of wax figures in which will be represented historical and allegorical scenes. Several other features are also under consideration in connection with this concession, which will add to its attractiveness and popularity.

The Streets of Cairo will be another spot on the Midway which will doubtless attract the attention of visitors. This village will be distinctly oriental in its character and will be populated by the people from the sunny clime of Egypt. The daily life of these people will be constantly in evidence and many of their picturesque ceremonies will be reproduced with exactness. A group of dancing girls, executing the Nautch dances and certain others of the strange gyrations of these people, which have been dignified by the name of "dance" will doubtless possess attractions for people of an investigating turn of mind.

The Chinese village will be in evidence and the ear-splitting music and alleged singing of the almond-eyed beauties from the Flowery Kingdom will attract great attention. There will be dwelling houses and bazaars, restaurants and theaters and opportunities for witnessing the sly tricks of the "heathen Chinee" will not be lacking. As in other villages, the national dances will be strongly in evidence.

SOME OTHER FEATURES.

The Afro-American village will possess a certain air of familiarity for those who have lived in the southern part of this country. The life of the negro in the south before the war will be depicted in the most vivid manner and the numerous dances with which the jolly, rollicking "niggers" were wont to pass their hours of leisure will be rendered with every detail. The progress made by these people will also be shown and the village will be decidedly educational in its general nature.

In addition to the villages enumerated, there will be numerous other attractions, contracts having been closed with the following: Shooting the Chutes, a wild animal show similar to Haegenbeck's famous show, a scenic railway, a Wild West show, the Big Rock, Night and Morning, a cyclorama, and a concession known as Rolling the Roll.

Shooting the Chutes, the wild animal show and the Wild West show are too well known to require any description. It is announced by the Concessions department that these attractions will all be conducted on the highest plane.

The Scenic railway will be a small railway with open cars large enough to carry adult passengers and will pass through tunnels, over mountains, across rivers and through canyons, the scenic effects being produced by means of paintings with natural foreground.

The Big Rock will be a representation of a huge rock and upon entering it the visitor will find himself in a large cave opening onto a mountain ravine. While he is gazing about him two girls will appear on the opposite side of the ravine and descend toward the spectator. Reaching a platform in the rocks, they will execute a number of dances and disport themselves for the entertainment of the onlookers. While this is going on a thunder storm will be stimulated by means of electrical effects and vivid flashes of lightning will illuminate the scene. As the girls turn to run up the mountain side the path by which they came will be turned to a rushing torrent of water and his Satanic majesty will step from the earth at their side. At the same time the flowers which cover the ravine will be turned into writhing snakes and the whole scene will be one of horror. Electric effects of startling nature will follow in quick succession and the girls will shriek and pray for mercy. When it seems that the culmination of destructive power has been reached quiet will be restored and the show is over.

LATEST ADDITION.

Night and Morning is one of the latest additions to the Midway, the contract for this attraction having been closed only a few days ago. Henry Roltair is the projector of this amusement and he is reputed to be one of the most expert manipulators of optical illusions and scenic effects in the country. His concession will occupy a pyramid 140x140 feet on the ground and 100 feet in height. Upon entering the pyramid the visitor will reach a labyrinth, which will engage his attention for some time as he seeks an outlet. When it is finally found he will find himself in a realistic reproduction of Dante's inferno. Passing from an inspection of this the visitor will ascend to the next floor, where he will find a large number of pleasing scenic effects arranged with all the skill of a master in the art. From this floor the visitor will ascend to the third floor near the top of the pyramid. Here he will find the "heavenly cafe." Just what this may be passes the comprehension of an ordinary mortal, but Mr. Roltair promises that it shall be a place of great attractiveness, where the waitresses shall appear as angels, with wings, flowing robes and all the other concomitants that are supposed to belong to the inhabitants of the region of bliss.

The concession known as Rolling the Roll is an entire novelty in this country, never having been exhibited on this side of the water. It will be operated by three Frenchmen, A. Baron, O. S. Sarzi and O. B. Obergo, who operated it in Paris. It comprises a huge tub, which stands on edge. Seats are made at either side inside the circle and the passengers are strapped to these. The tub is then sent whirling down a steep incline and hits a "bumper" at the bottom, which sends it down another incline to a point beneath the starting place. The passengers alight and the tub is raised for another trip.

The cyclorama which will be exhibited will contain a representation of the famous encounter between the Merrimac and the Monitor.

SCOPE OF MR. FOSTER'S AUTHORITY.

Board of Directors Settles that Matter Without Question.

Although the newly appointed general superintendent of the exposition, A. C. Foster, has not had time to familiarize himself with the duties of his position, a question has arisen in certain quarters regarding the scope of his authority and the claim is made by certain ones that he is simply the superintendent of the Department of Buildings and Grounds and has no connection with, or authority over, any other department of the exposition. The advocates of this construction are generally believed to be actuated by well understood motives, but the report of the special committee of the Board of Directors, under which this appointment was made, clearly shows the intention of the board at the time the executive committee was given positive instructions and defines the duties of the general superintendent as fully as possible without going into minute detail. The report of the special committee to which reference is made was made November 15, and was adopted by the Board of Directors without a dissenting voice and without discussion. The full report is as follows:

To the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition: Gentlemen—Your special committee, appointed at the meeting of the board held on November 12 to investigate and report upon the question of the appointment of a director general or some other supervising officer, to promote the energetic completion of the arrangements for the exposition, begs to report as follows:

Your committee has held an extended conference with the executive committee and discussed the entire situation as fully as it was possible to do the president of the exposition and all members of the executive committee being present, and is pleased to report that a substantial consensus of opinion was eventually arrived at, that the present situation does not seem to make it necessary that the office of director general be created at this time, but that the work of all the departments might be energetically pushed perhaps more satisfactorily than by any other arrangement by the appointment of a general superintendent, a practical builder, at a maximum salary of $200 per month, whose office and headquarters should be upon the exposition grounds and who should be placed in charge of all work in the line of construction of any or all of the departments, with the express duty of overseeing and pushing all such work to energetic completion. As the greater proportion of the work would be in the Department of Buildings and Grounds it would seem advisable to your committee that the nomination of such an officer should be conceded to the manager of that department, but that such nomination should be approved by the executive committee in the usual manner.

Your committee has had under consideration certain amendments to the by-laws touching the powers and duties of the president, but has not had sufficient time to conclude its deliberations on this subject, and would ask that it have further time to consider and report on the same.

(Signed)

HERMAN KOUNTZE,

JOHN L. WEBSTER,

GEORGE F. BIDWELL,

C. F. MANDERSON,
I. W. CARPENTER.

Interest in Idaho.

Special Agent C. E. Llewellyn of the Department of Publicity and Promotion wrote to the department from Boise City, Idaho, that interest in the exposition seems to be active in that state and that the indications for a creditable exhibit are favorable. He says the commission recently appointed by Governor Steunenberg will meet in Boise February 24 to organize for business and men will be put in the field to collect money for a state exhibit. The plan which seems in favor is to issue certificates to subscribers, which the legislature will be asked to take up and return the money.

 

Success in Switzerland.

James T. DuBois, United State consul general at St. Gaul, Switzerland, has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he is meeting with flattering success in his efforts to interest the people of his district in the exposition and has distributed all the advertising matter sent him; he requests that another large quantity be sent him at once as there is a brisk demand for it.

WATER MAINS ALL READY

NOTHING TO DO BUT TURN ON WATER

As Soon as the Company Provides for the Connections the Big Buildings Will Be Safe.

The turning on of water at the exposition grounds will relieve the exposition management of one of the most embarrassing predicaments which has been encountered in the entire history of the enterprise. The question of water supply has been a most vital issue since the beginning of active work on the grounds. Numerous plans have been suggested for securing water from other sources than the water company, but all of these plans proved futile when fully investigated and it was finally conceded by all who had given the matter any attention that the only practical plan was to have the water supplied by the water company. When this conclusion was reached action was commenced to bring about a favorable arrangement with the water company to supply the necessary water. The events following this decision are too recent to require repetition.

Recognizing the fact that the settlement of this matter would probably consume considerable time, the exposition management went ahead with the work of putting in a complete system of water main, fire hydrants, house connections, etc., and this is now ready for immediate use as soon as connections are made with the mains of the water company Wherever a street was available the water mains were laid in the proper place to be available for use after the exposition shall have passed into history. As the land occupied by the main court and the old fair ground tract has never been platted or laid out with streets and alleys the mains were laid where the streets will pass whenever this property is platted.

The location of the fire hydrants will afford ample fire protection to all parts of the grounds. In the main court hydrants are stationed both in front and behind the main buildings and in the other parts of the grounds they are placed at frequent intervals, so that the danger from fire is reduced to the minimum. The exposition authorities do not intend to rely solely upon the fire protection supplied by the fire hydrants, however, but preparations have already been made for supplying the exposition grounds with all the most improved appliances for fighting fire. Portable fire extinguishers are already distributed in all of the main buildings and one large chemical engine is stationed in the main court and is manned by three members of the Omaha fire department. Arrangements have been made for the purchase of hose wagons, chemical engines and various other apparatus of the latest patten, which will be installed on the grounds at convenient points. The details of these arrangements are largely carried out along lines suggested by Chief Redell of the Omaha fire department and he will have general charge of the fire patrol of the grounds.

MUSIC FOR OMAHA'S BIG SHOW.

One of the Greatest Attractions that Can Be Had.

"Music is one of the great attractions at an exposition," said Louis M. Ballenberg at the Millard last night. Mr. Ballenberg, a resident of Cincinnati, is here representing the interests of the Bellstedt Military band of that city and is himself a musician of considerable renown. "Everybody likes it and therefore should have it," continued he. "Visitors to a great exposition like that which will undoubtedly be held in this city grow tired after a time of nothing but sightseeing and they wish a relaxation. This is furnished by the musical organizations. I dare say that one of the most pleasant memories the average visitor to the World's fair brought away with him was the music. It was free as the air and the programs were rendered by famous organizations. After tramping over the grounds of the White City, the people, I noticed, would seek a shady spot and there listen for hours to the melody of Sousa, Siedl or some other bandmaster's efforts. Omaha should not forget this feature. I understand that nearly all the best bands in the country have made offers to the exposition managers, but as yet nothing has been done in this regard. It will not do to defer action on this subject too long, for it must be understood that the maintenance of one of these bands is most expensive. Our organization alone numbers sixty performers, among which we have ten high priced specialists. A manager of such an organization as this is very anxious to make his entire bookings for a season before he starts his men out on the road. All the large bands, of which there are really only four in the United States, will soon have their routes scheduled and it behooves the exposition managers to move in the matter if they care for the services of any of them."

Georgia Commission at Work.

The Georgia exposition commission is traveling about all over the state, holding public meetings in all of the larger towns and arousing the people to the importance of having the state well represented at exposition. This course is having the desired effect and subscriptions are coming in from all quarters. The state exhibit, which is said to be the finest of its kind in the country, is being overhauled and put in good order and preparations are being made to commence work on the Georgia Pine Palace, the money for this purpose being nearly all in hand. This Pine Palace will be one of the marvels of the exposition grounds. It will be constructed entirely of Georgia pines, with "hard oil" finish inside and outside and will have the finest specimens of the beautiful "curly pine" placed at prominent points to add to the beauty.

Oregon May Yet Come.

Oregon seems to be in a fair way to attend the exposition in force and with an exhibit. The latest news from that state is to the effect that the governor is now considering the appointment of an exposition commission and will make his announcement within a few days. Special Agent C. E. Llewellyn of the Department of Publicity and Promotion is in that state and is arousing the people to the importance of getting in line. He has notified the department that the situation has improved very materially and that the prospect for prompt and energetic action is assured.

Nodaway County Will Exhibit.

MARYVILLE, Mo., Feb. 20.—(Special.)—At a mass meeting of the citizens of Nodaway county held at the court house in Maryville yesterday afternoon it was decided to raise at least $2,500 for a Nodaway county exhibit at the Omaha Exposition. Of this amount $500 is to be raised by the Maryville Commercial club, $500 to be appropriated by the county court and the rest raised by subscription in the outlying townships.

Will Erect a Building.

The Liggett & Meyers Tobacco company of St. Louis has decided to erect a building on the exposition grounds. The decision was telegraphed to the Department of Exhibits Saturday and with it came instructions to Leo Bonet to commence work at once upon the plans for the building, which will be 100x50 feet in size and of handsome design.

Favorable to Indian Congress.

The Department of Publicity and Promotion is in receipt of information to the effect that there has been a great change in sentiment in the committee of congress having in charge the Indian bill which carries the appropriation for the Indian congress. The members of the committee who have been opposing the appropriation for the congress have been receiving telegrams and letters in large numbers from their constituents, urging them to support the measure, and these are having considerable weight with the committee.

INDIAN CONGRESS IS A GO

AMENDMENT IS VERY LIKELY TO PASS

If the Good Management Thus Far Shown is Continued the Redskins Will Certainly Assemble at Omaha.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 21.—(Special Telegram.)—There is a growing belief that Omaha will get $45,000 for the Indian congress if the present diplomatic conduct of legislation looking to its adoption by the committee of conference on the Indian appropriation bill is maintained. The whole management in the campaign thus far has been without a mistake and if anything like the present finesse is shown there will be no difficulty in keeping the amount of $45,000 on the appropriation bill as it came from the senate.

COLORADO IS CONVINCED

TRIP TO EXPOSITION GROUNDS SATISFIED

Thirty-Seven Enthusiasts from Denver See All They Looked For and a Great Deal More at Kountze Park.

The first installment of Colorado people who are coming to inspect the exposition and imbibe some of the exposition enthusiasm which permeates the air, have arrived in the city and are being entertained by the exposition management while information is being administered in large quantities. The party was ciceroned by Commissioners W. S. Ward and A. T. Macdonald, members of the Colorado commission and of the Denver commission, who visited Omaha several weeks ago and were greatly inspired by what they saw. They decided after returning home that the only way their fellow citizens could be aroused to the proper pitch of enthusiasm would be to bring them to Omaha to see for themselves that the exposition is to be the greatest American exposition ever held on this continent.

There are thirty-seven men in the party, all but two being from Denver. Business men from other portions of the state fully intended to accompany the party but failed to make the necessary connections. The visitors are a bustling, business-like body of men, and they seem to exude energy at every pore. They say they are here for business and promise that Colorado and Denver will not be missing when the roll is called for the opening day of the exposition.

The full list of the delegation is as follows: Lieutenant Governor Jud Brush, Mayor W. S. McMurray, Vice President Edward F. Bishop, capitalist; W. N. Beyers, retired capitalist; F. A. Keener, vice president Denver Consolidated Tramway company; William Church, capitalist; S. M. Allen, manger Bradstreets; Max Kuner, president Kuner Pickle company; W. A. Hoover, wholesale druggist; S. E. Roberts, transfer business; W. S. Ward, mining expert; George Ady, general agent Union Pacific; Joseph Milner, city passenger agent Burlington; W. A. Firth, general agent Rock Island at Denver; W. F. Bailey, general passenger agent Colorado Midland; J. E. Preston, general agent Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railway; Fitz Mac, journalist; J. M. Ward, city editor Post; Willis Thompson, city editor Republican; A. T. Macdonald, deputy city auditor; S. N. Hastings, real estate; H. H. Roth, insurance; M. Morris, national secretary Retail Clerks association; Colonel J. D. Fanning, proprietor Albany hotel; T. A. Triplett, mine owner, Central City; J. H. Adams, capitalist; Colonel Goodell, capitalist; Warren Gilbert, sketch artist for Denver Post; Ardice Davis, plumber; John D. Bradley, real estate; C. W. Bishop, clerk circuit court; Donald W. Campbell, engineer Board of Public Works; J. J. Humphrey, architect Manufactures building on exposition grounds; T. D. Boal, architect of Denver city building; J. J. Jo[?]lin, dry goods; O. A. Reinhardt, capitalist; Henry J. Mayham, president Mayham Investment company.

FROM HOTEL TO GROUNDS.

The local committee which assembled at the hotel to accompany the visitors to the exposition grounds included these Omaha men: President Wattles, Mayor F. E. Moores, Major T. S. Clarkson, chief of the Entertainment bureau; Chairman William Neville of the Nebraska Exposition commission; Dr. S. K. Spalding, W. H. Roberson, Dudley Smith, W. S. Poppleton, H. E. Palmer, Rev. T. J. Mackay, Colonel J. J. Dickey, H. J. Penfold, H. S. Weller, Judge W. D. McHugh and W. F. Allen. After a short time spent in getting acquainted a special train of trolley cars was brought to the hotel and in this the entire party made a quick trip to the grounds.

The main court was first entered, the party going into the Auditorium, the size, purpose and cost of which was explained by President Wattles, after which the entire party assembled on the bank of the lagood​ in front of the Mines building, where President Wattles explained the names of the main buildings and the general scheme of the grounds. From here a circuit of the main court was made, each building being entered and the progress of construction noted.

The visitors were loud in their praise of the evident magnitude of the operations and the magnificent plan which dominated the whole. They commented very freely on the grand scale on which preparations are being made and confessed that what they saw greatly surpassed their expectations. The general trend of the expressions heard was to the effect that Denver must have a building on the grounds and that Colorado must be represented in a creditable manner.

As each of the buildings was visited the astonishment of the visitors increased and the time consumed in passing through the immense structures seemed to impress them with the huge proportions of the whole affair. The staff shop in the Manufactures building was a point of great interest, and many of the visitors watched the operation of making staff with great interest.

 

From the main court the party passed to the bluff tract and examined the buildings there under construction. The location selected for the Denver building was examined and commented on, the opinion being general that Commissioners Ward and Macdonald had made an excellent selection.

After the grounds had been fully inspected the party returned to the city and were entertained at luncheon at the Millard. This was followed by an interchange of courtesies and short talks by the visitors and members of the local committee.

Some of the party will return home this evening on the Burlington and the others will remain in the city until tomorrow and will return via the Rock Island.

BOOMERS MEET GREAT SUCCESS.

George Clayton Tells of the Trip as Far as Columbus, O.

George Clayton, northwestern passenger agent of the Wabash railroad, has just returned from Columbus, O., where he left the party of Nebraskans now touring through the central and southern portions of the country advertising the Transmississippi Exposition. Mr. Clayton accompanied the party from here to Columbus, personally attending to the matter of railroad connections and assisting in other details of the trip. He was obliged to leave the party on Thursday last because of the demands of business here.

To a Bee reporter yesterday he said: "This trip, in my opinion, will prove to be the most successful of any time that have been undertaken to spread the fame of the exposition. The party is a large one and a representative one, and contains a number of good speakers. Everywhere it is being received royally, and in every city and town visited the people are convinced of the real importance of the exposition and its broad scope. At every place the party visited the leading business and professional men of the city. The papers in all the cities were exceedingly kind, and invariably gave us from a column to a column and a half notice, besides locals for several days in advance of our arrival.

"We started in at St. Louis, and after the close of the Stock exchange there one of the party told the brokers all about the exposition. Then we were entertained at the Manufacturers' club. The next day we covered Vincennes, Ind., meeting the mayor and all the prominent citizens. The southern part of Illinois and Indiana were crossed by daylight, and that evening we pulled in at Louisville, Ky., at 6 o'clock. After a fine supper we had a big meeting and the interests of the exposition gained many real friends. It was the same thing over again at Cincinnati, at Dayton, O., at Springfield, O., and at Columbus, O. At the latter place the governor and the legislature were unusually cordial and promised the support of the state. All in all, the trip will undoubtedly do more real good for the exposition than any trip that has yet been undertaken, and will certainly make the exposition literature that shall now be sent into that country read with much greater interest."

PARIS EXHIBIT ASKS FOR SPACE.

French Dealers Apply for a Chance to Show Their Wares.

The first installment of applications from the large number of French exhibitors secured by Frederick Mayer, the French commissioner of the exposition, have been received. There are nineteen in this collection, eleven of whom exhibited at the World's fair. The names and characters of exhibits are these: Emile Pinedo, bronzes, statuary, etc.; Fernand Martin, mechanical toys; J. B. Martin, musical instruments; M. Shorestene, hat makers' supplies; M. Besegher, varnishes; M. Carue, gymnastic apparatus; Ernest Carriere, mirrors and glass; M. Hubert, artistic toys, etc.; M. Renou, jewelry, precious stones; G. Vichy, artistic toys, etc.; M. Delaunay, artistic furniture; H. Morin, perfumery; M. Marmorat, jewelry, precious stones, etc.; M. Charpentier, furniture and bronzes; M. Hartman, the same; M. Levy, dresses and women's apparel; M. Vuitton, trunks, valises, etc.; M. Colmont, optical instruments; F. Mayer, collection of illustrated views of the Paris exposition.

All of these exhibitors are from Paris, and Commissioner Mayer says the exhibits made by them will be of the very highest class. Superintendent Hardt of the Exhibits department, says he is personally acquainted with many of these exhibitors and knows that their exhibits will be of the highest grade of excellence. Commissioner Mayer says he will forward another lot of application in a few days, and will have a fine collection of exhibitors in the French section. He says the American Chamber of Commerce in Paris is giving him great assistance in securing exhibitors and in arousing interest among the people concerning the exposition. He issues from his office special exposition pamphlets at short intervals and says the demand for them is constantly growing.

DELAY SETTLING WATER MATTER.

Stipulation for Dismissal of Baum Injunction Not Yet on File.

The injunction proceedings which have prevented the city council from paying the back bills of the water company are still pending, but it is expected that the necessary stipulation for dismissal will be filed within a day or two and then there is no apparent reason why the water cannot be turned on at the exposition grounds at once. The stipulation has been signed by the attorney for Mr. Baum and is now in the hands of the attorneys for the water company and the signatures of its officials will complete the document.

It is not expected that there will be any hitch in the payment of the water bills by the city after the injunction proceedings are once out of the way. There is no dispute in regard to the bills, and in fact $43,000 of the amount due has already been allowed. No action has been taken on the 1897 bills amounting to $87,040 on account of the injunction, but the council is understood to be ready to approve them as soon as the legal barrier is removed. The smaller amount can be paid at once, as the warrants are drawn and in the hands of the comptroller, but as the 1897 bills are provided for in the pending issue of refunding bonds there would be a short delay while the bonds were being disposed of.

Ogden Editor Interested.

William Glasmann, editor and proprietor of the Ogden Standard, is in the city and accompanied the Colorado party to the exposition grounds. Mr. Glasmann was most favorably impressed with the progress which has been made on the exposition grounds and buildings and said he intended taking up the matter in his paper and urging the people of Utah to take a more active interest in the matter of being represented. "Our state has a commission which has been doing very active work," said Mr. Glasmann, "but I am satisfied that the people generally do not fully realize the magnitude of the enterprise you people are preparing for. I am astounded at the magnificent scale on which preparations are being made and I shall make it a point to urge our people to make all possible use of the opportunity which will be afforded them to make a fine showing."

Mr. Glasmann made copious notes on the grounds on which he will base a series of energetic letters to his paper and he says he will follow these with editorials, urging the people to give the state commission all possible support.

Endeavorers and Sunday Opening.

Treasurer Jones and A. L. Emmons, chairman of the press committee of the Omaha union of the Christian Endeavorers, authorize a denial of any intention on the part of the local members of that organization to have a rally of delegates, en route to the national convention, on the exposition grounds on Sunday, July 3, as stated in the letter of Chairman Brainard of the transportation committee in a letter to President Wattles. These representatives of the local union say that preparations have been making for a rally in Omaha on July 3, but the promoters have not intended that it shall be held on the exposition grounds, as they are opposed to having the gates opened on Sunday, but they have intended to have the meeting held down town and have the delegates remain in the city all day Monday in order that they may visit the exposition on that day.

Georgia Has a Nice Fund.

B. M. Fowler, the Georgia agent of the exposition, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that the Georgia Exposition commission has already raised $3,600 for the expenses of installing the magnificent state exhibit now at the state capitol, and expects to increase this amount to $5,000 or $6,000 very soon. He says the commission is canvassing the entire state and is meeting with great success in raising funds in this manner. The commission travels about in a body, holding public meetings in the principal towns and bringing the exposition logic directly home to the people.

Part of the Navy Exhibit.

Lieutenant Commander Fatch, the representative of the Navy department on the board of control of the government exhibit, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that among the articles to be exhibited by the Navy department will be a model of the dry dock at Puget Sound, twenty-six feet in length, with a model of a battleship lying in the dock. There will also be a full size model of a ship's stateroom.

Fills Vacancy on Supreme Bench.

ST. LOUIS, Feb. 22.—A special to the Post-Dispatch from Jefferson City, Mo., says that Governor Stephens William C. Marshall, city counsellor of St. Louis, to the supreme bench to succeed Justice McFarland, who died recently.

CHORUS GETS UNDER WAY

PRELIMINARY MEETING A SUCCESS

More Than a Hundred Express Their Intention of Joining After Hearing the Plan Explained and Having a Drill.

The meeting last night to organize the exposition chorus was a complete success, both in point of the number of singers in attendance and in the enthusiasm with which they entered into the spirit of the undertaking. The meeting was held in Hayden's music hall and there were just 107 people, by actual count, in the chairs reserved for the singers when Choral Conductor Kelly swung his baton for the first chorus. In addition to these there were a number of spectators, some of them having come as escorts for prospective members of the chorus, and others being people interested in musical matters, but who do not sing.

The singers were prompt in assembling and it was but a few minutes after 8 o'clock when Mr. T. J. Kelly, the choral director of the exposition, called the meeting to order and stated very briefly the object for which the meeting was held. He then asked Manager Lindsey of the Ways and Means department of the exposition, called the meeting to order and stated very briefly the object for which the meeting was held. He then asked Manager Lindsey of the Ways and Means department of the exposition, the department having direct control of the music of the exposition, to say a few words.

Mr. Lindsey said he would not make a speech, but would merely say that it will be the policy of the exposition management to give the music of the exposition all the money that can be spared for that purpose. He promised that his feature of the great enterprise would not be allowed to suffer, but will be supported in a substantial manner, and he asked the singers of this vicinity to lend the movement all the assistance in their power.

DIRECTOR KIMBALL'S EXPLANATION.

Prof. Willard Kimball, musical director of the exposition, was introduced to the assembly by Director Kelly. He stated that this meeting was of greater import to the development of musical culture in the west than any meeting ever before held in Omaha or any other western city. He laid especial stress upon the statement that the chorus now in process of organization would be generally regarded as the criterion by which people from other sections of the country will judge the musical culture of this section and appealed to those present and to musicians generally, as well as those interested in the upbuilding of the cause in the west, to lend their hearty support to aiding in the establishment of a chorus which shall be a credit to Omaha and the entire west.

Prof. Kimball then referred briefly to the advantages which membership in the chorus will confer upon those who identify themselves with it. He spoke of the opportunities which will be presented for hearing many concerts by the most noted performers, including the most celebrated singers in the world, as well as concerts by an orchestra of the highest standing. In this connection he said negotiations are now being conducted with several of the leading orchestras of this country and it will soon be known which organizations will be engaged. Returning again to the benefits to be derived by members of the chorus, Mr. Kimball said the chorus will not be asked to sing more than once or twice in any week, but members will be admitted to the Auditorium on any day when concerts are to be given, and this privilege alone, he said, represented at least $25. The practice which will be acquired by rehearsing before and during the exposition will be valuable to all singers, and all that each member of the chorus is asked to pay is $5 to assist in defraying some of the minor expenses.

In closing, Prof. Kimball called attention to the fact that the stage of the Auditorium is limited in size and will not seat more than about 225 singers, so that it will be necessary to limit the number of members to about that number.

CHORUS STARTS WELL.

This concluded the preliminary work of the meeting and Choral Director Kelly took charge of the proceedings. Copies of the "Daughter of Jairus" were distributed and rehearsal was at once taken up with this work. Mr. Martin Cahn, the well known pianist, was present and was invited to play the accompaniment. The first chorus was taken up and no delay ensued in getting under full headway. The singers entered at once into the spirit of the music and the number moved with a precision and accuracy of attack that was a source of great pleasure to Director Kimball, who was an interested observer. The several parts were fairly well balanced, although there was a noticeable deficiency in numbers in the ranks of the tenors, but those in that row labored energetically and the volume of sound from that quarter was strongly in evidence. One chorus followed another in rapid succession, interruptions and repetitions being frequent as little details were brought out, and the best of humor prevailed throughout the drill.

After an hour spent in this way Mr. Kelly announced that he would be ready Saturday of this week to try the voices of all applicants for membership, and asked all who desired to become members to come to his   studio on that day between the hours of 2 and 5 p. m. He then asked all who intended to join the chorus to give evidence of that fact by rising and every chair was vacant in an instant. He proceeded to take the names of those wishing to become members and the name of nearly every person present was entered on the list.

While this was being done Prof. Kimball related briefly the various choral societies which have expressed a desire to come to Omaha during the exposition and give concerts, to all of which members of the Exposition chorus will be admitted without charge. He said the exposition management will expend about $50,000 to make the music of the exposition a prominent feature and he dwelt upon the importance of such an expenditure in building up the musical standing of Omaha. He predicted that it would result in the organization of a permanent choral society of large size and a high grade of excellence and the establishment here of an orchestra of the highest proficiency.

This concluded the business of the meeting and it was announced that the second meeting will be held in the same hall next Monday evening at 8 o'clock and all who desire to become members of the chorus were invited to be present at that time and place.

EXHIBIT OF BABY INCUBATORS.

London Firm Secures a Concession for a Novel Scientific Show.

The executive committee yesterday authorized Manager Reed of the Department of Concessions to enter into a contract for a concession for an exhibit of infant incubators. The promoters propose to erect a building in which they will install eight of these machines, each with a living occupant, and the tiny bit of humanity inhabiting each of these compartments will be in plain view of the spectators. The concessionaires are Duncan Shepperd and Louis Luby, both of London, England. They made similar exhibits at the Brussels exposition last year and at the Queen's Era exposition in London. Commissioner Dudley Smith saw both exhibits when in Europe as the representative of the exposition, and pronounces them strong attractions.

Manager Reed was also authorized to make a contract with Messrs. Obergo and Baroni to conduct an employes' and exhibitors' restaurant on the exposition grounds, where meals will be furnished those desiring them and thus obviate leaving the grounds.

The proposition of Sculptor Franz Engelsmann to make the sculpture for the Agriculture building for $4,680 was accepted.

Mesa County's Part.

The fruit growers of Grand Junction, Colo., held a meeting in that city Saturday and appointed a committee to take full charge of the exhibit to be made by Mesa county at the exposition and see that the extensive fruit interests of that section are properly presented. This committee is as follows: P. A. Rice, C. W. Steele, Dr. F. R. Smith, J. W. Constan and J. S. Charlton. The committee will at once take up the work for which it was created and the fruit growers of that section have promised their hearty co-operation.

Montana's Advisory Board.

Vice President W. H. Sutherlin of Montana has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he has appointed an advisory board to assist him in preparing Montana's exhibit, consisting of the following persons: Marcus Daly of Anaconda, A. L. Babcock of Billings, W. G. Conrad of Great Falls, W. A. Clark of Butte and W. W. Morris of Pony.

CAPTURES CENTENNIAL STATE

DENVER'S DELEGATES ARE DELIGHTED

Trip to Kountze Park Followed by Luncheon, at Which Many Kind and Encouraging Words Are Spoken.

The Transmississippi and International Exposition has no warmer supporters than the thirty-seven Coloradoans who arrived in the city yesterday morning to inspect the exposition grounds and learn for themselves just what is being done to prepare for the great show they have heard so much about. The citizen of Colorado is a boomer by instinct, and those who were in the party in question admitted that they had formed a dim idea that perhaps the people of Omaha were subject to the same complaint, but they freely admitted, after they had visited the grounds, that "the half had not been told," and they were loud in their praises of the magnificence of the preparations and the remarkable progress which has been made in getting ready for an exposition which they declared will be second only to the great World's Fair. They promise that the Centennial state will not be missing when the roll is called on the opening day of the exposition, but will be here with an exhibit and the people will attend the show in great numbers.

LUNCH AT THE MILLARD.

After the inspection of the grounds had been completed the party returned to the city and were entertained at luncheon at the Millard.

The west end of the main dining room was set apart for the party and tables were arranged to form three sides of a hollow square. The seats of honor were occupied by Governor Holcomb of Nebraska, Lieutenant Governor Brush of Colorado, Mayor McMurray of Denver and Mayor Moores of Omaha, Vice President Bishop of the Colorado commission and Colonel W. N. Byers of Denver. President Wattles occupied the center of the table, with Master of Ceremonies Clarkson at his side, and the executive committee was represented by Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion.

After the cigars had been lighted Major Clarkson assumed charge, an ideal toastmaster, and his happy references to the several speakers kept the assembly in good humor and added greatly to the enjoyment of the occasion.

President Wattles extended a welcome to the visitors on behalf of the exposition. His remarks were brief, but he said he wished to emphasize the point that the coming exposition is not an Omaha fair, but an exposition of the whole western country and that Omaha has simply been acting as the agent of Colorado and the other western states in making ready for the great event. He said he took pleasure in welcoming a delegation which had come to see how its agent had been conducting the business in which they were all interested and he expressed the hope that the result of the investigation would be that Colorado will be present at the exposition with an exhibit and with her people.

GOVERNOR HOLCOMB'S WELCOME.

Governor Holcomb was called on and responded with an eloquent speech which aroused the visitors to a high pitch of enthusiasm. He commenced by expressing his pleasure at being able to join with his fellow citizens of Omaha in welcoming the visitors to the state and city and expressed the hope that they would return to their homes and give their neighbors a true account of what has been done in the way of preparation. He hoped the visitors would feel that the enterprise now in prospect will redound to the credit of the entire west. He declared that it is extending every day and already reaches from Atlantic to Pacific; the states both in the east and in the west are taking an active interest and will be here with their exhibits. There will be no spirit of unfriendly rivalry between the states, but all will join in showing to the world the progress which has been made by the great west since the subjugation of what was once regarded as a barren region. He invited Colorado to join in this great exposition and assist in showing to the world the magnificent resources of this great exposition and assist in showing to the world the magnificent resources of this great section, in order that those desiring to improve their condition may be able to take their choice from seeing what each locality has to offer. The people of Omaha and Nebraska have done all in their power to prepare for the event and now ask the other states to come in and help in making the exposition a great success.

FROM COLORADO'S EXECUTIVE.

Lieutenant Governor Brush conveyed the regrets of Governor Adams at being unable to be present. The governor had told him to say that he is in full sympathy with the exposition movement and will do all in his power to assist in making it a success.

Speaking for himself, Governor Brush said he had heard wonderful accounts of what was being done before he reached Omaha and had been somewhat skeptical about believing all he heard, but after visiting the grounds all he could say was, in the language of scripture, "the half has not been told." Colorada has been a little lukewarm toward the exposition, but he predicted that when the delegation of which he is a member returned home great interest will be aroused to the importance of being well represented, he had no doubt a way will be found to bring about that result. He declared his conviction that the exposition will be a great success and worthy of participation by every state in the union and he predicted that Colorado will not be missing when the gates are opened.

Mayor Moores added to the welcome of the visitors, assuring them that the town was theirs. His remarks were well timed and witty and kept the assembly in an excellent humor.

SPEAKS FOR DENVER.

Mayor McMurray of Denver expressed the thanks of the visitors for the hearty entertainment of which they had been the recipients. When he visited the grounds he had been greatly surprised at the magnitude of the plans and the advancement that had been made and felt as much interested in the progress and success of the exposition as a Nebraskan could possibly feel. It is a matter of great regret with all the Coloradoans that their legislature had made no appropriation for participation in the exposition, but they hope to make up for the deficiency by arousing the people when they return home. Colorado might not be able to put up a building, but the people will be here and they will come with exhibit that will not be made ashamed by the showing made by any other state. He asked that space be reserved in the main building for Colorado and for Denver, and also put in an application for a special day, to be called "Colorado day," when the people of Colorado and Denver may come and visit the exposition and feel that they have a proprietary interest in it.

Mayor McMurray also served notice that Colorado will have a great exposition in 1903, to celebrate the "Louisiana purchase" and he invited all the people to come to Colorado at that time to help celebrate.

Toastmaster Clarkson declared that a day would be too short in which to take care of all the visitors who will come from Colorado and he announced that a full week will be set aside for that especial purpose. He also served notice that Omaha and Nebraska will be on hand when Colorado holds it great celebration of the Louisiana purchase and will do all in their power to make that occasion a great success.

BELONGS TO THE WEST.

Manager Rosewater was called for and responded by saying that the strongest feature of the Transmississippi and International Exposition will be the exhibits of the states in the transmississippi region. This will be the first exposition at which the greatest attention will be paid to the states of the union. Washington and Oregon are the only states west of the Mississippi which have not taken active steps to be represented and the latest advices are to the effect that the governor of Oregon will appoint a commission within a few days, leaving Washington as the only state without representation. Mr. Rosewater said he realized that it is difficult to make an exhibit without a state appropriation, but he referred to Missouri as a shining example of what can be accomplished by persistent effort and enterprise. Denver, "the Paris of the West," should take hold of the matter and see that the state is represented. He referred to the Mountain City as a thriving wide awake, enterprising commonwealth that has outstripped Omaha in many respects by sheer force of the energy of her people, and said the people of Colorado are equally enterprising, and will undoubtedly be represented at the exposition in a fitting manner. Referring to other states which have been working without a state appropriation to ensure suitable representation, Mr. Rosewater named Wisconsin, which has collected nearly $15,000 and will erect a building; Georgia, which has collected several thousand dollars and will have a magnificent exhibit; Alabama, Tennessee, New Jersey, which is asking for an appropriation, but will have a large exhibit whether one is secured or not; Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York and Pennsylvania, all of which are going ahead without appropriations and are bound to be on hand with creditable exhibits. More states will be represented than were at the Philadelphia Centennial. The people of the east are talking about the exposition and it is assured that at least 3,000,000 will attend the exposition. Colorado must certainly take advantage of this most excellent opportunity to advertise her resources to the people of the world. Whatever helps Colorado or the west will help Omaha, and vice versa.

COLORADO'S EFFORTS.

Colonel Edward F. Bishop, vice president of the Colorado commission, a former schoolmate of Major Clarkson and a comrade-in-arms, was the next speaker. He said he had expected great things of the exposition, but he had been more than surprised at what he had seen on the grounds. He ventured the statement that if George Washington should look down on the earth on this, his natal day, his eyes would rest with approval on the fertile state of Nebraska and the great city of Omaha. He declared that the men composing the Colorado delegation represented the best business interests of Denver, who had been brought to Omaha to see what had been shown them. There had been no indisposition to make an exhibit, but efforts in that direction had been hindered by lack of a state appropriation. A commission had been appointed and efforts made to provide for an exhibit. A fine exhibit is assured, he said, regardless of what may result from future efforts, and the resources of the state in minerals, agriculture, horticulture and fine arts will be well represented.

W. S. Appleton told about the visit of the Omaha exposition to the Centennial state just a year ago, when the exposition was yet in its infancy, and the hearty reception that had been given the party by the people of Denver. He spoke of the rough places the exposition had passed since that time and expressed the hope that Colorado will be at the exposition, assuring the visitors of the co-operation of Omaha in their contemplated celebration in 1903.

EARLY EXPOSITION HISTORY.

Colonel W. N Byers expressed his surprise at what he had seen on the exposition grounds, saying it was far beyond his anticipations. He said he had no doubt the people of Omaha were surprised at the tardiness of Colorado in getting into line, but he was assured that energetic action will be taken at once and suitable provision made for participation. The veteran surveyor then reviewed some of his early experiences when he first came to the west. He said the ground where the exposition is now being prepared was then a cornfield planted by the Mormons. At that time this section of country west of it was considered a barren waste. He indulged in several interesting reminiscences of those early days when the Mormons were located at Kanesville, above what is now Council Bluffs. When the Mormons started for the west the speaker went with them, returning to Omaha when there was but a single cabin on what is now the city.

G. M. Hitchcock told of the difficulties of the party that visited Colorado on exposition business one year ago. What was then   imaginary, he said, has since been fully realized, and the work that has been done in preparing for the exposition, he declared, will be a great revelation to those who have not seen it in course of preparation. It had been said then that this exposition would be a great X-ray which would show to the people the vast resources of the great west, and he expressed the belief that this prophecy will be fully realized. Colorado has been slow, but he believed what had been lost in time will be made up in energy and that what will be of benefit to Colorado will benefit also Nebraska and all the other states.

This concluded the post prandial exercises and the party dissolved. Twenty-four of the visiting delegation returned home on the Burlington train at 4:30 yesterday afternoon and the other thirteen remained in the city. They will leave on the Rock Island train this afternoon.

State Horticultural Society.

Yesterday afternoon the State Horticultural society met at the Barker hotel and took steps toward revising the premium list and preparing for the exposition. A committee, consisting of three florists and three horticulturists, was appointed to prepare the list for the exposition premiums. This committee consists of C. H. Barnett of Table Rock, G. A. Marshall of Arlington, Peter Youngers of Geneva, C. H. Chapin of Lincoln, Louis Henderson and J. H. Hadkinson of Omaha. The premium list will include offers amounting to $1,000.

GENERATES SOME WARMTH

SECRETARY CASPER DESCANTS ON EXPERTS

Employment of Numerous Assistants Arouses Him to an Indignant Protest, but He is Outvoted Just the Same.

The Nebraska Exposition commission held a meeting last night for the first time this month. There was very little business transacted, principally because a good part of the session was occupied by a very animated and heated discussion. Some of the members claimed the others were getting more than their share of the soft jobs for their friends and there were some very severe criticisms of the policy of employing alleged experts for the work to be done. The warmth which pervaded the meeting extended to the lobby and a heated argument terminated in a fist fight between two employes of the board.

The trouble started over a very innocent appearing motion made by Commissioner Whitford. Mr. Whitford is a horticulturist by choice and the affairs of the horticulture department have been regulated largely according to his suggestions, but when he moved that the board proceed to select an assistant superintendent of horticulture Secretary Casper's hair stood on end. The secretary entered a most vigorous and emphatic protest against the appointment of any more employes until some kind of an agreement was reached by which some of the districts which have no representation on the pay roll should have a chance. As the usually placid and mild-mannered secretary proceeded his ire increased and he demanded to know of the chairman if it was not a fact that the board had already appointed a superintendent of horticulture and an assistant.

Chairman Neville declined to be drawn into what he saw was likely to be an unpleasant discussion and he maintained a dignified silence.

Mr. Whitford's manner was gentle as a summer's breeze as he informed Mr. Casper in a tone of gentle reproach that it was true that the board had already employed the persons he had named, but he reminded the secretary, still in the same gentle tone, that the care of the horticultural exhibit would require the greatest attention and it was necessary to employ experts to do the work properly.

CASPER ON EXPERTS.

The reference to "experts" was like flaunting a carmine undergarment in the eyes of an excited gentleman cow and furnished a text for a dissertation by the secretary that was a gem. He declared that he was tired of hearing about "experts." "We are told at every meeting," said he, "that we must have an expert for this and an expert for that and it always happens that the man who talks the most about experts has some friend who is just the right kind of an expert to fill the bill. The result is that we have got a lot of experts on our pay roll calling up the money and what do they amount to? We have got two or three experts putting up our state building and one goes out there and orders a thing done this way and right after him comes another expert and orders the work torn down and done his way. I understand that the cornice on our building has been torn off three times to please some of our alleged experts and the good Lord only knows whether some of our other experts won't come along tomorrow and say it is all wrong and must be done another way. Now we are told we must have an expert to wipe off apples and put them on a plate. I believe I could learn how to take an apple off a plate and wipe the dust off of it and then put it back again after I had been instructed eight or ten times by the superintendent and I believe any other hayseed could learn to do it in time. I would like to know when we are going to agree on the number of employes we are going to put on the pay roll and have some understanding how the different districts are going to be represented. I have not nominated a single man for a position under this board, and yet I believe I have as many applicants for jobs as any of the rest of you. I believe all the democrats in the state think they must come either to Mr. Boydston or myself when they want a job under this board, and there are plenty of pops and one or two republicans who have made application to me. I always tell them that we are not ready to hire any men and have no determined just what we will do, but it makes me tired to come here one meeting after another and see other members slipping their friends into nice soft jobs when I have to go home and be cussed by my friends for not having sense enough to get anything for my district."

EXPERTS IN A ROW.

The remarks of Mr. Casper about the alterations in the cornice of the Nebraska building caused a discussion between Assistant Foreman Watson, one of the numerous "experts" who has been in charge of the construction of the Nebraska building, and Timekeeper E. W. Crane, an "expert" engaged to keep account of the number of hours put in by the expert carpenters, expert laborers and the numerous other expert attaches who draw pay for their valuable services. Watson said Casper was "mistaken" about the cornice being changed three times and claimed it had only been changed twice. Crane forcibly insisted that Casper was right. This counter attraction diverted attention from the proceedings of the board and those who could not watch the performance in both rings at the same time turned their attention to the lobby. At this point the lie was passed and Watson jumped to his feet and struck at Crane. The latter kept his seat but threw out his feet in an energetic manner and kept Watson at bay. Before Watson could break through this guard bystanders separated them and attention was again turned to the proceedings of the board.

Member Poynter sided with Mr. Casper. He said he didn't like to vote against the men who had been nominated, as they were friends of his, but he called attention to the fact that he had named but one employe of the board.

EMPLOYS THE ASSISTANT.

Mr. Whitford had sat silently through the indignant speech of Mr. Casper, but he said that in order to test the sense of the board he would nominate George Nownes of Sarpy county to be assistant superintendent of horticulture. This motion carried with four votes "yes" and none in the negative, Messrs. Casper and Poynter not voting.

Mr. Boydston then essayed to pour oil on the troubled waters by moving the appointment of a committee of three to determine upon the number of employes to be permanently employed by the board and to "adjust" the number between the several districts of the state, taking into account the number already appointed. He suggested that he would favor allowing each member of the board to name the men to fill the positions assigned to his district.

This was carried unanimously and the chair appointed Commissioners Boydston, Poynter and Casper as the committee.

Before the storm arose over the distribution of "pie" Mrs. Helen R. Stires of Columbus, grand matron of the Order of the Eastern Star, appeared before the board and requested that the order be given a room in the state building for headquarters or be allotted desk room in the building.

Chairman Neville advocated delaying action on this matter, but Secretary Casper was in favor of "doing something" at once and coming to some conclusion.

This was discussed for some time and resulted in passing a motion instructing the assistant secretary to notify all societies in the state who want space in the Nebraska building for headquarters to make that fact known at once by an application in person or by mail. When these are received the whole matter will be taken up and some definite action taken, the nature of the action depending upon the number of societies.

WILL SETTLE WATER QUESTION.

Legal Formalities Are Nearly All Gone Through With.

The legal technicalities surrounding the furnishing of water to the exposition seem to be about overcome and there is every indication that the whole matter will be settled very soon. The stipulation by which the injunction is to be dissolved in the case of J. E. Baum against the city of Omaha, to restrain the city from paying past due hydrant rental to the water company, has been signed by Mr. Baum and the city authorities, and stipulation for the dismissal of the case of the Omaha Water company against J. E. Baum for damages on accounnt​ of the first named suit, has been signed by Mr. Baum. Both of these stipulations are in the hands of Mr. Montgomery, counsel for the exposition, and he says he will turn them over to the water company as soon as he receives the contract for the furnishing of water to the exposition, duly executed by the officials of the water company, the exposition officers have signed it several days ago. This contract is in the hands of Mr. Hall, attorney for the water company, and he says he is ready to turn it over to Mr. Montgomery in exchange for the stipulations of dismissal. A meeting between the two attorneys has been arranged for and it is expected that these formalities will be disposed of at once.

The officials of the water company say that as soon as these preliminaries are concluded and the city authorities have turned over the money or other evidence of indebtedness to the water company the connection with the exposition grounds will be made.

LOUISIANA IS BOUND TO COME.

Proposes to Be in Evidence at the Exposition.

NEW ORLEANS, Feb. 23.—(Special Telegram.)—The exposition excursionists arrived here at 9:30 this morning. After breakfast they marched in a body to the Board of Trade, where they were welcomed by President Broumh, who confined his remarks largely to the growing importance of New Orleans as a port for the shipment of western products, stating in that connection that the Crescent City was determined to secure the lion's share of the ocean business of the great northwest, promising also to soon provide streamers built expressly for the import trade. He stated that Louisiana was alive to the importance of transmississippi traffic and that the state would make a highly creditable showing; also the exposition.

Following the meeting at the Board of Trade the party was given a trolley ride over the city, visiting the great levee on the Mississippi side and being taken through the better residence portions of the city.

At 5 o'clock the delegation was escorted to the Jefferson club, where Governor Foster made an address. He promised hearty co-operation in making the exposition a success, recognized the growing importance of the great northwest and believed New Orleans the natural sea port for the products of that country. He also promised to be at Omaha during the coming summer and it is understood that it is his intention to take with him his official staff and a large retinue of Louisianans.

At Mobile the visitors were entertained by the Commercial club, taken up and down the river, viewing the immense lumber mills to the north and going as far down as the mouth of the government channel. The party leaves for Baton Rouge tomorrow morning.

DENVER, Colo., Feb. 23.—(Special Telegram.)—The Denver excursionists to the Omaha Exposition returned this morning. All expressed themselves as immensely pleased and surprised at the progress at the exposition grounds. The concensus​ of opinion seemed to by: "Omaha is all right; the Transmississippi Exposition is going to be a humer​." Mayor McMurray will call a mass meeting next week to devise ways and means under which the resources and manufactures of Colorado and Denver may be fully exhibited.

CLOSING DATES ON EXHIBITS

TUESDAY ENDS TIME FOR APPLICATIONS

Department Finds the Space All Occupied by the Most Desirable Class of Exhibitors—Making Out Acceptances.

March 1 is the date fixed by the rules of the Department of Exhibits as the last day of grace for the reception of applications for space in the exposition. After that time the individuals, firms, municipalities or states which have not filed their applications for space will have a hard time convincing the authorities that their applications for admission should be accepted. Another rule provides that no articles intended for exhibition will be admitted after May 1, and space not taken possession of by that time will revert to the exposition authorities for reassignment.

These dates are being very rapidly approached and the Department of Exhibits is growing in importance at a corresponding rate. Acceptances of applications are being sent out as fast as the necessary surveillance canbe​ had, and already 290 acceptances have been sent out. These represent a large number of applications, many of them being for collective exhibits, such as are to be made by states and large concerns where exhibits are made in several different buildings.

The policy of the department has been to proceed very deliberately in the matter of acceptances, and only those applications have been accepted which are regarded as particularly desirable. It was plainly apparent several weeks ago that the applications for space would far exceed the capacity of the bulidings​ and that it would be necessary to do a great deal of "weeding out" in order to select only the most desirable exhibits.

The acceptance of an application is followed by the assignment of the exact space the exhibit is to occupy and the plat of the building is marked to show the exact location and the amount of space thus disposed of.   This allotting of space has occupied the time of Superintendent Hardt for several weeks. He has devoted his evenings to the work in order to be free from interruption, and the main floor plans of each of the main buildings show that there is little or no space remaining unoccupied. In one or two of the buildings there are two small spaces still unassigned, but these will be occupied within a day or two. The galleries are the only hope of those who have not yet been assigned space and the limited amount of space in these will not accommodate a great many exhibitors. A large amount of space in some of the galleries has already been assigned.

Superintendent Hardt says that in making these selections from the great mass of applications on hand he has taken the greatest care to select exhibits which will make a complete and harmonious collection, covering the full range of the subject under consideration. He says that his experience in such matters shows him that the exhibitions which will be made in each of the buildings will be of the very highest grade of excellence, and that an exposition is assured which will be, from an exhibit standpoint, one of the most complete and magnificent affairs ever seen in this country. Every branch of art, science, manufacture, agriculture, mining and all the kindred industries will be fully and completely exemplified, with all the most advanced methods illustrated.

FLORIDA'S STATE COMMISSION.

Governor Bloxham Enlarges the Body, Which Reorganized.

Governor Bloxham of Florida has enlarged the exposition commission appointed by him some time ago and the commission has reorganized and is doing active work. As reorganized the commission stands: President, George W. Wilson, editor Florida Times-Union, Jacksonville; vice president, Henry Curtis, immigration agent Florida Central & Peninsular railway, Quincy; secretary, S. Boteler Thompson, passenger agent Florida Central & Pennsylvania railway, Lake City; treasurer, W. W. K. Decker, sponge dealer, Tarpon Springs; W. R. Carter, editor Metropolis, Jacksonville; C. B. Rogers, wholesale merchant, Jacksonville; F. P. Fleming, lawyer, Jacksonville; John D. Peabody, physician, Ozona; M. R. Marks, Orlando; G. Lawton Bryant, merchant, Lakeland; George W. Scobie, merchant, Titusville; J. C. S. Timberlake, hotel proprietor, Rockledge; W. S. Jordan, agent Florida Central and Pennsylvania railway, Madison; B. L. Porter, farmer, Grand Ridge; G. A. Danley, farmer, Chipley; Eric Von Axelson, land commissioner, Yellow River railroad, Laurel Hill.

Secretary Thompson is the executive officer of the commission and he reports to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that matters are in excellent shape in the Flower state and that it is hoped that the state will come to the assistance of the commission and aid it in making a fit and proper exhibit of the resources of the state. Whether this is done or not a good exhibit will be made, but it is the desire of the commission to have the showing as fine as it can be made and the assistance of the state would enable this to be done.

DATE FOR THE LABOR CONGRESS.

Committees Holr​ a Joint Session but Split on Dates.

The congress committee of the Woman's Board of Managers and the special committee appointed by the Central Labor union to take charge of the proposed labor congress, held a joint meeting at the office of the Woman's board in the Paxton block last night. All the members of both committees were present. It was decided that the labor congress shall be held during the entire week commencing with Monday, September 5. This date is Labor day, and it was decided that no more appropriate time could be chosen for such an event. It was also decided that a committee of men prominent in labor matters should be appointed to take charge of the arrangements for the program and other matters pertaining to the fixing of the scope of the congress. The personnel of this committee was the rock whereon the two committees split. The representatives of organized labor insisted that men prominent in the cause of organized labor should constitute the committee, and the women were equally insistent that the congress should not be confined to organized labor alone but should cover the broad ground of social economy and include all labor, whether organized or not.

The meeting adjourned without settling this question.

Arranging for the Annex.

The general character and size of the annex to the Manufactures building has been determined and Architect Humphreys of Denver, the architect of the Manufactures building, has returned home to commence work at once on the plans. The building will be approximately 184x145 feet in size, excepting a small space at one corner where a detour will be made to avoid an obstruction. There will be 18,606 square feet of floor space in the building as now planned, but provision is made for extending the building to the north almost indefinitely, as circumstances may require. The architecture of the annex will be in harmony with that of the Manufactures building. It will not have a gallery and will not be as high as the other buildings.

Invitations to Western States.

President Wattles has sent invitations to the governors of Utah, Kansas and Idaho, inviting them to visit Omaha in company with such committee or delegation as they may select to see the preparations that are being made for the exposition and learn for themselves the plan and scope of the enterprise.

These three states are the only ones in

EXPOSITION GETS WATER

CONNECTIONS WITH BIG MAINS MADE

Superintendent Hunt Moves Promptly to Care for the Arrangements—General Plan of the Service.

Water will be turned into the mains on the exposition grounds before the sun sets tonight. Mayor Moores attached his signature at an early hour to the resolution passed by the city council ordering the payment of the bills of the Omaha Water company. Even before this was done orders had been given to the workmen of the water company and a force of men was on the grounds making preparations to connect the city mains with those on the exposition grounds.

The exposition mains will be connected with the city mains at five different points in order to give a complete system of circulation. The connection on which work was first commenced was at Twenty-fourth and Pinckney streets. The big Twenty-fourth street main of the water company was tapped at Pinckney street at the time work was commenced on the water system of the exposition, and a twelve-inch pipe was laid to a point just outside the exposition fence. A valve was put in at this point and the pipe "blocked" to prevent damage. The twelve-inch main of the exposition system extends to within about fifteen feet of this valve, but the trench between these two points was filled in to prevent accidents. All that remained to be done to make the connections with the exposition system was to put in the fifteen feet of pipe and a meter and open the valve heretofore referred to. Superintendent Hunt estimated that this work would require the greater part of the day and he went out to the grounds early to personally oversee the work and expedite it as much as possible. As soon as the work is completed the water will be turned on.

Superintendent Hunt stated that as soon as the connection at Twenty-fourth and Pinckney is completed, the entire exposition grounds will be supplied with the regular fire pressure, but in order to make the system more complete and satisfactory connections will be made with the exposition system at Twenty-fourth and Manderson, Sixteenth and Pinckney and on Twentieth street at some ppoint​ to be hereafter determined. He says this will give complete circulation and would make the exposition system equal to any demand that may be made upon it.

COMMISSION ADJOURNS UNTIL MARCH

Sarpy County Offers an Old Chimney as an Exhibit.

At yesterday afternoon's meeting of the Nebraska Exposition commission the Horticultural society of sarpy county offered to move to the exposition grounds the stone chimney of the first mission house erected on Nebraska soil, providing the commission would furnish the necessary space. The offer was accepted, and the ancient chimney will be in evidence on the grounds.

Former Governor Furnas offered his extensive collection of native woods to the commission for exhibition, and this offer was accepted.

A discussion arose among the members of the commission over a request of Kimball Brothers, the staff contractors, for instructions as to how to proceed in putting a strip of staff moulding around the base of the Nebraska building, and also making a claim for extra pay if the moulding is to be put on. This discussion developed the fact that Architect Craddock and Superintendent Blake have been making numerous changes in the construction of the Nebraska building without consulting the commission, and have added several hundred dollars to the cost by this proceeding. The strip of moulding spoken of by Kimball Brothers was shown to be one of these unauthorized changes, but inquiry developed the fact that the construction had been so changed that the strip could not be omitted without causing an additional cost of over $300 for making the change.

This development, together with the frequent changes in the cornice referred to by Commissioner Casper in his speech about experts, combined to produce "that tired feeling" on the part of the members of the commission, and after a short discussion Chairman Neville was appointed a committee of one to take charge of the building until the next meeting of the commission, and he was given full authority to discharge the entire working force, if he deemed that course necessary, and also to adjust the difficulty concerning the staff work in the manner that he considered best.

This concluded the business of the board and it adjourned until March 8.

ORATORIO FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Willard Patten's "Isaiah" to Be Produced by a Grand Chorus.

Minneapolis people are entering into the spirit of the exposition heartily, especially the musical department, and are enlisting much support among their neighbors. Their object is to secure a good choral production of the oratorio "Isaiah," the work of a Minneapolis composer. In this connection the Minneapolis Times of February 22 has this to say:

Willard Patten's oratorio, "Isaiah," will be produced on a grand scale this summer at Omaha, as a leading musical feature of the Transmississippi Exposition. Word was received yesterday from the musical director of the exposition, definitely placing the work on the musical program and agreeing in a general way as to the terms. Minnesota's musical masterpiece will occupy a place of honor. It will be sung by a great chorus collected from the great cities of the west, accompanied by the Thomas orchestra, which is to play five weeks at the exposition.

The exposition management has agreed to furnish the Thomas orchestra for the event, also four soloists who shall be satisfactory. The production will be in an auditorium on the exposition grounds, seating 3,000 people. The plan at present is to collect a Minnesota chorus of 250 voices, of which Minneapolis will furnish the larger part. Choruses will be organized in St. Paul, Duluth and possibly other cities, which will study "Isaiah" and come together at Minneapolis for a final rehearsal before going to Omaha. Then the Apollo club of Chicago has already arranged to go and large choral societies of St. Joseph, Denver and Salt Lake City are planning to attend. This will in all probably take up the work and after one final rehearsal with the orchestra the grand chorus of several hundred voices will produce it. No selection of soloists has yet been made and it is among the possibilities that some of the leading lights of grand opera will be secured as features of the exposition and will sing the solo parts in "Isaiah."

The Minnesota commissioners have not taken official action in the matter, but a meeting will be held some time next week, at which they will no doubt officially adopt the oratorio as a Minnesota feature and they will probably ask that it be given the place of honor in the program which will open the exposition to the public about June 1. Three members of the commission were seen yesterday by the Times and they were enthusiastic over the matter. They said there could be no question that the commission would give its official endorsement.

The Chicago musical colony is enthusiastic over "Isaiah" and the suggestion that it be produced at Omaha came from there, in a letter to Mr. Patten from a musician who was to him a total stranger. When the suggestion was presented to F. H. Peavey, vice president for Minnesota, he took it up enthusiastically and at once wrote to Omaha. Willard Kimball of Lincoln, musical director of the exposition, heard "Isaiah" produced in an eastern city and needed no urging to see that it would be a strong feature for the exposition. The work of a western man, produced in the west by western people, it would prove to eastern visitors that there was something here besides raw materials.

He at once sent a favorable reply and the matter was then taken up actively. J. M. Anderson of the Metropolitan Music company was appointed a member of the commission by Governor Clough, who heartily approved of the plan. A rough draft of it was sent to Omaha and the letter received yesterday endorsed it. So nothing remains but working out the details.

Local musical people are enthusiastic and there is a remarkable sameness of opinion among them. The usual professional jealousy seems to have been entirely laid aside and they are all anxious to see the oratorio produced and Mr. Patten given full credit for his work. He will receive earnest support from the whole fraternity here when it is needed and Chicago musicians are enthusiastic. Editor Mathews of Music, who so warmly commended "Isaiah," has put his shoulder to the wheel. Carberry, the soloist, who sung the tenor role so successfully here last winter, has taken hold actively. Singers the country over are using solos from "Isaiah" and the local work is being well advertised. Its production at Omaha will be a crowning feature in its career.

"People in the east have an idea that we have lots of wheat and lumber in Minnesota, but very little else," said J. M. Anderson of the Metropolitan Music company last evening. "We want to show them that we have some degree of culture here and that western soil produces something more than raw materials. Minnesota should be proud of such a work."

CONSIDERING SOME CONCESSIONS.

Executive Committee Has a Busy Session Over Privileges.

The subject of hot roast beef sandwiches consumed considerable of the time of the exposition executive committee yesterday afternoon, that having been made the special order for yesterday's meeting. No conclusion was reached, however, and the matter was laid over until today for the awarding of the concession. There are about a dozen applicants for this concession and they are hot on the trail.

F. N. Mervin of Beaver City, secretary of the Nebraska Press association, suggested that the exposition management provide a building for headquarters for the visiting newspaper men and said the association would assist in paying for the services of an attendant. The matter was referred to Manager Rosewater.

 

WATER IN EXPOSITION MAINS

Pipes on the Grounds Are Finally Filled with Fluid.

AMPLY SUPPLIED FOR FIRE PURPOSES

Difficulties in the Way of Making a Connection Overcome and the Pressure Turned on at Midnight.

The water mains on the exposition grounds are now connected with the mains of the Omaha Water company and the buildings on the grounds are protected against danger from fire. The connection was made and water turned on shortly before midnight Friday night. A delay of over twenty-four hours was caused by the conditions which were found to exist when work was started. The frost had penetrated the ground to a considerable depth, causing great difficulty in excavating the trench, and it was found that there was no valve in the exposition mains near where the connection was to be made, so that it was necessary to allow the water to run into the excavation and then pump it out before the work could proceed. These difficulties were surmounted, however, and the water was turned on.

The next step will be to make connections with the bluff tract. This portion of the grounds has been supplied through an inch pipe with water for construction purposes, but a complete system of large mains was laid some time ago the full length of this tract and connection will be made with this system at Sixteenth and Pinckney streets. Work was started on this connection as soon as the water was turned into the main court, and there will be no cessation until the connection is completed. It is expected that this work will be finished some time Monday. The other connections will be made as fast as possible and by the end of the coming week it is thought the entire exposition system will be connected on all sides with the water company's mains, giving a complete circulating system.

OREGON READY TO TAKE PART.

State Commission Actively at Work on Exposition Matters.

That Oregon will have a fine exhibit at the exposition is now assured. An active commission, composed of prominent business men and capitalists, has been appointed by Governor Lord, and will be organized for business at an early day. It has been estimated that $20,000 will be required to make an exhibit, and the governor states that he has no doubt but that this amount may be easily raised as a loan, the subscribers to be reimbursed by the legislature at its next session.

This information comes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion from Special Agent C. E. Llewellyn, who has been in the state for a week arousing the public-spirited citizens and state officers to the importance of having their state represented.

This is a full list of the Oregon commission: J. E. Haseltine, Portland, state senator; C. C. Beekman, Jacksonville, banker; Henry E. Dosch, Portland, president State Horticultural society; J. F. Batchelder, Portland, president street railway company; R. D. Inman, Portland, banker; J. A. Wright, Sparta, merchant; J. Henry Longmaid, Bourne, mine owner; J. G. Day, Roseburg, contractor and mining; Philip Metschan, Salem, state treasurer; E. P. McCormack, Salem, banker; H. B. Miller, Grant's Pass, president Agricultural college; B. F. Alley, Baker City (newspaper man; J. O. Hanthorn, Astoria, salmon packer; George G. Gans, Salem.

A mass meeting of all interested persons and of the newly appointed commission has been called to be held in Portland March 4, at which time the commission will be organized and the general plan of operations decided on. The state has already a fine exhibit of fruit, grasses, grains and minerals and this will be used as a mucleus​ for a fine exhibit. The salmon packers are reported by Mr. Llewellyn to be very enthusiastic in the matter and are beginning active operations to install a fine exhibit showing the extent of the salmon industry of Oregon.

A meeting of business men was held in Portland February 22, at which Mr. Llewellyn presented the exposition in all its bearings and it was the consensus of opinion of those present that at least 4,000 feet of space will be required to properly present the many resources of Oregon.

Special Agent Llewellyn is now in Washington endeavoring to have the governor appoint a commission and provide for state participation in the exposition. Washington is the last state to remain totally inactive.

NATIONAL FIREMEN'S TOURNAMENT.

Plan for a Great Gathering Submitted to Exposition Authorities.

F. W. Wood of Cedar Rapids, Ia., president of the National Firemen's association, and E. I. Alderman of Marion, Ia., vice president of the same organization for Iowa, are in the city for the purpose of making arrangements with the exposition management for a national tournament of firemen to be held in Omaha some time during the latter part of the summer.

"There has been no national tournament of firemen in the United State since the tournament held in Chicago in 1878," said President Wood to a Bee representative. "At that celebration there were 17,000 firemen in line in the parade, and it is evident from that that it is no small affair. I believe if a tournament is held in Omaha and a fair amount is offered in prizes that fully 75,000 people will be brought here as a result of the tournament alone."

Messrs. Wood and Alderman called on President Wattles and presented the matter to him and also visited the exposition grounds with a view of determining whether a suitable place could be found there. They were well pleased with the opportunities offered by the north tract of the exposition grounds and said this could be made to answer very well for the many tests of skill and efficiency which go to make up the firemen's tournament.

President Wattles agreed to lay the matter before the executive committee.

EXCURSIONISTS FROM MINNESOTA.

Visitors from the Northwest Will Be Shown Exposition Beauties.

A party of forty-two people, composed of newspaper men and their wives, will arrive in Omaha via the Union Pacific at 1:30 p. m. today and will visit the exposition grounds under the escort of a special committee appointed by the exposition management for that purpose. The party has been making a tour of the west under the auspices of the Minneapolis Journal and has been as far south as Mexico.

The delegation will be met at the Tenth street depot by the special committee and will be taken to the exposition grounds on special street cars. After inspecting the grounds the entire party will return down town and will visit The Bee building and other points of interest about town, returning to the Webster street depot in time to board the train on the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha road which leaves at 5:55 p. m.

There are a number of women in the party, and President Wattles has asked Mrs. Harford, president of the Woman's club, to appoint a committee of six members of the club to be at the depot and assist in entertaining the visitors. In addition to this the president has appointed the following committee to meet the party and act as escort: William Leverett and Victor E. Bender, Council Bluffs; George W. Lininger, M. C. Peters, M. S. Bartlett, E. Rosewater, W. H. Roberson, George A. Joslyn, H. W. Campbell, I. W. Carpenter, C. D. Thompson, G. M. Hitchcock, R. L. Metcalfe, S. F. Neble, Clement Chase, J. C. Barnard, F. A. Kennedy, H. F. McIntosh, G. A. Linden, Fred A. Schnake, M. G. Perkins, W. V. Morse, John Rosicky, W. G. Shriver, Miss Mary Fairbrother.

The following is a complete list of the party of visitors: Minnesota—W. A. Anderson and wife, Springfield; C. Aberle, Alexandria; Dr. H. J. Boyd, Alexandria; C. W. Babcock, Kasota; Mrs. L. L. Bradbury, Springfield; W. W. Blackman, Springfield; Miss Brundage, J. F. De Laittre and wife, Mrs. H. S. Dean, J. F. Evans and wife, L. S. Gillette and wife, Mrs. John Gluek, Misses Lizzie, Carrie and Dena Gluek, W. B. Goddard, Guy Merrill, Mrs. A. E. Merrill, N. J. Nelson, L. T. Sowle, A. W. Warnock and wife, Minneapolis; Dr. J. H. Carson, Miss Edith S. Carson and F. B. Day, Duluth; C. P. Fenstermacher, Breckinridge; Fred Greiner and wife, Chaska; E. R. Hyser, Breckinridge; W. Koch, New Ulm; Theodore Kobarsch, New Ulm; E. Lowell, Stillwater; J. S. McLain and wife, Minneapolis; M. Mullen and wife and Miss Mullen, New Ulm; J. Megins, Duluth; C. J. McCollom and wife, Hallock; E. Reiff and wife, St. Paul; A. Roberts and wife, Springfield; A. L. Sackett, St. Peter; A. P. T. Suffel and wife, Hallock; A. E. Sawyer and wife and Miss Fannie L. Sawyer, Faribault; R. Walker, Alexandria.

Other states: S. Bailey, Wonewac, Wis.; W. L. Banjamin, Ashton, Ia.; Dr. J. Grassick and wife and Miss Grassick, Buckston, N. D.; A Ganssle, St. Thomas, N. D.; J. L. Hall, Volga, S. D.; J. Knight and wife, Indianapolis, Ind.; L. L. Lostutter, Iroquois, S. D.; T. F. Marshall and wife, Oakes, N. D.; W. W. Reyleck, Grafton, N. D.; J. W. Smith, Grand Forks, N. D.; P. C. Weydert, Louistown, Mont.; C. E. Wolfenden, Wonowac, Wis.

Montana's Great Preparations.

The Montana mining exhibit is growing at a rapid rate and the preparations which are being made by that state for participation in the exposition are being greatly enlarged. The Department of Exhibits has been notified that, in addition to the 2,000 feet already reserved by this state in the Mines and Mining building, 600 feet more will be required in order to properly install the magnificent exhibit which is being collected. Vice President Sutherlin reports that matters are in a very promising condition so far as making an exhibit is concerned and he promises a showing in minerals and all other lines to be represented that will reflect great credit on the state and also on the exposition.

In addition to its other exhibits the state will erect a state building at a cost of $12,000. Plans have been made for this building and the contract for the construction of the building has been let to Leo Bonet, the well known builder and staff contractor. He will commence work at once and says that the Montana building will be a beauty.

Recent Applications for Space.

Among the applications for space which have been received by the Department of Exhibits during the last few days are the following: Byron Weston Paper company of Dalton, Mass., eighty feet; Keystone Manufacturing company, Sterling, Ill., farm machinery, 600 feet; American Electric Vehicle company, Chicago, 225 feet; Home Embroidery Machine company, Kansas City, 150 feet; White Sewing Machine company, 500 feet, this space to be occupied by the $15,000 booth used by this firm at the Brussels exposition; Standard Filter company, Omaha, forty feet; M. A. Wilumsen, Murray, Utah, automatic coupler; D. M. Sechler Carriage company of Moline, Ill., 400 feet; S. O. Campbell, East Peru, Ia., gate hangers in operation, 200 feet; S. J. Morgan, Chicago, garment cutting in operation, sixty feet; Ripley Hardware company, Grafton, Ill., stock feed cooker, 130 feet; Nebraska Seed company, Omaha, 600 feet in addition to amount heretofore reserved.

Bureau Does Nothing.

The Bureau of Public Comfort of the exposition held a meeting at noon, but did nothing of any moment. The time was spent in discussing some of the details of the work which the bureau has in hand.

Notes of the Exposition.

Manager Babcock of the Transportation department is confined to his home by illness.

A donation of $1,000 from the Kitchen Bros.' Hotel company was received at exposition headquarters as the latest acquisition to the assets of the exposition.

Special Commissioner R. W. Richardson is in Frankfort, Ky., in the interest of the exposition, endeavoring to arouse more interest in the exposition among the people of that state.

DIRECTOR KIMBALL ON HIS PLANS.

Exposition Music to Be of the Best Obtainable Variety.

The Exposition chorus will meet at Hayden's music hall tonight for rehearsal. Musical Director Kimball and Choir Director Kelly will be present and it is expected that there will be a large increase in the membership of the chorus at this meeting.

Musical Director Kimball is in the city to consult with the executive committee relative to further details in connection with the musical department and he stated that arrangements have been completed whereby the celebrated Thomas orchestra has been engaged to furnish orchestral music for the exposition. This organization will be used in connection with the chorus and will also render concert programs at stated intervals.

Negotiations are pending for the engagement of one or more bands, and it now appears probable that Phinney's United State band, formerly known as the Iowa State band, will be engaged to furnish outdoor music during a portion of the exposition and will probably take part in the opening exercises. It is also proboble​ that other bands will be engaged to perform the large amount of escort duty, which will form one of the prominent features of the exposition. Among the bands which are receiving most favorable consideration in the latter connection is a local organization, which has attained an enviable reputation in this city and elsewhere, for its musical ability and the general excellence of its appearance.

All of these matters are rapidly taking form, and it is announced from headquarters that definite arrangements will be concluded in the very near future and announcements will then be made.

 

DENVER WILL DECIDE TONIGHT.

Mass Meeting of Citizens to Consider Exposition Matters.

Mayor McMurray of Denver has called a mass meeting to assemble at the Mining exchange in that city tonight. All members of the committee which went to Omaha the early part of last week will be present and make report of what they think of the coming exposition. At this meeting it is expected that the necessary cash will be raised to pay for the Denver building, and possibly more. All the money expended in this undertaking will be cash well invested.

The Republican has the following in regard to the Denver building:

Plans have been completed for the Denver building. The cost of the building completed on the grounds is estimated at $6,000.

The structure will be on the lines of Spanish architecture, as applied in the colonies. Its exterior ground measurement is 60x68 feet. The material is timber covered with staff.

An attractive entrance through an archway leads to a porch, and from there a porch 16x15 feet leads into a lobby sixteen feet square. This will be filled with Indian blankets, pottery, some mineral specimens and other things which the Denver committee may decide to exhibit.

From this room the walk leads into a rotunda with a diameter of twenty feet and a height of thirty-two feet. On the upper line of the rotunda there will be a frieze of eighteen feet, representing the choicest of Colorado scenery.

Below this frieze there will be panoramic view of Denver and on a still lower line there are to be separate views of various parts of Denver. All these photographs will be chosen from the finest that have been taken by Jackson.

To the right of the rotunda is a room 16x20 feet, to be known as the Colorado and Denver Bureau of Information. On the left of the rotunda is to be a reading and writing room of the same size as that just mentioned. There will be a ladies' retiring room. Around the rotunda are to be located four connecting porches, one of which will be devoted exclusively to the use of ladies. At the four corners of the building are to be situated four court yards, each 23x28 feet, in which will be growing Colorado flowers.

Work on the building will be commenced as soon as money for the purpose can be raised. The location is the best and most conspicuous on the exposition grounds.

CAPTIVE BALLOONS IN PROSPECT.

War Department Proposes to Exhibit a Pair of Them.

Captain Henry C. Ward, the army officer who is the representative of the War department on the board of control of the exhibit to be made in the Government building, has just returned from Denver, where he went to visit Fort Logan with a view of adding to the War department exhibit a couple of balloons such as are used during war to observe the movements of the enemy.

Many experiments are being made at Fort Logan by Lieutenant William Glassford, a signal officer of the army, who has devoted a great deal of time and energy to investigations in military signaling, and captive balloons have been made the subject of exhaustive investigations to determine their practicability in time of war. These balloons are allowed to rise to a height of half a mile or more, being held comparatively stationary by a stout cable attached to the car and anchored securely at the land end. The occupants of the car are supplied with telescopes to enable them to scan the surrounding country and the results of their observations are communicated to those below by a variety of devices in use in the army signal corps. Signals are made by means of flags in the daytime and by flash lights at night, and in some cases a light telegraph cable is made a part of the cable holding the balloon and telegraphic communication is maintained below the balloon and those below.

Captain Ward hopes to have two of these balloons on the exposition grounds in full operation as a part of the War department exhibit and his trip to Denver was for the purpose of making the necessary arrangements for carrying out this idea.

Within a few days Captain Ward will start for the east and will visit the various government arsenals for the purpose of collecting a number of articles required to make the display of the War department more complete. He will probably go to Washington before his return to supervise the preparation of the exhibit and give directions concerning its shipment to Omaha.

EXTENDS THE TIME ON EXHIBITS.

Department Will Receive Applications Until March 15.

A prolonged conference was held yesterday afternoon between Manager Bruce of the Department of Exhibits and the several superintendents of that department relative to the closing up of all contracts for space and the enforcement of the rule of the department which provides that no applications for space will be received after March 1. Several of the superintendents stated that they had negotiations pending for space for exhibits of different kinds which they had been unable to close in time to comply with the rule, and they urged that the time be extended in order to allow them to complete these arrangements.

The recent action of the executive committee in authorizing annexes to be made to certain of the main buildings was discussed in this same connection and it was the opinion of all present that this would give enough space to allow of certain groups and classes of exhibits being enlarged. It was, therefore, decided to accept applications for space for certain groups and classes of exhibits until March 15 and instructions will be issued accordingly to the various agents of the department.

St. Louis Proposes an Exposition.

St. Louis has taken the bull by the horns in the matter of an exposition to commemorate the Louisiana purchase and has already introduced a bill in congress authorizing the Mississippi Valley International Exposition company to hold an exposition in St. Louis some time in 1903 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of that event. The bill provides for an appropriation by the government of $250,000 for a government exhibit and provides that all the details of the exposition shall be left to the company referred to. The treaty of the Louisiana purchase was ratified September 20, 1803, but the date at which the exposition is to be held is left blank in the bill to be fixed by the exposition company, which is not yet organized. The bill follows the general lines of the bill for the Transmississippi Exposition and provides for a government building to cost $75,000. The bill has been introduced in the house and will be introduced in the senate also in order to expedite its passage.

Daly's Subscription Ready.

Marcus Daly, the millionaire mine owner of Montana, has notified Governor Smith that his subscription of $15,000 to the fund for a state exhibit is available whenever the money is needed. This subscription was made by Mr. Daly while the legislature was considering the subject of a state appropriation. He sent word to the legislature that he would describe this amount if the legislature would appropriate a like amount. This was done and the fund of $30,000 thus created has enabled the Montana vice president, W. H. Sutherlin, to collect an exhibit which will be very extensive and include many of the industries of the state which would otherwise have been omitted.

Demand for the Special Stamps.

The demand for exposition postage stamps is growing stronger as the time approaches for the stamps to be issued. The Department of Publicity and Promotion receives almost daily urgent requests from large firms in different parts of the country who want large quantities of these stamps for use in sending out their mail matter. The latest big order is that of Fred Macy & Co. of Grand Rapids, Mich., a large manufacturer of desks and office furniture, who want 200,000 of the one cent stamps.

Secretary Dearing's Plans.

Assistant Secretary W. H. Dearing of the Nebraska Exposition commission has gone to Norfolk to look over the ground in connection with his appointment last week as assistant physician at the Asylum for Insane. If he decides to accept the position tendered him, his resignation as assistant secretary of the Nebraska commission will follow. In the meantime, Daniel Althen, bookkeeper of the commission, is officiating as acting assistant secretary.

Call for Texas Commission Meeting.

Chairman S. J. T. Johnson of the Texas Exposition commission has issued a call for a meeting of all members of the commission, to be held at Austin, March 4. He has invited all progressive commercial organizations to send representatives to this meeting, which is expected to take final steps for a Texas exhibit at the exposition.

Suggestion from Canton.

Harry A. March of Canton, O., suggests to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that a novel and attractive exhibit on the exposition grounds would be the Canton home of President McKinley, the house to be filled with campaign material of all kinds.

Notes of the Exposition.

The beekeepers' associations of Colorado are getting in line for a splendid display of honey.

The National Live Stock association, with headquarters in Denver, will have a permanent location at the exposition.

In the Arkansas valley district in Colorado nearly $10,000 has been raised for a display of the product of that locality.

The inspectors of the Colorado State Bureau of Mines report a very lively interest being taken in the mining districts from the various localities.

Mayor T. S. McMurray writes that the Denver city building at the Omaha exposition will be an architectural dream. T. D. Boal of Denver designed it.

The secretary of Colorado's State Board of Farmers' Horticulture writes that some of the prairie states will need to look to their laurels when the Centennial state arrives.

Prof. Cederstrom of Lehi, an expert in onyx mining, is making preparations for an exhibit of Utah onyx which he promises shall excel anything ever seen in this section of country.

Denver will have a $10,000 city building at the exposition. It will be furnished by the railroads and the women of Denver and be one of the most attractive features on the Bluff tract.

The state mine commissioner of Colorado is preparing for the exposition the finest mining exhibit ever made at any exposition. It will occupy the central place in the Mines and Mining building.

Colorado's commission is actively at work on the state exhibit. It's mining display will require nearly 4,000 feet of space, and as Colorado leads the world with its mining output something unique may be expected.

Robert W. Shingle, editor of the Hawaiian Star, a newspaper published at Honolulu, has applied to the Department of Concessions for the privilege of installing and operating a Hawaiian village on the exposition grounds.

The executive committee authorized Manager Bruce at its meeting yesterday afternoon to appoint a commissioner of mines and mining. Mr. Bruce said after the meeting that he would probably make the appointment early the coming week.

The report comes from Nevada that the work of collection material for the exhibit to be sent from that state is making rapid progress and a fine exhibit is promised. It will be especially strong in minerals and will include magnificent specimens of many varieties of ores.

The Massachusetts agents of the exposition appeared before the Massachusetts State Board of Trade recently to urge that organization to take an active interest in the movement to have the state participate in the exposition by the erection of a building on the grounds which shall be a reproduction of the Old South church, or Faneuil hall. It is estimated that such a building would cost not to exceed $8,000. The matter was taken under consideration by the board.

MINNESOTA EXCURSIONISTS

PARTY INSPECT THE EXPOSITION GROUNDS

Visitors from the North Given a Pleasant Surprise and Find Much to Wonder at in Omaha.

The special train of the Minneapolis Journal, having on board the excursion party which was en route to Minneapolis after a trip extending to the City of Mexico, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Denver and Omaha, arrived in the city at noon yesterday, twenty-four hours behind time, having been delayed for that length of time by an accident in Mexico. The party traveled in a special train of Wagner cars, having three sleepers, a diner, a tourist car and a baggage car. There were eighty six people in the party when it started from Minneapolis, but one after another had been dropped at points along the road until there were but sixty-two persons in the party when it reached Omaha. The delegation was made up of people from numerous towns in Minnesota, South Dakota and neighboring states, representing all lines of business and professions.

The party was met at the Tenth street depot by a committee appointed by the exposition management for the purpose, including President Wattles, Major Clarkson, assistant to the president; Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, W. H. Roberson, J. H. Barnard, W. G. Shriver, G. W. Lininger, C. D. Thompson, M. G. Perkins, John Rosicky, Frederick Schnake, R. F. Hodgin, Clem Chase, Miss Mary Fairbrother, Mrs. F. M. Ford, Mrs. Harriet Heller.

After greetings had been exchanged the party boarded special cars which were in waiting and were quickly carried to the exposition grounds. The main court was visited first and as the full beauty of the buildings burst upon the visitors there were many exclamations of astonishment and delight. They declared with great emphasis that the sight far surpassed their expectations and plied the escorting committee with questions. President Wattles explained the name of the buildings and the general plan of the grounds to all and then the party made a tour of the grounds, visiting the whole tract. The bluff tract was visited and the buildings under construction examined.

After the grounds had been fully examined the cars were re-entered and the party alighted at Sixteenth and Farnam streets, going directly to The Bee building, where they visited the business office and the editorial rooms going from there to the composing room and inspecting the type-setting machines.

From The Bee building the party were escorted to the art gallery of Hon. G. W. Lininger, where a pleasant hour was spent in inspecting the beautiful and costly paintings and other works of art.

The train in which the delegation traveled did not leave the city until 10 p. m., and the intervening time was spent by members of the party in visiting the various points of interest about the city. At 10 o'clock the train left the Webster depot for the north.

 

HAS ITS PLACE IN HISTORY.

Origin of Design of One-Cent Exposition Postage Stamp.

The Milwaukee Sentinel of February 17 prints the following interesting reference to the recent effort to secure a photograph of Lamprecht's painting, "Marquette Discovering the Source of the Mississippi," which is to form the subject for the design on the 1-cent stamp of the special series to be issued by the Postoffice department:

"Omaha's Transmississippi fair is to be commemorated by a special series of postage stamps resembling in a general way the Columbian issue which was engraved in honor of the World's fair. As this latter series was composed of a number of typical tableaux celebrating the discovery of America, so the former is to embrace scenes characteristic of the exploration, settlement and development of the great northwest. Among those thus chosen is Lamprecht's famous painting, "Father Marquette Discovering the Source of the Mississippi," of which a graphic sketch may be found on the first page of this issue. The faculty and students of Marquette college are now treasuring this beautiful canvas with increased interest and pride. This picture forms the only ornament of the austerely simple little reception room at the college, and next to the few relics of Father Marquette himself, it is the chief treasure of the institution.

"The picture was painted by an artist named Lamprecht, who lived in Covington, Ky., at the time, about 1869 or 1870. The commission was given him by the Peter Claver society of Cincinnati, which is interested in the education of colored people, the donor being a wealthy resident of that city. From the Peter Claver society it passed into the possession of the late Father Lalumiere, in his turn, gave the painting into the keeping of the father rector and the faculty of the college.

"Aside from the historical interest attached to it, the picture is a noteworthy one, for the artist, it is said, painted the scenery from sketches made by himself at Prairie du Chien. The colors are soft and rich and the poses of the Indians and of the missionary priest spirited ones. It is a rather interesting bit of gossip that the model for Pere Marquette was Rev. Father Weninger, a well known Jesuit priest of Cincinnati. The Marquette fathers are not quite sure of this, but they are ready to assert positively that the cloak and hat put into the picture were certainly Father Weninger's very own.

"The relics of Father Marquette are even more interesting, both to devout Catholics and to students of history, though Father Buschart of the college is very careful about not claiming their entire authenticity, only offering certain letters as proof. The relics are not on public exhibition, though forming one of the chief features of the college museum.

"They consult of bits of bone and pieces of wood and iron gathered from the ruins of the log chapel of St. Ignace by Father Jacker, who, wishing to ensure their safe keeping and disliking to have them buried under the monument erected to Pere Marquette, sent them to Father Lalumiere for the college. Each bit is now wrapped in its separate piece of blue paper and carefully laid away in a tin box, which, in turn, with the documents relating to the relics, is under lock and key in a wooden casket.

"The letters of Father Jacker to Father Lalumiere concerning the transfer of the relics from St. Ignace to Milwaukee are interesting. The first one is dated Hancock, Mich., August 5, 1882."

Considering the uncertainty of life, I would like to place my collection of memorials from Father Marquette's grave in good hands, and knowing of no other place where they would be better appreciated than in your college, I offer them, through you, to that institution.

My intention in taking these memorials with me in leaving St. Ignace two years ago was to keep them safe (whatever I left behind me there has disappeared) until such time when an appropriate monument would be erected on the spot where they were found and then to deposit them there. But now it appears that the form of the monument already ordered to be erected by my successor in St. Ignace—Father Kilian—is such that whatever may be deposited therein will have to be buried in the ground. Hence, when that good father insisted on my delivering up to him what I possessed of Father Marquette's (reputed) remains I sent him but one-fourth of the fragments of bones, together with a small collection from the divers articles (pieces of evidence, as we might call them,) found in the cellar and in the grave. I thought it a pity that the whole collection should be withdrawn from sight, perhaps forever, and partly to prevent further molestation, but principally to secure its preservation in a more appropriate manner, I made up my mind to dispose of the greater part of the collection as said above.

Will your reverence then please let me know whether the reverend father rector and the faculty of your college are willing to receive that collection as a sacred deposit, to be preserved in that institution?

Should circumstances (i. e., time and money) allow me to go to Milwaukee, I would prefer to bring that treasure thither personally, and might on that occasion answer any questions about the significance of the several articles contained in the collection, as far as my ability goes.

Very respectfully and sincerely, your reverence's humble servant,


EDW. JACKER.

FOSTER HASTENS THE WORK

COMPLETING EXPOSITION BUILDINGS

Finishing Touches on Some All that is Now Needed—Government Work Goes Ahead Rapidly—Working Out Details.

The beneficial effects of the creation of the office of superintendent of the exposition is plainly to be seen by a visit to the grounds. The work is proceeding with more energy than was apparent when every branch of the work was under a separate head and marked progress is being made in every line. Superintendent Foster has been in office just a week and has devoted his entire time to the Department of Buildings and Grounds, gathering up the many threads in that department, and getting the work thoroughly organized. He now has the matter well in hand and has commenced the operation of pushing things to the fullest extent. He announces that if he is allowed to carry out his plans he will have no difficulty in completing all preparations and having everything in readiness to open the gates promptly on time.

The beginning of the end in the preparation of the ground of the main court has just been commenced. A force of men has been put to work laying sewers to carry the storm water from the main buildings into the lagoon and as soon as this work is completed the underground electric light wires will be laid, completing the underground work in the main court. The laying of walks and the completion of the embellishment of the main court will follow this work rapdly​. The frost is almost entirely out of the ground on the north side of the lagoon, but on the south side the ground is frozen to a depth of over two feet. Work will be commenced on the north side first in order to give the sun and other influences a good opportunity to thaw the ground as much as possible.

PUSHING THE BUILDINGS.

The buildings in the main courts are rapidly nearing completion. The Mines and Machinery buildings are practically finished, little except the finishing touches remaining to be done to these buildings. The Agriculture, Manufactures and Liberal Arts buildings are all in an advanced stage and but a short time will be required to complete all the work on them. The Art building is ready for the staff contractors, and they will commence work on them within a very short time. A large force of men will be put on this building, and it will be finished in a very short time. The carpenter work is entirely completed, the skylights are finished and the staff work on the building is of such a nature that but little time will be required for its completion. The greater part of the embellishment of the building is to be sculpture and Sculptor Bringhurst of St. Louis is now working on this. A series of high relief panels will extend entirely around the building just below the cornice, the panels showing processionals of art workers of all arts and all periods. The pediments will enclose groups of statuary comprising a seated female figure surrounded by various art workers bringing their handiwork for judgment. Flanking the pediments will be groups of symbolic composition representing history, literature and science. Crowning each pediment will be a single figure representing Fame. Scattered all about the building, above the cornice, will be groups of cherubs, eagles and shields.

GOVERNMENT WORK.

The Government building is making the most remarkable progress. It is under contract to be completed by April 1, and Engineer Farnan, the government engineer in charge of the construction, says the building will be ready before that time. He has already notified the several departments which are to make exhibits in the building that exhibits may be shipped at once, as the building will be ready to receive them by the time they can arrive. The building is entirely under roof, except the dome, and that will be completely enclosed within a very few days. The staff for the building is being put in place as fast as possible, and already the Government building is one of the landmarks on the grounds. It can be seen from down-town with great distinctness, and when the upper portion is covered with staff, it will form a most imposing sight. A staff statue, "Liberty Enlightening the World," fourteen feet in height, will surmount the dome, the pedestal on which the figure will stand being 150 feet from the ground. All of the models, except the groups of statuary which will flank the base of the dome, have been received, and the greater portion of the staff is made and is ready to put on the building. This will be the only building to be covered entirely with staff. There will be no plastering on the outside of the building, the entire exterior being covered with staff. The plain surfaces will be covered with slabs of the white staff and the building will be dazzling in its whiteness. The ornamentation of both interior and exterior is ornate in the extreme, and is on a massive order that is both beautiful and very impressive. Every detail is worked out to a nicety, and the building promises to be the handsomest structure on the grounds.

CONSTRUCTING COLONNADES.

The colonnades which flank the Mirror and connect the Government building with the Art building on the south and the Agriculture building on the south and the Agriculture building on the north are nearing completion. The carpenter work on the south colonnade is nearly finished, and that of the north colonnade is nearly as far advanced.

The colonnades flanking the Administration arch were completed some time ago.

The colonades​ and pavilions forming the exedra at the east end of the main court are under construction and are making good headway. The effect of the ornamentation of this exedra will be very pleasing. There will be a high central pavilion spanning the space between the approaches at either side and two smaller pavilions at each side. The colonnades between these pavilions will form segments of circles and the effect as seen from the west end of the lagoon will be very effective.

The north viaduct across Sherman avenue is making good progress, the girders having been placed entirely across the street. The superstructure will follow rapidly and the entire structure will soon be enclosed.

The Power building is proceeding rather slowly. The piles have been driven and the floor sills are in place.

NEBRASKA'S HANDSOME HOME.

The Nebraska building will be entirely completed within another week. This is one of the best, as well as one of the handsomest buildings on the grounds. The finishing touches are now being put on and the staff workers and plasterers will be through their portion of the work this week. The small amount of carpenter work remaining to be done will be completed some time next week and the buildings will then be ready for occupancy.

Superintendent Chapin of the Floriculture department, who has charge of the installation of the fountain which is to occupy the center of the main floor of the Nebraska building, has commenced work on the base of the fountain. It will occupy a space about fourteen feet square in the center of the main floor. The basin will be decorated on the outside with staff and lined with sheet lead. A handsome iron fountain will occupy the center of the basin and the whole will be decorated with handsome plants.

The Illinois building is in the hands of the staff contractor. The staff is nearly all made and a large force of workmen have commenced putting it on the building.

Want to Show a Working Mine.

Messrs. Holbrook and Hare, a couple of San Francisco men, are applicants for space for a mining exhibit which gives promise of being a very interesting exposition of mining operations. They propose to construct a mining tunnel extending into the bowels of the earth for a considerable distance and showing the various methods of mining. It is intended to show, in a graphic way, the appearance of a tunnel running through all kinds of rock; the different methods of "bracing" will be shown, and the meaning of the terms winzes, up-raises, inclines, cross cuts and all the other vernacular peculiar to the mining business.

The proposition of these people will be laid before the executive committee at an early date for consideration.

T. P. A. MEETS IN OMAHA IN MAY.

Executive Committee Fixes the Date for the Annual Convention.

The Travelers' Protective association, a national organization of commercial travelers, will hold its annual meeting in Omaha at such a time that the delegates and visitors to the convention will be able to participate in the opening of the exposition. The executive committee met in St. Louis Saturday of last week and fixed the date of the meeting for May 31 and the remaining four days of the week.

There are usually about 300 delegates to the meetings of the national organization, and the number of visitors usually swells the attendance to from 1,500 to 2,000. Nearly all of the members bring their wives and families with them, thereby increasing the number considerably. The traveling men will undoubtedly take a prominent part in the ceremonies of the opening of the exposition and will assist in giving the enterprise a good start.

Those interested in the exposition are greatly pleased that the traveling men will hold their convention at an early stage of the exposition, because, it is argued, they will be scattered over the entire length and breadth of the country within a very few days after the convention is over, and will circulate the reports of the exposition far and wide, being a most effective advertisement of the merits of the show.

 

BIDS ON TRANSPORTATION BUILDING.

Contractors Make Offers for Its Immediate Erection.

Bids for the construction of the Transportation and Agricultural Implement building were opened at the office of the Department of Buildings and Grounds at noon today. There were only three bids, each of these being for the complete building, including the necessary plastering. The style of architecture adopted for the north tract obviates the use of staff, the buildings being in the style known as mediaeval, or Swiss farm architecture, the heavy timbers being exposed and the intervening spaces covered with rough plaster. This building is to be about 400x600 feet in size and one story in height, except in the center, where a clear story will carry it to the height of two stories.

These were the bids: R. C. Strehlow, $37,775; Westlake Construction company, $41,692; William Goldie & Sons company, $37,440.

Southern California is Alive.

Notwithstanding the action of the commercial bodies of San Francisco in deciding to make no effort to have a California exhibit at the exposition, the counties of southern California are taking energetic action for an exhibit of the resources of that portion of the state, with a very flattering prospect of success, regardless of what is done by the more northern counties. The supervisors of Los Angeles county have appropriated $1,500 toward a fund for a Los Angeles exhibit and a fund of $10,000 has been raised for an exhibit. Active work is being done in San Bernardino, San Diego, Riverside and Orange counties, and committees have been appointed in these counties to raise funds.

Denverites Are Enthusiastic.

DENVER, Colo., Feb. 28.—(Special Telegram.)—Three hundred representative citizens attended a meeting tonight for the purpose of discussing the construction of a Denver building at the Transmississippi Exposition. The delegates who visited Omaha last week made detailed reports. Governor Adams, Lieutenant Governor Brush, Ex-Mayor Platt Rogers, Mayor McMurray and others made addresses creating great enthusiasm. A committee composed of nine leading merchants were appointed to secure funds for the construction of the building. The state commission is working with success in arranging exhibits for the different departments.

Topeka Wants the Building.

A rather novel proposition comes from Topeka, Kan. The citizens of that town have raised a fund of $16,000 for an auditorium building and a proposition has been made to the exposition management by which the money will be turned into the fund for a Kansas exhibit, provided the exposition management will agree to turn over to Topeka the material in the Auditorium building on the exposition ground for removal to Topeka, where they propose to reconstruct it. By this means they hope to secure a fine exhibit at the exposition and still devote the money to the purpose for which it was collected. The railroads of Kansas have agreed to contribute $15,000 toward an exhibit if the people of the state will contribute a like amount, and the Topeka scheme would more than comply with this condition.

The proposition was made to the Department of Publicity and Promotion and the Kansas promoters have been apprised of the nature of the construction of the Auditorium building and informed that the exposition management will perform its share of the scheme if the people of Kansas desire to enter into such an arrangement.

Notes of the Exposition.

E. Elvoir & Co. of Madeleine, France, have applied for space for an exhibit of sugar beet seed.

Clay county, South Dakota, has appropriated $500 to the South Dakota fund for an exhbit​ at the exposition.

The American Association of Nurserymen will hold its annual meeting in Omaha during the second week of the exposition, the dates for the meeting being June 7, 8 and 9.

The Minnesota commission will meet Thursday of this week at the office of Governor Clough in Minneapolis, to conclude arrangements for Minnesota's participation in the exposition.

W. H. Green, the conductor of the excursion which returned Sunday from a two weeks' trip through the east and south, is now projecting a trip to the northwest, extending to Puget Sound and down the Pacific coast.

General Superintendent Foster is having a complete outfit of night watch system alarm boxes installed on the exposition grounds in order to make certain that the night watchmen employed on the grounds performed their duties properly.

Special Agent Lleyellyn reports to the Department of Publicity and Promoton​ from Spokane that the prospects is good for an exhibit of minerals from eastern and northern Washington. He says the minng​ exchanges are taking the matter up and the outlook is encouraging.

F. M. Murphy, president of the Sante Fe & Prescott Railway company, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he is confident that a fine exhibit of Arizona minerals will be made by the Mining exchange of Prescott. He says he is co-operating with the exchange and considerable in-[?]

H. A. Watrous of Des Moines, president of the American Pomological society, writes to the Department of Exhibits that he believes the prospect is encouraging for a meeting of the society at Omaha during the coming year. The meetings of this society are held once in two years and 1898 is an "off year," but an effort is being made to secure an extra meeting.

Nodaway county, Missouri, has organized an exposition committee and this body is now engaged in raising a fund of $2,500 to provide for a county exhibit at the exposition. The county commissioners have been asked to appropriate $500 for this fund and the Commercial club of Maryville has approprated​ a like amount. The scheme is making good progress and a good exhibit is said to be assured.

DETAILS OF THE CONVENTION

LOCAL COMMITTEE OUTLINES THE WORK

Five General Meetings, with Numerous Sessions of Sections, Departments and Congresses—Colliseum​ Hall is Secured.

The local committee having in charge the matter of making preparations for the Transmississippi Educational convention to be held at Omaha June 28, 29 and 30 has issued circular No. 1, outlining the plan and giving a number of details in relation to the preliminary work which will interest those having to do with educational work. These circulars are to be sent to state superintendents of education in all of the transmississippi states with the request that they distribute them to the teachers in all of the counties and cities in their jurisdiction.

The following extracts are made from the circular:

"The Transmississippi Educational conven- has been organized to promote the educational interests of the states participating in the Transmississippi Exposition. It aims to give teachers and schoolmen the benefits accruing from a great gathering of representative educators interchanging ideas and listening to addresses of recognized leaders in the different branches of pedagogic work. While following in general scope the meetings of the National Educational association, it seeks to supplement its work and extend its influence. The plan and object of the convention have been endorsed by resolution of the State Teachers' associations of Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, South Dakota, Montana and Colorado.

DATE AND SCOPE.

"The date of the convention has been fixed for the last three days of June. This will give ample time for finishing up the closing work of the schools, for attending the convention, for visiting the exposition and, if desirable, to go on east for the National Educational association. The days of the week are Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. The time assures fair weather and moderate temperature.

"The convention will consist of five general meetings and numerous sessions of sections, departments and congresses. For the general meetings the program will provide addresses by educators of national reputation upon topics of general educational interest. The conference will be under direction of leading specialists in each field, as follows, so far as determined: School boards, arranged by Hon. J. H. Trewin, Lansing, Ia.; secondary schools and colleges, President secondary schools and colleges, President James H. Baker, University of Colorado; rural schools; manual training; teachers of deaf and blind, Prof. J. A. Gillespie of Omaha; teachers of history, Prof. F. M. Fling, University of Nebraska; teachers of English, Prof. Hopkins, University of Kansas; teachers of science, Prof. Charles E. Bessey, University of Nebraska; teachers of music, Prof. C. H. Congdon, St. Paul, Minn.; teachers of drawing; kindergartens; child study.

"Those conferences for which leaders are not named are still in process of arrangement.

"Aside from the program outlined the Transmississippi and International Exposition will be the great attraction. The exposition will be opened at Omaha, June 1, and it is conceded will be second to none except the World's fair. In it will be represented not less than thirty-five states of the union, besides many foreign nations. This exposition will be a graphic illustration of the resources and development of the western half of the American continent and will afford an education in itself. One of the special features will be the educational exhibits now in preparation by the schools of almost all the western states, illustrating the methods and results of advanced educational systems. Exhibits of text books, school furniture, literary apparatus and of the printing and book making trades promise to excel anything ever before attempted.

NO SPECIAL EXPENSE.

"There will be no special expense whatever imposed upon visitors except the moderate charge of 50 cents for the handsome official badge, which will entitle the holder to all privileges of the convention. Voluntary contributions in sums of 50 cents and over to the expenses of the meeting are, however, acceptable and will be properly receipted with the official badge—a beautiful souvenir [?]

"Special reduced railroad rates will be put in force for this convention equal to the best ever accorded any other educational gathering. In addition, limits, conditions, and deposit privileges will be arranged most favorable to those who wish to attend the Transmississippi Educational convention en route to other points and have their excursion tickets available on the return trip later in the summer or fall.

"The general meetings will be held in the Coliseum, in which the national convention of the people's party made its nominations in 1892. This hall has a seating capacity of 10,000. The section meetings and congresses will be held in the smaller halls, with which the city is abundantly supplied.

"Entertainment is promised in the way of a special day at the exposition, special night illuminations, social receptions, and, if possible, a grand school and college parade.

"While the local executive committee and its subcommittees have taken upon themselves the preliminary arrangements and work of entertainment, the program is being constructed with the help of an advisory board, including members from the various transmississippi states. The advice, suggestions and co-operation of all persons interested in educational institutions is respectfully solicited."

MORE PROTECTION AGAINST FIRE.

Additional Fire Fighting Apparatus at Exposition Grounds.

A regular meeting of the Board of Fire and Police Commissioners was held last night; present Commissioners Peabody, Herdman and Bullard. A communication was read from the chief of the fire department giving an estimate of the needed fire protection at the exposition grounds. It advised that seventeen men be stationed on the grounds, five on each of two hose wagons and seven on the hook and ladder truck. The communication was considered and an immediate addition to the force on the grounds was ordered to the extent of one hose cart and two men.

MEETING OF EXPOSITION CHORUS.

Members Becoming Deeply Interested in Their Work.

The second meeting of the Transmississippi Exposition chorus at Hayden's Music hall last night, was even more successful than the first meeting one week before. There were a number of new faces in the seats occupied by the chorus when Choral Director Kelly swung his baton for the first number and the volume of sound was all that could be expected from a chorus numbering about 120.

The entire evening was devoted to Charles Gounod's "By Babylon's Wave," a most difficult number, full of traps and pitfalls for the unwary but one of the most beautiful concerted numbers ever written. Director Kelly exercised the greatest care and patience in drilling each branch of the chorus on the difficult portions of the work and the members showed a degree of intelligence and interest which was warmly commented on by Musician Director Kimball who was an interested observer of the work of the chorus.

At the conclusion of the drill Director Kimball made a short talk to the members of the chorus, informing them that the celebrated Theodore Thomas orchestra has been secured for an engagement covering the first five weeks of the exposition, with a possibility that the engagement may be extended over a second five weeks. This organization will accompany the chorus in all its performances. Mr. Kimball called the attention of the members to the fact that this would be the first time this orchestra has played an engagement of over one week west of Chicago.

Mr. Kelly also talked for a few moments, speaking of the charge of $5 which is made for membership in the chorus. He stated that a membership ticket carries with it the privilege of admission to every concert given in the Auditorium during the exposition and explained that this meant at least $25 worth of admissions, as a season ticket to the Auditorium concerts is already contemplated, these tickets to be sold for $25 each. For their services in singing, the members of the chorus are to be given these tickets for $5 each, thus saving $20 by being in the chorus. Mr. Kelly also took occasion to deny the rumors that are being circulated by some of his alleged friends to the effect that he receives nothing for his services except what is derived from the fees paid by members of the chorus. He denounced these reports as being absolutely untrue, and stated that he received a fixed salary from the exposition management, regardless of the fees paid by members of the chorus.

The next meeting of the chorus will be held at Hayden's music hall Monday evening of next week, at 8 o'clock.

EXAMINES THE NEBRASKA BUILDING.

Chairman Neville Says the Structure Will Be Completed Next Week.

Chairman William Neville of the Nebraska Exposition commission came to Omaha yesterday to investigate the reports about the condition of the Nebraska building and the rumors of many changes in the plans of the structure, which were freely ventilated at   the last meeting of the commission, at which time he was appointed a committee to take such action in the matter as the situation seemed to require.

After making a trip to the grounds and looking over the buildings, making such inquiry as seemed necessary, Chairman Neville announced that he found the building so near completion that he thought best not to do anything to stop the work. He said the staff work would be completed within a few days and the carpenter work and all be finished by the last of next week. One or two changes that were contemplated he had stopped and had left positive instructions with Superintendent Blake that no more changes of any kind should be allowed.

The monthly report of the condition of the fund of $100,000 appropriated by the legislature for Nebraska's participation in the exposition has been made out by Bookkeeper Dan Althen and forwarded to Governor Holcomb. This report shows the following condition of the fund on March 1:

Salaries and wages$ 3,646.98
Furniture and fixtures 159.54
Office supplies 610.54
Construction 15,504.72
Agricultural department 5,017.25
Horticultural department 2,739.61
Apiary department 485.28
Live stock department 5,059.15
Dairy department 753.20
Poultry department 1,281.35
Floriculture department 118.60
Educational department 5,386.05
Miscellaneous space 3,560.25
Postage 100.00
Total$44,422.52

The total unexpended balance in the fund March 1 is $55,577.48.

EXPOSITION CELEBRATIONS

PRESIDENT WATTLES OUTLINING THE PLANS

Arrangements for Receptions, Parades and the Like Under Consideration—Display for the Opening Day's Exercises.

The arranging of programs for celebrations in connection with the exposition, special days, entertainment of distinguished guests, and all the other details which are a necessary adjunct to the proper carrying on of such a great public enterprise, but which do not properly belong to any of the various departments of the exposition, are matters which have been delegated to the president of the exposition to carry out, with the approval and advice of the executive committee. President Wattles has, therefore, been giving this matter considerable attention of late and has perfected an outline of a plan for the early days of the exposition which will be laid before the executive committee at an early day.

The president believes that the opening exercises should be made noteworthy in every respect and should be on a scale commensurate with the magnitude of the exposition. His plan comprehends making the event one of the most imposing celebrations ever seen in the west, surpassing in the extent and character of the military and civic display anything ever before attempted in this section. He would ask the governor of Nebraska and the mayor of Omaha to issue special proclamations declaring June 1, the opening day of the exposition, a general holiday in order that every man, woman and child who can possibly do so may come to Omaha and participate in the celebration. Invitations will be issued to the governor of each state in the union to come to Omaha on that day, accompanied by his entire staff and escort. Members of both houses of congress will also be invited and arrangements will be made for a special train from Washington to Omaha. The correspondents of the great papers of the country stationed at the national capital will be invited to accompany the congressional party.

In addition to the distinguished visitors every military and civic society in this section of the country will be invited to take part in the great parade which will pass through the streets of Omaha during the morning. There will be military organizations galore and bands will be sprinkled along the line in profusion. Civic societies of all kinds will be in line, and, to cap the climax, the concessionaires of the Midway will be there with their attractions, including the dusky denizens of the Afro-American village, the dark-skinned beauties from the Turkish harem, the Chinese artists and actors; people from the German village, Irish village, Streets of Cairo, Cosmopolis, animals in profusion, including camels, elephants, lions, tigers, etc.

The line of march will end at the exposition grounds and the opening exercises will take place in the Auditorium. These will include speeches by various celebrities, music by the Exposition chorus, the Thomas orchestra and well known soloists and the reading of an appropriate ode composed for the occasion by some western poet.

Arrangements will be made to have President McKinley start the machinery of the exposition by electricity, and the exercises will be concluded in some fitting manner.

SAMPLES OF CHILDRENS' WORK.

Entries in the Individual Competition Are Beginning to Arrive.

Entries to the individual competition instituted by the Woman's Board of Managers, for the purpose of securing a large number of meritorious specimens of children's handiwork for the educational display, have commenced to arrive. The completion closes April 15, at which time the judges selected for the purpose will pass upon the merits of the various entries and award the prizes provided for that purpose.

This competition covers every branch of school work and it is provided in the rules that all work winning a prize shall be given a place in the educational display to be made by the board. There are three branches which seem to be much more popular with the majority of competitors than any of the others. These are drawing, composition and the transmississippi history puzzle. The puzzle has proved a strong attraction and applications have been received by Secretary Ford from every state in the union, asking for copies of it.

Specimens of drawing have been received which show a high order of merit and articles of various kinds are being received daily.

The time within which entries may be made in the nature study series has been extended to May 15, in order to give competitors an opportunity to gather specimens during the early spring. All other branches close April 15.

South Dakota Holds Its Space.

The latest news received by the Department of Exhibits from South Dakota removes any doubt that may have existed regarding an exhibit from that state. Governor Lee telegraphed the department as follows: "State be represented without fail; be sure to hold space for us." J. P. Hymer of Deadwood, commissioner for the Black Hills region, writes that the mining interests of that portion of the state will be represented by an exhibit. He states that some arrangement is being made by which the necessary money will be secured through the county commissioners, but he does not go into detail beyond saying that an indemnity bond has been secured and will be given to the commissioners.

Woman's Club Quarters.

Mrs. Draper Smith of Omaha, secretary of the Nebraska Federation of Woman's clubs, has withdrawn the application filed by her with the Nebraska Exposition commission, in which she requested that the federation be given a room in the State building as headquarters. Mrs. Smith explained that she had learned that the federation could secure space in the Liberal Arts building for use as headquarters and she has filed an application for a space 10x20 feet, for which the Nebraska federation intends to pay the regular space charge. The headquarters will be established in the gallery of the Liberal Arts building, near the educational exhibit.

New York's State Commission.

Governor Black has announced the names of the gentlemen who are to compose the New York commission for the Transmississippi and International Exposition. They need no introduction in the world of business and little, if any, commendation to the general public. Here is the list: Chauncey M. Depew, John Jacob Astor, W. Seward Webb, Henry B. Hobart and Abel E. Blackman of New York; Charles N. Stowe of Deposit, Jacob Amos of Syracuse and John C. Graves of Buffalo.

The interests represented by these men are immense. No news is had of their intentions.

Model of the Maine.

One of the features of the display which will be made in the government building by the Navy department will be a model of the battleship Maine and it is more than likely that this miniature vessel will be the center of attraction. The model is now exposed to public view in the corridor just outside of the office of the secretary of the Navy in Washington. It is said to be one of the finest models of a battleship in the possession of the government. The model cost $6,000.

Georgia Asks for Plans.

Chairman Northen of the Georgia Exposition commission has asked the Department of Exhibits to secure plans for a Georgia building to cost not to exceed $6,000.

GARDENER ULRICH AT WORK

LANDSCAPE ARTIST ON THE HUSTLE

Proposes to Make Kountze Park and Bluff Tract Blossom Like a Garden of Paradise Before Summer.

Rudolf Ulrich of New York, the landscape architect who was engaged last summer to design and execute landscaping of the exposition grounds, has arrived in the city with the intention of remaining until the work is completed. A force of men will be put to work on the grounds at once and no time will be lost in making the grounds "a thing of beauty and a joy" all summer.

There is an immense amount of work to be done, but Mr. Ulrich has the reputation of accomplishing more work in a given amount of time than any other man who ever attempted to expedite the workings of nature. The prestidigitator who causes a rose bush in full bloom to grow in two minutes on the bare top of a table couldn't "hold a candle" to Mr. Ulrich. At his command huge giants of the forest will rear their heads on spots never accused of growing anything more lofty than the emerald stocks of Indian maize. Shrubs of all kinds, both flowering and non-flowering, will displace the rank growth of noisome weeds, and winding paths ending in cool, shady nooks, will transform the erstwhile prairie into a veritable garden of the gods.

The beautifying of the grounds will be carried on in all parts of the grounds will be carried on in all parts of the grounds at the same time. Mr. Ulrich says the time is now ripe for pushing the work with all possible speed, and he hopes to complete the work of planting trees, shrubs, etc., within the next two or three weeks. A number of trees have been transplanted to the bluff tract, bordering the main avenue leading from the Grand Plaza to the Horticulture building. In the main court a row of Lombardy poplars has been planted in front of the Manufactures and Agriculture buildings. These are between thirty and forty feet in height. A lot of box elder trees about twenty feet in height are on the ground ready to be placed near the poplars, the latter standing at the top and the former at the bottom of a terrace extending along the entire front of these buildings.

The space between the Machinery and Manufactures buildings, as well as that between the Mines and Liberal Arts buildings, will be parked in an attractive style and the same may be said of the space between the Liberal Arts and the Art building, on either side of the main entrance.

NEBRASKA'S BEAUTIFUL WOMEN.

Judge Neville Selects Two for the Exposition Medal.

Judge William Neville, to whom was left the task of choosing the two most beautiful of Nebraska's lovely women for the exposition medal, writes The Bee as follows:

NORTH PLATTE, March 2.—To the Editor of The Bee: I have selected Miss May O'Shea of Lincoln and Miss Netta Harmer of Syracuse for the composite photograph (exposition medal) and have forwarded the photos to Chairman Lindsay. I have positive proof that Nebraska has more beautiful women than any state in the union, and the decorations in the Nebraska headquarters, as well as the medal, will confirm my statement. Yours truly,


WILLIAM NEVILLE.

Exposition Chorus Progress.

Choral Director Kelly said, when asked about the exposition chorus this morning, that the chorus is filling up rapidly and making good progress. The executive committee considers having future meetings of the chorus in the Board of Trade building. Prof. Kelly will try voices at his studio in the Boyd theater building next Saturday from 2 till 5 p. m.

Prof. Chambers is organizing an auxiliary chorus in Council Bluffs, and will train his singers under the direction of the Omaha management.

Mr. Kelly says that he is glad to find that musical people are realizing that the exposition chorus is not a private undertaking, but a society organized by and under the direct control of the Transmississippi and International Exposition. It is a thing of national interest and the persons who remain out of it will be the losers. Monday night the chorus will take up "Daughter of Jairus" by Dr. Stainer, and also the Easter hymn from "Cavalleria Rusticana."

Illinois Building Plans.

The Illinois commission is now considering the advisability of building an annex to the beautiful state building which is now in course of erection on the bluff tract. The purpose of the commission is to make this annex an art gallery, in which will be displayed many of the valuable paintings and other works of art owned in Illinois. It will also afford a place for four magnificent   paintings, 10x20 feet in size, showing the World's fair, thus affording another opportunity of viewing the white city, which seemed to have risen as if by magic from the lake, a veritable wonderland, which was the world's greatest achievement in architectural magnitude and beauty, and which is now only a fading memory to those who saw it.

The annexe​ will be in the same style of architecture as the main state building and will be connected with it by a covered colonnade, adding greatly to the beauty of the Illinois building.

Douglas County Horticulturists.

The Douglas County Horticultural society held a meeting at the Commercial club yesterday afternoon to discuss ways and means of having a county exhibit at the exposition. The society had a conference with the county commissioners a few days ago with a view of securing a portion of the proceeds of the county exposition bonds for such an exhibit, but no satisfactory conclusion was reached. The report of the result of this conference formed the basis of the discussion at yesterday's meeting.

It was finally decided that the only way in which a county exhibit can be made is through such an appropriation, inasmuch as the members of the society feel that they cannot afford to subscribe any money for the purpose. A communication will be sent to the county commissioners soliciting the appropriation of a sum for the exhibit and recommending, in case the appropriation is passed and the exhibit is made, that it be put in charge of W. L. Crosby.

Admission to the Grounds.

The contract with Concessionaire Swobe, who has had charge of the skating and toboggan slide on the exposition grounds, will expire Tuesday of next week and the full control of admission to the grounds will on that date pass into the hands of the bureau of admissions, of which Manager Lindsey is the chairman. No attempt has been made to restrict admission into any part of the grounds except the main court and no change in that respect is contemplated in the near future. It is stated semi-officaily​, that greater restrictions will be thrown around the main court than heretofore. The work on this portion of the grounds has reached a stage where the presence f​ a large number of people is quite detrimental and some means will ave​ to be resorted to in order that no delay may be caused.

Maryland's Commission.

The governor of Maryland has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he will sonn​ increase the Maryland Exposition commission by adding three more men. As at present constituted the commission consists of two men and three women and the contemplated appointments will give it a membership of eight.

Colonel Maxson on Nevada.

Colonel H. B. Maxson of Reno, exposition vice president for Nevada and chairman of the Nevada Exposition commission, has arrived in the city en route home from Washington, D. C. He reiterates what he said when in the city several weeks ago, that Nevada will be well represented with an exhibit of minerals as well as agricultural and horticultural products.

Tiffany's Exhibit.

The Tiffany company, the well known New York jewelers, propose to erect a booth 80x24 feet in size in which they intend to install a magnificent exhibit of jewelry of all kinds. They have notified the Department of Exhibits that they will expend fully $10,000 in preparing and maintaining their exhibit, and they request especial protection in the way of guards in order to protect their valuable display from thieves. One of the features of this display according to this notice to the Exhibits department, will be a diamond valued at $500,000, and there will be a large number of other jewels of great value, hence their solicitude regarding police protection.

American Forestry Association.

B. E. Fernow, chief of the division of forestry of the Department of Agriculture of the federal government, and chairman of the executive committee of the American Forestry association, has notified Prof. Taylor, chief of the bureau of forestry, horticulture, agriculture and irrigation, that the society will hold a meeting in Omaha during the latter part of July ,or early in August. This association holds its annual meeting in the winter, but holds other meetings at irregular intervals during the summer, and the meeting at Omaha will come in between a meeting in the Yosemite valley and another at Boston.

Applications for Space.

Among the applications for space which have been received within the last few days by the Department of Exhibits are the following: Puck Soap company of Columbus Junction, Ia., toilet articles, soap, etc., sixty-four feet; J. W. H. Crawford, Delhi, Ne. Y., 400 feet, for a display of pneumatic tire and ball bearing axles for carriages; Buffalo Forge company of New York, 200 feet, for its latest design of engines; Nebraska Seed company of Omaha, fifty feet, for seeds and poultry food; Trenton Pottery company, New Jersey, 360 feet; Columbia university, 350 feet; Frank Crawford, Omaha, handy heaters.

Kansas Asks for Space.

Governor Leedy of Kansas telegraphed to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that the state will certainly be represented by an exhibit and requested that space be held in reserve for Kansas. No commission has yet been announced from the Sunflower state, but the telegram of the governor is an assurance that action will be taken very soon.

Union Pacific Helps Idaho.

The members of the Idaho Exposition commission, as well as the people of that state, are rejoicing over the announcement that the Union Pacific railroad will furnish free transportation for material intended for exhibition at the exposition. The success of the Idaho exhibit was seriously threatened a week or two ago by the fact that a railroad which had been depended upon to assist in transporting exhibits had established a rate which was practically prohibitive. The Union Pacific came to the rescue, however, and a fine exhibit is assured.

Interest in Washington and Oregon.

Special Agent C. E. Llewellyn of the Department of Publicity and Promotion has returned from the Pacific coast, where he has been engaged in arousing an interest in the exposition among the people in the extreme northwest section of the union. He reports that the people in both Washington and Oregon are enthusiastic regarding the exposition and are determined to be on hand with exhibits. Both states have appointed commissions, which are energetically at work, and Mr. Llewellyn says that all the leading industries of these states will be well represented by exhibits.

The Washington Exposition commission comprises the following: George W. Thompson, Tacoma; George B. Stetson, Phillip F. Kelly and L. M. Wood, Seattle; W. J. Spillman, Pullman; J. E. Baker, Tacoma; C. H. Thompson, Spokane; C. H. Clark, Spencer.

Double Time for Sunday Work.

There is a slight indication of trouble in connection with the plastering of the Nebraska building, but nothing serious is anticipated. The plater contractors concluded to work their men last Sunday on account of the fine weather and after the day had passed the men put in a claim for "double time," as provided by the union scale of wages for Sunday work. The contractors refused to allow the extra pay and the local union at once took up the matter. It will be laid before the Nebraska commission at the next meeting and the contractors will probably be required to comply with the demands of the men. The building is almost completed and one or two days more will give plenty of time for finishing the plastering, so there is no probability fo​ a strike.

Promotion in New York.

A. M. Wheeler has been commissioned by the Department of Publicity and Promotion to represent the exposition in Albany, N. Y., in the endeavor to promote an appropriation by the New York legislature for state participation in the exposition.

E. T. Bickford, the commissioner of the department who has been in New York for some time, and to whose efforts the appointment of the New York commission is due, will turn his attention to Massachusetts and Rhode Island and endeavor to expedite exposition matters in those states.

Notes of the Exposition.

Six applicants for space in the Agricultural, Implement and Transportation building have been received.

The Westliche Post of St. Louis, one of the principal German dailies of the west, will erect a booth in the Manufactures building for use as headquarters by its representatives and friends.

The plans for the Dairy and Apiary buildings will be completed some time this week and will be turned over to the Department of Buildings and Grounds. Bids for their construction will be asked at once and work on them will be pushed.

EXTENSIVE RUSSIAN EXHIBIT.

Application for Space Comes Through the Paris Commissioner.

An application for space for a Russian exhibit on a large scale has been received by the Department of Exhibits. The application comes through Frederick Mayer, the French commissioner of the exposition, who vouches for the responsibility of the parties making the application. These parties propose to occupy a large space adjoining the French section in the foreign building and in this they propose to install on exhibit which shall be gorgeous in its magnificence and conducted in true Russian style. In this section will be displayed costly furs from the land of the czar, bronzes, stoneware, carved stone tables, decorative furniture, artistic brassware, Russian carpets, etc. A Russian tea house will be reproduced in one part of the display and Russians in national costume will be in attendance at all times.

Art Exhibit Plans.

Art Director Griffiths writes to the Department of Exhibits from Detroit that preparations for the art exhibit have now reached a point where he is able to state with authority that the display in the Art building will be first-class in every respect. He says the best artists of New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Pittsburg and other art centers have promised to send their best works. These pictures have been seen by Mr. Griffiths, and he says that he bases his prediction on personal knowledge.

In summing up the situation, Mr. Griffiths says he has in hand sixty oil paintings from New York, sixty-three from Boston and Philadelphia, seventy-five from Paris and seventy-five at Detroit, among the last named being a number of the works of Scotch artists. He also has 225 water colors and drawings in black and white, making a total of 500, besides the large number of paintings in St. Louis, Cincinnati, Washington and Philadelphia which are available, and another large lot from New York artists who have promised to send their pictures after the close of the spring exhibitions in the east.

Arkansas Pushing Preparations.

The Arkansas Exposition commission is pushing things in that state and is going ahead with its preparations as fast as possible, relying upon the public spirit and generosity of the people to stand behind the commission by raising the necessary funds. The state has been divided into districts and a vice president appointed for each with contributions. The secretary is advertising for bids for a building 70x70 feet in size. It is to be constructed entirely of Arkansas lumber and is to cost not to exceed $7,500. The architects are given until March 10 to submit plans and the successful competitor must submit plans and the successful competitor must submit full specification not later than March 20. The competition is confined to Arkansas architects. A large committee has been appointed to induce the railroads to co-operate with the commission by contributing to the funds of the commission and by granting reduced railroad rates on exhibits.

Executive Committee Meeting.

At a meeting of the executive committee yesterday afternoon the members of the Board of County Commissioners were present and the amount and location of the space to be alotted​ Douglas county for an exhibit of its products was discussed at length. There was no disagreement and the matter was settled in a manner perfectly satisfactory to both parties.

Manager Reed announced that George F. Stich, to whom the concession for the Afro-American village had been let, had not carried out his contract and he recommended that the concession be awarded to John F. Coad, Thomas Hoctor and J. P. Finley. This was agreed to and a contract will be made with these parties.

Mayer, Katskee & Cross were awarded the concession for selling fresh fruits and melons.

Bureau of Public Comfort.

Preparations are being made by the Bureau of Public Comfort to open an office on the sixth floor of the Paxton building alongside the rooms occupied by the Department of Transportation. Active operations will be commenced at once by this adjunct to the exposition. A force of men will be put to work to canvass the city and schedule the rooms where lodgers will be accommodated and the places where meals will be furnished together with thep rices​ and such other information as will be desirable. All of this data will be tabulated and strangers will be provided with information without cost.

Change in the Offices.

The Department of Concessions has changed its quarters and now occupies a suite of six rooms on the north side of the top floor of the Paxton block. The large room occupied jointly by the Department of Exhibits and the Concession department is now used by the former and the small room adjoining, which has just been vacated by the Concessions department, will be occupied by Mayor Clarkson, assistant to the president.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Delaware County (Iowa) Agricultural society will offer a premium of $100 for the best exhibit of butter from that county at the exposition.

Statuary in butter will form an interesting feature of the exhibit planned by the Missouri Dairymen's association for Missouri's dairy exhibit. The American Refrigerator Transit company will furnish a car with sides of glass in which the dairy products of the state will be placed. A portion of the space in this car will be allotted for a studio, in which will be modeled life sized figures of noted persons and objects of interest in full view of visitors.

 

TOURNEY OF FIRE FIGHTERS

GREAT FEATURE OF THE EXPOSITION

Chief Redell and Major Clarkson Working on a Plan to Bring Together the Firemen of the Country.

Major T. S. Clarkson, the assistant to the president, is engaged in arranging plans for the national tournament of firemen which is proposed by President Wood of the National Firemen's association, who was in Omaha a short time ago to confer with the exposition officials regarding the matter. As soon as a definite plan is outlined it will be laid before the executive committee for ratification.

Mayor Clarkson has been in consultation with Chief Redell of the Omaha Fire department regarding arrangements for the tournament and says that the chief has entered most heartily into the spirit of the thing. It is conceded that such a tournament would attract thousands of people from all sections of the country. The last national tournament was held in Chicago in 1878, and there were 15,000 firemen in the parade. It is estimated that a tournament in Omaha would attract fully 25,000 firemen and three or four times that many visitors. The last twenty years has seen many changes in the methods of fighting fires, and a great increase in the number of firemen employed. The tournament proposed includes the volunteers, as well as the paid fire departments, and it is conceded that there has been a great increase in the number of both classes since the last tournament.

One of the most essential features of a firemen's tournament, and, in fact, the principal object of the tournament, is tests of skill in fighting fires. The plan which has been contemplated by Major Clarkson and Chief Redell, although not fully matured, includes the erection of a temporary structure several stories in height, in some open space which is to be fired and the several companies contesting for supremacy given an opportunity to show their speed and activity. This would give opportunity for the use of pompier ladders, and all the most modern inventions for fire fighting. Purses of sufficient size to induce hot competition will be offered in the several classes.

Those who have kept in touch with the matter in its preliminary stages feel certain that arrangements will soon be made that will be entirely satisfactory to all concerned and that the largest and most successful tournament of firemen ever held in this country will eventuate in Omaha during the coming summer.

PLANNING FOR THE BIG WIGWAM.

Money Enough in Sight to Pay All the Expenses.

The executive committee of the Council Bluffs Transmississippi association held a meeting last night that kept the members talking until nearly midnight. The matters that called forth the chief discussion related to the affairs of the committee and the large undertakings in hand. It was an earnest, practical discussion of some problems that have been up for solution for some time, and which the association felt must be solved at once. The discussion resulted in a satisfactory adjustment and the association proceeded to the consideration of the other business, chiefly that connected with the erection of the big wigwam. President Graham and George F. Knight reported that they had closed the contract for the site of the building on the exposition ground and obligated the association to pay the first installment of the rental, $250, at once. It was found that the site originally selected had been leased to a Chinese Midway attraction for $3,000, but the exposition management agreed to cancel the contract with the orientals and give the chosen site to the Council Bluffs association. The amount of the first installment was ordered paid at once.

Mr. Wright reported that he had received a telegram from Representative Potter in Des Moines announcing that the Pottawattamie delegation had been before the legislative appropriation committee in regard to the appropriation to be made for the Iowa exhibit and had been well received. The telegram suggested that it would be well for the association to send a special committee of its members to Des Moines and assist in convincing the legislative committee that a liberal appropriation was a necessity. The suggestion was favorably acted upon and the members of the association's appropriation committee were ordered to go to Des Moines at once and co-operate with the county's delegation and other friends of the exposition. While the subject was up Mayor Carson spoke very earnestly in favor of a large Iowa exhibit and a suitable building to show it. He declared that Iowa should exceed Nebraska in the liberality of its treatment of the exposition, and that no cry of poverty should be permitted to interfere with the showing the state should make. Reverting to the question of the wigwam, Mr. Moore suggested that all of the agents of eastern manufacturers and wholesalers be asked to solicit their houses to make special exhibits in the wigwam. He thought that several thousand dollars could be raised by this means that would help to make the wigwam the success that the people desired it should

The financial report showed that there was in sight about $8,500 for use in buildings the wigwam and making the exhibits. The total expenses that had been figured out amounted to about $7,000.

A resolution was passed making the president of the association the executive head of the wigwam committee and obliging him to spend part of each day in the office of the secretary for the purpose of advising and directing the work. The plan was discussed of building the wigwam under the immediate direction of the association, employing a suitable superintendent and the association buying all the material. The same resolution required the secretary for the next three months to devote all of his time to the work of the association and provided that his compensation should be $100 a month. This portion of the resolution was laid on the table, with the understanding that the secretary would be paid after his work was done, but that no money collected for the purpose of erecting the building should be used in the payment of any salaries.

The committee appointed to confer with the representatives of the women's clubs reported that the women were anxious to assist in the work, and had plastered a series of entertainments by which it was expected to raise $1,000.

OHIO AND KENTUCKY LINING UP.

Commissioner Richardson Sends Home Very Encouraging Reports.

Special Commissioner R. W. Richardson, who has been in Ohio and Kentucky for the past week in the interest of the exposition, reports to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that the outlook for legislative action in both states in very promising.

At a conference held by Mr. Richardson with the leaders in both houses of the Ohio legislature it was agreed that a joint resolution would be introduced providing for the appointment of a state exposition commission and making an appropriation for a state exhibit. The Board of Trade of Columbus passed a resolution urging that the state should be properly and creditably represented and requesting the legislature to appropriate funds for this purpose.

The Commercial club of Louisville, Ky., passed a series of resolutions declaring it to be to the best interests of the manufacturing, agricultural and mineral industries of the state to be represented and urging all interested to assist. It is urged that the fact that the trade relations between Kentucky and the states in the transmississippi region have been inconsiderable is all the more reason why a fine exhibit should be made in order to secure a portion of this trade.

Mr. Richardson will devote more of his

OMAHA LEADS WHOLE COUNTRY.

Cash Register People on Prosperity in the West.

William P. Kiser of Dayton, O.fl, general manager of the National Cash Register company, is in the city endeavoring to make suitable arrangements for an elaborate exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition. If he is successful in securing the space he wants he will put in a display similar to the famous pearl and gold one which took first prizes for grandeur in display at the Antwerp exposition. Mr. Kiser is in Omaha after a trip through the west, and says he is thoroughly convinced of th​ return of prosperity to this section.

To a Bee reporter he said: "Our sales are better by two to one than they were a year ago in the west, and the collections are much better. To my mind these are two accurate indices to the commercial condition of any territory. Our business has improved all over the country, but the improvement has been more marked in the west than in the east. This is true in regard to both sales and collections. That Omaha stands in the very lead in the enjoyment of the returned prosperity is indicated by the return of our Omaha agent, H. B. Whitehouse. Our company makes an award of $100 every month for the best returns, various standards being fixed for different territories according to their respective population. During 1897 Mr. Whitehouse secured seven out of a possible twelve of these monthly awards, and he was in competition with agents all over the world. He has already won the prize for January, 1898, and I think he also has that for February, 1898, although all the returns are not yet in. More than that he has just been awarded the $200 silver cup offered annually for the best knowledge of the firm's business, and also the annual diploma for the highest general average in all departments of the business for the year 1897. This remarkable collection of prizes by one agent indicates more than exceptional ability on his part. It goes to show that the territory in which he is representing the company is enjoying a full measure of the commercial improvement that is noticeable all over the county."

MISSOURI'S MONEY IS COMING IN.

Contract for Its State Building Will Soon Be Awarded.

ST. LOUIS, March 4.—(Special.)—A meeting of the executive committee of the Omaha Exposition commission will probably be called within the next ten days, for the purpose of awarding a contract for the erection of a state building on the exposition grounds. The call will be issued by the chairman, Colonel John O'Day of Springfield and meantime the aspiring architects will complete their plans and submit the same to the committee.

The necessary ground pace for the Missouri exhibit has already been secured by the president of the commission, Clark H. Sampson, and the locality is said to be a desirable one. It is the intention of the commission to not expend over $10,000 on a building as it is deemed this sum will be amply sufficient for a temporary structure.

The main work now ahead of the commission is to secure the necessary money to make the Missouri exhibit a complete success. At the recent meeting in Kansas City some $26,000 was reported as having been collected, and nearly all of this came from the cities. The country is yet to hear from and letters of inquiry have been sent out with a view of learning just how much each county can be depended upon to furnish in ready cash.

The commission estimates that it will require not less than $50,000 to make anything like such an exhibit as the state should have, and it is thought that a considerably larger sum could be expended to good advantage. Most of the city subscriptions have been collected and by the time the next meeting of the executive committee is held it is thought they will all be in the hands of the treasurer. It is not known at this time how much money has been subscribed in the country. Many of the county courts have made appropriations, but in most cases small sums were voted.

Anticipating that there will be difficulties in the road of raising sufficient funds in the usual way, the committee has resorted to another method for obtaining small contributions. A handsome exposition button, or badge, as some call it, has been secured. It is duly inscribed as a Missouri Exposition button and has the seal of the state stamped in the center. Persons desiring to possess one of these souvenirs can do so by enclosing their address and $1 to the treasurer, F. C. Marshall cashier of the St. Louis Continental Bank. All money arising from the sale of these buttons will be turned into the general exposition funds. The committee expects that a large number of them will be disposed of during the next few days. Letters have been sent out by the secretary calling attention to the souvenirs.

Assurances are coming in to the executive committee from all parts of the state from individuals and corporations stating that they will need space for their exhibits and when all these are added to the exhibit of the state now being provided for it is believed that Missouri will easily walk away with first premium.

COLORADO MAKES GREAT PROGRESS.

Managers of Departments Make Encouraging Reports.

The Colorado Exposition commission is meeting with great encouragement in its efforts to have a fine exhibit of the many resources of the state. At a meeting held in the governor's office Wednesday night, reports were received which indicate that exposition matters are in a very good condition and a large and fine exhibit is assured. State Mining Commissioner Lee reported that $8,000 will be required for a creditable mining exhibit and he said a good share of this had already been secured and pledges were given to guarantee the balance. Mrs. M. A. Shute, secretary of the State Board of Horticulture, who is in charge of the horticulture exhibit, reported that the friendly rivalry between the various sections of the state made it certain that plenty of money will be available for a fine exhibit of fruit extending through the entire exposition. Colonel R. E. Goodell, chairman of the department of coal, iron and oil, presented assurances from leading people connected with these industries of a fine exhibit in all these lines. The members of the commission were greatly pleased at the outlook and no stone will be left unturned to make the Colorado exhibit all that could be desired. The state has been assigned the most prominent position in the Mines building and the mining exhibit will be made especially fine on that account.

The Denver commission also held a meeting Wednesday night and it was found that there will be no difficulty whatever in raising sufficient funds for the erection of the proposed Denver building.

Kentucky Legislature Interested.

Special Commissioner R. W. Richardson, who is promoting the exposition in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana, writes to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that a joint resolution has been introduced in the Kentucky legislature providing for a state exposition commission and an appropriation for a state building.

He also states that the Chamber of Commerce of Cincinnati has passed a strong resolution urging the Ohio legislature to make an appropriation for state participation and to provide for a state commission.

 

Indian Commission.

Special Commissioner R. W. Richardson telegraphed The Bee from Indianapolis that the governor of Indiana will name a state exposition commission to provide for an exhibit from that state. The Chamber of Commerce of Indianapolis endorses the idea of having the state well represented at the exposition and urges the governor to take action on the matter. The legislature of Indiana is not in session, and the commission will be compelled to rely upon private subscriptions for funds with which to make an exhibit.

Plans for Girls' and Boys' Building.

The executive committee of the Woman's Board of Managers was in session all of yesterday considering the plans for the Girls' and Boys' building. Several minor changes were made in the plan, but nothing was done to change the general character or size of the structure. The architects were directed to prepare complete plans and specifications for a special meeting to be held next Friday, at which time prompt steps will be taken to begin active work on the building.

State Educational Exhibit.

State Superintendent W. R. Jackson, in charge of the educational exhibit, his assistant, W. C. Stewart, and Prof. Barbour of the University of Nebraska, spent the day making a thorough inspection of the space assigned to the educational display in order to make a full detailed report to the Nebraska Exposition commission at its next meeting.

Notes of the Exposition.

R. A. Finley has been appointed auditor of accounts in the office of Secretary Wakefield, to succeed John Rush, resigned. Mr. Finley has been a resident of Omaha for a number of years, and is well known.

Major T. S. Clarkson, assistant to the president, has taken possession of the office on the sixth floor of the Paxton block, assigned to the joint use of the president and his assistant, and is to be found there. The room is 602.

EXPOSITION AND THE COLISEUM.

Board of Governors on the Matter of Giving Up Ak-Sar-Ben's Den.

There is said to be some question whether the exposition association will be able to use the old Coliseum building for conventions and other gatherings during the summer. No arrangement has yet been made with the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben, who control the property, and it is understood that some of the members of the board of governors are now opposed to any change in their program.

The members of the board of governors state that in the first place they offered to allow the exposition people to use the building if they would construct a shed immediately adjoining that would answer for the storage of the floats. No answer was given to this proposition and the knights went ahead and made their plans, which involve the use of the old building. Within the last day or two the exposition officials have decided that they want the building, and at this late day the knights cannot change their plans without serious inconvenience. The matter will be taken up at the meeting of the board of governors next Tuesday night, when a final answer to the exposition association will be determined on.

Major R. S. Wilcox said that the board of governors was willing to oblige the exposition people if possible. But the matter had been allowed to rest until so late a say that it was feared that it might interfere with their plans to give up the building. The matter will be thoroughly canvassed Tuesday night and as far as he understands the sentiment of the board the request will be granted if it can be done without too much disarrangement of their plans.

H. J. Penfold said that it is unfortunate that the exposition people had not seen fit to accept the proposition made by the board of governors in the first place. The board has now gone so far with its plans that it will be difficult to change them. Whether it can be done at all is to be settled Tuesday night and until the board has discussed the matter it is impossible to say what action it will take.

PROTECTION AGAINST FIRE

Exposition Has a Separate and Distinct Fire Department.

IT IS MANNED WITH THE VERY BEST OF MEN

In Addition to the Engines, Stand Pipes Are Placed in Buildings for Use in Case of a Conflagration.

The protection of an exposition against fire is always a vital question and one which causes the management of any enterprise of that nature a great deal of uneasiness until the exposition is safely brought to a close and everything is removed from the grounds. The Transmississippi Exposition is no exception to this general rule and a great deal of thought has been devoted to this particular department. The entire charge of the grounds of the exposition, including the buildings, is vested in the Department of Buildings and Grounds. Manager Kirkendall of that department has been giving a great deal of attention to providing the proper facilities for guarding the buildings against fire and perfecting arrangements which will be a safeguard against the destruction of the multitude of expensive exhibits which will soon be placed in the buildings.

A system has been arranged which is believed to be extensive enough to meet all the requirements and assure as perfect protection as is possible to be obtained.

There is now stationed on the exposition grounds, in the hose house, standing temporarily on the south side of the lagoon about the middle of the tract, a four-wheel hose reel manned by five men. These men were picked from the Omaha fire department and are all experienced fire fighters. They are all single men and live on the grounds.

Within a short time the house in which this company is sheltered will be moved from its present temporary location to Twentieth street, between Manderson and Pratt, where it will be about midway between the main court and the north tract. Another hose house will be erected on the bluff tract opposite the viaduct leading from the main court onto the bluff tract.

BUYING MORE EQUIPMENT.

Manager Kirkendall has contracted for a hook and ladder truck of the largest size, carrying a sixty-foot ladder and several smaller ladders in addition to the other equipment of a truck. He has also contracted for two hose wagons. All of this apparatus is of the most improved type and has been selected with the advice of Chief Redell of the Omaha fire department, who was appointed by Manager Kirkendall some time ago as a member of the Fire Insurance board for the grounds. It is the expectation of the exposition management that the city authorities will take this apparatus from the exposition at a fair price after the exposition is closed.

No definite arrangements have yet been made for manning the apparatus, but it is rather taken for granted that the Omaha fire department will supply the men. The men now on duty on the grounds are being paid by the city, but whether the city will continue this policy has not been determined.

In addition to the fire apparatus referred to there is a complete system of stand pipes in each of the exposition buildings. The Machinery and Electricity building is provided with four of these stand pipes, each having two openings. The pipe extending from the water main to the building is six inches in diameter, but the stand pipe is but three inches in size. Attached to each opening in the stand pipe will be from 100 to 150 feet of hose. These stand pipes are so arranged that the entire interior of the building is within reach of the hose. In the Machinery and Electricity building there are four stand pipes, each having two openings, the Mines buildings has six stand pipes, the Liberal Arts six, the Fine Arts four, Agriculture six, Manufactures six, Girls' and Boys' building two, Auditorium two.

Hydrants are placed at the ends and in front of each buliding​ in such a way as to afford an ample supply of water. On the Midway hydrants are placed 200 feet apart.

In addition to the water service there will also be a large chemical engine of 100 gallons capacity stationed on the grounds and three-gallon portable chemical extinguishers will be distributed in profusion in all of the buildings.

FINE MUSIC FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Thomas Orchestra Secured for a Five Weeks' Engagement.

The working out of the details of the music for the exposition is progressing slowly, there being several differences of opinion between the musical director and some of the executive committee regarding certain of the details. These matters are of such a nature, however, that the delay does not affect in any way the progress of the main features of the arrangement.

It has been definitely settled that the Theodore Thomas Chicago orchestra will be at the exposition during the first five weeks and perhaps longer, and will furnish the orchestral music for the various choral societies which will appear in the Auditorium during its engagement. The Apollo club of Chicago, one of the best known musical organizations in the country, will probably appear two or three times at the opening of the exposition. Arrangements are now pending by which this society will render "Elijah" the opening day of the exposition and will follow this on the two or three succeeding days with lighter works of well known composers. Other choral societies of note are preparing to come to the exposition, among them being the Minneapolis society, the magnificent choir of the Mormon temple in Salt Lake City, the Denver society, the St. Louis society and many others.

Musical Director Kimball is negotiating with managers of a number of the most noted soloists for engagements to appear in the Auditorium both in solos and in company with some of the numerous choral societies. It is his intention to have a concert in the Auditorium afternoon and evening at least three days each week. These concerts will include all classes of music. There will be orchestral numbers, solos by noted singers and oratorios by different choral societies.

The Omaha Exposition chorus will meet at Hayden's music hall at 8 o'clock tomorrow night, at which time the beautiful Easter hymn from Cavalleria Rusticana will be taken up and a portion of the time will probably be devoted to Stainer's "Daughter of Jairus." This chorus is meeting with great encouragement from the singers of Omaha and a general invitation is extended to all singers to join this organization and help along the good cause. There is room for singers in all branches of the chorus and as a money saving investment, the terms offered would be hard to beat. An entrance fee of $5 is required of each member and in return for this, in addition to the instruction which will be received during rehearsals, each member will be furnished with a ticket admitting him to the Auditorium to all concerts given there. As there will be at least 100 concerts, to which the admission will never be less than 25 cents, the chorus member will be ahead just $20 in money. One of the rules provides that simplicity will prevail in the matter of dress; the women will wear a blue serge sack coat, with pants and straw hat.

BRINGING ORDER OUT OF CHAOS.

Exposition Buildings Are Rapidly Nearing Completion.

The grounds of the main court of the exposition grounds are in a torn-up condition and visitors find considerable difficulty in making their way about unless they are athletically inclined and are fond of jumping over ditches and other obstructions. The work of laying storm water sewers to carry the water from the roofs of the main buildings into the lagoon is being pushed and a large force of men, divided into gangs, are crowding this work as fast as possible. Another large force under the direction of Landscape Architect Ulrich is also digging up the ground and interfering with sightseeing by planting trees and making other preparations for the beautification of this part of the grounds. Still another force of workmen is engaged in putting a heavy iron railing all around the banks of the lagoon and making approaches to the water's edge, preparing the island for the embellishment which is to be placed on it, and making various other preparations.

In addition to the work being done upon the ground, both above and below, numerous workmen are engaged in putting the finishing touches on the main buildings. The scaffolding used by the staff workers on the Manufactures, Agriculture and Liberal Arts buildings is being removed and these three buildings now take their places among the almost completed palaces, in which class the Mines and Machinery buildings have been for some time. The Art building is now in the hands of the staff workers and rapid progress is promised by Smith & Eastman, the staff contrators​. They will put their entire force on this building and it will be completed within a very short time.

The government building continues to be the marvel of all beholders. The speed with which this immense structure has taken form has been the cause of remarks by every person who visits the grounds or who passes in sight of the building. George Moore & Sons of Memphis have the carpenter contract and Alexander & Son, also of Memphis, have the staff contract. The construction of the building is under the direction of Engineer J. J. Farnan, one of the staff of the Treasury department.

Those who secure a view of the building from the inside of the grounds are loud in their praise of the great promise of beauty which is held out. The carpenter work on the building is rapidly nearing completion, the dome being almost entirely finished and the staff work is making extraordinary progress. The contractor was seriously delayed by failure to receive the models from Washington until very recently, but no time has been lost since these arrived and the finishing staff is being turned out very rapidly. The ornamentation of this building is extremely ornate and beautiful. Enough of the staff is now on the building to convey a very fair idea of the appearance of the finished structure and the classic beauty of the building is apparent in every line. The decoration is on a broad and heavy scale, giving the building a massive appearance and the nicety with which the details are worked out shows that no little point has been neglected. The staff which is going on the building is of exceptional whiteness and the casting is clear cut, having every appearance of the finest marble. The entire exterior is to be covered with staff and this will add greatly to the appearance, as the staff is much whiter and smoother than the plaster coating which covers the plain surface of the other buildings.

It is expected that all of the underground work in the main court will be completed within a week and work will then be commenced upon the walks in this part of the grounds.

Work on the roadways on the bluff tract will be commenced early this week. The contract for these walks was let to Van Court & Winn some time ago and they have only been waiting for the frost to leave the ground before beginning work. In the exposed position of the bluff tract the ground is nearly free from frost and work will be commenced at once. These walks will be macadamized. No decision has yet been reached regarding the material to be used for the walks in the main court. Brick is strongly favored in some quarters, mainly because of its cheapness and on account of the large amount of salvage.

Graders have been started to work on the site of the Transportation building and the driving of the piles for this building will be commenced within a few days. The lumber for the building has been ordered and is [?]

 

Danish Association Celebrates.

The Danish association of this city celebrated its twenty-seventh anniversary last night in Washington hall. The affair was in main a masquerade ball, but during the course of the evening an interesting pantomime was rendered. The attendance was good and the number of costumes that appeared on the floor was unusually large. In honor of the day the hall was hansomely​ decorated with the American and Danish colors. Stringers of bunting hung from all the balconies. The effect was heightened by a number of Chinese lanterns which were placed behind the folds of the decorations.

Jolly Eight Dancing Club.

The Jolly Eight Dancing club gave its regular monthly dance in Patterson hall last night. A large number of the friends of the club were present. The colors of the body, white and blue, were conspicuously displayed. The program of twenty-two well selected dances was greatly enjoyed.

Reviewing Ohio National Guard.

CINCINNATI, March 5.—Colonel Cochran, commandant of Fort Thomas, reviewed the First regiment, O. N. G., at its armory. Numerous officers of the national guard from other parts of Ohio and from other states were present. In respect to military equipment the bearing of the regiment made a great showing.

RESULT IS MAGNIFICENT

DR. DAY ON THE EXPOSITION SETTING

Government Officer Expresses His Delight with the Arrangement of the Grounds and Buildings and Plans of the Work.

"The management of the Transmississippi Exposition has displayed more common sense in the arrangement of the ground at its disposal and more intelligence in the disposition of the available facilities than has been the case with any former exposition. The result it, that more has been accomplished for the money expended and a better effect produced upon visitors than has been possible with other expositions."

This is what Dr. David T. Day, one of the officers of the United States Geological survey, said to Major T. S. Clarkson, assistant to the president, in whose company he had just visited the several tracts constituting the exposition grounds. Dr. Day has been connected in an official capacity with every exposition of recent years in which the government exhibits and his last visit was made with a picture in his mind's eye of the grounds as they appeared in the early stages.

"I do not mean to disparage the management of any other exposition," continued Dr. Day, "but the people at the head of this exposition have simply profited by the experience of their predecessors. The result is that they have produced the most magnificent result and have a setting which has never been excelled. I realized when I was here before that the possibilities were very great and I have been somewhat curious to learn just how things were being worked out, but I am delighted with the broad and liberal plan with which the whole matter has been treated and I predict that this will be one of the grandest and most complete expositions ever held in this country. The opportunities were magnificent and they have been taken advantage of to the fullest extent.

GOVERNMENT WILL BE ON TIME.

"I have been looking at the Government building," continued Dr. Day, "and am glad to see the way it is progressing. The government has never been late at any exposition and will not be in this case. It is safe to say that every government exhibit will be in place and the doors ready to open the morning of May 31. Much of the material to be sent here is boxed now and ready for shipping and it will be sent forward just as soon as the space is ready for it.

"The exhibits to be made by the several departments will be much more extensive than the exhibit made at either Nashville or Atlanta. All of the material at Nashville was sent back to Washington, and the material to be sent to Omaha will be an entirely new exhibit. Of course, there may be some things sent here that were at Nashville, and the same cases will probably be used in a great many instances, but the exhibit will be fresh and in the best of shape. There will not be as much material as was exhibited at Chicago, principally because there will not be as much space, but it developed that much of the material shown at Chicago was simply 'dead timber' and this will be eliminated, with the result that the character of the exhibit will be even better than that at the World's fair."

Dr. Day is in Omaha in response to a telegram from Manager Bruce of the Exhibits department who wished to consult [?]missioner of the mining exhibit. This is a position which has never been filled and it has been tendered to Dr. Day. The doctor is an expert in mining, his work with the geological survey being of a nature that brings all matters in the department work connected with mining under his direction. He was in charge of the mineral exhibit at the Nashville and Atlanta expositions and has had wide experiences in such matters. In event that he accepts the position offered him by Manager Bruce, he will act in an official capacity as a government officer and also as an officer of the exposition.

SOME OF HIS IDEAS.

When in Omaha last fall Dr. Day offered a number of suggestions regarding the general rules which should govern a mining exhibit, and if he becomes an officer of the exposition he will probably carry out the plan then suggested. At that time he declared that the most effective way of making a mining exhibit that would be instructive, as well as pleasing, would be to show the various stages of mining operations, working out the details of each kind of mining, showing the different conditions in which each metal is found, the processes of treating the ores, and, in fact, making the exhibit a perfect school of instruction which shall show everything there is to be known regarding this great industry.

The time which will intervene before the gates will open will be very short in which to carry out such a plan and make a complete exhibit, but in speaking of this matter, Dr. Day said a great deal could be done in three months with energetic work.

ADVANCE GUARD OF THE MIDWAY.

Coming of Camels and Donkeys Announces the Approach of the Show.

Six camels and eight diminutive donkeys, followed by about 200 small boys, formed a motley procession which wended its way slowly along Sherman avenue Sunday afternoon toward the exposition grounds and impressed people along the street with the idea that a circus was coming to town. It was simply the advance guard of one of the concessions which will occupy a prominent place on the Midway of the exposition, the concession wach​ was first called Cosmopolis, but which will probbaly​ be called Streets of Nations.

The proprietor of this concession is Gaston Akoun, a Frenchman, who furnished some of the amusement at the World's fair, at Atlanta and at Nashville. He arrived in the city Sunday with his camels and donkeys and a company of about twenty people, who will take part in the entertainment to be furnished in this concession. A further consignment of animals will all have their uses in connection with the ceremonies which will form features in this attraction. The elephants, camels and donkeys will be used to carry people about the streets, while the yak will form the center of attraction as the sacred bull in the religious ceremonies in that section of the concession devoted to India.

The Streets of Nations will illustrate the life and customs of the people in a number of Old World cities. Mr. Akoun says that a strong feature will be a revival of Olympian games and to give a fitting setting for these a building will be erected in the center of the ground which will be a reproduction of the famous Parthenon. In the open space about this the games will take place and from this plaza will radiate the streets set apart for the different nations. Each of these will have houses, bazaars, cafes, etc., representing the actual conditions in the country depicted and will be peopled by natives of those countries. These will carry on their several duties and will manufacture articles peculiar to their country, which will be sold as souvenirs.

SAYS RESULT IS MAGNIFICENT.

Dr. Day Expresses Delight at the Exposition's Arrangements.

"The management of the Transmississippi Exposition has displayed more common sense in the arrangement of the ground at its disposal and more intelligence in the disposition of the available facilities than has been the case with any former exposition. The result is, that more has been accomplished for the money expended and a better effect produced upon visitors than has been possible with other expositions."

This is what Dr. David T. Day, one of the officers of the United States Geological survey, said the Major T. S. Clarkson, assistant to the president, in whose company he had just visited the several tracts constituting the exposition grounds. Dr. Day has been connected in an official capacity with every exposition of recent years in which the government has been interested. He had arrived in Omaha but a few hours before, and his visit to the grounds was his first errand. He was in Omaha about four months ago on business in connection with the government exhibits and his last visit was made with a picture in his mind's eye of the grounds as they appeared in the early stages.

"I do not mean to disparage the management of any other exposition," continued Dr. Day, "but the people at the head of this exposition have simply profited by the experience of their predecessors. The result is that they have produced the most magnificent result and have a setting which has never been excelled. I realized when I was here before that the possibilities were very great and I have been somewhat curious to learn just how things were being worked out, but I am delighted with the broad and liberal plan with which the whole matter has been treated and I predict that this will be one of the grandest and most complete expositions ever held in this country. The opportunities were magnificent and they have been taken advantage of to the fullest extent.

GOVERNMENT WILL BE ON TIME.

"I have been looking at the Government building," continued Dr. Day, "and I am glad to see the way it is progressing. The government has never been late at any exposition and will not be in this case. It is safe to say that every government exhibit will be in place and the doors ready to open the morning of May 31. Much of the material to be sent here is boxed now and ready for shipping and it will be sent forward just as soon as the space is ready for it.

WORK OF THE SCULPTORS

BUSY MODELING THE FIGURES IN CLAY

Methods Employed in Designing and Executing the Exterior Decorations for the Palaces that Will Grace Kountze Park.

The demand for statuary to add the finishing touch to the beautiful palaces on the exposition grounds is responsible for the establishment in Omaha of a new industry, giving employment to a number of men.

Every building on the main court will be decorated with statuary, both single figures and groups, and the turning out of the completed figures involves a great amount of work, of which the general public knows little or nothing. To do this work sculptors of ability have come to Omaha and are now engaged in modeling the silent presentments of life, actual and symbolical. Workshops have been established in various parts of the city, where each sculptor has a force of assistants.

Sculptor Franz Engelsmann of Chicago has the contract for the statuary for the Agriculture building, and his shop is a very busy place. There are a large number of single figures and groups in the statuary designed for this building and one large pair of spandrels which are to be placed over the main entrance. Sculptor Metler of Chicago has the contract for the statuary on the Administration building, and has his work almost completed. R. W. Bock, another Chicago sculptor, is making the statuary for the Machinery and Electricity building, and Sculptor Bringhurst of St. Louis is now working on the lavish decoration for the Art building.

WORKING OUT DESIGNS.

In preparing this statuary the first thing is a suggestion from the architect of the general character of the decoration to be employed. This is furnished in the form of a sketch or wash drawing. It is more or less definite, according to the ideas of the archiect​. Taking this as a guide, the sculptor moulds in clay what he, too, calls a sketch. These small models or sketches are usually about a foot or less in height and are not made to any definite scale. They are simply the expression of the ideas of the architect elaborated and given definite form by the sculptor. The sketch is submitted to the architect for approval, and when this is received the work on the statue proper is commenced. With the sketch as a model a full-size figure is modeled in clay. A skeleton of sticks is made in crude form, the only purpose being to give rigidity to the figure. A single piece of wood two inches square and of the proper height furnishes the "backbone" for a heroic statue of man or woman, and a cross piece of wood or iron at the shoulders furnishes a foundation for the arms, if they be extended. On this framework the clay is moulded roughly, and gradually worked to the proper form. In every case the figure is moulded in the nude in order to give the proper contour, and the drapery is moulded in clay after the figure has been approved. This work requires great skill and care. As the figure nears completion the clay is scraped away or small pieces pressed on wherever necessary until the proper result is attained. When completed it is approved by the reviewing authority and alterations may then be made wherever necessary.

After approval the clay figure is given a liberal coating of shellac. When this is dried the figure is divided into sections by pressing strips of tin into the clay, and a mould, in plaster, is taken of each of these sections. A mould is also made of each section in a preparation composed largely of glue. The glue mould is placed inside the plaster mould, which holds the glue in the proper position. From these sectional moulds the plaster figure is made, the process being much the same as that for making staff. The interior of the glue mould is coated with a mixture of hard plaster which "sets" very quickly, and this is strengthened with plaster mixed with hemp or jute fiber, the whole cast being about an inch in thickness. In this way the entire figure is cast and the parts are then assembled, the joints "pointed up" and the figure is complete. The surface is gone over very carefully and dressed, all little excresences​ being removed and imperfect spots filled with plaster. This process is the same with all the figures and requires a great deal of time.

 

Personnel of Washington Commission.

Regarding the personnel of the Washington Exposition commission appointed last week by Governor Rogers the Spokane Review says that George B. Stetson is a prominent lumber miller of Seattle; Victor F. Kelley is prominently identified with the salmon industry; Charles H. Clark of Spencer is a large fruit grower; Prof. W. J. Spillman is connected with State Agriculture college at Pullman; Lovett M. Wood is editor of the Trade Register, Seattle; Mr. Baker of Tacoma is state commissioner of horticulture, and C. H. Thompson of Spokane is interested in mining. It is expected that other names will be added to the list. G. W. Thompson of Tacoma, vice president for Washington, is the head of the commission and the Review says the commission has gone to work with a vim to secure a collection of exhibits in every line of industry.

OHIO AND KENTUCKY LINING UP.

Governors Bushnell and Bradley Write Concerning the Situation.

Governor Bushnell of Ohio writes the Department of Publicity and Promotion of the exposition that he is doing all he can to further the interests of the exposition in Ohio. There is now pending in the legislature a resolution providing for the participation of the Buckeye state with those of the western country in the great fair. As soon as the action on this matter has been taken, which will not long be postponed, Governor Bushnell will name a state commission and the work will be promptly pushed. Public interest in the exposition has been greatly stimulated recently and there is good prospect of extensive represented from Ohio.

Governor Bradley of Kentucky says in a letter to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that there is good reason for thinking that the legislature of his state will adopt, at his suggestion, a bill which appropriates $10,000 for making an exhibit at Omaha. The commercial interests of the state have taken a deep interest in the matter since it was properly brought to their attention and want to make a showing that will attract for Kentucky some attention among the western as well as the southern states of the nation. Recently the Louisville Chamber of Commerce adopted an address to the dealers of the state, setting out the benefits that would grow from the state's being properly represented at the exposition. Much pressure is being brought on the legislature through the business men of the state in behalf of the appropriation.

GOVERNMENT BOARD OF CONTROL.

Meeting to Be Held in Washington During the Coming Week.

Captain Ward, U. S. A., who has charge of the War department's exhibit on behalf of the government, has returned to Washington to take part in a conference of the Board of Control, which will be held at Washington during the week. This meeting will very likely result in the immediate shipment to Omaha of a large part of the government's exhibit. It was at first intended to send the articles direct from Nashville to Omaha. Investigation, however, at the close of the Nashville show proved that much of the exhibit made there was not what was wanted for Omaha. The scope of the Transmississippi Exposition is greater than the Board of Control had at first anticipated and the change in plans growing out of the increase in the size of the building and the rearrangement of the apportionment made necessary a revision of plans for the exhibit. The Board of Control now expects to make a much more extensive and comprehensive exhibit of the government's functions than was shown at Nashville. Some days ago Supervising Engineer Farnan received word from Washington requesting him to push the work of construction, as the board wanted to begin to ship exhibits to this city without delay. Farnan replied that shipments could begin at once, for by the time any freight could arrive the building would be in condition to afford excellent storage. Since then great progress has been made on the building and it is now in condition to provide storage for the entire exhibit, and within a little while the erection of exhibits in place will be possible.

Promotion in Canada.

British Vice Consul M. A. Hall left yesterday for Montreal to consult with the Dominion government on exposition matters. Canada has looked up the matter, the commissioner of agriculture for the Dominion having had considerable correspondence with the Department of Publicity in regard to an exhibit. It is Mr. Hall's mission to bring this matter to a head. He will close all arrangements with the Canadian authorities and Our Lady of the Snows will show her charms to the multitude at the exposition next summer.

Indian Bureau Anticipates Congress.

Senator Allen has sent to Manager Rosewater a letter from the commissioner of Indian affairs, asking for a conference with officers of the exposition in regard to the Indian congress. It appears the Indian bureau anticipates the passage by congress of the appropriation providing funds for the congress and desires to have the preliminaries arranged with as little delay as possible. No arrangements have yet been made for the conference, but it will be attended to without delay.

UNION PACIFIC SUBSCRIBES

GIVES $25,000 TO THE EXPOSITION

President Burt Notifies the Managers of His Intention to Aid the Big Show on Behalf of His Road.

The exposition stock subscription list has been increased by the addition of $25,000 which was subscribed by the Union Pacific Railway company. This subscription has been announced by President Burt and brings the total amount subscribed by the railroads entering Omaha to $115,000, the Burlington having contributed $30,000, the Northwestern system $30,000, the Rock Island $20,000 and the Milwaukee road $10,000.

Numerous conferences have been held with President Burt by a committee headed by Manager Lindsay of the Ways and Means department and Manager Rosewater of the Publicity and Promotion department. A great amount of argument was required to convince the new president of the Union Pacific that his road should subscribe a liberal amount. He admitted from the first that something should be done, but was not disposed to make the amount as large as some of the committee thought should be given. He finally reached the sum of $25,000 and this was deemed acceptable by the committee.

The only roads now remaining in the background in the matter of contributing to the exposition treasury are the Missouri Pacific "when the revenue of the road will warrant it," but that point seems not to have been reached. Some intimation has been expected from him for a long time, but nothing has been heard that would indicate that the prospect is any brighter now than when the exposition movement was first started and this pledge was given. The road is expected to subscribe at least $10,000. Whether this Wabash road will contribute anything to the exposition is still an open question. When the estimate was first made of the amount each road should be asked to subscribe, the Wabash was scheduled for $5,000, but since that time the deal with the Kansas City, Pittsburg & Gulf road has complicated matters somewhat in this connection and some readjustment will probably be made.

IOWA'S PARTICIPATION IS CERTAIN.

Legislature Ready to Make the Necessary Appropriation.

Special Agent C. E. Llewellyn of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, has just returned from Des Moines, where he went at the direction of Manager Rosewater to survey the ground and report on the probability of an appropriation for state participation in the exposition. Mr. Llewellyn states that he is convinced that the Iowa legislature will appropriate at least $25,000 in addition to the $10,000 appropriated by the preceding legislature.

"There is no particular opposition to an appropriation for the Iowa Exposition commission," said Mr. Llewellyn, "but nearly all of the people admit the something should be done. The state indebtedness is about $600,000, while the constitutional limit is $250,000. All appropriations for state institutions are being reduced to the lowest limit and the sentiment is in favor of treating the exposition appropriation in the same way. The state commission has asked for $47,400 and the commission says if it cannot get that much it doesn't want any. This rather arbitrary position has caused some little friction, but the matter will probably be adjusted without trouble. I was satisfied when I left Des Moines that the house committee would recommend an appropriation of $30,000 and I see that was done yesterday. I am just as well satisfied that the senate committee will reduce this amount to $25,000, and I believe that is what will be appropriated. I talked with a number of members of the legislature and told them that if anything was to be done it should be done at once, as the space which has been held in reserve for Iowa is in great demand, and they must not expect the exposition to keep it for them and then be left holding the sack. The state commission has been pounding the legislature to take some action in the matter and I believe there will be no further delay."

The delay on the part of Iowa has caused the Department of Exhibits great uneasiness for some time. When the Iowa commissioners were in Omaha soon after their appointment they picked out one of the choicest building sites on the bluff tract and the choicest locations in the main buildings, requesting that these be reserved for Iowa. Merely as a matter of accommodation this was done and no further steps have been taken by the Iowa commission to clinch the reservation. Other states have been clamoring for the site selected for Iowa's building and have insisted that they were ready to take the site and pay for it. Missouri and Arkansas each demanded that they be given this site because Iowa had given no sign that it would erect a building or make an exhibit and they were very wroth when they were refused. Relying upon the partial promise of the Iowa commissioners the spaces in the buildings and on the grounds have been held, but a formal notice was recently sent to the Iowa commissioners that this sort of thing could not be continued indefinitely and decisive action must be taken at once or the spaces would be assigned to other parties.

DION GERALDINE STILL CIRCULATES.

Represents Himself as Executive Officer of the Exposition.

Dion Geraldine, who "resigned" last fall his position as superintendent of the work of construction on the exposition buildings, had been in Kansas City recently. His mission there was to purchase a second-hand "shoot the chutes" outfit, which will be installed somewhere on the grounds during the exposition period. In conversing with reporters at Kansas City Mr. Geraldine admitted that "the Omaha exposition from an architectural standpoint will be one of the greatest exhibits ever given in the United States." According to the paper from which this is taken, "Mr. Geraldine was the superintendent of the World's fair at Chicago and is the executive officer of the Omaha exposition."

The "shoot the chutes" outfit purchased by Mr. Geraldine has hitherto been used at Troost park, Kansas City. It was shipped to Omaha Monday night.

Musical Artist's Offer Services.

The musical director of the exposition is the recipient of many calls from representatives of great musicians who desire to enter into engagements for their principals to appear at the exposition. Prominent among these is A. Liberati, cornet soloist, who desires to make an engagement for himself and his entire band of fifty skilled musicians. The representative of Sousa, the bandmaster who appeals to the common people, is also here endeavoring to close a contract for the organization which is swayed by Sousa's magic baton. Ysaye, the great violinist, and Gerardi, the 'cellist, who are touring together, have a representative on the ground, and the numerous singers of renown have representatives on the ground endeavoring to make arrangements for the appearance of their principals. No engagements have yet been made with any of these people, but definite plans will probably be perfected in the near future.

Exposition's Eastern Interests.

Manager Z. T. Lindsey of the Ways and Means Department and Manager E. Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, have started for New York and other eastern points on exposition business. They will stop in Chicago to call upon a number of officers of corporate interests which are interested in Omaha, but which have not yet manifested the extent of their interest by subscription to exposition stock. The same errand will occupy them in New York, and from there they will go to Philadelphia to make final arrangements for the exposition medals and endeavor to expedite their issue as much as possible. Washington will probably be visited before their return.

MINNESOTA COMMISSION AT WORK.

Organizes and Proceeds to Raise Funds to Make Needed Showing.

The Minnesota Exposition commission is new organized and ready for business. The members met at the office of Governor Clough in Minneapolis last week and discussed the situation thoroughly. The governor urged the members to take prompt steps to have the state represented, notwithstanding the failure of the legislature to make an appropriation. It was suggested that subscribers might be reimbursed by the legislature, as was done in the case of the World's fair exhibit. The consensus of opinion was that at least $25,000 would be required for an exhibit and at least $5,000 for a building, if the commission decided to erect a state building. The latter point was left undecided, although plans were submitted by MacLeod & Lamoreaux of Minneapolis for a building to be constructed entirely of logs.

The commission was organized by the election of the following officers and committees:

 

President, John L. Gibbs, Geneva; vice president, R. A. Kirk, St. Paul; secretary, E. L. Danforth, Minneapolis; treasurer, W. D. Kirk, St. Paul.

Executive committee, the above officers and C. H. Graves, Duluth; A. T. Stebbins, Rochester; E. J. Phelps, Minneapolis.

Press committee, J. M. Anderson, Minneapolis; Conde Hamlin, St. Paul; Elmer Adams, Fergus Falls; Hudson Wilson, Faribault; A. D. Thompson, Duluth.

The following gentlemen were appointed to look after the arrangements and selection of the principal exhibits that will comprise the state's exhibits: Manufactures, E. L. Danforth, Minneapolis; grain and milling, E. J. Phelps, Minneapolis; dairy and stock, John L. Gibbs, Geneva; agriculture, E. W. Randall, St. Anthony Park; lumber and building, J. Newton Nind, Minneapolis; mines and mining interests, J. L. Greatsinger, Duluth.

The second meeting of the commission will be held Thursday of this week, when a plan for raising funds will be adopted. The plan that met with the greatest favor at the first meeting was for the counties to contribute according to some agreed basis, the amount to be returned by the legislature at its next session.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE BUSINESS.

Dr. Day Named to Superintend the Mining Exhibit.

Manager Bruce of the Exhibits department reported to the executive committee yesterday afternoon that he had reached an understanding with Dr. David T. Day regarding the position of superintendent of the Mining building and exhibits, and he recommended that Dr. Day be appointed to that position. The appointment was approved at once and Dr. Day will enter immediately upon his duties. He will make a careful survey of the situation and will devote the balance of this week to formulating a plan of operations. With the exception of a few days, he will devote all of his time until the month of July in carrying out such plans for the mining exhibits as may be decided on.

The executive committee decided that the building which is to be constructed as an overflow for the Manufactures building shall be called the International building. It will be occupied by the foreign exhibitors.

Manager Kirkendall was authorized to grant the Illinois commission additional space for the Art annex which will be erected near the Illinois building. In this building will be exhibited a number of valuable works of art, among them four large paintings of the World's fair which have seen on exhibition in Chicago for some time.

Manager Kirkendall was also authorized to grant space to a number of citizens of Canton, O., who desire to erect on the grounds a fac simile of the McKinley cottage in Canton, which was the Mecca of so many citizens of the United States during the last presidential campaign. The house will be filled with a large number of exhibits of campaign mementoes.

President Wattles was authorized to arrange plans for the celebration in connection with the opening of the exposition.

NORTH DAKOTA'S TWO BEAUTIES.

Land of Wheat Contributes to the Composite Photograph.

North Dakota's contributions to the composite picture which is to show the condensed essence of the beauty of the women of the transmississippi region, has been received by Manager Lindsey. The two women chosen by Vice President Lounsberry of Fargo are Mrs. Fred B. Fancher of Bismarck and Mrs. E. M. Darrow of Fargo. Their photographs meet the requirements of the competition and have been forwarded by Manager Lindsey to New oYrk​, where Photographer Rockwood, the inventor of the composite photograph, will include them in the picture which is to form the model for the woman's head which will appear on one side of the exposition medal.

In addition to these pictures, Vice President Lounsberry sent to Manager Lindsey the photographs of the women not chosen who had consented to having their pictures appear in Munseys Magazine as types of western beauty. The Department of Publicity and Promotion has already received a large number of pictures which had been thrown out by the several vice presidents, and these will all be turned over to the publishers of Munsey's Magazine for publication. The conditions surrounding this contest was so short, that comparatively few eligible women could comply with them. The pictures were required to show a full profile of head and shoulders, showing the left side of the face, and evening dress was absolutely necessary. As a photograph complying with these specifications is a decided rarity, and as expert photographers do not exist on every corner in most western towns, it was a very difficult matter to secure photographs coming within the requirements. A large number were sent to the vice presidents, however, with the idea, perhaps, that they "might do," and as a result the vice presiednts​ have in their possession a large number of photographs of very handsome women. Acting under the request of the Publicity department the vice presidents have endeavored to secure the consent of the subjects of these pictures to have them appear in Munsey's and the department is receiving a number of them.

The contribution of North Dakota consists of thirteen pictures, all of them being portraits of women of exceptional beauty, but they do not comply entirely with the provisions of the management and could not be used in making a composite picture.

Exposition Chorus Rehearsal.

The third rehearsal of the Exposition chorus was held at Hayden's music hall last night. The membership was still further increased by the addition of a number of well known singers and Choral Director Kelly announced that he would accept no more soprano voices, as there were as many sopranos enrolled as were necessary.

He said a few more members would be accepted in the other branches and the lists would then be closed.

The meetings of the chorus will hereafter be held on Tuesday nights in the large room at the southwest corner of the top floor of the city hall. The use of this room was granted the chorus last night by the Board of Education and the rehearsals will be held there Tuesday night of each week until further notice.

The entire evening was spend in drilling the various parts on the beautiful Easter hymn from "Cavalleria Rusticana." There were about 150 voices in the chorus. Good progress was made on this rather difficult selection, and the result was encouraging to the conductor.

Cards were issued to all members of the chorus whose voices had been tested and they were instructed to pay their fee of $5 to Secretary Wakefield at Exposition headquarters.

South Dakota Still at Work.

The South Dakota Exposition commission is now making a canvass of the several counties in the state, asking each county to contribute to the state fund 20 cents for each vote cast at the last general election. They estimate that about $16,000 will be raised if this plan is carried out. The plan of the commission provides that this sum shall be used for making a display of the resources of the counties east of the Missouri, the Black Hills counties having already made provision for an exhibit of their own. It is also the intention of the commission to have a local organization in each county seat and raise a fund of $100 in each place to be offered to the farmers for the best collections of grain and other products, in order to collect a fine lot of material for exhibits.

Model Forestry Plantation.

B. E. Fernow, chief of the division of forestry of the Agricultural department, has applied to the Department of Exhibits for a space 138x172 feet in the irrigation field in which his division will maintain a model forestry plantation.

Illuminating Government Building.

The government building on the exposition grounds will present a beautiful scene at night. The plan of Consulting Engineer Luther M. Stieringer to outline the structure with electric lights and to bring out its prominent features in the same manner has been adopted. About 1,000 electric lights will be used in this plan of ornamentation. The effect is expected to be one of the most striking to be witnessed on the grounds.

Following the adoption of this plan, J. J. Farnan, the engineer of the building, is inviting bods from local electrical companies for the work. The bids will be opened and the contract awarded as speedily as possible. The contract will be one of considerable size.

Prof. Knapp's Visit.

Prof. Warren E. Knapp, superintendent of public schools of Arapahoe county, Colorado, is in the city from Denver. He is returning from the recent educational meeting at Chattanooga Tenn., and has stopped off in Omaha to confer with the local school authorities regarding the assemblage of school teachers in the transmississippi country here during the exposition.

Cold Storage Exhibit.

The Ideal Refrigerating and Machine company of Chicago has applied for space in the Horticulture building in which to erect a room equipped with their refrigerating apparatus, where they propose to store fruits which are to be used for exhibit purposes in the building.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Cosmopolitan Publishing company has notified the Department of Publicity that an article relating to the exposition, which has been contributed by General C. F. Manderson, will appear at an early date in the Cosmopolitan Magazine.

J. B. Sawhill, a well known civil engineer of Omaha, has been engaged by the exposition management to make an official map of the grounds. He has commenced this work and will devote his entire time to making the map, which has been in great demand, but which could not be turned out by the regular force, on account of the great press of work.

The Missouri Pacific Railway company will erect a building on the north tract near the Transportation and Agricultureal​ Implement building, in which it will display the resources of the sections of country through which its lines pass. The building will be a most attractive structure and will cost about $5,000. General Agent Phillippi is looking after the matter, and he promises a fine exhibit of the productive regions traversed by the Missouri Pacific.

CAMPBELL GETS THE PLACE

CHOSEN SUCCESSOR TO DR. DEARING

Populists Too Many for the Democrats When the Time Comes to Vote on the Place So Many Wanted.

The election of an assistant secretary of the Nebraska Exposition commission to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of W. H. Dearing after his appointment as assistant physician at the Hospital for the Insane at Norfolk, developed one of the neatest little skirmishes on the outskirts of the approaching state campaign that has been seen in these parts for some time. J. N. Campbell of Fullerton, a populist, was elected to succeed Dearing, and there is a great deal of dissatisfaction in the ranks of the popocrats over the outcome of the scrimmage. The most active candidates for the position to be filled were J. N. Campbell, J. G. P. Hildebrand of Lancaster county and B. S. Littlefield of Otoe county. Campbell and Littlefield are populists and Hildebrand is a democrat. The latter's application was endorsed by the entire democratic machine of the state, including the officers of the state committee, Nebraska members of the national committee, and numerous other prominent in the councils of the party in this state.

As soon as it became known that W. H. Dearing had been appointed assistant secretary of the Norfolk Asylum for the Insane applications began to pour into the office of the commission, and there were at least a dozen candidates of different degrees of efficiency. Certain of the members of the commission, however, saw the opportunity to kill several birds with one stone and a nice little job was fixed up which worked like a charm.

The parties to this scheme were Judge Neville, chariman​ of the commission, Commissioner Poynter and Secretary of State Porter.

Julge​ Neville has been conceded to be a candidate for the gubernatorial nomination at the hands of the populists. His friends argue that he is entitled to it because he was elected a contingent judge of the supreme court but was not allowed to take his seat because the constitutional amendment increasing the number of members of the court was not adopted.

AND POYNTER, TOO.

Commissioner Poynter is anxious to secure the nomination for congress from the Third district to succeed Judge Maxwell, the word having been passed around among the populists that Maxwell is not to be nominated. One stumbling block in Poynter's way was said to be in the fact that J. N. Campbell, a member of the upper house of the last legislature, is also an active candidate for congressional honors. In addition to his congressional aspirations Campbell is credited with having considerable of a pull in his own district and in other sections of the state as well, and to be a rather formidable antagonist.

Secretary Poynter is known to be anxious to sacrifice his private interests in order to serve his country another term, and these three formed a combination to secure Campbell's influence and get him out of Poynter's way by making him assistant secretary.

Governor Holcomb also took a hand in the matter, but there appears to be considerable uncertainty as to just what the governor wanted in this connection. Judge Neville said the governor had asked that the commission do nothing in the matter of electing a successor to Dearing until he could consult with the members of the commission. The governor was in the city last night, but did not appear about the Millard hotel, where the meeting of the commission was held, and he authorized a denial of the statement that he had asked the commission to delay action. Secretary Porter was said to be armed with a letter from the governor, however, to the effect that he endorsed Campbell and he showed this letter to members of the commission after the meeting had adjourned.

BROUGHT OUT A CROWD.

The fact that a successor to Dearing would be selected at this meeting of the commission and that the "committee on pie," appointed at the last meeting to distribute the offices among the members of the commission, would report, accounted for the presence in the lobby last night of a number of popocrats who have been hoping some crumbs of comfort in the shape of jobs would fall to their share. Some of the lucky ones who have been holding office since the last election were also there to assist the commissioners in finding men to fill the available positions. Among the latter were Frank Hibbard, state oil inspector; W. C. Bullard, Omaha police commissioner; J. H. Dawes, superintendent of the Institute for the Deaf, and D. Clem Deaver, steward at the same institution.

The commission remained in session until 10 o'clock, considering various matters of business, and adjourned without [?] the desires of the anxious on[?]

 

After adjournment the members of the commission remained about the office until midnight, each member being buttonholed by a supporter of one of the candidates or by the candidates themselves. Campbell, Littlefield and Hildebrand were there and Secretary of State Porter took an active interest in the vigorous "log rolling" which was in progress.

BALLOTING BEGINS PROMPTLY.

The commission convened again at 9 o'clock this morning and about the first matter taken up was the acceptance of Dearing's resignation and the election of his successor. An informal written ballot was first taken, resulting like this: F. E. Diefendorf of Butler county, 1; J. N. Campbell, 2; B. S. Littlefield, 1; J. G. P. Hildebrand, 2. Diefendorf was Caspers man and hiswas​ the one vote cast for him. Neville and Poynter voted for Campbell, Dutton voted for Littlefield and Boydston and Whitford voted for Hildebrand. The second ballot resulted: Diefendorf, 1; Campbell, 3; Littlefield, 1; Hildebrand, 1. A third ballot was ordered and this gave Campbell a majority, the vote being like this: Campbell, 4; Littlefield, 2. Whitford and Boydston voted for Littlefield and the other members voted for Campbell.

This removed a large element of interest from the proceedings of the commission and when the "pie committee" announced that it had not come to any conclusion on the allotment of the spoils and would not make any reports until the next meeting the lobby quickly vanished and the members were left alone in their glory.

In addition to the interest created in the proceedings of the commission by the knowledge that there would be a more or less generous distribution of spoils and chances for jobs the meeting of the board was made more interesting by the fact that all superintendents of departments were ordered to submit reports showing the expense of their departments, both up to date and in prospect. In accordance with these instructions the superintendents were at the meeting in force and their reports were sandwiched in between the other proceedings of the commission.

SOME OF THE ROUTINE WORK.

Superintendent E. D. Johnson of the Agricultural department reported that $8,247.69 would cover the entire cost of his department. He made a number of recommendations to the board which were adopted. These provide that all counties wishing space in the Nebraska agricultural exhibit must file applications with Superintendent Johnson on or before April 1, and must commence work installing their exhibits on or before May 1. Assistant Superintendent C. E. Drake was ordered to commence work in this department April 1, and Secretary Johnson was directed to commence preparing at once for the exhibit.

Superintendent W. R. Jackson of the Educational department showed that there had been expended for his department to date. $5,809.40 and the estimate of the amount still required to make the exhibit and care for it

STOCK BREEDERS' REQUEST.

C. H. Elmendorf, Thurlington; W. G. Whitmore, Valley; C. H. Searl, Edgar, and W. H. Chappel, Normal, constituted a committee representing the Nebraska Improved Live Stock Breeders' association and the Nebraska Swine Breeders' association. They asked sufficient money to exhibit improved stock at the exposition in competition with the fancy stock from other states. Mr. Elmendorf as spokesman urged the large extent of the fine stock industry in this state as good and sufficient reason why the commission should assist the breeders. The matter was, however, laid over.

Superintendent Dawes of the Institute for the Deaf asked for an allowance of $100 for buying material for making show cases in which to place the exhibit of the institution, the cases to be made by the boys in the manual training department. This was allowed.

Miss Mellona Butterfield, superintendent of the Art department, made a verbal repart​ regarding the decoration of the Nebraska building, including the tinting of the walls, carpeting the floors of the rooms, etc., her estimate of the probable expense being $3,900. As the committee to determine the uses to which the rooms are to be devoted had not reported, Miss Butterfield said she could not make an exact report and the matter was laid over until after this committee shall have reported.

At this point the board decided to go into executive session and the room was cleared of everybody except members of the commission.

In executive session the report of the superintendent of live stock was received and filed for future reference. It was decided to lay off all the carpenters, including the superintendent of construction, and Mr. Whitford was appointed a committee of one to supervise the completion of the Nebraska building. In view of the fact that a carpenter will be needed for the construction of wall space in the building, repairs, etc., the commission decided to unite this position with that of timekeeper at the timekeeper's salary. Bookkeeper Althen's salary was raised from $65 to $75.

ABOUT READY FOR STAFF WORKERS

Good Progress Being Made on the Horticulture Building.

Alexander & Son, the staff contractors for the Horticulture building, have constructed a shop inside of the building and have a staff of men at work making the models and patterns for the staff for this building. This building is well advanced and the woodwork is practically completed to the cornice line, a large force of carpenters being engaged on the dome, which will be finished within a very short time. The staff work will be pushed and the contractors expect to complete the entire building within thirty days.

The same firm also has the staff contract for the two big restaurant buildings which will flank the east end of the main viaduct. The have made preparations to commence at once the erection of a temporary shop under the viaduct and will commence turning out the staff for these buildings. The carpenter contract on the restaurants has his piles on the grounds and will commence work at once. The staff men will follow the carpenters closely and the buildings will be completed in a very short time.

A large force of workmen is engaged on the construction of the huge grotto in the northwest corner of the Government building, in which will be displayed the elaborate exhibit to be made by the fish commission. The grotto will be finished in imitation of a tunnel through great rocks and will be lighted by incandescent lamps. The entrance will be very elaborate, being of staff imitating intricate figures carved out of the rocks.

Engineer Farnan says that arrangements have been made to construct a tramway from the north door of the Government building to the railway tracks on the north side of the grounds.

Good Word from Georgia.

ATLANTA, Ga., March 9.—At a meeting of the Omaha exposition commission and the citizens of Atlanta in the Chamber of Commerce it was decided to have an exhibit at the Omaha exposition consisting of a display of the resources of Georgia. Ex-Governor Northen was instructed to telegraph to the president of the Omaha exposition to reserve space for the Georgia building.

TWO CONCESSIONS ARE AWARDED.

Reinhart Gets the Photograph and Graham the Gondola.

The executive committee passed upon a matter at its meeting yesterday afternoon which will interest the hundreds of amateur photographers in Omaha and vicinity who have been visiting the exposition grounds and taking pictures of everything in sight. The committee authorized Manager Reed to make a contract with F. A. Reinhart, an Omaha photographer, for the exclusive privilege of taking pictures on the exposition grounds with anything but a kodak. This will be sad news to the many amateurs who have been amusing themselves and entertaining their friends with views of the grounds showing the progress made on the buildings and taking snap shots at interesting groups and incidents. All this will be prevented in the future and nothing will be allowed but kodaks. For this exclusive privilege Mr. Reinhart will pay to the exposition $1,000 and 20 per cent of the gross receipts.

The gondola concession was awarded to U. G. Graham for 20 per cent of the gross receipts. Graham is associated with W. S. Jardine.

Manager Kirkendall reported that he had been offered reels for hose to be used inside the buildings in connection with the stand-pipes if he would pay the transportation expense from Independence, Mo. The offer was accepted.

Manager Rosewater was authorized to purchase 5,000 frames for the bird's-eye views of the grounds. He was also authorized to make a contract for 200,000 copies of The Weekly Bee of the first week in May for $3,200, the paper ton contain a four-page supplement of exposition matter and a full-page bird's-eye view of the grounds this price to include mailing and postage.

Manager Bruce was authorized to act as chairman of the executive committee and manager of the Ways and Means department during the absence of Manager Lindsey in the east.

EXHIBITS IN LINE OF ELECTRICITY.

Prof. Owens Reports on the Work of His Department.

Prof. R. B. Owens, superintendent of the Machinery and Electricity building and commissioner in charge of electrical exhibits, has notified the Department of Exhibits that the General Electric company wants 500 feet of space in addition to the 1,000 feet already reserved for this company and also offers to make an educational exhibit if allowed 300 feet of space in addition. Prof. Owens writes that he has assigned Elihu Thompson 200 feet, Charles F. Brush 300 feet and Charles P. Stemmetz 200 feet, all for electrical exhibits of a high order of interest. The American Vehicle company wishes space in the building for an exhibit of batteries, and B. J. Arnold, a consulting electrical engineer, wishes to exhibit drawings, etc. Prof. Owens also names a number of prominent electrical firms which wish to exhibit electrical devices of various kinds, including electrical vehicles of several designs. He also says that S. F. B. Morse, grandson of the inventor of the telegraph, has consented to exhibit the manuscript, apparatus, etc., belonging to his celebrated grandfather.

The professor announces that the Western Society of Engineers will meet in Omaha in September, also the Association of Edison companies.

Wants to Revive the Press Club

Major Clarkson, assistant to the president, is strongly in favor of reviving the Omaha Press club and establishing a press headquarters where representatives of the newspapers of the country may feel at home and meet their colleagues. He declares that something of this kind is an absolute necessity in view of the large number of newspaper representatives who will be in Omaha during the exposition and he is contemplating steps to bring about the desired result.

Notes of the Exposition.

The business men of the Twin Cities—Minneapolis and St. Paul—are showing great interest in exposition affairs.

The Georgia Exposition commission has filed a formal application for 3,000 square feet of ground space on which to erect a state building.

T. Mizutany of Chicago, representing the Japanese Central Tea association, is in the city negotiating with the exposition authorities for a concession for a Japanese tea garden and a Japanese exhibit.

A generous attendance of Minnesota visitors is now assured. The press and people of the state are rapidly awakening to the importance and magnitude of the approaching great exposition.

The proposed Minnesota building will show a structure with peaks and gables, wide verandas, built of logs, lumber, cut and rough stone, rubble work of stone and iron ore, brick and other products of the state.

The Estey Organ company applied by telegraph for 1,630 square feet of space for an exhibit of pianos and orgains​. The application was accepted in the same expeditious manner eand​ a fine exhibit is in prospect by this firm.

Hon. John L. Gibbs, president of the Minnesota commission, is one of the good old war horses of the state, in whose hands work and imposed duties never lag. The secretary of the commission, E. L. Danforth, is an active and capable young man, who will make a record in the field before him.

The secretary of the Minnesota commission reports many applications and inquiries for space and concessions. As the North Star state is a community and rich in natural resources and peopled by an enterprising populace, much may be expected from that section.

The prospect for a New York state building seems to be very encouraging. There is a balance of about $5,000 in the appropriation made by the legislature for state participation in the Nashville exposition, and Special Commissioner Wheeler is commencing operations to make this money available for the erection of a building.

The Self-Lifting Elevator company of Lima, O., has applied for space for installing one of its machines. Superintendent Hardt is considering the advisability of having two or three of these machines installed in each of the main buildings for the use of people who do not wish to walk up and down the steps leading to the gallaries​.

"Pigs-in-Clover" has been revived in behalf of the exposition. In its new form the game has sixteen different colored balls. The object is to separate the balls, getting eight of two colors on each side of the lagoon across the central bridge, and then putting four of each color in the proper compartments in the corners. It is neatly gotten up and will serve to distract the attention of any one who tackles it.

TIME LIMIT TO ENTER EXHIBITS

SPACE IN BUILDINGS ABOUT ALL TAKEN

Indications Favorable for the Exposition Being Opened Promptly on Time—Superintendents in Charge of Buildings.

"May 25 the gates of the exposition will be closed against the reception of exhibits and any exhibitor not having his material on the grounds at that time will be shut out. The time between that date and June 1 will be utilized in making ready for the opening of the gates and the Transmississippi and International Exposition will be opened on time and every exhibit will be in readiness for the inspection of visitors." Thus spoke H. B. Hardt, superintendent of the Exhibits department of the exposition, and he showed a pile of printed notices to this effect which are being sent to all exhibitors as an incentive for them to govern themselves accordingly.

"It may work a hardship on some exhibitors to be compelled to comply with this rule," continued Mr. Hardt, "but it cannot be avoided if the exposition is to be opened on time."

"It has been announced that this exposition will be opened on June 1 and Manager Bruce has issued positive instructions that all exhibits must be in place at that time. Nothing will be left undone to bring about this result and it can be announced with certainty that   there will be no delay so far as the Exhibits department is concerned. There will probably be a few exhibitors who will be unavoidably delayed for some good reasons and these will be admitted to the grounds after June 10, but between May 25 and June 10 no exhibits will be received. There will be some exhibits which cannot be made ready as early as the opening day, especially in horticulture and agriculture, and these will be received after June 10, but at the time of the opening there will be no confusion, such as is seen at nearly all expositions, caused by exhibitors and their assistants rushing about getting their exhibits installed. There will be no packing cases scattered about in the aisles and no noise of preparation. Western push and enterprise will show to the world that it is possible to open a great exposition promptly on time with everything ready."

WILL START THEM EARLY.

May 1 the floor in each exhibit building will be marked to show the space assigned to each exhibitor, and on that date every exhibitor will be required to commence getting his exhibitor in shape. Each building will be placed in charge of the superintendent of the department in which the building belongs and this superintendent will be required to see that the rules of the department are complied with. The office of Manager Bruce will be removed to the grounds on that date and will be established in the Manufactures building, and all operations of installation will be directed from that point.

The Manufactures building will be under the direction of Superintendent Hardt, who will look after the installation of exhibits will look after the installation of exhibits in that building. Superintendent F. W. Taylor will be in charge of the Agriculture and Horticulture buildings, Secretary Ford of the Woman's Board of Managers will have charge of the Liberal Arts building, Dr. David T. Day, the mining commissioner, will be in charge of the Mines building; Art Director A. H. Griffiths will have charge of the Art building. Prof. R. B. Owens will be in charge of the Electricity and Machinery building, Superintendent D. H. Elliott will take charge of the installation of exhibits in the Transportation and Agricultural Implement building. J. B. Dinsmore will have charge of the Dairy building and E. Whitcomb will be in charge of the Apiary building. All will be under the general direction of Manager Bruce, who will take up his headquarters on the ground and will devote nearly all of his time to this work.

SPACE IS ALL ALLOTTED.

The allotment of space in the several exhibit buildings is virtually completed. Every building is entirely filled and additional room can only be made by reducing the amount allotted to exhibitors already assigned. There are very few cases in which this can be done, as nearly all of the exhibitors make their preparations to fill a certain space and cannot change their designs without great expense and loss of time. For this reason the department is encouraging the erection of buildings by certain desirable classes of exhibitors and the indications are that there will be no spot of ground left unoccupied when the gates are opened.

INDIAN BILL IN THE HOUSE

MOVE TO NONCONCUR IS AGREED TO

Bill Now Goes to a Conference Committee, Where Friends of the Indian Congress Hope to Win Out.

WASHINGTON, March 9.—(Special Telegram.)—When the house convened this morning great interest was manifested among the members as to the fate of the free homes amendment, which would in all probability be reported by Chairman Sherman of the committee on Indian affairs. Shortly after convening, Sherman reported the bill to the house with information upon senate amendment and moved nonconcurrence. This was agreed to with the exception of four paragraphs of the free homes amendment, gilsonite lands in Utah and two minor amendments upon which direct votes were desired. Among the amendments nonconcurred in was that in the Indian congress paragraph carrying $45,000 for an exhibit at Omaha. This action was most desired by the Nebraska delegation, although for a time it looked as if the senate amendments might be voted upon seriatim. The rest of the day was consumed in the discussion of the free homese​ and Uncompahgre reservation affairs. A vote, in all probability, will be reached tomorrow.

The Indian congress feature of the Indian bill is now in good shape and will be taken care of by the conferees when the bill is sent to conference.

CAMERA FIENDS IN DOUBT

COMPETITION OF PROFESSIONALS IS ENDED

Letting of the Photographic Concession to Reinhart Clears Up the Mystery Considerably but Leaves Amateurs Uncertain.

The awarding of the contract for the exclusive privilege of taking photographs of the exposition grounds and buildings to F. A. Reinhart of this city has settled one phase of the photograph question, but that portion of the matter which is of peculiar interest to the amateur "fiends" is still undetermined. So far as the amateurs are concerned, they will be allowed to use hand cameras 4x5 inches, or less, on the grounds on conditions to be hereafter determined, but they will not be allowed to use a tripod under any circumstances.

It has been conceded from the beginning of active work on the exposition that the exclusive privilege of taking photographs of the grounds and buildings would be awarded to some professional photographer and the competition for this privilege has been animated. Fully a dozen photographers have been negotiating for the concession and a great deal of time has been devoted by the Concessions department to making such terms as would do away with many features which the experience of other expositions had proved to be objectionable. Manager Reed has given his personal attention to the matter and believes that arrangements have now been made which will be entirely satisfactory to all concerned.

Definite specifications were drawn for this privilege and every photographer desirous of making a bid for the concession was furnished with a copy of these. The contract with Official Photographer Reinhart will be drawn in accordance with these specifications.

The official photographer is given the exclusive right to make all kinds of photographs on the grounds except tin-types, which may be made on the Midway with the understanding that none of the Midway concessionaires are to be allowed to take photographs, and further excepting the privilege of allowing visitors to use hand cameras, with 4x5 films of plates or smaller sizes, the latter privilege to be under the control of the exposition management, with the understanding that tripods will not be allowed to be used with said hand cameras.

RIGHTS OF THE CONTRACTOR.

The official photographer is given the exclusive right to sell all kinds of photographs within the exposition grounds except those of people or of typical scenes of foreign countries. He is also given the exclusive right to make and sell photographic views, leaflets and booklets of the grounds, buildings and points of interest within the grounds. In this connection, the official photographer is required to publish and have for sale on the grounds, not later than July 1, the views, leaflets, booklets, etc., here referred to. He is also required to publish and keep on sale on the grounds, views of points of interest in and about the city of Omaha.

An exception to the rule excluding all photographic machines is made in the case of representative newspapers and periodicals which may desire to send representatives to the grounds for the purpose of taking photographs of scenes of the grounds, exhibits, etc., for reproduction in their respective publications, this feature of the work being placed under the control of the Department of Publicity and Promotion.

The official photographer is also given the exclusive right to take the photographs which will be required on the tickets of admission of officers, employes, exhibitors, concessionaires and their employes, as well as purchasers of season or commutation tickets, the price of each of these photographs to be 25 cents. It is provided, however, in this connection, that the officials and employes of the United States government and proprietors and reporters of newspapers shall be photographed free of cost.

AMATEUR STANDING NOT SETTLED.

The regulations regarding which the amateur photographers are most concerned have not yet been perfected, and until some definite plan is agreed on no cameras of any description, excepting those of the official photographer, will be allowed on the grounds. Ever since the gates have been closed to visitors not in possession of an admission ticket or a pass the Concessions department has been in control of the admission of cameras of every description. A few permits were issued to persons who applied for them, but since March 1 no permits have been issued to any person and the rule against the admission of cameras to the main court is being rigidly enforced. No more permits will be issued for this purpose.

Manager Reed is now considering the best means of regulating the use of hand cameras and until some definite course of action is agreed on they will not be admitted to the grounds. He is still undecided whether to offer for sale the exclusive privilege for hand cameras, allowing the concessionaire who secures this privilege to regulate the admission of these instruments, or whether it is more desirable to [?] fee for each instrument. The latter course was adopted at the World's fair and at Atlanta and Nashville. When the course to be pursued in connection with hand cameras is decided it will then be made known whether any of these instruments are to be admitted to the grounds before the gates are opened.

GERMAN VILLAGE PLANS DRAWN.

Beindorff & Whipple Nearly Complete Their Arrangements.

The plans for the German village on the Midway are progressing and building operations will be commenced in the very near future. This concession was let some time ago to C. F. Beindorff and J. C. Whipple, both of Omaha, and Mr. Beindorff has about completed the plans for the structures which will constitute the "village".

The German village will be located on the bluff tract near the grand plaza and will be quite an elaborate affair. The famous Heidelberg castle will be reproduced and one of the prominent features will be a restaurant after the fashion of the Bratwurst Glocklein resorts which are to be seen in many parts of Germany. In this place will be a restaurant, where the bratwurst so popular with Germans will be served, together with other delicatessen so dear to the heart of those who spent their early days in the Vaterland. There will be a Vienna cafe, a concert garden, a pavilion where there will be vaudeville performances and bazaars for the sale of articles imported from the old country. Carvers of wood, meerschaum and other wares will be imported for this village, including wood carvers from the Hartz mountains, Bohemian glass blowers, etc. There will be athletic games, bowling alleys and all the other methods so dear to the Germans. Negotiations are pending with a female band of Berlin, an organization of fifty-five pieces, for a series of concerts.

Waiting on the Legislature.

Secretary Chase of the Iowa Exposition commission writes to the Department of Exhibits that the commission cannot take any further action regarding closing up its application for space until the legislature takes definite action in the matter of an appropriation. This letter was in reply to one sent a few days ago by Manager Bruce calling the attention of the Iowa commission to the palpable fact that the space asked for by that body could not be held indefinitely in the fact of the demands of other parties for space.

Educational Executive Committee.

The executive committee of the Transmississippi Exposition convention met yesterday afternoon at Superintendent Pearse's office with all members except State Superintendent Jackson present. The different committees reported progress and outlined work in hand. It was agreed to send in without delay a formal application for special railroad rates. The question of badges, hotel accommodations, headquarters and advertising were considered. The committee on program reported the following additional names of parties who had agreed to take charge of section work: Rural schools, State Superintendent J. R. Kirk of Missouri; manual training, Gilbert B. Morrison of Kansas City; kindergarten, Mrs. O. S. Chittenden of Omaha. Advisory committee on program is not quite completed.

Finishing Nebraska's Building.

All the carpenters and other employes about the Nebraska building, except the workmen employed by the staff contractors, have been laid off in accordance with the terms of the resolution adopted by the Nebraska commission. The pay roll of these men was made out immediately after the board adjourned and arrangements were made to pay the men off at once. Commissioner Whitford, who was appointed to take full charge of the building, has arrived in the city and at once hired a small force of men to complete the small amount of work required to finish the building. The plasterers are "pointing up" their work and there is a small amount of odds and ends to be cleaned up before the building is entirely completed. E. W. Crane, who has been employed for some time as timekeeper on the building, has been retained as custodian and will have charge of the structure until it is occupied as headquarters.

Executive Committee Meeting.

The executive committee awarded the sausage sandwich concession at its meeting yesterday afternoon, Fred T. Cummins being the lucky bidder for this privilege.

R. C. Strehlow was awarded the contract for calsomining and painting the Mines building, the price being $825.

The following bids for constructing the park colonnades between the Mines and Liberal Arts building, and between the last named and the Art Building were laid before the committee by Manager Kirkendall: Carpentry—R. C. Strehlow, $3,300; William Goldie & Sons, $3,470; Thomas Herd, $3,970; Westlake Construction company, $4,122. Staff work—Smith & Eastman, $1,977; O. S. Sarsi & Co., $5,700. The work was awarded to Strehlow and Smith & Eastman.

Accommodations for Military.

A plan is now under consideration by President Wattles and Major Clarkson to furnish some kind of accommodations for the numerous bodies of troops of the militia of the several states which have signified their desire to come to Omaha during the exposition. Investigations are being made   to determine whether suitable ground for a military camp can be secured in some convenient location and estimates are being prepared of the probable expense of such a movement. No definite plans have been outlined as yet, but it is probable that some arrangements will be made to accommodate the visiting military in a suitable manner.

Secretary Campbell at Work.

J. N. Campbell, assistant secretary of the Nebraska Exposition commission, has taken charge of the office of the commission in the Millard hotel and is rapidly "learning the ropes" in connection with his new duties. Personally he is a most affable gentleman and has a wide acquaintance in the state, his service in the legislature and active participation in political campaigns having brought him in contact with people from all sections of Nebraska. He is a farmer and stock raiser by occupation and owns an extensive farm near Fullerton.

Store Room for County Exhibits.

The county commissioners have leased the the vacant store room at 1309 North Twenty-fourth street, where they will store a quantity of exhibits that will be shown at the exposition.

The old soldiers have asked the commissioners for a portion of the proceeds of the money realized from the sale of the exposition bounds. They state that they want to use the money in collecting for exhibition war relics and also for entertaining visiting members of outside Grand Army posts. No action has yet been taken upon the request.

Off for New Mexico.

Special Commissioner Llewellyn will leave at once for New Mexico and Arizona in the interest of the exposition to stir up the lagging interest in that section. The New Mexico cimmission

PLANNNING FOR INDIAN CONGRESS.

Secretary Bliss and Commissioner Jones Are Hard at Work.

WASHINGTON, March 10.—(Special Telegram.)—In anticipation of the passage of the Indian bill containing an appropriation of $45,000 for the Indian congress at Omaha during the life of the exposition Secretary Bliss of the Interior department has requested Commissioner Jones to cast about for material to fitly represent the government and at the same time open correspondence with local officers as to what is needed at Omaha to make this congress, which will be the first in the history of the country, a credit to the government of the United States and an absolute reflection of what has been done for the Indian.

Commissioner Jones, appreciating that the credit of this congress is largely due to Mr. Rosewater, has requested his presence in Washington with a view of outlining his ideas in relation to the congress. Both the secretary of the interior and the commissioner of Indian affairs are proceeding upon the theory that the conference on the Indian bill will vote for the retention of the senate amendment, and this is confirmed today by both Senator Allen and Representative Mercer, who say that the conferees have practically made all arrangements to keep the amendment in the bill. Interest in the congress is growing and there are many predictions heard that is will be a distinctive and novel feature of the exposition. Secretary Bliss and Commissioner Jones will do all in their power to make the congress, in an ethnological sense, the crowning feature of this administration.

Senator Allen had called up and passed through the senate today the house bill to extend the time which the Rock Island railroad has to complete its line through Indian Territory.

STATE BUILDING IN SIGHT

BLUFF TRACT SITES ARE GOING FAST

Beautiful Buildings Erected by Commonwealths, Cities, Counties and Private Firms Will Line a Long Avenue.

One of the most important features of the exposition will be the buildings which will be erected by the states, counties or cities as headquarters for the people from the localities represented. These buildings will be located on the lower end of the large portion of the exposition grounds known as the bluff tract, a most sightly location overlooking the broad valley of the Missouri for miles up and down the river. The part of this tract set apart for buildings to be erected by outside parties is about half a mile in length and about 800 feet in width. It is laid out with numerous walks and will be beautifully parked, large trees affording an abundance of shade, and plans being already made for innumerable beds of all kinds of rare and beautiful flowers.

There are many very desirable locations on this tract for state and other buildings, but these are being rapidly reserved and this large tract will certainly be liberally dotted with handsome buildings in different designs, all harmonizing fully with the general plan and making this beautiful park one of the most desirable resorts on the entire grounds.

Eight states have taken positive steps in the erection of buildings designed to be used as headquarters for the people from those sections who visit the exposition, and several others are going through the preliminaries necessary to bring about this result. The states which will unquestionably have buildings are these: Nebraska, Illinois, Montana, Georgia, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Missouri and Arkansas. Iowa will erect a building if the legislature makes an appropriation sufficient for the purpose, a most desirable location being held for this state despite the clamors of other states which want this site. Pottawattamie county, Iowa, will have a huge wigwam and Denver will have a handsome city building, the only city building on the grounds, so far as definitely decided. Philadelphia is still considering the idea of erecting a fac-simile of old Independence hall, and this may be done. The prospect seems to be good for the erection of state buildings by New York, Massachusetts, Florida and Canada.

In addition to these buildings there will be several erected by business houses for the display of their wares. Those which have taken definite action in the matter and commenced operations for the erection of their buildings are Montgomery Ward & Co. of Chicago, the Ohio Syrup company of Cleveland and Liggett & Meyers Tobacco company of St. Louis. A number of other firms are negotiating for space and the number of sites still available for building purposes is rapidly diminishing.

TURNSTILES FOR THE GROUNDS.

New System Adopted by the Exposition Bureau of Admissions.

A complete system of turnstiles is being put in some of the gates leading into the main court at the exposition grounds and a complete record will be made of every person who pays for admission to the grounds. These turnstiles will be put at one gate of Sherman avenue and at the Twenty-fourth street entrance. The Sherman avenue gate will be at the middle of the east side of the Auditorium building, where all of the visitors to the grounds usually alight. It will be a few yards north of the large gate where teams have been admitted. The latter gate will be used for all persons having passes to the grounds, and they will not be allowed to enter at the turnstile. Two gates will be constructed at the Twenty-fourth street entrance, one with a turnstile and the other without that adjunct. The latter will be used exclusively for persons with passes.

W. P. Byrne, for several years connected with the local play houses, has been placed in charge of the pay gates at the grounds under the direction of the Bureau of Admission. He advised the erection of the turnstiles in order that the employes connected with the Bureau of Admissions may acquire experience in the handling of actual business, both at the gates and in handling the accounts in the office. In this way he hopes to secure a force of expert gate keepers before the opening day comes and thus do away with a most prolific source of annoyance both to the public and to the exposition authorities.

AD EXPO NOTES

MINNESOTA'S SPACE ARRANGEMENTS

Committee Coming to Close the Deal for the State's Exhibit.

A committee from the Minnesota exposition commission will arrive in Omaha early next week, probably Monday or Tuesday, to make final arrangements for space for the Minnesota exhibit and for the state building which will be erected. This committee will consist of F. H. Peavey, vice president for Minnesota; J. Newton Nind and E. J. Phelps. The committee will be accompanied by Architect MacLeod, who will come to look over the ground and confer with T. R. Kimball, resident architect-in-chief, regarding the exact date for the Minnesota building.

A preliminary sketch of the Minnesota building shows a very attractive structure designed along the lines indicated by Secretary Danforth when in Omaha several weeks ago with the Minnesota delegation on its first trip to the exposition. This design shows a building constructed of logs with the outer bark still on, something on the order of a Swiss cottage. This design has been regarded most favorably by the Minnesota commisssion​ and will probably be used in the construction of the state building.

Work of the Woman's Board.

The executive committee of the Woman's Board of Manager held a special session for the purpose of taking final action in approving the amended plans for the Girls' and Boys' building, but the plans had not been returned by the architect and could not be acted upon. When they are returned a meeting will be held at once and measures taken to commence construction at once.

An organization known as the Colored Women's association submitted a communication, in which it is stated that the organization is prepared to furnish "dozens of colored women or girls" for any or every "remunerative" position within the gift of the board. The cummunication​ was signed by Mrs. E. L. Mahammit, president, and Carrie King, secretary. The secretary of the Woman's board was instructed to notify the parties that the matter would be given due consideration at the proper time.

It was decided to sell a concession for the sale of sandwiches in the lower hall of the Girls' and Boys' building.

Wiring for Space.

March 15 is the time fixed by the Department of Exhibits as the last day on which applications for space will be received, and as this time approaches the telegraph wires are becoming hot with the many messages sent by belated exhibitors who make their applications in this way. Twenty messages of this character were received by the Department of Exhibits this morning and as the final day comes nearer the number seems to be increasing at an immense rate.

Labor Congress Difficulty Overcome.

The slight difference between the congress committee of the Woman's Board of Managers and the special committee representing organized labor, regarding the tome to be given the prospective labor congress, has been amicably adjusted be leaving the matter in the hands of the committee appointed by the labor unions. This committee [?]

BEAUTIFYING THE CITY PARKS.

Commissioners Arrange for Statuary and Additional Fountains.

The Board of Park Commissioners has decided to expend $5,000 for statuary at the exposition grounds on condition that the county and the exposition association will each expend an equal sum and that the entire lot is turned over to the board for the adornment of the various parks after it has served its purpose for the exposition. It is unofficially understood that this plan will be agreed to, as the statuary will naturally revert to the parks, and this makes it practically certain that the sculptural effects of the exposition will be commensurate with its architectural magnificence.

The board has also decided to place a handsome fountain on the west side of Hanscom park. This will constitute a very ornamental auxiliary to the flower beds and grass plots. The pattern that has been selected is a rustic effect with what is known as a stork base and two pans. The ground diameter of the basin is twelve feet and that of the first pan is a little over six feet. It is over twelve feet high and the figure of a boy holding a huge lily from which the water spurts is the crowning ornamentation. The fountain complete will cost about $350.

POSTOFFICE FOR THE EXPOSITION.

Distribution and Delivery of Mail at the Grounds a Problem.

It has not been decided yet what arrangements will be made in regard to mail distribution at the exposition grounds. Assistant Postmaster Woodard says that all probability the government will establish a postoffice in the Government building and that it will be run either separately or in conjunction with the Omaha office. He thinks it likely that the mail will be distributed on much the same plan it was at the World's fair, where carriers did the distributing and collecting just as in any city office. The postal department is very close run at present, and Mr. Woodard is not sure that it will feel like bearing the expense which such a system would entail.

ARRANGING FOR THE BIG WIGWAM.

Regular Weekly Meeting of the Executive Committee is Held.

At the regular weekly meeting of the executive committee of the Council Bluffs Exposition association last night a blue print of the exposition grounds was submitted showing the location of the site selected for the Pottawattamie county wigwam, together with a receipt for the amount of the first installment of the ground rental, $250, which had been paid by the committee having the matter in charge. The site is on Sherman avenue directly opposite the Iowa building, and close to the main entrance. It is one of the most desirable sites on the ground, and the big tepee will be a most conspicuous object that will arrest the attention of the visitor the moment the gates are opened. A resolution was passed instructing the wigwam committee to take the necessary steps at once for the purpose of beginning work of construction. The committee was authorized to confer with a number of the leading architects and builders for the purpose of securing working plans that will be somewhat of a modification of the original plans and will perhaps cheapen the cost of the structure. One plan will be the use of piling instead of the brick foundation, which will save a cost of 30,000 brick which were originally designed for the foundation. The piling will be much cheaper and make a much stronger footing for the building, as the upright posts will be bolted to the piling. Mayor Carson sounded a warning that the building committee must make no mistakes and take no risks in the work; that the fact must not be lost sight of that the building   must be constructed to resist severe wind storms and carry heavy weights. The modified plans must be submitted to the general committee at the next meeting, together with accurate estimates of the total cost.

The committee of women having in charge the publication of the women's edition of the Nonpareil reported that the total receipts of the venture were $566.55, the expenses $281.44, leaving a net tota​ of $285.51, one-half to be donated to the exposition committee amounting to $142.75. With the report was a submitted check for the amount and a statement that there was still due and uncollected $49.50, one-half of which would be turned over to the committee when collected. The committee from the woman's clubs who submitted the report consisted of Mesdames Metcalf, Atkins, Phelps, Reed, Hayden, McBride and Terwilliger. A vote of thanks was tendered them for their donation.

The members of the committee retired to the parlors of the hotel and formulated another plan for the purpose of assisting the association in disposing of the remainder of the exposition buttons, and after a short deliberation notified the association that they desired to meet a committee to convey the proposition to the association. Prof. Hisey and Dr. Cleaver were appointed and returned with an outline of the plan, which was to take charge of the button sales in the future. They submitted the names of nearly 100 young girls and boys whom they desire to meet at the ordinary of the Grand hotel on Saturday afternoon and interest in the work of selling the buttons. Prizes are to be offered for the work. Each girl or boy who sells ten buttons shall receive three free admission tickets into the exposition grounds, and proportionately more for larger sales. Larger prizes consisting of a bicycle, a gold watch, fine dress pattern, manicure set, etc., are to be offered to the persons selling the highest number, in addition to the regular prizes in the way of admission tickets. The offer of the women was promptly accepted, and a committee consisting of E. H. Walters, Dr. Cleaver and Prof. Hisey was appointed to confer with them and carry into execution the plans they agree upon. The secretary was instructed to notify the girls and boys whose names were presented to be at the hotel on Saturday afternoon and have the matter explained to them.

It was decided that the work on the wigwam must be well under way by the middle of April.

The financial report showed that all of the assessments of the members of the association had been paid, ranging from $10 to $25. The total amount of subscriptions outside of this list and the sale of buttons approximated a little over $2,000, and the total amount of money in the hands of the association with which to begin the construction work is between $2,500 and $3,000.

CONVENTION OF STENOGRAPHERS.

H. B. Boyles Names a Committee to Arrange for the Affair.

Another convention that is coming here this summer is that of the stenographers, the first meeting of what will probably be known as the National Stenographers' association. H. B. Boyles of this city is carrying on a correspondence which will undoubtedly result in the calling of the convention in Omaha on some days in the summer which are yet to be fixed.

The first gathering of the stenographers was held in Nashville during the exposition there last summer. There were then in attendance about 1,000 delegates from all parts of the country. At that time the plans of the national association were laid, but the complete organization was left in the hands of a committee, of which Kendrick C. Hill of New York is chairman. H. B. Boyles of this city was appointed chairman of the subcommittee on organization from this state.

A short time ago Chairman Hill wrote to Boyles, stating that he would call the next convention in this city if the proper hall and accommodations were guaranteed. In response Mr. Boyles has informed the chairman that everything in that line would be offered without expense to the association. Mr. Boyles believes that there is no doubt that the meeting will be held. It will be a considerable gathering, since it is estimated that fully the number that attended the Nashville meeting will come here.

Chairman Boyles has appointed the following to serve with him on the Nebraska organization subcommittee: Myron E. Wheeler of Lincoln, George Cocoran of Lincoln, John Maher of Chadron and H. M. Waring of this city.

Hatchet Will Come Some Day.

Secretary Ford of the Woman's Board of Managers says she has stopped making any predictions regarding the date of the appearance of the famous Hatchet, the paper which is to be issued for the benefit of the fund for the Girls' and Boys' building. She says the public is to be given a surprise by having the paper issued very soon, but she refused to divulge the exact time it will make its appearance.

Special Stamps Hang Fire.

Postmaster Martin has heard nothing from the special issue of Transmississippi Exposition stamps since February 1, when he had a lettter​ from Washington stating that it would be several months before the stamps would be ready. Many wholesale firms write to Mr. Martin wanting these stamps and thousands of dollars worth of them could have been sold if they had only been on hand.

Chauncey M. Depew's Sentiments.

Chauncey M. Depew, one of the members of the New York Exposition commission recently appointed by Governor Black, in a letter to the Department of Publicity and Promotion regarding exposition matters says: "I do not know what our commission will do, or what the legislature will be willing to do. Personally, I want the state represented as creditably as possible at the exposition."

Notes of the Exposition.

The Ohio Falls Car Manufacturing company of Jeffersonville, Ind., is a recent applicant for space for an exhibit.

The senior member of the firm of H. R. Eagle & Co. of Chicago, wholesale dealers in general merchandise direct to the consumer, is in town making arrangements for a large display at the exposition.

Colonel H. B. Maxson of Reno, vice president for Nevada, writes that there is a great interest being manifested by the people in his jurisdiction in the matter of representation at the exposition, and the territory will be heard from when the time comes.

The governor of Michigan has called an extra session of the legislature and the Department of Publicity and Promotion will make a special effort to arouse sufficient interest in that state to produce an appropriation for state participation in the exposition.

The people of west Florida are becoming aroused to the importance of having their portion of the state represented by an extensive exhibit independent of anything that may be done by the state commission. They have applied to the Department of Exhibits for space and announce that they will make an extensive exhibit of their resources.

Clement Chase has issued a very handsome exposition booklet containing sixteen full page photogravures, printed on heavy enameled paper and bound with ribbon in a parchment cover bearing a handsome design. Mr. Chase has also issued a series of sixteen souvenir cards on the style of postal cards, presenting on the reverse side in small size the main state buildings.

The Department of Exhibits is in receipt of a letter from the Los Angeles committee of arrangements, asking if that county can be assigned space where it can erect an immense column of oranges seventy-five feet in height as a portion of its exhibit. A reply has been sent to the effect that the county will be assigned a space in the Horticultural building directly underneath the dome, where a column ninety feet in height may be erected.

MAJOR CLARKSON'S SCHEME

WOULD REVIVE SOME LAPSED SOCIETIES

Expects to Enlist Services of Former Members in the Entertainment of Visitors During the Exposition Season.

An effort is to be made by the exposition management to revive the nuerous​ societies formed of natives of certain states which flourished in Omaha a few years ago, and these societies will be utilized to assist in the entertainment of people from other states who may attend the exposition on special occasions. There were a number of these societies at one time, among them being one composed of natives of Ohio, another made up of people who claimed Pennsylvania as their native state, still another formed by people from Illinois, other representing Maine, Indiana, New York, and so on to the end of the list. So far as known, these organizations have all lapsed, but Major Clarkkson, assistant to the president of the exposition, on whose shoulders rests the burden of working out the details of providing for the entertainment of visitors on special occasions, believes that these societies should be revived, and that their old mebmers​ should assist the exposition in arranging to devise plans for bringing large numbers of people to the exposition from these states and providing suitable programs for their entertainment. It is Major Clarkson's idea to have special "days" when arrangements will be made to provide special attractions for the people from a certain state and the members of the society composed of natives of that state will be asked to assist in making the visit entertaining. For instance, there will be an "Ohio day," when excursions will be run from all parts of Ohio and members of the Ohio society will be expected to fill places on the entertainment committee and assist in making the event an enjoyable one. It is believed that the presence of former residents of Ohio would go a long way towards making the visitors feel at home and would do much to induce them to prolong their stay and come again with all their friends. The same would be true of all the other societies.

Major Clarkson desires to communicate with any of the officers or members of these state societies regarding this matter, and invites them to call at his office in the Paxton block.

WISCONSIN BUILDING CONTRACT.

Committee Comes to Omaha to Award the Work of Construction.

Chairman J. C. Koch and Treasurer A. C. Clas of the Wisconsin Exposition commission are in the city for the purpose of letting the contract for the erection of the Wisconsin building on the exposition grounds. Bids for the construction were taken from local contractors several days ago and final preparations for commencing the construction will be commenced before the Wisconsin representatives leave the city.

The Wisconsin building will stand on the bluff tract, directly west of the Illinois building, being just south of the grand plaza. It will be sixty feet square and the cornice will be about thirty-five feet from the ground. The plans were made by the firm of Ferry & Clas of Milwaukee, and show a very pleasing building of classic style. The most elaborate portion of the exterior will be the main entrance, four immence​ fluted Corinthian columns supporting a broad pediment, forming a most imposing front. The whole building is Corinthian in style and will form a most pleasing contrast to its nearest neighbors, the Illinois building and the Nebraska building.

About $10,000 will be spent for the building and its embellishment. Like the Illinois and Nebraska buildings, the Wisconsin headquarters will be covered with staff. The lumber for the building has been donated by the large lumber concerns of Wisconsin and all of this material is now on the road to Omaha. The plumbing and other material required for the proper fitting of the interior of the building has also been contributed by Wisconsin manufacturers. A prominent feature of the Wisconsin building will be the central court. Almost the entire lower floor will be an immense rotunda and in the center of this will be a large funtain​, the basin to contain specimens of every variety of fish which frequent Wisconsin waters.

Chairman Koch stated that the commission has made no effort to prepare for a state exhibit of Wisconsin's resources, either in agriculture or manufactured articles, but has devoted its time and energies to inducing manufacturers and others to make exhibits. He said the work in this line had been successful and the state will be represented by a large number of exhibitors, covering all lines of products.

Names Kentucky's Commission.

Governor W. O. Bradley of Kentucky has officially notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he has appointed a Kentucky Exposition commission, composed of the following persons: Mrs. John B. Castleman, Mrs. James F. Buckner and Logan C. Murray, Louisville; H. H. Houston, Paducah; Charles H. Todd, Owensboro; C. U. McElroy, Bowling Green; Charles Blandford, Bewleyville; E. C. Hopper, Covington; Wilbur R. Smith, Lexington; George E. Welsh, jr., Danville; J. O. McCartney, Flemingsburg; E. C. O'Rea, Mt. Sterling; W. B. Hansford, Somerset.

Concerning his appointees, the governor writes: "The ladies have great influence and may do good in Louisville. I knew the state would give nothing and tried to appoint persons who would take an active interest. The gentlemen appointed are first-class."

Directors Lack a Quorum.

Yesterday was the day for the regular monthly meeting of the Board of Directors of the exposition, but there were but twelve members present when President Wattles rapped for order after waiting three-quarters of an hour for a quorum.

The president said he wished to call especial attention to the fact that over 70 per cent of the subscriptions for exposition stock had been collected, despite the predictions made by many people when the subscriptions were obtained that more than 50 per cent of them would never be collected.

In the absence of a quorum the meeting was adjourned.

More Midway Attractions.

A characteristic Japanese tea garden is the latest acquisition to the Midway, Manager Reed having been authorized at the meeting of the executive committee yesterday afternoon to make a contract with T. Mitzutany, a native of the Flowery Kingdom, to conduct a resort of this character on the bluff tract.

Manager Reed was also authorized to make a contract with the Giant Seesaw company of Nashville for the privilege of installing and operating this machine on the Midway.

Oregon Commission Organizes.

The Oregon Exposition commission has organized for business and J. F. Batchelder, president of the Portland Mining exchange, has been elected secretary of the commission. He telegraphed to the eDpartment​ of Exhibits that Henry E. Dosch, state commissioner of agriculture, started from Portland Friday night for Omaha, to make full arrangements for space for OrOegon's​ exhibit.

 

Suggestion for Arkansas Building.

Among the suggestions for an Arkansas building at the exposition which are being considered by the Arkansas commission is that of Architect Gibb of Little Rock, who advises the erection of a fac simile of the Albert Pike mansion, still standing in Little Rock. General Albert Pike is widely known as the founder of the so-called southern jurisdiction of the Scottish rite, who died a few years ago after a long residence in Washington city, where the headquarters of the rite were maintained. His former residence in Little Rock is said to be a fine example of the prevailing architecture of southern homes.

BRYAN HOUSE BUILDERS

REGULAR ORGANIZATION OF SILVERITE HERO-WORSHIPPERS.

ROSEWATER'S HANDY GRAFT

Gets Big Pay for Booming His Paper —[?] ffle Jacobs' Damage Suit—Population About Omaha—Notes.

STATE JOURNAL BUREAU,
306 South Twelfth St.

OMAHA, March 11.—Unless the bimetallists of Nebraska prove long on zeal and short on cash and energy the Bryan homestead will be reproduced on the exposition grounds as a counter attraction to the McKinley homestead. The committee announced to take charge of the Bryan homestead movement met today at the Paxton hotel. There were present E. E. Brown, G. W. Berge, O. N. Humphrey and James Manahan of Lincoln, J. B. Kitchen, R. L. Metcalfe, I. J. Dunn, Frank T. Ransom, Frank Hibbard, Dr. Hipple, Dr. Saville, Willis Hudspeth, all of Omaha, C. M. Hunt of South Omaha and T. J. Evans of Council Bluffs. G. W. Berge was called to the chair and Mr. Metcalfe made secretary. The latter was invited to explain the object of the meeting and did so.

A committee comprising Messrs. Metcalfe, Manahan and Hibbard was appointed on permanent organization. There seemed to be an idea entertained that space for the proposed enterprise might be denied by the exposition authorities and a committee comprising Messrs. E. E. Brown, Dr. Saville and O. N. Humphrey was chosen to wait upon Superintendent Kirkendall of the department of buildings and grounds and consult with him in regard to securing the necessary space.

In due time this committee returned from Mr. Kirkendall's office with the assurance that the required space would be allowed subject to the same regulations and restrictions as the space for the McKinley home. Mr. Kirkendall requested that plans of the proposed building be made and some idea given of the amount of space required and when they are completed he is ready to go to the grounds with the committee and aid in picking out the location. Some time after the committee had reported a formal letter was received from Manager Kirkendall, which was the exact counterpart of one sent to Canton, O., regarding space for the McKinley home. It provides that there shall be no competitive exhibits in the building and nothing offered for sale. It was stated that this will preclude the giving away of campaign literature in either building.

This communication was placed on file and its acknowledgement was ordered, with the information that the committee on construction will work in harmony with and report to Manager Kirkendall.

The committee on permanent organization reported a plan whereby the management of the affairs of the enterprise shall be vested in a president, a vice president, a secretary and treasurer, with finance, auditing, construction, literature and souvenir committees. This report also recommended G. W. Berge for chairman, I. J. Dunn for vice president, F. T. Ransom for secretary and J. B. Kitchen for treasurer. For the committees the report favored the following:

Finance and auditing—J. B. Kitchen, T. J. Evans, J. H. Broady, G. A. Magney and C. M. Hunt.

Construction—F. B. Hibbard, O. N. Humphrey, Willis Hudspeth, A. H. Hipple and I. J. Dunn.

Literature—J. H. Broady, J. J. Saville, James Manahan, E. E. Brown and G. W. Berge.

Souvenirs—James Manahan, C. M. Hunt, T. J. Evans and J. H. Broady.

The report was adopted as presented and Mr. Ransom was authorized to engage a stenographer at $10 a week.

The committee on construction was directed to have plans of the Bryan home in Lincoln prepared at once and report at the next meeting the probable cost of the projected building.

The Paxton hotel was made headquarters and it was determined to meet again Thursday afternoon. The finance committee was requested to at that time present a plan for raising the necessary funds by popular subscription.

The proposition of the Canton people is to reproduce the McKinley home and prepare also an exhibit of the manufactures of Canton and in his reply to the request for space for the Bryan homestead Manager Kirkendall adhered so strictly to the program in the McKinley project that he referred to an exhibit of the manufactured products of Lincoln. It is not understood, however, that the committee intends to include any such in the exhibit.

Never Forsakes the Main Chance.

Considerable comment has been created among the newspaper publishers of the state by a recent announcement that Mr. Rosewater, as a manager of the exposition, has been enabled to play into the hands of Mr. Rosewater, as the publisher of a newspaper, to his great advantage in the latter capacity. It has just been announced that he is soon to issue a pictoral​ supplement to the Bee, for which he will draw the neat sum of $3,200 out of the exposition exchequer. Mr. Rosewater is a lucky man. He will be the only Nebraska publisher who has been able to get a finger into the till of the great enterprise and he will at one fell swoop pull out of it nearly as much as his subscription to the exposition, concerning which subscription listening Nebraskans have heard now and then from Mr. Rosewater's own lips. Speaking on this subject a well known Nebraska newspaper man said:

"It looks to me decidedly cheeky to allow Rosewater that $3,200 for the circulation of a picture that is bound to prove a great feature for his paper and which one would think he would be willing to exploit free to the exposition as a bit of merited newspaper enterprise. You will remember that the Bee was given the privilege, or got it in some way, of sending out the official bird's eye view of the grounds as a supplement, and he must have made a handsome figure out of it, for he charged 10 cents a copy for the paper, and there were firms in Omaha who sent out hundreds of them. It seems to me that if I were running a newspaper enterprise of the magnitude of the Bee in Omaha I could somehow find a way to send out these pictures which the Bee is to send out and do it as a stroke of enterprise without asking any $3,200 from the exposition for it. The exposition has received a great deal of free and valuable advertising from the newspapers of the land on the theory that it is an enterprise that merits the support of the press, but none of the publishers who have opened their columns to its announcements would have done so with the freedom that they have had it ever been supposed that the editor of a local paper who has a pull as a manager would get his gaff into the treasury for over $3,000 for a work which his duty as a publisher to the community should prompt him to do without compensation from the exposition management and which will inure to the great advantage of the paper, possibly to a greater degree than the money that is to be received for the work. For my part I think it is treating the papers in other cities decidedly shabby and while the management may have been led into this expense by the discovery that it is the only way to keep in the expense I do not think it does any very great degree of credit to Mr. Rosewater or the Bee to have it announced that the management has had to pay him $3,200 for what most any newspaper would have done for its community without other pay than the prestige it would give the paper and the money that could be made from the sale of the papers."

Vance Lane Gets Back In.

Vance Lane, whose duties with the telephone company compelled him to retire reluctantly from the board of governors of the Knight of Ak-Sar-Ben at the close[?]

ADDITION TO ILLINOIS EXHIBIT.

Art Gallery to Be a Feature at the Omaha Exposition.

The Illinois commission is contemplating an addition to the Illinois building, to be used as an art gallery, which will prove an elegant and attractive feature of the beautiful state building now nearing completion in the grounds of the transmississippi exposition at Omaha. The principal feature of the art gallery will doubtless be the four large oil paintings of the world's fair, each ten by twenty-five feet in size, thus affording another opportunity of viewing the "white city" of memory.

The Illinois Stock Breeders' Association will see that the breeders of fine stock are well represented, while the state horticultural society will probably make such an exhibit as will call attention to the fact that Illinois is a great fruit growing state and grows more and better apples than any other state in the union. The exhibit of the agricultural implements manufactured in Illinois will probably exceed in character and amount any previous exhibit from this state. The coal operators have under consideration a grand exhibit of the great coal and mining interests of Illinois.

The transmississippi exposition promises to excel all previous expositions ever held in this country, always excepting the great world's fair in 1893. The transmississippi states are so great in area that if laid down upon the map they would cover several kingdoms of the old world and overlap the territory usually assigned as the "markets of the world." They are peculiarly the market of Illinois and lie at her very door. Over 50,000 square feet have already been secured for Illinois exhibitors, and more is in process of negotiation. The managers of the exposition have extended the time for acceptance of applications for space from March 1 to March 15, although they have had to increase their accommodation for exhibits by building annexes to some of the main buildings and putting up some entirely new ones.

Exhibitors who have not yet secured space have no time to spare, and should make their applications at once. The office of the Illinois transmississippi commission is at room 206, 218 LaSalle street.

Canton Ohio

CANTON AT OMAHA.

Senator Thurston's Suggestion Calls Out Criticism.

NEBRASKA'S FREE SILVER ORGAN

Does Not Want the McKinley Cottage Reproduced At the Exposition Unless Bryan's Home is Also Represented—Mrs. Sherwood in Washington.

Washington, March 12.—(Special.)—The suggestion recently made to the city of Canton by Senator Thurston, that a reproduction of the famous McKinley homestead be erected at the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition has aroused considerable comment both in Omaha and in this city. On the seventh of the month an application to erect such a building was made to the exposition directory and permission and a site were granted. The free silver organ of Nebraska, the World-Herald thought it saw a political scheme in the concession and in a triple-leaded, double-column editorial called upon all of the white metal faith to erect a reproduction of the Bryan homestead on the exposition grounds, and suggests that at least one room of the proposed fac-simile be devoted to the distribution of literature telling of the dire effects of the single gold standard and the benefit to be derived by returning to bimetallism. It also says that the proposed reproduction of the McKinley home is by "idolators of the single gold standard."

The Washington Post in commenting editorially on the World-Herald editorial, rightly states that it would be improper to fight again the battle of '96 at the exposition, but says it would be at the height of impropriety to erect on the grounds a reproduction of the home of a private citizen.

 

OLD FASHIONED FAIRNESS.

compels that the impression conveyed by the World-Herald be corrected. The senator did not intimate anything of a political nature in his interview with The Repository correspondent and the idea that a collection of souvenirs would add to the attractiveness of the industrial exhibit, was only intimated. At any rate, Canton again secures considerable free advertising from the proposition, which every one here appears to think should be taken up by the board of trade and Business Men's association. Letters received by Canton people in this city from officials of the exposition show that the Omaha people are anxious to have this unique exhibit. One writer says that "the world will be astonished at the display, the magnitude and beauty of the grounds. From an architectural point of view, it will be superior to the World's Fair. The buildings are not so large but they are better grasped."

However, the World-Herald has viewed the proposition of Senator Thurston from a very

NARROW POINT OF VIEW

through a deeply colored pair of glasses. In giving me this interview the senator was actuated solely by a desire to further the interests of the exposition and incidentally to benefit Canton. That the concession for the erection of the building was so easily obtained was evidence that the idea was so considered by the directors of the exposition.

MRS. SHERWOOD AT THE CAPIT[?]

SELLING WIGWAM BUTTONS

Children Enlisted in Behalf of Exposition Work.

ADD INCENTIVE OF PRIZES TO PATRIONISM

Committee of Women's Board Makes Arrangements by Which a Lot of the Buttons Will be Disposed Of.

The women who have undertaken the work of disposing of the remainder of the exposition buttons had a most successful meeting in the ordinary of the Grand hotel yesterday afternoon. The committee of women having the matter in charge consists of Mrs. George T. Phelps, Mrs. B. S. Terwilliger, Mrs. Thomas Metcalf, Mrs. R. J. McBride, Mrs. J. B. Atkins and Mrs. S. H. Foster. In accordance with the arrangements made at the meeting of the Exposition association on Thursday night at which the secretary of the association was instructed to invite a large number of young people to meet the committee, there was a large number of boys and girls present when the women were ready to explain their scheme for selling buttons to raise funds for the building of the wigwam. The committee outlined the plan and made it very clear to the boys and girls, who entered into the scheme with great enthusiasm. According to the plan any person who is recommended by the committee can engage in the sale of buttons and for every five buttons sold at $1 each, which is the uniform price, will be given one admission ticket to the Transmississippi Exposition. If the sales reach the number of 1,000 buttons, the following prizes will be awarded:

To the person selling the greatest number of buttons, a first-calling, high grade bicycle, for either lady or gentleman.

To the girl or boy selling the second highest number of buttons will be given each a fine gold watch.

The fourth prize will be a high class camera and outfit; and there will be other prizes, the exact nature of which has not been determined.

Should the sale of the buttons reach 2,000 in number, the prizes will be doubled. The time limit for the sale is June 1, at which time all prizes will be awarded. This competition is open to all who desire to take part, and application should be made to one of the members of the women's committee. The Exposition association is represented in this work by a committee consisting of Mr. E. H. Walters, Dr. J. H. Cleaver and Prof. J. C. Hisey.

CALIFORNIA'S EXPOSITION

People of the State University Favor Holding a Big Fair.

DATE HAS NOT YET BEEN SETTLED

Celebration of the Semi-Centennial of Statehood—Progress of the Pacific Coast in Fifty Years—Invitations Sent Out.

SAN FRANCISCO, March 11.—(Special.)—It is now practically certain that there will be a state exposition held in this city in celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of statehood. The suggestion that the golden wedding of the state to the union be made the occasion of a grand exposition has met with hearty approval on all sides. The merchants and citizens of San Francisco have pledged their hearty support and several of the mayors representing interior cities of the state, have also promised aid. Mayors Land of Sacramento, M. P. Snyder of Los Angeles, Valentine Koch of San Jose, J. A. Fuller of Napa, W. T. Ellis of Marysville, C. J. Craycroft of Fresno, D. C. Reed of San Diego and Charles P. Patterson of Pomona have expressed their favorable feelings toward the proposed celebration. They are united in the opinion that the exposition should be held, not alone to represent and fittingly advertise the resources and products of California, but those of the junior states admitted after our state. We have in addition been promised the aid of several of the contiguous states, and by a concentration of action we will be able to hold an exposition in 1900 that will draw the attention of the entire world to the country west of the Rockies.

While everyone admits that an exposition would prove of incalculable benefit there is not a unanimity of opinion as to just when it should be held. There are some who fear that the Paris fair, which will be held the same year, would prove a counter attraction and keep many away who would visit us if our exposition should not be held until 1901.

The time of holding the exposition will be probably fixed by a committee to be appointed by Mayor Phelan within the next few days.

Governor Budd has sent out invitations to the chief magistrates of adjoining states asking them to join us in making the semi-centennial one that will redound to the credit of the entire Pacific slope.

EXECUTIVE COMMITEE MEETING.

Two Communications on Sunday Closing Are Received.

The executive committee was entertained at its meeting yesterday afternoon by two communications relating to the mooted question of closing the gates of the exposition on Sunday. The first was an official communication from the secretary of the Painters' and Decorators' union, notifying the committee that at the last regular meeting of the union a resolution had been unanimously adopted protesting against closing the gates on Sunday. The second communication was from Rev. J. R. Getty, who signed himself as pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church of DeWitt, Neb. He stated that he had felt very friendly toward the exposition and had about concluded to attend and advise all his friends to do the same, but since learning that the gates might be kept open on Sunday he had concluded to withdraw his support and that of the 200 members of his congregation unless it was decided to close the gates on the first day of the week.

Vote Down Exposition Appropriation.

ABERDEEN, S. D., March 12.—(Special.)—The Board of County Commissioners has voted down a proposition to make an appropriation for the Transmississippi Exposition, although a request for the appropriation was presented which bore the signature of over sixty business men and citizens. It is hoped more favorable action can be secured at a later meeting.

Will and Frank Dinger have again been arrested at Sisseton for selling liquor to the Indians on the reservation.

A bicycle for a little girl 20 months old is being built here. The machine has a ten-inch frame and is believed to be the smallest yet made. It is expected the little girl will be able to ride the wheel by the time she is 2 years old. If this hope is realized Aberdeen will be able to boast of having the youngest girl cyclist on earth. She should be allotted full space at the Omaha exposition.

MONTANA TO HAVE FINE DISPLAY

Immediate Steps Will Be Taken to Erect a Building.

W. H. Sutherlin, vice president of the Montana Exposition board, arrived in Omaha last night and will take immediate steps to begin the Montana building. As soon as the plans are approved by the architect-in-chief work will be commenced. The building is to be two stories in height and the general plan of it is not quite completed. Mr. Sutherlin says the exhibits are largely prepared and will be shipped as soon as a place is provided for them. The exhibits of mineral will be finer than anything the state has ever sent out. The leading mines of the state will each have their separate departments and an effort will be made to arrange the ores so as to show how they are disposed in the veins and their general condition before they are taken from the mine. Professor Craig of Missoula, professor of geology in the State University of Montana, has charge of the geological exhibit and will have a classified collection of the many formations that crop out in the state. Professor Craig has also prepared specimens of all the fish found in Montana. The timber exhibit is under the supervision of Lieutenant Abron of the State Agricultural school. The largest tree in the state will be brought to Omaha and the commission is having some difficulty in deciding between several contestants for the honor. Montana will also have an art exhibit to which Russell, the cowboy artist, will be the chief contributor. Mr. Sutherlin expresses the opinion that the thing which will create the most surprise is the fine exhibit of agricultural products which is being prepared. He says that the state has always been considered a mining state and a few people know of its agricultural resources.

RELATING TO INDIAN CONGRESS.

Mr. Rosewater Will Consult with Commissioner Jones.

WASHINGTON, March 12.—(Special Telegram.)—Mr. Rosewater, who is now in New York, will hold an important conference tomorrow with Commissioner of Indian Affairs Jones and Major Powell of the Bureau of Ethnology in relation to the proposed Indian congress, Mr. Rosewater having been summoned to Washington by Commissioner Jones, who desires to have the benefit of his judgment as to the lines upon which the congress should be erected. Later in the day the chairman of the Bureau of Publicity and Promotion of the exposition will have a conference with the director of the mint, Roberts, in relation to souvenirs and medals for the exposition. Mr. Rosewater is now in New York, but is expected here tomorrow.

Exposition Chorus Meeting.

The exposition chorus will meet Tuesday night in the large room in the southwest corner of the fifth floor of the city hall. A piano will be placed in the room and the elevator will be in operation to carry members of the chorus to the top floor. The Easter hymn from Cavalleria Rusticana, "The Daughter of Jairus," and "By Babylon's Wave" are in rehearsal and will be taken up by Choral Director Kelly.

A number of new voices have been tested during the last week by Mr. Kelly and will be added to the chorus at the next meeting.

Letters have been sent to all of the leading singers of the city, inviting them to aid the exposition by giving their assistance to the chorus and becoming members of it.

An exposition chorus will be organized in Council Bluffs some time this week. Choral Director Kelly will call a meeting of the singers of the Iowa city within a few days and will form a chorus which will be drilled by him on the same music rehearsed by the Omaha chorus.

Bids on the Dairy Building.

Bids for the construction of the Dairy building were opened at the office of the Department of Buildings and Grounds as follows: Westlake Construction company, $4,728; R. C. Strehlow, $5,375; Thomas Herd, $5,500; A. G. Wahlstrom $5,780; William Goldie & Sons company, $5,845.

These bids were laid before the executive committee yesterday afternoon and the contract awarded the Westlake Construction company.

CASH FROM DOUGLAS COUNTY

Commissioners Will Help Woman's Board of Managers Materially.

FUNDS FOR BOYS' AND GIRLS' BUILDING

Twenty-Five Hundred Dollars Appropriated to Aid Its Construction—Announcement Comes from Good Authority.

If the members of the Board of County Commissioners follow out the plan that they now propose it is certain that the Boys' and Girls' building on the exposition grounds will be constructed along the lines proposed.

For some weeks the promoters of the   [?] construct a building for the ex-[?] use of the children who visit the exposition have been doubtful about being able to raise funds. The county commissioners have about decided to come to their relief and appropriate the sum of $2,500, to be applied to the construction and maintenance of the building.

One of the county commissioners last night in speaking of the condition of the proceeds of the bonds voted by the county in aid of the exposition said: "At the adjourned meeting of the board, to be held next Wednesday, one of the commissioners will offer a resolution appropriating the sum of $2,500 to aid in the construction and maintenance of the Boys' and Girls' building. It is certain that the resolution will be adopted by a unanimous vote, as all of the members have expressed themselves as being favorable to the project. We have reached this conclusion after making a careful estimate of the funds that will be required to collect and maintain the Douglas county exhibit. While we are under no obligation to expend the entire proceeds of the $100,000 of exposition bonds we feel that we are justified in assisting in the construction of the Boys' and Girls' building."

MAKES THE BUILDING CERTAIN.

When informed of the aid that the county commissioners had promised in the erection of the Boys' and Girls' building Secretary Wakefield said: "This means that the building is certain and that it will be constructed along the original lines proposed. Up to this time it has been doubtful about the Woman's board being able to raise sufficient funds to carry out the original ideas, that of having a building to cost $8,000. Now, however, all doubts are removed, as the money for construction is practically all in sight. The women have raised about $4,000 and $1,500 will be realized from the Hatchet, which with the $2,500 that the county will appropriate will make up the $8,000 required. The maintenance of the building will require considerable cash, but I think that this is all provided for. The exposition people have given the concession privileges of the building to the board and then there is a prospect that $1,500 will be secured from another source. With this money all in sight the building is a go, and I am of the opinion that it will be one of the features of the exposition."

CHANGES WROUGHT IN A YEAR.

Progress at Kountze Park Since March 18, 1897, is Wonderful.

The exposition ground is about the liveliest place in town and the manner in which the work of preparation is being pushed is an example of energy and push which gives great promise of the miracle to be accomplished in transforming the rough tract of broken ground into a park of beauty and a city of palaces. It is just one year since work was commenced on the construction of the exposition buildings and the preparation of the grounds. March 18, 1897, was the date on which the first stake was set for the gradens​, but since that time the transformation which has taken place is marvelous. The work has gone steadily on, the unusually open winter having made it possible to work out of doors continuously, and while no great effort has been made to rush the work, the progress has been satisfactory. Within the last few weeks, however, the greatest activity has been displayed about the grounds and the work of preparation is being pushed with energy. An army of men is employed and the change that has been wrought in the appearance of the grounds in that time is fully as remarkable as the change that has been made by the erection of the buildings.

Persons who have not visited the grounds for the last month will be surprised to find that the bare and bleak bluff tract, which was devoid of trees except along the edge of the bluff, has been transformed into a perfect forest. Trees forty feet in height and from six to ten inches in diameter dot the tract on every side, being arranged according to a well conceived plan, and shrubbery in profusion is growing where none grew before. The same is true with regard to the main court, trees and shrubbery being used here to the best advantage, particular attention being paid to the requirements of the stiff design prevailing in this portion of the grounds.

CHANGES NATURE'S FACE.

All of these improvements are being carried on under the direction of Rudolf Ulrich, the landscape architect engaged for the purpose. Over 200 men are working under his direction. Trees and shrubbery have been hauled to the grounds by the carload and are banked on the grand plaza on the bluff tract until required in working out the detailed design in each portion of the grounds. The result of this work has been to change entirely the general appearance of the entire exposition grounds, the greatest change being apparent on the bluff tract, where the trees and shrubs are used much more liberally than in any other portion. The walks are bordered with large trees to afford ample shade in the summer and the bushes are used very freely along the fence and at points where a background of green will add to the general effect.

The making of roadways about the grounds is also progressing fully as rapidly. The contractor having charge of making the roadways on the bluff tract commenced work the first of last week, the start being made on the broad avenue which will extend entirely through the Midway. This roadway will be seventy feet in width and will extend from the grand plaza to the north viaduct and from this viaduct directly west to Twentieth street. The avenue will be macadamized, as will all the walks on the bluff tract. A twelve-ton roller is being used in the work and the top dressing of gravel, well rolled, will prevent any possibility of dust.

Work will be commenced tomorrow on the walks in the main court. It has been decided to make these walls of brick laid in three inches of sand. A large force of men under Mr. Urich will be employed on this tract tomorrow and the laying of walks and making of parks will be carried on at the same time, the earth excavated for the walks being utilized in making the parks. The work will be commenced at the east end of the main court and extended to the west end as fast as possible.

STAFF MEN CLEANING UP.

In preparation for this work, the staff contractors have been very busy for the last two or three days cleaning up the debris about the buildings at the east end of the main court. This work has been nearly completed about the buildings east of Twentieth street and the sheds used by the contractors for workshops have disappeared. Smith & Eastman, the staff contractors, will proceed at once to finish the little work remaining to be done on the buildings east of Twentieth street and the east end of the main court will soon take on a finished appearance.

The laying of storm sewers and conduits for electric light wires has been completed at the east end of the main court and the buildings in that portion of the grounds have been completely wired for electric lights. The west half of the court is being pushed with might and main and will be completed within a very short time.

The government building is keeping up with its excellent record in making progress. The work of the carpenters is now concentrated on the huge dome and this is rapidly nearing completion. The scaffolding which completely filled the interior of the dome has been removed and a small staging in the extreme top is all that obstructs a view of the full structure. The height of the dome inside is over 100 feet. Preparations are being made to place the collossal​ figure of Liberty Enlightening the World in position on the extreme top of the lantern crowning the dome and within a few days this towering figure will be a land mark in full view from all parts of town. The west wall of both wings of this building are covered with staff and the scaffolding will be removed at once. Work on the east front is making rapid progress.

Oregon Commission Organizes.

The Oregon Exposition commission has organized for business and J. F. Batchelder, president of the Portland Mining exchange, has been elected secretary of the commission. He telegraphed to the Department of Exhibits that Henry E. Dosch, state commissioner of agriculture, started from Portland Friday night for Omaha, to make full arrangements for space for Oregon's exhibit.

STATE DEPARTMENT'S SHOW

Portion of the Government's Exposition Exhibit Outlined.

MANY INTERESTING RELICS OF GREAT MEN

Letters of Washington, Madison, Hamilton and Jefferson, Papers Signed by Foreign Potentates and Similar State Documents.

As the principal object of the government exhibit at the exposition is to show the people of the United States what the government is doing and the manner in which it is done, the Department of State has paid particular attention to making an elaborate and extensive exhibit of its functions and the methods adopted by it for transacting its business. For this purpose a brief history of the department has been printed for free distribution, setting forth the methods of transacting business in each bureau, beginning with the receipt of the business matter in the department and then showing in consecutive order the progress of such business matter, through the various bureaus and official hands, until the same is finally disposed of and notice thereof duly given to the proper party. This will be more fully explained by actual examples of work properly arranged in cases, in a convenient and compact form, which, together with photographs of the different rooms in the department, will make an instructive and comprehensive exhibit.

Particular attention will be given to the method of applying for and procuring passports, the different blank forms used in applying for them and the places where they may be obtained.

PAPERS BY GREAT MEN.

The historical archives of the department contain many rare collections of papers and letters written by men connected with the foundation of the government. There will be on exhibition one volume of the "Washington Papers," containing manuscript letters of George Washington, including that of December 29, 1783, resigning his commission as general of the army. This collection comprises 313 volumes. There is one volume in each of the following collections in the exhibit: The Madison papers, in seventy-five volumes; the Hamilton papers, in sixty-five volumes; the Jefferson papers, in 131 volumes; the Monroe papers, in twenty-two volumes, and the Franklin papers, in thirty-four volumes. These papers were all purchased by the government. There will be also the diaries of Washington, volume 1, May to August, 1781; volume ii, August 14 to November 5, 1781; volume iii, September 2 to October 4, 1784; the commission of General Washington as commander-in-chief, from the archives of congress (this is the original engrossed parchment surrendered by him at Annapolis), and Washington's meteorological record, 1799, which probably contains the last words written by him.

The department has in its custody the original Declaration of Independence, but this precious document is so faded that it became necessary to protect it from the light. A fac simile will be exhibited, with thirty-eight portraits of the signers. Accompanying these will be an artotype of the original rough draft containing interlineations and corrections by Adams and Franklin, a reproduction of the original petition to the king of England, October 26, 1774, presented to him by Franklin, and also an artotype of the original Constitution of the United States, with thirty-six portraits of the signers, making an interesting and instructive exhibit. These artotype reproductions are so like the originals that they are esteemed equally good for exhibition.

LETTERS FROM FOREIGNERS.

There will be a fine collection of autograph letters from foreign officials and celebrities to the presidents of the United States, among them being one from Robespierre, Barere; Carnot; Louis, king of France; Napoleon I; Jerome Bonaparte; Queen Victoria; Alexander I of Russia; William I, emperor of Germany; President Diaz of Mexico; Ranavalamonica, queen of Madagascar, and Chulalongkorn, king of Siam. The autographs of the presidents are shown in original proclamations on various subjects, the only signatures lacking being those of President William Henry Harrison and President James A. Garfield, both of whom died before signing one.

There will be a set of portraits of the secretaries of state of the United States, maps showing the growth of the United States' diplomatic and consular service; maps showing the expansion of the United States under treaty provisions; Andrew Jackson's sword; swords presented to the United States by Japan and Siam; Malay krises captured from pirates; a large gold medal set with diamonds, containing a fine cameo with a representation of Columbus discovering America, designed and presented to the United States by the sultan of Turkey in commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America; a statuette of George Washington by Baron Marchetti from the original study and model by his master, Houdon of Paris, in 1785-90, for an equestrian statue, which, according to Thomas Jefferson, then United States minister to France, was sent to America by Houdon with the expectation of receiving an order from the congress of the United States to have it cast in bronze, but the model was destroyed by fire in Washington, leaving this statuette as the only survival. It was in the possession of the Rit. Hon. George Young of Edinburgh, Scotland, and at the time of the Chicago exposition he presented it to the United States, and it was placed in the custody of this department.

Two flags of much interest will be exhibited, one, a silk flag woven in one piece, paid for by subscriptions received from 25,000 weavers of Lyons, France, and presented to the United States as a durable expression of their sympathy at the death of President Abraham Lincoln; the other is the first American flag raised over Alaska.

A photograph of the Bartholdi Statue of Liberty Enlightening the World, now standing in the harbor of New York, together with the original deed of gift from France and the acceptance of the same by the United States; photographs of several of the buildings occupied by the Department of State; the seal of the United States, the obverse of which is the legal representation of the coat of arms, emblazoned in oils according to the provisions of the act of congress creating it; the development of the seal shown by illustrations reproduced from the manuscript reports of the committees of the Continental congress showing the various designs submitted; photographs of buildings occupied by some of our consuls in various parts of the world, and a number of minor objects too numerous to mention in detail, will complete the exhibit.

Building the Streets of Cairo.

The material for the construction of the Streets of Cairo has been delivered on the exposition grounds and work will be commenced at once on this concession. This feature of the Midway will occupy a space 400 feet in length on the upper end of the bluff tract, extending from the north viaduct to the permanent brick building at Manderson street. The most imposing structure on the street will be a mosque, where the inhabitants of the street will hold their religious services. a large theater will be another important feature and in this will be given the amusements which have come to be regarded as a necessary adjunct to the Cairo concession. There will be plenty of bazaars and shops for the manufacture of articles for sale. A circular space about sixty feet in diameter at   each end of the village will afford opportunities for the ceremonies and games which will be constantly going on. About $18,000 will be expended on this concession in preparing the buildings.

DATES FOR THE CONVENTIONS.

Time for the Session of a Number of Omaha Gatherings.

More than eighty conventions are to be held in Omaha during the exposition, but many of them have not yet decided upon a date. The following dates are assured, and it is probable that within another week the full list can be reported:

National Cricket Clubs, June 25 to 30. J. B. Reynolds, secretary, Omaha. (National.) Attendance, 250.

Transmississippi Turnfest, June 30 to July 3. Philip Andres, secretary, Omaha. (Interstate.) Attendance, 7,000.

Nebraska Poultry Association, September 19 to October 1. E. A. Pegler, secretary, Lincoln, Neb. (State.) Attendance, 200.

National Live Stock Exchange, October, 1898. C. W. Baker, secretary, Union Stock Yards, Chicago, Ill. (National.) Attendance, 100.

Nebraska State Homeopathic Medical Society, June 23 to 30. Dr. P. C. Moriarty, secretary, Omaha. (State.) Attendance, 100.

Transmississippi Teachers' Convention, June 28 to 30. J. M. Gillan, secretary, Omaha. (Interstate.) Attendance, 7,000.

Nebraska State Masonic Grand Lodge, June 15. W. R. Bowen, secretary, Omaha. (State.) Attendance, 500.

Gran Commandry Knights Templar, April 1. W. R. Bowen, secretary, Omaha. (State.) Attendance, 500.

Scottish Rite Masons of the United States, April 26. W. R. Bowen, secretary, Omaha. (National.) Attendance, 500.

Nebraska Grand Lodge Knights of Pythias, October 11. Will H. Love, secretary, Lincoln, Neb. (State.) Attendance, 400.

Travelers' Protective association May 31 to June 3. Lewis T. LeBeaume, secretary, Union Trust building, St. Louis, Mo. (National.) Attendance, 500.

General Assembly United Presbyterian Church of North America, May 25 to 31. Rev. William J. Reid, principal clerk, Pittsburg, Penn. (National.) Attendance 250.

National Association Railway Postal Clerks, June 8. George A. Wood, secretary, West Medford, Mass. (National.) Attendance 100.

National Funeral Directors' association, October 12. Charles W. Nully, secretary, Philadelphia, Pa. (National.) Attendance 500.

National Republican League, July 15 to 17. M. J. Dowling, secretary, Chicago, Ill. (National.) Attendance 1,600.

American Association Nurserymen, June 8 and 9. G. C. Saeger, secretary, Rochester, N. Y. (National.) Attendance 200.

National Dental society, August 30 to September 2. Dr. Emma E. Chase, secretary, 3334 Washington avenue, St. Louis Mo. (National.) Attendance 700.

Nebraska Dental association, August 29. W. H. Latey, secretary, Omaha. (State.) Attendance 150.

National Association of Dental Examiners, September 2 and 3. Charles A. Meeker, secretary, 29 Fulton street, Newark, N. J. (National.) Attendance 50.

National Association of Dental Faculties, September 2 and 3. Dr. J. H. Kennedy, secretary, St. Louis, Mo. (National.) Attendance 50.

Annual convention American Cemetery superintendents, September 12 to 17. Frank Eurich, secretary, Detroit, Mich. (National.) Attendance 150.

Nebraska State Association Funeral Directors, September 12 to 14. Peter Bell, secretory​, Norfolk, Neb. (State.) Attendance 100.

Nebraska State Pharmaceutical society, June 6. W. N. Heilman, secretary, Tecumseh, Neb. (State.) Attendance 250.

The Western Surgical and Gynecological association December 24 to 26. Dr. George H. Simons, secretary, Lincoln, Neb. (State.) Attendance 200.

American Institute of Homeopathy, June 23 to 30. E. H. Porter, secretary, 181 West Seventy-third street, New York City. (National.) Attendance, 600.

HATCHET READY TO BE HANDLED.

Paper Issued by the Women's Board of Managers is Out.

The famous Hatchet has made its appearance at last. It has been turned out by the printers and is now in the hands of the managing editor, the business manager, the circulation manager and all the other managers. The papers for the towns in the state will be sent out by express at once and those intended for circulation in Omaha will be distributed Monday.

The patronesses appointed for the several schools will act as distributing agents for the subscriptions which were taken by the school children. The papers will be sent to these patronesses Monday and given by them to the pupils who secured the subscriptions and thus delivered to the subscribers. The paper will also be on sale at all of the principal news stands, the proprietors of these having agreed to handle them without the usual commission.

A corps of boys will be enlisted Monday by the circulation manager and will thoroughly canvass the entire business district of the city and endeavor to dispose of all the papers. These boys will not receive any commission, all of the profits from the paper being designed to aid in the construction of the Girls' and Boys' building on the exposition grounds. The women hope to realize a profit [?] $1,000 on this paper and this amount [?]

Typographically, the Hatchet is a very handsome publication. The cover is of ivory enamelled paper and a novel idea is shown on the front page of the cover. There is nothing on it to indicate the name of the paper or the nature of the contents. All that appears is a design of oval shape, with twenty tiny baby faces peeping out, while the center is filled with a larger picture. All of these little faces are portraits in half-tone engraving, and the effect is extremely pretty and suitable for framing. Inside, the contents are found to be fully as inviting as the cover. The style of the paper is very neat and artistic and the work is well done, resulting in a very handsome publication. The reading matter is well selected, being largely the work of children, but is devoid of the air of chidishness​ which might be anticpiated​. Portraits of children are scattered through the pages and there are also engravings of the exposition buildings, not omitting the Girls' and Boys' building, which is shown in a handsome cut.

The issue of the paper was 25,000 copies of which about 15,000 have already been sold by subscription. The women expect to dispose of the remainder within a very few days by active canvassing and they urge the people to buy them and send them to their friends in all parts of the country.

ILLUMINATIONS FOR THE STREETS.

City Electrician Schurig Has a Plan to Provide for Exposition Display.

City Electrician Schurig is considering a scheme by which the streets in the business district may by illuminated all through the exposition with the funds that have been provided for use during the week of the Ak-Sar-Ben festivities. He says that the system of stringing incandescent lights along the streets is at the best very unsatisfactory. The temporary construction that supports the lights is not sufficiently substantial to withstand the wind, and it is impossible to get the best results by keeping the lights up to the required candle power. His plan contemplates the erection of substantial arches over the principal intersections which will afford a solid support for the lights and which will stand as long as they are wanted. The iron motor poles that now stand on the street corners will furnish the vertical supports for the arches. The latter can be very inexpensively constructed of angle iron steel with a strip of thin galvanized iron underneath to protect the lamps from the weather. Mr. Schurig suggests that if the business establishments on each corner will provide the arches the funds appropriated by the council will be sufficient to furnish the lights through the exposition. The expense of an arch on each intersection will be very little after it is divided among the various business firms in the vicinity. Then the business district will be attractively illuminated during the entire exposition, and it will be very easy to add some additional effects during Ak-Sar-Ben week. The scheme has not been fully worked out, but Mr. Schurig will obtain bids for the construction cost, and then the matter will rest with the business men interested. It is believed that the idea can be successfully carried out at a cost that will allow the down town business concerns to secure a permanent illumination in front of their places of business for very few dollars each.

Chadron's Militia is Coming.

CHADRON, Neb., March 12.—(Special.)—It is practically assured the Chadron will be represented at the encampment of the Nebraska National Guard in Omaha during the Transmississippi Exposition, by a company from this city. Adjutant General Barry was in Chadron Thursday looking over the field with a view of reporting to the State Military board on the advisability of establishing a company here. He was most favorably impressed and stated that he would recommend the organization of a company of National guards. The business men and young men of the city are a unit in their desires for such an organization and that it would be a success is a certainty.

Will Reproduce Bryan's Home.

Application has been made to the executive committee for space to erect on the grounds a fac simile reproduction of the Lincoln home of Mr. W. J. Bryan. The permission requested has been granted. Permission had already been given for the reproduction of the McKinley home at Canton, O.

PLANS FOR PUBLIC COMFORT

HOW TO CARE FOR VISITING CROWDS

Matters Still in a Nebulous State, Although Much Thought and Discussion Has Been Bestowed Thereon.

The providing of accommodations for the convenience of the general public at the exposition is one of the things which has been receiving a great deal of attention at the hands of the executive committee for several months. This is a very large subject and one with many branches. With an average daily attendance of fully 40,000 people, which the most conservative admit is a low estimate, the accommodations of different kinds which must be provided must necessarily be calculated on a huge scale.

The most important consideration is water. With the warm weather which will unquestionably prevail during the greater part of the exposition season, thousands of gallons of drinking water will be consumed each day and arrangements will have to be made for having water tanks at every hand. Many people from abroad will decline to drink Missouri river water, notwithstanding it can be demonstrated that it is about the purest water to be had anywhere, but thousands will insist on having water from some of the well known mineral springs. At the World's fair water of this kind was sold at different points about the grounds in mechanial​ vendors, a penny in the slot producing a glass of the sparkling liquid from the tank imbedded in ice. Huge water tanks with ice in the water and others with ice surrounding the water receptacle abounded on every side. The lesson imparted by the state fair in Omaha in 18985 is an example of the effect of neglecting the water supply.

Another feature almost equally important is the providing of ample accommodations for eating. Several concessions have been let for eating places of various kinds, and two large restaurants will be in operation in the great buildings which are now being erected at the east end of the main viaduct on the bluff tract. There will be several restaurants on the Midway, but these will be very largely for the convenience of the employes of the concessions in which they are located. A restaurant will be located on Twentieth street just north of the Administration arch and another at some point in the main court to be determined upon. In the event of a great rush of people, however, these places would be literally swamped.

Arrangements have not yet been made for lavatories and closets and this is the feature which has been the subject of the greatest discussion on the part of the executive committee. The main discussion has been directed to the point of whether to provide these accommodations without charging a fee for their use, or to establish both pay and free accommodations. This matter has been discussed time after time and no conclusion reached, there being a decided difference of opinion in the committee. For that reason no work of preparation has yet been commenced, although a number of propositions have been before the committee for several months.

The care of the sick on the grounds is another matter whih​ comes under the classification of public comfort, but in this feature ample provision has been made. A hospital will be constructed on Twentieth street just north of the Administration arch, and this will be equipped with all modern conveniences and will be in charge of a corps of physicians. An ambulance of the most improved pattern has been purchased and is now in the city. A hospital corps will be organized and sick people will be well cared for.

Little progress has been made in the matter of boot black stands, the local artists in that line being imbued with the idea that there is very little profit in conducting a plant on the grounds.

MINNESOTA SELECTS ITS SPACE.

Commissioners Arrange for Exhibits and Secure a Building Site.

Minnesota will be creditably represented at the Transmississippi and International Exposition. The exposition authorities have had this assurance for some time. But the assurance was transformed into fact on the occasion of the visit of a portion of the commission of Minnesota to the exposition here yesterday.

In the party were: F. H. Peavey, vice president of the exposition commission of Minnesota; E. J. Phelps, J. Newton Nind and James Alan MacLeod, all of Minneapolis. They arrived in Omaha yesterday morning, spent nearly the entire day at the exposition grounds and returned to Minneapolis last evening at 6 o'clock. The party comprised three of the working members of the commission and the architect of the Minnesota state building at the exposition, Mr. MacLeod.

While at the exposition grounds the visitors selected space for the exhibits of Minnesota to the extent of nearly 8,000 square feet. This is exclusive of that which will be occupied by the state's own building. In the Agricultural building all the available space that was left unpromised was taken by the Minnesotans. It amount to about 1,000 square feet. In the building devoted to the Mining industries about 2,000 square feet was reserved. In the Dairy, Apiary and Horticultural buildings the Minnesota men were informed that they could have all the space they needed, and they expect to take advantage of this offer by making liberal displays in each of the buildings named.

The Minnesota state building will be one of the most attractive of the smaller buildings on the exposition grounds. A site for its location was definitely selected yesterday. It will stand on the bluff tract and will be just a little north and east of the handsome Horticultural building. The dimensions of the building are to be 60x100 feet. While not very large, the unique design selected will make it most inviting. The style of architecture is that of a Swiss cottage. Constructed entirely of Minnesota logs with their bark on, the exterior will present an appearance well calculated to remind one that Minnesota's chief industry lies in its lumber camps.

 

The building will be two stories in height. The plan of the first floor shows a large reception room, squarely in the middle, to be fitted up in modern clubhouse style, with all the attendant conveniences. To the right as one enters the reception hall will be the parlor for women, which will be tastefully furnished. The men's parlor will be to the left of the reception hall and will be equally inviting. It will be fitted up as a logging camp and its every detail will suggest life in the timber regions of Minnesota. On the second floor there will be the offices of the state commission to the exposition, the office of the secretary and the living quarters of the secretary, janitor and other attendants. Porches will surround the ground floor and balconies the second.

Architect MacLeod said to The Bee just before leaving for Minneapolis that work will be commenced on the state building as soon as the final drawings can be completed, which will be at an early date. He will make a half dozen trips here to supervise the work of construction and a regular superintendent will look after the work for the commission from the start of the building to its completion.

At a meeting of the commission recently in St. Paul it was decided that $25,000 will be required to make a creditable exhibit and erect a state building. After discussing several plans for raising this money it was decided that the quickest way would be to divide the amount to be raised among the several counties of the state according to the assessed valuation of the property in each county. The counties have been asked to carry out this plan and it is proposed to ask the legislature to reimburse them. Governor Clough and Lieutenant Governor Gibbs are taking an active interest in the matter of having the state well represented and are urging prompt action.

No attempt will be made to have an educational exhibit on account of the short time before the exposition will open, but it is announced that extensive exhibits in all lines of manufacture and agriculture will be made. The millers of Minneapolis will unite in making a large exhibit of their products. The State Agricultural society has offered the commission the large forestry exhibit belonging to the society and this will be installed in the state building.

The lumbermen, quarrymen and iron mine owners have been asked to contribute the material needed for the construction of the state building.

GUARDS FOR THE GROUNDS

KIRKENDALL MIGHT ENLIST AN ARMY

Thousands of Applications from All Sorts and Conditions of Men for Positions on Exposition Police Force.

The question of guards for the exposition is becoming a live issue and is causing Manager Kirkendall all kinds of trouble. The arrangement of a plan for guards and their appointment is a function of the Department of Buildings and Grounds, and this department has been made the target for applicants from every nook and corner of this broad land. If there is a square mile of territory within the confines of the United States which has not contributed an aspirant for a position in the Transmississippi guards it is because the spot is uninhabited.

Manager Kirkendall has thousands of applications from every conceivable class of people. A number are from army officers of the junior grades who are anxious to take charge of the force. Others are from civilians who have occupied positions as officers of the guard at other expositions and who are anxious to continue in the business. Others, again, are from men who are imbued with the idea that they were born to command and they want to practice upon the rank and file of the exposition forces. These latter usually have some great scheme to suggest and they estimate their monthly salary up in the hundreds. Applications from all of these sources have been pouring in for the last six months at the rate of forty or fifty per day, and a special file case has been constructed for filing them away.

The applications for positions in the ranks of the guards are received by the thousands. A large proportion of them are from men who have served in the same capacity in former expositions and they seem to like the business. Hundreds of applications have been received from soldiers in the regular army. Some of them say their time of enlistment will expire some time before June 1, and others say they can get leave of absence during the exposition. Large numbers have also been received from men holding positions as guards in penitentiaries. These men argue that their experience makes them familiar with criminals and, hence, they would be able to render valuable service.

COLLEGE BOYS ARE ANXIOUS.

By far the largest proportion of the applications, however, come from young men who are attending college in various parts of the country. These men are anxious to repeat the experience of many of their fellows at the World's fair and rub up against the world while absorbing information in large quantities by this contact and by what may be seen about the exposition grounds. The item of salary cuts very little figure with this class of applicants, few of them making any mention of the feature which seems uppermost in the minds of most of the other applicants. When the question of salary is touched upon by the college men, however, the figures quoted are invariably low, in some instances reaching the sum of $15 per month. Out of this sum they agree to provide such uniform as may be required and board themselves.

An application has been received from the battalion of cadets at the University of Nebraska, which contemplates furnishing as many guards as may be required. This is a pet project of Chancellor MacLean's, who is especially anxious to have his "boys" given this opportunity for acquiring experience with the world and information at the same time. He has appeared before the executive committee to urge that the guards be selected from among the cadets, urging as reasons for such action that the boys represent the entire middle west, there being students from nearly every portion of Nebraska and the adjoining states, and he also argues that the complete discipline of the cadets and their neat uniforms would make them most desirable in every respect, while their familiarity with the usages of polite society would enable them to act as guides and dispensers of information in a manner which would reflect credit upon the exposition management.

Manager Kirkendall has taken all these applications and arguments under consideration, and has been revolving in his mind a plan for settling the matter, but he says he has not yet reached a point where he is prepared to make any announcement of what he will do, although he will take decisive action within a short time. He will recommend the employment of about seventy-five men at first, and this force may have to be doubled as the crowds increase. The guards will be quartered on the grounds in a portion of the Service building, to be erected on Twentieth street, just north of the Administration arch, and will be required to be on the grounds at all times. Their tours of duty will be arranged in convenient shifts, but the entire force will be available at any time. The guards will be required to do police duty and act as guides in giving out information and showing visitors about the grounds.

MISSOURI EDUCATIONAL DISPLAY.

Superintendent Pope Says He Will Want Large Space.

E. B. Pope of St. Louis, state superintendent of schools of Missouri, is in the city as the guest of Superintendent Pearse of the Omaha schools. He visited exposition headquarters and the exposition grounds in company with Mr. Pearse, and was greatly interested in looking at the space which has been reserved for Missouri. When he learned that his state had reserved about 900 feet in the Liberal Arts building for an educational exhibit Mr. Pope declared that this space must be increased to at least 2,000 feet, as he intended to have an excellent educational display and could not possibly confine it to 900 feet. He said he would take this matter up with the Missouri commission as soon as he reached home and have the space increased. Mr. Pope stated that the Missouri exhibit, in the educational line, would include all lines of work, but would be especially strong in the kindergarten department. He said the schools were making elaborate preparations for the occasion and would make a fine showing.

Work in Colorado.

A letter from Secretary Macdonald announces that a meeting of the Colorado Exposition commission is scheduled for tonight, at which time the commission hopes to be able to make definite arrangements regarding space for the state. He says two weeks of valuable time were lost in trying to secure county appropriations, but that this plan has been abandoned on account of insurmountable legal obstacles and the various interests are asked to supply the exhibits and the funds.

Regarding the Denver commission Mr. Macdonald says that $3,500 of the $5,000 asked for has been raised and a systematic canvass of the city is being made for the balance.

Congress and Correspondence Coming.

Congressman D. H. Mercer writes to President Wattles regarding the projected special train from Washington to Omaha at the opening of the exposition, that the proposition has met with the most hearty reception at the hands of the Washington correspondents of the great metropolitan newspapers and the members of both houses of congress, all of whom will be invited to be of the party. "Dave" says that every newspaper representative and every member of congress would be greatly pleased to join the delegation and he urges the exposition management to carry out the proposed plan.

May Get Congregational Delegates.

There will be a meeting of the National Council of Congregational churches at Portland, Ore., July 8, and efforts are being made by President Wattles to induce the large numbers of delegates from the eastern states to stop in Omaha either going or returning from this meeting. A number of very prominent people usually attend these meetings and it is thought that a visit from them during the early stages of the exposition would result very favorably. Congressman Dingley of tariff fame is the moderator of the council, and Rev. H. A. Hazen of Auburn, Mass., is the secretary.

League of Republican Clubs.

L. J. Crawford of Newport, Ky., president of the National Republican league, has written to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he has prepared a circular letter to be sent to every member of the National league committee and to every president, vice president and secretary of every state league in the country urging them to co-operate with the Department of Publicity and Promotion in securing the largest possible attendance at the convention to be held in Omaha this summer. In closing, Mr. Crawford says: "I can assure you that the attendance will be large and I hope that we shall be able to make it the largest convention in the history of the league."

Interest in Arkansas.

Reports in the Arkansas papers indicate that great interest is being taken in all sections of that state in the matter of having a state building and exhibit at the exposition. A committee has been appointed to solicit material from the lumbermen and other building interests in the state for the erection of the state building and vice presidents have been appointed in each county to co-operate with the commission in raising funds for the necessary expenses.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Morris (Ill.) Floral company has applied for space on the bluff tract for beds of new bedding plants.

The Sunset Seed and Plant company of San Francisco, specialists in sweet peas, has applied for space on the bluff tract for large beds of these popular beauties.

An application has been received from L. G. Kellogg, president of the Wisconsin Horticultural society, for 500 feet of space in the Horticultural building for a fruit exhibit.

Achitect​ MacLeod of Minneapolis spent the day in consultation with Architect-in-Chief Kimball regarding the Minnesota building and they visited the grounds together to inspect the location selected for that structure.

The latest news from Massachusetts is to the effect that the outlook for a state building on the exposition grounds is very encouraging. Governor Wolcott has expressed a strong desire to have his state represented by a building and is working to bring that about.

TALK ABOUT INDIAN CONGRESS

Conference Held to Consider Details of the Project.

WASHINGTON, March 13.—(Special Telegram.)—An important conference, participated in by Mr. Rosewater, chairman of the Bureau of Publicity and Promotion; Assistant Commissioner of Indian Affairs Tonner, Major Larrabee, in charge of the executive branch of the bureau, and Major Powell, chief of the Bureau of Ethnology, was held this afternoon upon the proposed Indian congress at the Omaha exposition. Major Powell, who is greatly interested in the scope of the congress, is of the opinion that better results could be obtained if the groups of Indians were made up from the principal tribes, and that these groups would represent the whole life of that people, their tribal customs and their religious exercises and festivals, as well as their peculiar skill and workmanship under primitive conditions, included within. Mr. Tonner brought out the fact that the appropriation of $45,000 would have to include the cost of subsistence and some material which the Indians would need in the construction of villages and manufacture. With an assurance from the railroads that transportation charges of the Indians would be nominal, their number could be materially increased. Estimates of subsistence expense will be left to Captain W. H. Mercer of the Omaha agency, who will have general supervision of the Indian encampment. Captain Mercer is expected here this week. It was agreed between Major Powell and the representatives of the Indian bureau that there should be hearty co-operation in organizing and selecting groups and exhibits to accompany them.

Mr. Rosewater also had a conference with Director of the Mint Roberts as to the representation of the mints at Omaha, medals and souvenirs. Final arrangements will be perfected at Philadelphia tomorrow by Managers Lindsey and Rosewater for the exposition.

 

OREGON COMING TO THE FRONT

COMMISSIONER ARRANGES FOR SPACE

Henry E. Dosch of Portland Makes All Necessary Arrangements with the Managers and Tells of His Plans.

That Oregon is to be represented in a creditable and extensive manner at the exposition is assured beyond doubt. Henry E. Dosch of Portland, a member of the state commission recently appointed by the governor, is in Omaha with full plenipotentiary powers and he has decided that the state must be represented. After conferring with the exposition authorities he has reserved 8,000 feet of space in the several buildings for Oregon's exhibit.

Mr. Dosch will have full charge of the exhibit to be made by his state. He acted in the same capacity during the World's fair and when he was appointed a member of the Oregon commission recently he was selected as a committee of one to come to Omaha and determine whether the state should make an exhibit or remain out entirely. Before he had been in town twelve hours Mr. Dosch decided that Oregon must be represented.

"We will raise $20,000 for our exhibit," said Mr. Dosch positively. "I know where this amount can be obtained with very little effort on the certificate plan, the money to be refunded by the legislature. I will return home as soon as I have completed arrangements for our space and take up at once the work of preparing for our display. We will show minerals, lumber, agricultural and horticultural products, fish and probably a number of entries in fine arts. We will not undertake to erect a state building, as the time is now too short to carry out such a project in the manner we would desire, but by utilizing the mineral and forestry collections now in hand we will have an exhibit that will be a credit to our state and will compare favorably with that of any of the other states."

Mr. Dosch is a retired capitalist and his work in the matter in hand is one of philanthropy. Reports from Oregon are to the effect that he earned the confidence of the people by the manner in which he conducted the exhibit at the World's fair, returning $18,000 to the state treasury as a balance from an appropriation of $60,000.

The 8,000 feet of space reserved by Mr. Dosch for Oregon is divided as follows: Mines building, 2,000 feet; forestry exhibit, 2,000; Horticulture building, 1,500; educational exhibit, 1,000 feet; Agricultural building, 1,000; fish exhibit, 500 feet.

ART FOR THE NEBRASKA BUILDING.

Miss Butterfield Very Successful in Her Quest for Exhibits.

Miss Mellona Butterfield, superintendent of the art department of the Nebraska exposition commission, and the hostess of the Nebraska building, is making good progress in the work of collecting paintings and other works of art from the studios of Nebraska artists, which will be used in decorating the and beautifying the interior of Nebraska's handsome building. She has made a number of trips to the principal towns of the state and has been in communication with a number of well known Nebraska artists who are now living in other states. By this means she has secured a number of works which she says are of the most desirable quality and will stand comparison with the work which may be produced by any other state. Among the works already secured are these: Paintings by Miss Parker, art instructor of the University of Nebraska; paintings by Mrs. Paul Holm and Mrs. McKnight of Lincoln, ceramics by Mrs. Brock of Lincoln, paintings by Miss Almira Graves of Arborville, the winner of a medal in painting at Brownell hall; paintings by Miss Ethel Milestone, formerly of Omaha, now of Boston; paintings by Miss Leta Hornlacker, formerly of Hastings, now of New York; same from H. H. Bagg, art instructor at the Peru Normal school; Mrs. Tannie McLennan Hinman, formerly of Omaha, now of Chicago, will contribute paintings; Mrs. Emma Homan Thayer of Denver has promised to contribute one or two paintings; Miss Tanie Snowden and Albert Rothery of Omaha will also contribute paintings.

Miss Butterfield says the building will be tastefully and prettily decorated in a manner which will make it as attractive as possible. She has secured possession of the beautiful mantel which the women of Nebraska contributed to the decoration of the Nebraska building at the World's fair, and this will be installed in the building. This mantel is now at Pawnee City.

TRYING TO STIR UP KANSAS.

Major Clarkson on a Special Mission Among the Jayhawkers.

Major T. S. Clarkson is in Kansas arousing an interest among the people of that state in the idea of having an exhibit at the exposition. Several formal attempts have been made in this direction by numerous agents, but nothing has come of them. The major reports that he has addressed a large meeting of business men at Atchison and received a very cordial reception, the people manifesting an interest in the exposition matter and issuing a call for a general meeting of citizens to be held Thursday evening. Action was also taken to urge the governor to appoint a strong commission to begin active work. From Atchison Major Clarkson wrote that he would go to Leavenworth and Topeka and would have a personal interview with the governor to urge him to take hold of the matter before it is too late. The major also said that he would organize a party of prominent business men from Leavenworth, Atchison and Topeka to visit Omaha and acquire a little enthusiasm.

Notwithstanding the apparent apathy of the state at large, some of the counties of Kansas are taking the matter in their own hands and are making preparations to make county exhibits at the exposition, regardless of what the state may do. Washington county has made an appropriation for an exhibit and has sent a committee, consisting of Messrs. Scofield, Morrow and Vincent, to Omaha to make arrangements for space, etc. This committee is in the city and will confer with the exposition officials regarding the matter.

Exhibits from Massachusetts.

Special Commissioner F. T. Bickford writes from Massachusetts that exposition matters are in a very favorable condition in that state. The executive committee of the Associated Board of Trade held a special meeting recently and a resolution was adopted which was introduced by the representative of the New England Shoe and Leather association, urging upon the governor the importance of having the state well represented at the exposition. Mr. Bickford says this organization is composed of representatives of twenty-six of the commercial bodies of Boston and is one of the strongest trade organizations in the world. He says the president and secretary of the organization are most favorable to participation by the state and will urge the governor to take action. The project of a state building is making good progress and every indication is in favor of the Old Bay state being at the exposition in full force.

Tennessee to Take Part.

W. T. Davis, commissioner of education for Tennessee, and a member of the Exposition commission recently appointed by the governor of that state, has written to Superintendent Wadley of the Concessions department regarding arrangements for an exhibit. He says a meeting of the commission will be held at the state capitol very soon to organize for business and expresses the opinion that the state will make a strong showing. Mr. Wadley was connected with the Nashville exposition and is personally acquainted with many of the commission. He believes that influence can be brought to bear to induce the Tennessee commission to erect a state building on the grounds.

WIGWAM TO BE BUILT IN APRIL.

Committee Decides on the Construction of the Proposed Building.

The wigwam committee of the Transmississippi association is busily engaged in making arrangements for the beginning of the work of constructing the building. The report that will be submitted by the committee at the next meeting of the association will show that all the arrangements for active work of building have been completed and the purchase of material and engagement of workmen will be the next thing for consideration. The sentiment of members of the building committee and also of the association is against beginning the actual work of construction until about the middle of April. Until then work cannot be done to as good advantage on account of the weather. It is believed that the building can be erected and finished inside of a month from the time the start is made, which will give two weeks for the preparation of the exhibits and their installation. It has been definitely decided that the work will not be let to contractors, but will all be done under the supervision of the association, most likely directly under the watchful eye of President A. C. Graham who is especially well fitted for the place and will do the work of superintending free of charge. One skilled builder will be given direct charge of the men and will lay out their work for them and will see to it that the plans of the architects are followed and all work properly done.

Another thing is also assured and that is that none but Council Bluffs men and material will be used from the start to the finish. This sentiment was evidenced by the approval of a resolution that was introduced at the last meeting by Mayor Carson, which declared:

Whereas, Ample funds have been secured for the beginning of actual work of construction of the wigwam, therefore be it

Resolved, That the building committee of the association is hereby directed to proceed at once with the construction of the foundation and the first story of the building. That the committee is hereby instructed to construct said wigwam of material furnished by Council Bluffs people and that the superintending architects, foremen and mechanics be employed from the citizens of Council Bluffs. That all employes be paid the customary wages and contract to permit a discount of 5 to 10 per cent from their wages, to be applied toward the construction fund. That the Council Bluffs dealers be requested to furnish all material at wholesale rates and given a discount of 10 per cent to the building fund.

The resolution passed in a modified form, but all of the sentiments it expressed were approved. Many mechanics who have been consulted have expressed a willingness to contribute the percentage of their wages suggested in view of the fact that the work will be done in the beginning of the season. Wholesale dealers also express a willingness to furnish material at wholesale rates. The committee of fifty responsible for the undertaking are all busy business men, who have been contributing their time to the enterprise, and in addition each has paid his $10 assessment, and a number of them have given double the amount agreed upon.

There is no question but that the wigwam will be built in ample time for the arrangement of the exhibits before the opening of the exposition or that it will be the imposing structure that was at first planned.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING.

Possible Political Clash Averted by Rescinding Previous Action.

The executive committee of the exposition passed the following resolution at its meeting yesterday afternoon:

Whereas, Space has been granted on the Transmississippi and International Exposition grounds for the reproduction of the McKinley and Bryan homesteads and the privilege has been given to exhibit therein certain manufactured articles and souvenirs; and

Whereas, These privileges are liable to create political contention and strife which would not be in harmony with the great purposes of this exposition and which was not contemplated by the executive committee when these privileges were granted; therefore, be it

Resolved, by this committee, That its action in granting space for these buildings and the privilege of exhibiting therein be and is hereby rescinded and that the secretary be instructed to notify the applicants in both cases of this action.

Secretary Wakefield laid before the committee a letter from President W. H. Bell of the Central Labor Union, which was ordered filed with a number of similar communications on the same subject, to be taken up at the proper time. The body of the letter was as follows:

I am instructed to notify you and through you the Board of Directors of the Transmississippi and International Exposition of a resolution unanimously adopted by the Central Labor Union, declaring organized labor's unalterable opposition to the closing of the exposition gates on Sunday.

DESIGNER OF THE AMERICAN FLAG.

Elizabeth Ross, Who First Made Old Glory, to Be Remembered.

President Wattles is in receipt of a communication from the secretary of the Elizabeth Ross Monument association, with headquarters in Minneapolis. The name of this organization does not throw much light on the nature of the communication unless the reader is well versed in American history, but it may be stated that Elizabeth Ross, or "Betsy" Ross as she was generally known, was the designer and maker of the American flag as we now know it. The association bearing her name was organized for the purpose of erecting a monument to this noted character in history and the secretary of the association suggests that a "flag day" be made a feature of the program of the exposition and that appropriate exercises be held on that occasion. It is suggested that the town and exposition grounds should be buried in an avalanche of red, white and blue, and noted men from all sections of the country should be invited to participate in the program. The date suggested for this celebration is June 14, the anniversary of the adoption of the American flag. In case this suggestion is adopted the secretary writes that the association will make arrangements to exhibit the first American flag made by Betsy Ross and other relics of interest in the same connection.

The matter will be given prompt attention by President Wattles.

ARKANSAS WILL BE RIGHT IN IT.

Adopts Plan for State Building at the Exposition.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark., March 14.—(Special Telegram.)—The executive committee of the state board of commissioners to the Omaha exposition met tonight and considered various plans submitted by architects for state building. Architect Gibbs' plans for the reproduction of the mansion built by General Albert Pike in 1843, now owned and occupied by Colonel John G. Fletcher, were adopted. This building is magnificent in architectural design, has 7,000 feet of floor space and will be a credit to Arkansas   and the exposition. George Sengel, president of the Fort Smith Board of Trade; George C. Harkness, secretary of the Little Rock Board of Trade, and W. D. Mathews, secretary of the state commission, were appointed a committee to visit St. Louis and other points to confer with railroads and wholesale dealers relative to assistance. Commissioner R. W. Richardson of Omaha closes a partial tour of the state tomorrow night and will leave for Omaha on Wednesday. It can now be said positively that Arkansas will make a creditable showing at Omaha.

WILL MAKE EXPOSITION RATES.

Omaha Roads Are Authorized to Dispose of the Question at Once.

CHICAGO, March 14.—For some time the western roads have been figuring upon the rates to be made for the Transmississippi Exposition to be held in Omaha. They have been desirous of making low rates, but have been waiting to see if congress would take any action regarding the exposition, as whatever it does would be likely to have considerable effect upon the attendance, and the roads would then be in a better position to make proper rates.

They have grown tired of waiting for congress to act and have referred the matter to the Omaha roads with the request that they take the matter up and dispose of it at the earliest opportunity. The Omaha roads will have the power of settling all the rates and arrangements for carrying the traffic to and from the exposition.

The same action has been taken in revelation to the annual convention of the Travelers' Protective association, which will meet in Omaha May 31.

MAKING THE EXPOSITION MEDALS.

Final Arrangements Are Completed at the Philadelphia Mint.

PHILADELPHIA, March 14.—Final arrangements were completed here today for the manufacture at the United States mint of the souvenir medals which will be used at the Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha, which will open in June. The party conferring with the mint authorities consisted of E. Rosewater, manager of the Department of Publicity and Promotion; Z. T. Lindsey, chairman of the executive committee; and F. T. Bickford, general eastern commisisoner​.

Revolutionary Societies' Plans.

A committee of the Nebraska society of the Sons of the American Revolution was present last night at the meeting of the Omaha chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution. J. H. Daniels, chairman of the committee for an exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition, reported that the Nebraska society had elected a finance committee, composed of Rev. Luther Kuhns, Charles W. Hamilton, L. D. Richards, Miss Elenor Dutcher and Mrs. C. W. Lyman. The local committee appointed by the Sons society was L. P. Funkhouser, Charles S. Lobinger, Mrs. F. E. Hall, Mrs. E. D. Troup and Mrs. George C. Towle.

Hustling in Nevada.

Colonel H. B. Maxson of Reno, vice president of the exposition for Nevada, is breaking the record for exploiting the exposition in his territory. Every newspaper in the state is printing display advertisements, editorials and columns of reading matter at the request of the vice president, calling upon the people of every section to render all the assistance in their power and send exhibits to the point designated by Colonel Maxson. The colonel reports that great interest is being shown in all sections of the state, especially the eastern portion and a fine exhibit is assured.

Increases Montana's Space.

Vice President Sutherlin of Montana has increased the space for the Montana exhibit in the Mines building and now has 3,300 feet reserved. He also reserved 400 feet in the Horticulture building and 1,000 feet in the Liberal Arts building. The latter will be used for an educational exhibit which will be made by the Montana university. The contract for the Montana building has been let to Leo Bonet, the cost to be $8,000. The building will stand on the west side of the bluff tract, opposite Emmet street, being just west of the space reserved for the Iowa building.

Black Hills Will Come.

Last night the Department of Exhbiits​ received the following message:

DEADWOOD S. D., March 14.—Contradict statement in Bee. Our committees are at work. Black Hills will make an exhibit.

A. M'KINNEY.

Mr. McKinney is vice president for South Dakota.

Life Saving Exhibit.

WASHINGTON, March 14.—(Special Telegram.)—Lieutenant McClellan, who has been in Omaha arranging for an exhibit of the life saving service, has returned and will submit his report tomorrow.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Battle Creek (Mich.), Steam Pump company has applied for 208 feet for an exhibit of steam pumps.

The Morris (Ill.) Floral company has applied for space on the bluff tract for beds of new bedding plants.

The Sunset Seed and Plant company of San Francisco, specialists in sweet peas, has applied for space on the bluff tract for large beds of these popular beauties.

An application has been received from L. G. Kellogg, president of the Wisconsin Horticultural society, for 500 feet of space in the Horticultural building for a fruit exhibit.

Architect MacLeod of Minneapolis spent the day in consultation with Architect-in-Chief Kimball regarding the Minnesota building and they visited the grounds together to inspect the location selected for that structure.

The latest news from Massachusetts is to the effect that the outlook for a state building on the exposition grounds is very encouraging. Governor Wolcott has expressed a strong desire to have his state represented by a building and is working to bring that about.

By inadvertence the name of E. B. Pope, western passenger agent of the Chesapeake & Ohio railroad, and that of J. B. Kirk, state superintendent of schools of Missouri, were mixed in the items concerning the Missouri educational exhibit that appeared in yesterday's Bee.

The executive committee of the Woman's Board of Managers will meet tomorrow for the Girls' and Boys' building. The plans and specifications will be laid before the committee by the architects and as soon as they are approved, active work on the construction of the building will be commenced.

The Minneapolis Republican Flambeau club desires to secure an engagement to appear at the exposition during the opening ceremonies and give a fireworks exhibition. A committee has written to President Wattles to ask what arrangements will be made for bringing to Omaha a drill team of forty men with all the paraphernalia for giving exhibitions.

MONEY FOR IOWA EXHIBIT

LOWER HOUSE PASSES APPROPRIATION

Thirty Thousand Dollars the Amount Carried—Decisive Vote Increases Its Chances in the Senate.

DES MOINES, Ia., March 16.—(Special Telegram.)—The house this morning passed the bill to appropriate $30,000 for Iowa's exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition. There was a long discussion, the bill passing by a vote of 59 to 30. It is expected this will materially improve the measure's prospects in the senate, where it is weaker.

DOSCH RECOMMENDS A BUILDING.

Oregon Commissioner Enthusiastic Over the Exposition.

Mr. Henry Dosch of Portland, Ore., the representative of the Oregon Exposition commission, is still in the city, and his enthusiasm in the exposition is increasing with every hour of his stay. He is greatly pleased with the location secured for the Oregon building, being a pleasant site on the west side of the bluff tract, midway between Emmet and Lothrop streets. He says the Oregon building will be a rival of the Georgia Pine Palace and will be constructed with "hard oil finish" on the outside, while the interior will be elaborately decorated with every variety of wood that grows in Oregon.

Mr. Bosch learned that the people of Aroostock county, Maine, have applied for space in which to exhibit about seventy-five or 100 varieties of potatoes grown in that county, which make a specialty of growing the tubers. "We will beat them all to pieces on potatoes," exclaimed Mr. Dosch. "At the World's fair we showed 265 varieties of potatoes, all grown in Oregon, and I guess if we set out to do it we could find another hundred or two. We are going to make a showing that will open the eyes of eastern people and make them think, what is a fact, that Oregon is the best substitute for Paradise that can be found in this world."

After visiting the exposition grounds yesterday afternoon Mr. Dosch, the Oregon commissioner, was very enthusiastic regarding the participation of his state in the exposition and declared most emphatically that he would urge his people to erect a state building on the grounds.

"I am going to recommend and insist that we put up a building to be used as headquarters on the grounds," said Mr. Dosch. "We can build it of wood, inside and outside, and make a structure which will be very attractive besides being a splendid advertisement for our lumber resources. In addition to the $20,000 which will be required for an exhibit we will require about $5,000 for our building and I believe we can raise the entire amount without any difficulty."

"I can hardly express my surprise at the beauty and grandeur of your exposition," continued Mr. Dosch. "I expected to see a good showing but I was surprised beyond measure at the magnitude and magnificence of the grounds and buildings. Your buildings are beautiful and the arrangement of the grounds are all that could be desired, but I am a horticultural crank and I am convinced that your Horticulture building is entirely too small. Why! I could fill one quarter of it with a display from our state. We raise everything in the fruit line except citrous fruits and we have a reputation to sustain. We took all the medals on apples, grapes and cherries at the World's fair and we will make a big showing in all kinds of fruits this summer.

"I am especially anxious to have our state represented by a headquarters building. After seeing the fine locations you have for state buildings and the great showing which is being made by other states in that direction I want our state to be in line and I believe it can be accomplished without difficulty. I think our big lumbermen will donate the wood and we will have as fine a building as there will be on the bluff tract. My plan is to have a building about 40x60 feet on the ground, two stories high and fitted with rooms for offices and parlors for our people. A veranda twenty feet in width should surround the whole building for shade and then we would have a place where our people could make their headquarters when they come to the exposition. I am going to turn my attention to this matter when I reach home and I believe it can be brought about."

REHEARSAL OF THE CHORUS.

Director Kelly Announces that Lists Will Close Next Week.

The regular weekly meeting of the Exposition chorus was held last night in the large room on the top floor of the city hall. This was the first meeting in these quarters and the change was a most agreeable one. The high ceiling and large area of this room made the work of the chorus much more satisfactory and the effect was noticeable in the results produced. Charles Gounod's beautiful work, "By Babylon's Wave," was the first thing taken up and the drill on this rather difficult number was productive of excellent results. The "Easter Hymn" from Mascagni's "Cavalleria Rusticana," was also put in rehearsal and good progress was made on it.

Prof. Edward Dworzak has been appointed accompanist for the chorus and assumed charge of the piano last night. The careful and conscientious manner in which he performed this thankless task was a great assistance to the singers.

Director Kelly announced that at all rehearsals hereafter no one not a member of the chorus will be allowed to sing and no persons will be admitted to the rehearsal except the members of the chorus or those acting as escorts for the female members. He also announced that the lists will be closed at the next meeting and no further members will be admitted.

The membership of the chorus has increased at each meeting, about a dozen new voices being added last night and the maximum number of 200 has been almost reached.

Building Walks and Drives.

The making of macadam roadways on the bluff tract is making rapid progress. The frost is entirely out of the ground and the big twelve-ton steam road roller packs the earth in the roadway until it is firm and the same process is followed with the four inches of broken stone and the inch and one-half of gravel which is used for a top dressing. By the end of next week the walks and drives on the bluff tract will have been entirely finished.

The brick selected for the walks in the main court are pressed brick of a dark cream color, made in Omaha. They will be laid in three inches of sand and the greatest care will be taken to make walks of exceptional excellence. This work is in progress, but the ground in the main court is not entirely free from frost and moisture and the work is proceeding rather slowly.

Tearing Down the Amphitheater.

The grandstand which faced the race track on the old fair grounds will soon be a thing of the past, although a section of it will remain to remind old-timers of the exciting events which have been witnessed from its uncomfortable seats. The west half of the structure has been moved north a short distance and will serve for the wild west show which will occupy a place on the West Midway. The east half is being torn down and hauled away.

Pleases Mr. Crowley.

Special Agent J. J. Crowley of the Treasury department at Washington is in Council Bluffs to testify before the grand jury against Whittlesey, the defaulting customs official. Mr. Crowley paid a visit to the exposition grounds and was considerably impressed with the magnitude of the coming show as indicated by the buildings.

"I have attended all the expositions held in this country during recent years," he said, "and I must say that the coming exposition here promises to be bigger than any except the World's fair. It will certainly be superior to those held at Nashville and Atlanta. The buildings are larger and more impressive and handsome in every way."

 

Insists on 6,000 Feet.

Wesley Stewart of Sturgis, S. D., made a flying trip to Omaha yesterday afternoon in the interest of the exhibit to be made by the Black Hills district. He assured the officials of the Exhibits department that the Black Hills will make a fine exhibit, especially in minerals and asked that the 6,000 feet of space which has been reserved for that section be held a little longer until the requirements of the exposition can be complied with. He was given until March 20 to comply with the conditions and promised that defensive action will be taken before that time.

Interest in Teachers' Convention.

There was a full attendance at the meeting of the executive committee of the Transmississippi Teachers association yesterday afternoon. Acceptances of invitations to take part in the meeting that is being planned for this city during the exposition were received from Hon. E. Benjamin Andrews, president of Brown University, and Hon. J. Sterling Morton of Nebraska City. Official badges were decided upon and contributions towards the expense of the meeting were received from several counties in this state.

Notes of the Exposition.

Work has been commenced on the Pabst pavilion on the West Midway.

The Concessionaires' club house, a restaurant on the north tract, where meals will be served to employes, is making good progress.

J. E. Lee, one of Louisiana's commissioners, writes that the department of Publicity and Promotion that his state will have a most complete and representative exhibit at the exposition.

Piles are being driven for the Transportation and Agricultural Implement building. Contractor Goldie says work will be pushed on this big building and it will be finished in about thirty days.

Val. Blatz, the Milwaukee brewer, is in the city with his architect to make arrangements for a handsome pavilion which will be erected in the Manufactures building for the large exhibit he will make of his goods.

A meeting of the Board of Fire and Police commissioners with managers Babcock, Reed and Kirkendall, President Wattles and Secretary Wakefield discussed the policing and fire patrol of the exposition grounds last night.

The east end of the lagoon has been drained to enable the gas company to lay a gas main across it along Twentieth street. The water will not be turned on again until the bridges at Twentieth street have been constructed.

The tall iron smokestacks are being hoisted into position above the boilers of the Power building. The boilers are of the upright class, standing about forty feet in height, and the stacks are ninety feet long, making the total height of the stack, in position, about 130 feet above the street.

URGE PURCHASE OF STATUARY

FORCES UNITE AGAINST COMMISSIONERS

Executive Committee, Park Commission and Women's Board Press the County Representatives to Reconsider Action.

The members of the exposition executive committee, each and every member of the executive committee of the Woman's Board of Managers and members of the Board of Park Commissioners are expressing the greatest disappointment at the announcement that the Board of County Commissioners will refuse to co-operate with the exposition management and the park board in securing for the decoration of the exposition and as a bequest to the public parks the lot of permanent statuary which the exposition desires to purchase from Captain Edward Kemeys, the well known sculptor of Indians and wild animals. The proposition as made by Captain Kemeys, through a representative who has been on the ground for some time, is to design an original group, in the size known as semi-heroic, showing an half-naked Indian astride his pony in the act of administering the death blow to a buffalo. In addition to this he proposes to furnish eight single figures of wild animals, life size, the exposition management to have the right to select the animals, the only provision being that they shall be of a distinctively western type. All of these figures are to be of cement on an iron frame, the material being treated by a patented process which is guaranteed to make it permanent in its character. For this work the sculptor asks $15,000 and the exposition management asked the park board and the county commissioners to co-operate with it, each contributing $5,000 toward the purchase, with the provision that the statuary is to become the property of the city after the exposition for the decoration of the city parks.

President Wattles of the exposition and Park Commissioner H. E. Palmer were discussing the status of this matter in the office of the former and both expressed the greatest regret at the report that the county commissioners would refuse to co-operate in the matter.

MOST REASONABLE PROPOSITION.

"If the county refuses to act with the exposition and park board in this matter," said President Wattles, "it means that the exposition grounds will not be embellished with any statuary. We have been trying to devise ways and means for securing some kind of statuary ever since the exposition was started and have been unable to see any way to do it, but this proposition promised to put an end to our troubles in that line. We have been investigating the statuary question for some time and have learned enough about it to know that this proposition is a most reasonable one and to the advantage of the exposition to accept, but we have not seen our way clear to devote $15,000 to that purpose. After going to great expense to erect beautiful buildings and laying out magnificent grounds, if we do not have statuary to add the finishing touch it will be like giving a man a fine suit of clothes and sending him out in the street without any hat. Statuary is absolutely essential to the carrying out of our plans, but we have not the money to pay for it. We have asked the park board and the county to help us out of this dilemma and we feel justified in saying that this proposition is the best that we can expect to receive."

"I feel very much disappointed about the matter," said Captain Palmer. "The board was well satisfied with the proposition and we are especially anxious to secure the Indian and buffalo for Jefferson square. We believe it will be the handsomest and best ornament for that park that could possibly be secured and would soon become a landmark. I hope the commissioners will not pass the resolution that has been introduced, but will help us to get this statuary for our parks.

PROPRIETY BEYOND QUESTION.

"Statuary is a thing you can't put a fixed value on," continued the captain. "Kemeys is one of the most celebrated sculptors of wild animals and Indians in the country and what could be more appropriate than a statue of an Indian and buffalo in Omaha, the recognized center of the Indian country in the olden days. The only question our board has had in the matter has been the permanency of this material, but I am informed that there are statues in Europe made of the same material which have been in existence hundreds of years, and a recent issue of one of the principal scientific papers published in this country contained an article regarding a gigantic statue of this kind which was erected about 300 years ago and which is still standing. If it lasts as long as that I believe we will get out money's worth."

The executive committee of the Woman's board spent considerable time at its regular weekly meeting discussing this statuary question. They had a material interest in the matter, as this committee first agitated the matter of securing several pieces of statuary for the exposition grounds with a view of having them placed in the parks afterward and the progress of the matter has been watched with a great deal of interest. After discussing the matter at length the women formulated a letter to the Board of County Commissioners, urging that body to join the exposition management and the Board of Park Commissioners in purchasing the statuary and giving several reasons why this should be done. Among the reasons were these: "We consider the present an unusual opportunity for securing such valuable and permanent decoration. The far-reaching educational value, both as an exhibit of high art for the exposition and as a perpetual legacy to our community we deem of very great importance. We believe these works of art will be a most fitting souvenir of the great exposition and that the large body of intelligent citizens will commend the wisdom and generosity of the men who provided them; and that the appreciation of all classes of reflect honor upon those who secured them."

This letter was signed by each individual member of the executive committee and transmitted to the county commissioners.

KANSAS MEN VISIT THE GROUNDS.

Leavenworth Citizens Seeing What is Prepared for the Exposition.

A strong delegation of Leavenworth business me​ accompanied Major T. S. Clarkson of the exposition executive department on his return from a trip to Kansas to arouse the interest of the people of that state in the matter of state representation at the exposition. The committee consisted of Mayor John D. Edmond, Edward E. Coombs, general manager of the Leavenworth Street Railway company; E. G. Krezdorn, former county attorney; Louis Latte, editor of the Leavenworth Tribune, and George P. Rothschild, a prominent merchant of Leavenworth.

The party was escorted to the exposition grounds by Major Clarkson, and then went to the Millard hotel for luncheon, after which the various exposition officers were visited and a large amount of information acquired regarding the exposition. The visitors, with the exception of Mr. Coombs, returned home this afternoon.

The visit to the grounds was a great surprise to the Leavenworth delegation. Mayor Edmond spoke for the committee, saying: "We expected to see something fine, after hearing Major Clarkson talk so much about it, but we were simply overwhelmed by the preparations which are being made. We will stir our people vigorously when we return and there is no doubt but Kansas will be well represented by exhibits, and all of our people will visit Omaha during the summer."

Major Clarkson reports that this mission was very successful. He had a long interview with Governor Leedy and the latter agreed to do all in his power to help the matter along. He said he would appoint a strong commission at once and would ask the next legislature to reimburse any subscriber who will assist in raising the $15,000 which must be raised to make the $15,000 raised by the railroads available. Major Clarkson says this latter promise on the part of the governor was all that was necessary to insure the raising of the money and that it will be on hand within a very short time. The governor has been urged to appoint his commission at once and to call a meeting of that body at Omaha in the near future so that the commissioners may see for themselves whether the exposition is all that it has been represented to be.

PREPARES FOR AQUATIC PLANTS.

Beautiful Feature of the Bluff Tract Being Arranged.

Henry A. Dreer of Philadelphia, the leading propagator of aquatic plants in this country, is beginning his arrangements for furnishing the aquatic basins, which will be a prominent and very beautiful feature of the floral decoration of the bluff tract. There will be three of these basins just north of the Horticulture building, directly in the center of the bluff tract. The middle basin will be eighty feet in diameter, and at the east and west sides will be smaller basins, each twenty-five feet in diameter. The large basin has been excavated and the planting of this will be commenced at once. The bottom will be puddled and covered with sand to the depth of several inches. On this frames will be set and the entire basin will be planted with many varieties of beautiful water lilies. In a short time the broad green leaves will appear and float on the surface of the water, and about the latter part of June the flowers will begin to appear. These will present a great variety of colors, and their fragrance will scent the air for a considerable distance on every side.

The side basins, however, will be the greatest attraction to lovers of the beautiful. These basins will be cemented and supplied with heating apparatus to maintain the water at a temperature of 80 degrees at all times. In each of these basins will be planted one specimen of the beautiful Victoria Regia, one of the finest varieties of water lilies in cultivation. One plant of this immense variety will fill one of these basins. Its broad, flat leaves, two or three feet in diameter with upturned edges, float on the water and between the leaves will appear the huge flower, fully a foot in diameter and of surpassing beauty.

These "plants" are started in a greenhouse and put in the basin after the weather is sufficiently warm.

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MILITIA.

What the Exposition Will Offer to the Visiting Guardsmen.

President Wattles has commenced active operations toward securing a militia encampment for Omaha during the summer and has completed arrangements by which military organizations desiring to come to the exposition will be provided with accommodations such as their necessities require.

At the meeting of the executive committee yesterday the president was authorized to make arrangements to provide suitable camp grounds for such of these organizations as desires to come, a large number of troops from different states having already made inquiry regarding the accommodations which will be furnished by the exposition. The president recommended that these accommodations be provided: Camp grounds, lights for the streets in the encampment, water, sanitary conveniences, tents with temporary board floors, provided tents can be secured from the government without cost; straw for tents; one free admission for each member of the organization who accompanies it.

These accommodations are substantialy​ the same as have been provided by former expositions, and it is expected that the inducements thus offered will result in gathering at Omaha a large force of militia. The only return asked of the troops is that they shall participate in any parades which may occur during their stay. A proper camping ground will be provided in the neighborhood of the exposition grounds.

NATIONAL FIREMEN'S TOURNAMENT.

President Wattles and Chief Redell Plan One for Omaha.

Arrangements have been made by which the tournament of the National Fremen's​ association will be held in Omaha during the summer. The entire matter has been turned over to President Wattles and Chief Redell of the Omaha fire department, and they have made arrangements by which an enclosed space of sufficient size for the exhibitions will be provided. This space lies north of the Missouri Pacific railway tracks and south of Ames avenue, between Twentieth and Twenty-fourth streets, being now enclosed by the exposition fence. On this space will   be created a suitable building for storing apparatus and other property of the firemen and another building which will be used for exhibition drills and for an actual fire. Plenty of water will be provided.

Chief Redell is most enthusiastic over the possibilities of this tournament. The last national tournament of firemen was held in Chicago about twenty years ago and was attended by over 25,000 people, there being nearly 15,000 firemen in the parade. He predicts that on this occasion there will be fully 50,000 people in attendance.

A committee will arrange for purses which will be offered for the several contests. There will be $20,000 offered in prizes.

Bids for Sodding Grounds.

Bids for furnishing 20,000 yards of sod for the main court were received at the office of the Department of Buildings and Grounds. Four bids were received and the amount desired will be divided among the bidders in order to make sure that the desired quantity will be supplied quickly. It is expected that the grass seed sown on the bluff tract will supply the green covering for that portion of the grounds.

SETTLES ON THE GROUNDS

LEASE MADE FOR AMES AVENUE TRACT

Ideal Place for Base Ball—Plenty of Room to Line 'Em Out—Street Cars Run Right to the Gates.

The location of the base ball park has been settled at last and anyone who wants to see the Omaha club of 1898 play ball will find it at Twenty-fifth street and Ames avenue. The lease for these grounds was signed by Manager O'Brien yesterday afternoon and the task of converting the site into a first class ball park will begin at once. They will be ready for the use of the team in practice by April 1 and the grand stand and other improvements will be completed soon after.

The new grounds constitute an ideal base ball site, aside from the fact that they are a little further from the business district than those previously occupied. Manager O'Brien has waited until as late as possible in the hope of being able to secure the University grounds, but it has been impossible to reconcile the numerous interests involved in that site, and it was finally decided that the Ames avenue grounds were next in point of merit. The new location will afford the most commodious and naturally adapted park that the city has ever had, and when the improvements are completed the city will have one of the finest ball parks in the country. The grounds will by 620x675 feet, thus affording ample room for fast fielding and also a commodious quarter stretch for the use of carriages. Very little grading will be necessary and a very little rolling and scraping will put the grounds in admirable condition. Manager O'Brien will put a force of men at work at once to build the fence and the other improvements will follow rapidly.

While the new grounds are about five minutes' ride further north than the University grounds, they are really almost as easy of access. The additional riding time is very nearly offset by the fact that both the Sherman Avenue and cross-town lines will deposit patrons right at the gates, while it would be necessary to walk from two to four blocks to reach the University grounds from any of the motor lines. While the latter was the first choice of the management as well as of most of the patrons of the game it is believed that the new location will be satisfactory. Everyone who has been out to examine the site is enthusiastic over it and the big park will be most acceptable after seeing the game played in cooped-up grounds for two or three years. The man who hits the ball over the fence at the Ames avenue park can get $100 of the manager's money and the people who like to see the sharp fielding of long hits will be fully accommodated. When all the advantages of the location are considered it is not unlikely that the public will be more than pleased with it as soon as it becomes accustomed to the change.

President Frank Murphy of the Street Railway company has tacitly assured the management that the Twenty-fourth street line will be extended to Ames avenue and with this improvement the facilities for reaching the grounds will be better than those that are enjoyed by any other city in the league except Detroit.

Manager O'Brien is making arrangements to begin the transformation of the grounds at Twenty-fifth street and Ames avenue into a base ball park and before the end of the week a gang of men will be at work building the fence and grading the diamond. The fence will be built of matched lumber, to the probable consternation of the small boys who cherish happy anticipations of spending sunny afternoons with first one eye and then the other glued to a crack. The plans for the grand stand will be completed today and this feature of the work will be pushed along with the rest.

LUTHERANS AND SUNDAY OPENING.

Position of Two Divines on the Question Given.

Rev. Luther M. Kuhns of Omaha writes to the Lutheran Observer, the organ of the "General Synod" Lutherans, as follows:

The Transmississippi Exposition is to be held in Omaha from June to November. The Ministerial union of Omaha has been exerting itself to secure the closing of the gates of the exposition on Sunday. A committee of the Ministerial union was appointed to wait upon the directory of the exposition, if possible, to secure this, and another committee was appointed to secure the co-operation of the presbyteries, synod and conferences, and the support of the various young people's organizations in this effort. The various denominations and young people's societies have endorsed the effort of the Ministerial union to secure Sunday closing.

At the last regular monthly meeting of the Ministerial union the committee to wait upon the directorate of the exposition reported that "the executive committee of the exposition directory declines to confer at the present time with the committee in regard to this matter." Upon recommendation of the committee the Ministerial union declared itself opposed to Sunday opening of the exposition.

The Jewish rabbi and the Unitarian minister of this city have expressed themselves as favorable to Sunday opening. Besides these, the following letter from the pastor of one of the Missouri Lutheran churches of the city will be of sad interest to General Synod Lutherans:

(Here follows the letter of Rev. J. S. Her, commenting on the sermon of Rev. Howard McAyeal, published in The Bee of February 7.)

Commenting on the above the Lutheran Witness, organ of the "Missouri" Lutherans, has the following to say:

Above communication has furnished the editor of the Lutheran Observer the material for an editorial on "Sabbath Desecration." We submit, in all kindness, (1) that Rev. Her is far from teaching, or inviting, the desecration of the Christian Sunday; for he himself states reasons why the closing of the exposition to be held at Omaha next summer might be desirable. (2) Rev. Her appeals to scripture and confession; with scripture and confession he should be met. (3) Rev. Her places himself on the sound basis of a well known scriptural and political principle, that of the separation of church and state. It should be shown that this principle does not apply in the case in question. Expressions of grief and pious exclamations will avail nothing with a conscience bound by the word. Rev. Her makes the impression of a conscientious person. We have always found that such persons can be easily brought to see an error and acknowledge it. Truly, after the Observer has gone so far in the matter, Rev. Her would seem entitled to further consideration. Will the Observer undertake the argument against the position of Rev. Her?

RATES FOR EXPOSITION TRAVEL.

Local Passenger Men Have the Matter in Hand.

There is some prospect that the matter of providing reduced rates for the Transmississippi Exposition will soon be taken up by the general passenger agents of western lines. The matter is now in the hands of a sub-committee of passenger agents of local lines. The general committee met about four months ago to discuss the work of securing reduced rates for the exposition. The matter was at that time referred to a subcommittee, consisting of E. L. Lomax, general passenger agent of the Union Pacific, and John Francis, general passenger agent of the B. & M. The sub-committee has not yet made its report to the general committee.

The other lines in the Western Passenger association, as well as the passenger associations in other parts of the country, are waiting for the local committee to make its report before taking any action in the matter. At a recent meeting of western lines in Chicago it was agreed that whatever rates should be recommended by the general passenger agents of the lines entering this city should be accepted and participated in by the other lines. A little over two months will intervene before the opening of the exposition. The World's fair did not secure the advantages of cheap rates to Chicago until the fair was well advanced. This was due to the tardiness of lines there agreeing on reduced rates.

Working for the Exposition.

WEST POINT, Neb., March 16.—(Special.)—In the matter of subscriptions in aid of the construction of the Boys' and Girls' building at the Transmississippi Exposition Cuming county leads all the counties in the transmississippi country. Contributions have been made by men and women in every station of life, from the richest to the poorest. Much credit is due to Mrs. D. C. Giffert's untiring efforts in behalf of the exposition in this county. In addition to large sums of money given, Cuming county citizens have purchased 600 copies of the Hatchet and have in other ways contributed to the exposition funds.

OPPOSE THE STATUARY PLAN

COMMISSIONERS EXPRESS THEIR OPINIONS

Will Not Vote to Assist the Park Board in Acquiring Permanent Groups for the Exposition and Parks.

There is nothing to indicate that the members of the Board of County Commissioners will change their minds and vote to appropriate the sum of $5,000 to be used in the purchase of nine pieces of statuary for the exposition grounds. While they have not formally rejected the request, they have offered a resolution, which has been referred to the committee of the whole for consideration. This resolution is in the nature of a rejection, and if its adoption is rejected by the committee, the whole matter will thus be disposed of.

"In the interest of economy," said Commissioner Ostrom, "I don't see how we can appropriate the sum of $5,000, or any other amount, to buy statuary to be placed on the exposition grounds. Aside from the question of costs, there are several other reasons why we should not vote $5,000 to assist in buying these figures. In the first place, they are purely park attractions, and if the members of the Board of Park Commissioners want them, let them pay for them out of their funds. We have quite an amount of exposition money on hand, but we are going to need about all of it in preparing our county exhibit and maintaining it during the exposition. After the fruit and vegetable season opens, we will have to replace the exhibits at least once each week. This cannot be done for nothing. In addition to this, we have got to help in maintaining police regulations on the ground by paying our proportion of the salary of the guards.

"If the exposition people are so anxious for the statuary, as it has been intimated that they are, why don't they appropriate $10,000 and let us pay an aditional​ $5,000 for the maintenance of the big show? I don't think that I shall vote to appropriate money for statuary."

Speaking of the proposition to buy statuary, Commissioner Harte said: "It is too much money. They are making figures and groups of figures for the purpose of ornamenting the buildings on the exposition grounds, and they are not paying anything like what is asked for these nine pieces that it is proposed to sell us. If the price was anything within reason, I might vote for an appropriation. At this time I can't see how I can agree to put one-third of $15,000 into nine pieces of cement. It's too much money."

Chairman Kierstead said: "Unless I change my mind, and at this time I can't see any reason for so doing, I shall vote against the proposition to buy this statuary. I want to be liberal, but I don't think that we should pay any man the profit that this party who makes the statuary wants."

Commissioner Hofeldt said: "Statuary is pretty and it is attractive, but I don't see how I can be a party to paying $15,000 for nine pieces that can be made in a month and at a cost of not more than $500."

Commissioner Hocter said: "We are willing to help the exposition with all of the proceeds of the $100,000 of bonds, but we want to put the money where it will do the most good. We want to advertise the state and the county and I think that the best way to do so is to make an exhibit of the resources of this locality. If we can have more money than we need, we can turn it over to be used in helping to pay the actual expenses of the exposition. If the exposition management wants the statuary, why don't it go on and buy it. It has done so in other instances."

"WINGED VICTORY" TO BE SHOWN.

French Government Allows a Copy of the Famous Statue to Be Made.

One of the prominent features of the statuary display in the Art building will be a full size copy of one of the most famous statues in existence, the Winged Victory of Samothrace. The French commissioner for the exposition, Frederick Mayer of Paris, notifies the exposition authorities that he has secured a special concession from the French government which will allow a copy of this famous work to be made for the exposition, and he reported that the figure could be made for 1,175 francs. The matter was laid before the executive committee and Manager Bruce was authorized to accept the proposition. He cabled Mr. Mayer to close the bargain and ship the statue as soon as possible. Chairman Paul Charlton of the art committee hopes to make arrangements to keep this very desirable work of art in Omaha after the exposition closes, but one offer has already been made by a museum in another city to take the state for $200, and the contest promises to develop some sharp competition.

 

The Winged Victory is one of the most famous ancient statues which has ever been discovered. It was unearthed in the valley of Samothrace in 1867 by a representative of the French government. It was in fragments and was removed to the Louvre and put together. About eight years later the gigantic pedestal was discovered and this was also removed to the Louvre, where pedestal and figure were restored to their original positions as far as possible. The pedestal represents the stony prow of a galley, below which sea waves are represented by sculpture. The colossal figure, more than double life size, towers above this massive and lofty hulk. The statue is badly mutilated, but it shows a fully draped female figure which has alighted on the prow of a ship, sweeping down with lightning speed, the powerful form, with rushing drapery, seeming to force a way for this imposing goddess of victory. The dainty wings of the goddess are extended and might and power are delineated in every line of the figure and drapery. The figure is of Parian marble, and the exquisite nicety with which every detail is worked out marks this as one of the most remarkable examples of the great genius of the Hellenic sculptors which has ever been discovered. Careful calculations by antiquarians places the origin of this figure in the third century, B. C.

CLASSIFYING HIS MANY EXHIBITS.

Superintendent Taylor Working on a Big Contract.

Superintendent Taylor of the Bureau of Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry and Irrigation is engaged in classifying the many exhibits which belong in this department and arranging for the location of the displays. He has decided to locate the forestry display in the big Transportation and Agricultural Implement building which is being erected on the north tract, as this is the only building where a sufficient space can be secured without interfering with other exhibits. The Oregon exhibit, according to Mr. Dosch of Portland, who was here early in the week, will include one "stick" sixty feet in length and five feet square, intended to show the size of the lumber obtainable in that prolific section of the universe. To accommodate such large exhibits will require a great deal of open space and this can only be obtained in the building referred to. There are a number of applications from other states which desire to make forestry exhibits and these will all be placed in this same building.

Date for Special Stamps.

The announcement that the special exposition postage stamps will be issued about May 15 is a source of great gratification to the exposition management and especially to the Department of Publicity and Promotion. Orders have been received for several hundred thousand of these stamps from large mercantile establishments and the department has received many inquiries regarding the probable time of issue.

TROOPS COMING TO OMAHA

ORDER TO BE ISSUED IN NEAR FUTURE

Soldiers in Department of the Missouri to Rendezvous in Nebraska's Metropolis the Coming Summer.

WASHINGTON, March 18.—(Special Telegram.)—Today it was given out at the War department that Adjutant General Corbin would shortly issue an order directing the troops in the Department of the Missouri, formerly the Department of the Platte, to rendezvous at Omaha during the summer. This order will bring to the Gate City thousands of people in addition to the soldiers and will prove one of the drawing cards of the exposition. Mr. Rosewater has been especially interested in this cantonment and as the Department of the Missouri includes some of the crack government troops, their assemblage at Omaha will be appreciated by all lovers of the army.

Manager Rosewater of the Department of Publicity and Promotion of the Omaha Exposition was greatly elated today on account of the great amount of work he had accomplished while but a day in Washington, having arrived from New York this morning. Everything is working splendidly in behalf of the Indian congress project. He held a conference with Captain W. H. Mercer, agent of the Omaha and Winnebago Indians, who will have charge of the encampment; Assistant Commissioner of Indian Affairs Tonner and Colonel Larrabee, and ascertained that the Indian department was actively at work arranging details for this great ethnological event. Secretary Bliss of the Interior department was also seen and while emphatically stating that the amount expended would have to be within the appropriation, he went so far as to say the department would issue rations to those Indians who would be entitled to rations on the reservation. This concession was greatly appreciated, as the decision will permit of many more Indians.

Mr. Rosewater also secured an immense concession from the Navy department, in that it has agreed to permit the Marine band to go to Omaha, providing proper inducements are made to the men. The Fort Omaha military reservation will be turned over to the Omaha Exposition management during the months beginning June and ending November. The order has heretofore been issued allowing the use of the grounds for the exposition, but within a short time a new proposition will issue directing that the Omaha Exposition authorities take care of the garrison and be allowed the use of the buildings. A number of persons have been trying to get hold of the buildings for a fair, but Secretary Alger thought it best for the Omaha Exposition to have the use of the buildings and the order will issue at once. It is expected that the transmississippi stamps will be issued by May 15.

Bureau of Public Comfort.

The Bureau of Public Comfort has not yet commenced active operations in the work assigned to it. An office has been opened on the sixth floor of the Paxton block, but Chairman Dudley Smith says he will not commence active operations until about May 1. He believes that a great many people will change their residence before that time and that a canvass made now would be of little value for that reason. About May 1 he says he will put on a force of canvassers and make a house-to-house canvass of the entire city, obtaining all particulars regarding location, name, number of rooms to rent, number of meals which will be furnished, rates and all the other data which will be required to properly inform strangers in the city regarding lodging and board.

In the meantime Mr. Smith is compiling a list of the hotels in the city, the number of rooms available, rates, etc., and writing to the officials who had charge of public comfort departments of other expositions regarding the methods pursued by them, with a view to profiting by their experience.

Notes of the Exposition.

Manager Lindsey telegraphed to exposition headquarters yesterday from New York that Lawrence Minot, the representative of the estate which owns the Union National bank building, had subscribed $500 to the exposition.

The concession for selling popcorn and peanuts on the exposition grounds was let to the Out of Sight company of Chicago by the executive committee yesterday. There was a warm contest for this concession, several competitors being in the field.

Trees Along the Tracks.

John P. Brown of Connersville, Ind., is in the city in the interest of forestry extension in the west. He is an expert on the planting of trees, and comes to Omaha from Arbor Lodge, Nebraska City, where he has been in consultation with Hon. J. Sterling Morton. The latter is in cordial sympathy with the plans of the Indiana man, and is going to help him in his efforts to get the great railway systems of the west to do some tree planting in the territory tributary to their lines.

At present Mr. Brown is in consultation with General Manager Holdrege of the B. & M. and other Burlington officials on his mission. He has their assurances of support, and while in the west will make a trip over all the lines of the Burlington west of the Mississippi river to investigate the matter of planting the right trees in the right places. He also is being backed by Collis P. Huntington, president of the Southern Pacific company, who has promised to help the cause of forestry along the lines of that system. MMr.​ Brown says he is confident that if the railroads and the press of the west take up the mission of those who are trying to secure general tree planting in the west, that this section of the country will soon enjoy the most beneficial effects therefrom.

Endorsement of the Homeopathists.

The last number of the American Homeopathist, published at Cleveland, O., contains the following editorial bearing on the meeting of the Homeopathic institute in Omaha: "We are assured by Dr. W. H. Hanchett and other members of the Omaha committee that no fear need be entertained but that the capacity of the hotels of that city will be ample for all the demands of the institute. There may be some of our members who have been to Europe a few times but have never been west of the Mississippi river until they went to the institute at Denver and who, therefore, have had the thought that Omaha is a small town on the outskirts of civilization. A cursory reading of some of the literature which is being issued by the exposition company, after deducting a fair margin for exuberance of spirits, will convince anyone that it is a large city and that the exposition is second only to the World's fair; and that even here, in many details, it surpasses the fair. At any rate it will be a beautiful picture and one which no good American can afford to miss. It will be well, however, not to defer engaging rooms until the best rooms are taken. It costs but a postal card."

ASSURES A MILITARY CAMP

Omaha to See a Great Gathering of Regular Soldiers.

WAR DEPARTMENT'S PLEASING ACTION

Exposition Authorities Greatly Gratified by the News that a Cantonment of Troops Has Been Ordered.

The officials of the exposition are greatly elated over the news from Washington regarding the encampment of the regular troops of the Department of the Missouri at Omaha during the exposition. This is a matter which has been quietly agitated for some time, and the approval of the War department was all that was required to insure its complete success. President Wattles has been conducting the negotiations with General Coppinger to bring about this result, and he expresses the great gratification at the success which has been attained.

It was for this purpose that application was made to the War department for the control of the old Fort Omaha reservation, the intention being to use this ground for the encampment of troops The department some time ago gave authority to the exposition to use the land, but reserved the buildings. The exposition has since been endeavoring to get permission to use the buildings, also, and this will probably be granted.

The plans for this cantonment of troops of the Department of the Missouri are not thoroughly worked out, but in conferences between President Wattles and General Coppinger the plan considered has been to bring to Omaha one or two regiments at one time, allowing this force to remain for about two weeks and then ordering another similar detachment to relieve it. In this way a good-sized force of regulars would be at hand at all times and all the troops of the department be given a short season of camp life. Each regiment will bring its field equipage with it and make camp on the old fort grounds, where the regulation camp routine will be maintained. The daily drills and field evolutions of the troops will take place inside the exposition grounds, where a suitable place of sufficient size will be provided for the purpose.

The troops in the Department of the Missouri include a number of regiments of cavalry as well as some of the finest infantry regiments of the army, and the attraction afforded by the evolutions of these troops, especially the field drills of the cavalry forces, will undoubtedly prove a very strong drawing card.

The effect of this action of the War department on the militia of the surrounding states is expected to be very pronounced. Arrangements are being made by President Wattles for the use of a section of land in the immediate vicinity of the old fort for the encampment of such militia organizations as may visit Omaha during the exposition. This land will be provided with many of the necessary requirements for a military camp, including tents with board floors, water, sanitary arrangements, lights and straw for bed ticks. The advantages to be derived from such a camp in the immediate vicinity of a large camp of regular troops are recognized by the military men as forming a strong inducement, of itself, to the troops of the national guard of neighboring states to come to Omaha for that purpose, aside form the inducements offered by the exposition and many other attractions, and it is expected that the military features of the exposition may yet assume considerable proportions.

FOR AN EDUCATIONAL EXHIBIT.

Superintendent Jackson Tells of the Space that is Available.

Superintendent W. R. Jackson of the Educational department of the Nebraska Exposition commission has issued a circular in which are given a number of additional notices to teachers and others interested in the exhibit to be made by the Nebraska schools at the exposition.

This circular states that applications for space have now been received from seventy-two of the ninety counties in the state, representing a teaching force of over 2,300. This includes 322 rural schools, 186 graded or high schools (Omaha, Lincoln, etc., counting as one), eight state institutions, including the schools for defectives, industrial schools and the University of Nebraska; five private normals and business colleges, five denominational schools and the State Chautauqua.

The superintendent gives notice that additional space has been secured for the educational exhibit and that the amount now available will allow each teacher to have space for two mounted cardboards, each 22x28 inches.

 

Teachers are advised to prepare three cardboards, the third to be kept in reserve to replace work which may become soiled. It is announced that all work must be in the hands of the superintendent by April 20.

Spreads the Gospel in Wisconsin.

Chairman John C. Koch of the Wisconsin Exposition commission has been telling the people of Milwaukee about the exposition since his return from his recent visit to Omaha. In an interview published in one of the Milwaukee papers the former mayor of that city said that the work of preparation is progressing very rapidly and satisfactorily and he had no doubt that everything will be in place and ready by June 1, the date set for the formal opening. "I was every foot of exhibit space was taken, and that no more space can be contracted for," said Mr. Koch, "and I guess the statement is correct, because while I was there a business friend of mine in the hardware business told me an organization with which he was connected had just given up 75,000 feet of space, owing to some hitch in the work of the intended exhibitors, and in less than twenty-four hours every foot of the surrendered space was taken and contracts signed. While there we closed contracts for the erection of the Wisconsin building, and it will be completed within six weeks. The new 'White City' has something of the general appearance of the one at Chicago, though the buildings are, of course, much smaller, but in some instances I think they are handsomer and neater."

MORE CONVENTIONS ARE COMING.

Thirteen Gatherings Secured During the Last Week.

During the last week Secretary Utt of the Commercial club has secured the dates of sitting of thirteen additional conventions, making a total of about forty-five, or less than one-half, scheduled up to date. The following is the list:

Society of American Florists, August 16, 17, 18 and 19, 1898; William J. Stewart, secretary, Bromfield street, Boston, Mass. National; delegates, 500.

Western Traveling Men's association, July; Arthur L. Shutz, secretary, Grand Island; State; delegates, 500.

Transmississippi Fruit Festival association, June 1 to November 1; W. G. Hervey, secretary, Omaha. Interstate.

Nebraska State Horticultural society, July; C. H. Barnard, secretary, Table Rock. Interstate; attendance, 250.

American Association of Farmers' Institutes, October; F. W. Taylor, secretary, Omaha. National; attendance, 350.

Nebraska State Medical society, June 14, 15 and 16; W. O. Bridges, president, Omaha. State; attendance, 500.

Independent Order of Foresters, July 19; Finley L. Coombs, secretary, Omaha. State; attendance, 2,500.

National Alliance Theatrical Stage employes, July 18; J. Bayard, secretary, Omaha. State; attendance, 100.

United State League Local Loan and Building associations, July 27 and 28; H. F. Cellarius, secretary, Cincinnati, O. National; attendance, 150.

Bohemian Day Transmississippi and International Exposition, August 27; V. J. Sebek, secretary, Omaha. National; attendance, 10,000.

Western District Bohemian tournament, August 28 to 30; V. J. Sebek, secretary, Omaha. Interstate; attendance, 300.

National Convention Bohemian Turners, August 31; B. Bartos, secretary, Omaha. National; delegates, 4,000.

Danish Lutheran Church of American, June 13 to 15; Rev. P. Grarengaard, secretary, Brayton, Ia. Interstate; delegates, 200.

FORM A PENNSYLVANIA CLUB.

Natives of the Keystone State Make a Local Organization.

In response to the call of Major Clarkson about twenty natives of Pennsylvania met at exposition headquarters and formed an organization for the purpose of assisting in the celebration of "Pennsylvania day" at the exposition. Major Clarkson explained that the governor of Pennsylvania and his suite will visit the exposition some time during the summer and a large number of people will come from that state to visit the exposition, making it desirable to perfect arrangements for properly entertaining the visitors and making them feel that they are among friends.

It was stated that there are at least 10,000 Pennsylvanians in Nebraska, some of the counties having permanent organizations. Burt county, for instance, was reported to have a permanent organization which holds meeting at regular intervals. A search of the poll books shows that Douglas county has about 800 voters who are natives of Pennsylvania, and it was decided to be desirable to effect an organization to get these people together, the idea being to have all native Pennsylvanians in the state come to Omaha on Pennsylvania day and participate in the enjoyment.

With this in view a permanent organization was effected by electing the following officers: General C. F. Manderson, president; Major T. S. Clarkson, vice president; W. G. Shriver, secretary; H. B. Irey, treasurer. A committee on by-laws was appointed as follows: W. G. Shriver, D. B. Houck and W. S. Askwith. This committee will report at a meeting to be held at exposition headquarters next Saturday at 12:30 p. m.

MISSOURI COMING IN FULL FORCE.

Plans Made for Some Very Creditable Exhibits.

The Missouri Exposition commission is pursuing the same energetic course which has marked its work since the visit of the commission in a body to Omaha to see exactly what was being done and judge what might be expected. In a recent interview published in a Missouri paper Secretary Carroll said that he felt very confident, from the returns he had received, that Missouri will excel all the other states in the exhibits of horses, mules, cattle, hogs, cotton, corn, wheat, oats, flax, tobacco, fruits and berries, lead, zinc, granite, sandstone, limestone, onyx, lumber, and last, but not least, manufactured articles of many kinds.

Secretary Carroll also said that a legal opinion has been obtained in Buchanan county to the effect that county courts have power to make appropriations to aid in local exhibits. In some counties the courts went ahead weeks ago and made appropriations, but in others they have held back on the claim that they doubted their authority to do so. The commissioners hope that the ruling in the Buchanan county case will have a good effect on the counties where no help has been secured from the county courts.

One of Wyoming's Beauties.

The Department of Ways and Means has received the photograph of Mrs. M. A. Adams of Sundance, Wyo., one of the women selected by the vice president of Wyoming to represent that state in the composite photograph for the exposition medal. The picture has been forwarded to New York to be incorporated in the composite photograph.

HURRY EXPOSITION STAMPS

Officials in Charge Urged to Get the Issue Out Quickly.

LITTLE STICKERS ARE QUITE ARTISTIC

Possibility of Regular Stamps Being Displaced by the Exposition Issue During the Big Show.

WASHINGTON, March 19.—(Special Telegram.)—Mr. Rosewater had a long talk today with Claude Johnson, in charge of the bureau of printing and engraving, in relation to the exposition stamps. The chairman saw the designs for the stamps and expressed himself as greatly pleased with their appropriateness and their artistic character. Mr. Rosewater regretted that there could not have been some distinctive designation on the stamps, but he was shown that neither the Columbian stamps nor those issued for the Centennial were thus marked. Later he saw Third Assistant Postmaster General Merritt and urged the importance of having the present series of stamps withdrawn from use in order that the Omaha series of stamps may be made valuable to stamp collectors, use being an element of value. Merritt agreed to take up the subject, and also pledged the department to hasten their preparation.

Interior department officials are becoming greatly interested in the forthcoming Indian congress at the Omaha exposition, some of the ablest ethnologists in the country having given a strong endorsement to the idea of grouping the Indians for educational purposes. Prof. Mooney of the department will probably be assigned to detail work in arranging the convention, his knowledge of Indian tribes and customs being most exhaustive.

Secretary Bliss today rendered a second opinion on contests over lands within the limits of the Sioux City and Pacific railroad grant in O'Brien county, Iowa. The case decided today was that of Schneider against Links, Willer and others. Schneider purchased the land in controversy form the railroad company in 1883 and in January, 1886, filed notice of his intention to purchase the land in accordance with the notice of the department after the supreme court decision declaring the lands forfeited to the government. He claimed the land under the act of March 3, 1887, as a purchaser in good faith from the company. Links, Willer and others made homestead entries for land in February at the time of the opening under departmental instructions. The local officers decided in favor of Schneider. This decision was reversed by the land commissioner. The secretary today overruled the latter and awarded the land to Schneider as an innocent purchaser under the forfeiture act of 1887. The decision today in favor of the purchaser and the former decision in favor of the settler will determine the disposition of a number of contests, involving about 23,000 acres of lands declared forfeited by the supreme court.

Atwell L. Burr was today appointed watchman in the new government building at Omaha at a salary of $720 per year, the civil service commission having made the appointment. Burr was recommended by Senator Thurston, having taken the examination for watchman at Grand Island last year.

Congressman Sutherland has been authorized by the committee on private claims to report favorably bills for Isaac Marsh of Wellfleet, and George M. Anderson of Mariaville, Neb.

M. P. Keef of Omaha is in the city.

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY COMING.

Will Probably Make an Exhibit at the Exposition.

Princeton university will in all probability have an exhibit at the Transmississippi Exposition commensurate with its important position in the educational world of this country. Clement Chase visited the members of the faculty on his recent eastern trip and secured their promise to put in such a display if arrangements for a suitable manager could be made. This difficulty seems to be overcome by a proposition made by J. T. Downing, a Princetonian now in the city.

Mr. Downing has been in the city for several weeks on business, and while here became impressed with the idea that his house should put in an exhibit at the exposition. He informed the publishers to this effect, and his brother, one of the managers, is now looking over the situation. Both men are convinced that the Scribners should have a display and the result will probably be that one will be put in.

In case that J. T. Downing is installed as manager of this exhibit he is ready and willing to look after the one of Princeton University and has written to the faculty of that institution to that effect. Princeton had a magnificent exhibit at the World's fair and it is likely that one as good will be installed here. The grounds and buildings reproduced on a small scale and many historic relics of the revolutionary era of this country were displayed.

Women Beautify the Street.

The women living on Sherman avenue have formed an organization which they have named the Sherman Avenue Decorating club, the purpose of the organization being to improve the appearance of the main street leading to the exposition grounds by painting and otherwise improving the appearance of the houses along the street, beautifying the yards and adding to the beauty of that greatly traveled thoroughfare in many other ways. Among the schemes which the women have evolved is one for placing a bracket on the side of each telegraph pole, which is toward the street and on each bracket they propose a potted plant. The telephone company and street railway company will be called on to improve the appearance of their poles by painting them white or by replacing them with more sightly ones. The Missouri Pacific Railway company will be asked to improve and park the vacant land between its tracks and Sherman avenue, and property owners all along the street will be asked to show why they should not do their portion toward beautifying this street.

The officers of this society are: Mrs. W. Bishop, president; Mrs. Joseph Houska, treasurer; Mrs. James Redmon, secretary. The society met at the house of Mrs. Joseph Redmon last night, their coming being a complete surprise to Mrs. Redmon, but the visitors were pleasantly entertained and an interesting business meeting was held.

Statuary for the Arch.

The statuary for the Administration arch has been completed and has been taken out to the exposition grounds. These figures were made by Sculptor Walter Mettler at his temporary studio down town. The main group will be placed over the cornice at the center of the south front of the building. This group consists of three figures, the central figure being seated on a throne in a watchful attitude, holding in one hand a scepter, being representative of Administration. At the feet of the central figure are two messengers, one at either side. The corner pavilions are surmounted by four figures, one at each corner. These are seated, each holding a flaming torch above the head.

Work in New Mexico.

Special Agent C. E. Llewellyn reports to the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he attended a meeting of the New Mexico Exposition commission on the 15th inst., and found that all matters in relation to an exhibit are in good condition. He says the mineral exhibit, which is being collected by J. J. Leeson, added to the already large collection belonging to Mr. Leeson, will make this display one of the finest at the exposition. A good showing will also be made in other lines, particularly in agriculture.

Drawings of State Buildings.

Secretary Carroll of the Missouri commission has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he will send a perspective drawing of the Missouri building in a few days for publication in exposition literature.

A handsome water color drawing of the Minnesota building has been received by the department. It shows a handsome building, two stories in height, the Swiss style of architecture being followed. The building is to be of logs with the bark on and will be a most attractive structure.

A pen drawing of the Montana building is another received by the department. This shows a two-story building of staff exterior, with handsome ornamentation and very attractive in appearance.

 

Notes of the Exposition.

R. P. Bringhurst of St. Louis, the sculptor who is "doing" the sculpture on the Art building, has been awarded the contract for the statuary on the Mines building.

The plans and specifications for the Arch of the States have been delivered to the Department of Buildings and Grounds, and bids for the construction will be asked for at once.

The drawings and specifications for International hall, the building to be erected on Twentieth street just north of the Manufactures building, have been completed and bids for the construction of the building will be asked for. This building will be devoted entirely to foreign exhibits.

Dr. W. Seward Webb, president of the Wagner Palace Car company and member of the New York Exposition commission, has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion that he will be in Omaha Monday and will confer with the exposition officials regarding the work of the commission.

ILLINOIS AND EXPOSITION

SUCKER STATE PLANS A GREAT EXHIBIT

Clark E. Carr, President of the Commission, Talks of What His People Intend to Do at Omaha.

Clark E. Carr of Galesburg, president of the Illinois Exposition commission, Colonel W. H. Harper, chairman of the executive committee, and H. R. Wilson, architect of the Illinois building, are in the city to make arrangements regarding the annex which is to be made to the Illinois building to serve as an art gallery. In company with T. R. Kimball, architect-in-chief of the exposition, the Illinois delegation visited the grounds and the location of the Illinois annex was agreed upon. It will be 30x50 feet in size and the same height as the main Illinois building, with which it will be connected by an artistic colonnade. The annex at once, in order to complete it as soon as possible.

General Carr was quite enthusiastic regarding the part Illinois will play in the coming exposition and said the state will be represented in the most extensive manner. The commission has been doing energetic work to arouse interest among the manufacturers and many other interests in the state and President Carr says all of these interests says all of these interests will be represented by large exhibits of a high order. These matters are being looked after by the commissioners to whom they have been assigned and the indications are very favorable for a fine showing in every department.

The mining interests will make a fine showing, in the opinion of General Carr, the large mine owners having been interested in the matter of Judge Wall of DuQuoin. The breeders of fancy high class live stock will also make fine exhibits. In this line will be a magnificent showing of blooded cattle by the Illinois Live Stock Breeders' association and breeders of fine strains of sheep and horses are making unusual preparations for an exhibit that shall beat the world. The horticulturists of the state are greatly interested and a fine showing of all kinds of fruit will be made.

Regarding the Illinois building General Carr said it will be very handsomely decorated, the leading houses of Chicago having been asked to make figures on decorating the building. It is proposed to make the interior present an appearance in keeping with the artistic exterior and liberal use will be made of some of the handsome statuary made for the World's fair. The annex will be liberally decorated with statuary and paintings, the principal places being occupied by four large paintings of the World's fair by John Key. A large number of smaller paintings will be hung in the galleries and foyer.

HAS THE SANCTION OF CANADA.

Dominion Government Will Aid in the Exposition Work.

British Vice Consul M. A. Hall of this city, who went to Canada as the special representative of the exposition management to induce the Canadian government to reconsider its determination not to make an exhibit at the exposition, has returned and reports that his mission was very successful and that the Canadian exhibit in International hall will be a very creditable showing.

Mr. Hall visited Ottawa and had interviews with all of the leading officials in the dominion government and with the most influential members of the Dominion parliament. He encountered very little encouragement at first, the officials politely informing him that the matter had been disposed of and no exhibit would be made, but by dint of personal effort he succeeded in having the subject reopened and an appropriation was made for an exhibit. The Canadian government will occupy about 4,000 square feet of space in International hall and will make a collective exhibit, showing minerals, agricultural products and manufactured goods.

The Canadian Pacific railroad will co-operate with the government. In this connection, the Canadian Gazette, the official organ of the government, in its issue of March 12, prints the full text of the diplomatic correspondence, carrying with it the invitation of the exposition officials to the queen and her colonies to participate in the exposition. The invitation of President Wattles, the letter of Minister John Hay transmitting it to the marquis of Salisbury, and the letter of transmittal to the governor general of Canada, are printed in full together with the regulations of the United States Treasury department regulating the entry of foreign exhibits. This matter occupied three pages of the Gazette and is a formal notice to all the inhabitants of Canada that the government gives its official sanction to the exposition.

EMPIRE STATE TO MAKE A SHOW.

Dr. Webb Expresses His Determination to Have New York in Line.

President Wattles feels greatly elated over the effect a visit to the exposition grounds had upon Dr. W. Seward Webb, president of the Wagner Palace Car company and a member of the New York Exposition commission. Just prior to the arrival of the sleeping car magnate in this city a letter had been received from him, in which he stated that he could not find the time to give a great deal of attention to the exposition matter and had accepted the appointment as a commissioner with that understanding, but after a visit to the grounds and an inspection of the beautiful buildings, Dr. Webb expressed himself in the very strongest terms to President Wattles, who accompanied him on the trip, and declared in unqualified terms that the exposition was far superior to the World's Fair. He reiterated his astonishment at the wonders which had been accomplished by western enterprise and declared most emphatically that he would make it his especial business, upon his return to New York, to urge upon Governor Black and upon the legislature of the state the absolute necessity of prompt and liberal action in order to enable the state to be fitly represented.

Dr. Webb also said he would see to it that the Wagner Palace Car company makes a fine exhibit of its palace cars by exhibiting a full train of its finest cars equipped with all the modern appliances and comforts.

Exposition Chorus Work.

The Exposition chorus will meet tomorrow night for regular rehearsal in its new quarters on the fifth floor of the city hall. The rehearsal will begin promptly at one minute before 8 o'clock. Choral Director Kelly announces that persons who have signified their intention of joining the chorus will be dropped from the rolls unless they report Tuesday night personally or in writing.

The "Daughter of Jairus" will be taken up for rehearsal and Mr. Kelly desires all members of the chorus to provide themselves with this work. Arrangements have been made with the local music dealers by which members of the chorus may purchase this publication at a special price by making the fact of their membership known.

Apportioning Nebraska Building.

The special committee appointed at the February meeting of the Nebraska Exposition commission to report upon the employes who will be required to conduct the business of the Nebraska commission until the close of the exposition will meet in this city before the regular meeting of the commission tomorrow night. This committee is also charged with the duty of deciding upon the uses to which the several rooms in the Nebraska building are to be devoted. In this connection it will consider the hosts of applications from the various organizations, secret societies, etc., in this state, each of which desires to be assigned a room for headquarters.

A special committee representing the Grand Army of the Republic of Nebraska is in Omaha to appear before this committee and urge the claims of the old soldiers to a room in the Nebraska building for headquarters. This committee consists of T. J. Majors, department commander; J. D. Gage, adjutant general, and J. H. Culver, past department commander. This committee says that if a room is assigned to it a number of relics will be installed as decorations, among them the tattered standard of the First Nebraska Volunteers and many other war relics.

PLANNING THE MILITARY CAMP.

Secretary of War Meiklejohn Visits the Exposition Grounds.

Assistant Secretary of War Meiklejohn spent the day in the company of President Wattles and Major Clarkson of the Exposition Executive department, making a trip to the exposition grounds and to the site of old Fort Omaha. Mr. Meiklejohn expressed the greatest pleasure and surprise at the magnificent showing made by the exposition grounds and it seemed to increase his already strong interest in the progress of the enterprise. He said the old fort grounds will be turned over to the exposition authorities, together with the buildings on the grounds, excepting the buildings which have been leased to Prof. Gillespie for a school. These grounds will be utilized as a camp ground for the troops of the Department of Missouri, which will be ordered to Omaha in small detachments of one or two regiments to camp during the exposition. Mr. Meiklejohn said he would do all in his power to aid in carrying out this plan and expressed the greatest confidence in the success of the movement. The space inside the exposition grounds which will be used as a drill ground for the troops was pointed out to the secretary and he manifested great interest concerning everything connected with the matter.

During this ride Mr. Meiklejohn discussed with President Wattles and Major Clarkson a plan for bringing to the exposition the West Point cadets, the magnificent military organization from the great school maintained by the federal government for the education of young men in the art of war. The assistant secretary said he had been considering this idea for some time, and intends to lay it before the secretary of war with his recommendation that it be carried out. The West Point cadets are rarely ordered for duty away from the military academy, and there are very few precedents for the proposed action. The cadets attended the Centennial exposition at Philadelphia, and were encamped inside the exposition grounds for several weeks, but such instances are very rare, and if the plan of Secretary Meiklejohn is carried out the cadets will prove a strong attraction. They constitute one of the best drilled military organizations in the world, and their presence at the exposition, in addition to the strong force of regulars, would constitute an attraction seldom seen. Mr. Meiklejohn expressed a firm conviction the Secretary Alger will approve of this move and the exposition authorities consider it practically settled.

BIDS ON PAINTING BUILDINGS.

Three Contractors Make Offers for Doing the Work.

Bids were opened by the Department of Buildings and Grounds for painting and calsomining the interiors of all the main buildings. This includes giving a coat of paint to every bit of exposed woodwork in side the bid buildings and tinting the interior walls. There were three bidders for this work, R. C. Strehlow, Alexander & Son and W. H. Woerheide. The last named had a similar contract at the Nashville exposition and is supplied with spraying machines by which the paint is squirted through a rubber hose with a wide, flat nozzle, after the manner in which the buildings at the World's fair were painted. The other bidders proposed to do the work by hand, in the old fashioned way. In detail the bids were as follows:

Liberal Arts Building—Strehlow, $675; Alexander, $1,075; Woerheide, $590.

Agriculture—Strehlow, $1,050; Alexander, $1,175; Woerheide, $883.

Manufactures—Strehlow, $1,175; Alexander, $1,225; Woerheide, $806.

Machinery and Electricity—Strehlow, $950; Alexander, $1,180; Woerheide, $727.

Auditorium—Strehlow, $425; Alexander, $1,045.

These bids were laid before the executive committee by Manager Kirkendall.

Another Child Wonder.

One of the infant prodigies of the Omaha public schools will assist to entertain the child study department of the Woman's club Wednesday. This is a 6 year-old boy belonging to Miss Campbell's class in the Pacific school, who possesses a remarkable genius for extemporizing fiction. His performances in that line have become quite famous in local educational circles. His teacher hands him a picture that he has never seen before and without a second's hesitation the child will weave a story around the characters portrayed in the picture. He seems to be never at loss for a word or a plot and tells the story as though he was reading it from a book. His originality is quite as remarkable as his fertility of imagination and he has never been known to repeat himself. All through the performance he maintains a stoical indifference to his audience, unless some one ventures to laugh, an indignity that he vigorously resents.

Congregational Convention Delegates.

Rev. J. B. Clark, secretary of the Congregational Home Missionary society, writes to President Wattles from New York to acknowledge receipt of an invitation to delegates to the National Council of Congregational Churches at Portland, Ore., to stop in Omaha en route to and from the council. The secretary expresses the belief that many of the delegates will avail themselves of the opportunity to visit the exposition and says that the people of the east are quite familiar with the exposition from reading the many advertisements and notices in the eastern press and are impressed with the grandeur of the exposition and the admirable manner in which it is being managed.

Notes of the Exposition.

The specifications for the Girls' and Boys' building have been completed and bids for the construction will be asked at once.

W. A. Barnard and Frank L. Schopp, county commissioners of Gothenburg, are in the city to investigate the question of making an irrigation exhibit at the exposition. They visited the grounds in company with   Superintendent E. D. Johnson of the Nebraska commission and conferred with the Department of Exhibits regarding space for a display of the irrigation system in use in their county.

The members of the Woman's Board of Managers, and especially the members of the congress committee, are greatly elated over the fact that Hamlin Garland, the well known author, has accepted the position of chairman of the congress of authors. He has notified the congress committee that he will meet the committee in Chicago in a few days to talk over the details of the congress and begin active operations to make the congress a success.

The Concessions department is receiving propositions for the ice cream concession on the exposition grounds. This concession will cover ice cream, cake, berries and lemonade, and two places for serving the public will be provided, one on the bluff tract and the other in the main court. Several proposals have been received and the contest for the right to serve the public with congealed refreshments is waxing warm.

MEXICO AND INDIAN CONGRESS.

Mr. Rosewater Interests Senor Romero in the Project.

WASHINGTON, March 20.—(Special Telegram.)—Mr. Rosewater, with Prof. Mooney of the ethnological bureau, had a conference wth​ Senor Romero, Mexican minister to this country, in relation to the forthcoming congress of Indian tribes today. Mr. Rosewater has conceived the idea of interesting Mexico in the exhibit and if possible secure from that country representatives of the Indian tribes, which are wholly different from those in the United States. Minister Romero was greatly interested in the project, realizing its educational character and its importance from a practical standpoint. He desired, however, some formal invitation to his government to participate and should the appropriation for the congress become a law it is the understanding that Senator Allen will introduce a joint resolution calling upon the president to formally invite Canada and Mexico to participate in the Indian congress.

While in the city Mr. Rosewater began negotiations with the Marine band to be present at the opening of the exposition and to remain for at least two weeks, providing the consent of Secretary Long can be secured.

Mr. Rosewater left for New York tonight, where he will join Z. T. Lindsey and together they will leave for the west Monday evening.

B. F. White, general attorney for the Elkhorn, is in the city on business with the Interior department in relation to wells along the line of his road used by cattlemen for watering purposes, but found that the matter had been looked after previous to his coming. He will go to New York tomorrow, thence home.

The weighing of mails, upon which the government will make contracts for the next four years, commences on all western roads Tuesday.

FIXING THE COAST DEFENSES

SECRETARY MEIKLEJOHN ON SITUATION

No New Developments Which He Feels at Liberty to Disclose—Plans to Boom the Exposition.

Assistant Secretary of War Meiklejohn, who came to Omaha to attend Mrs. Thurston's funeral, says there are no new developments in the trouble with Spain which he is at liberty to make public and that the report of the board of inquiry is necessary before any action can be taken in the matter. The appropriation of $2,975,000 made for the coast defense will be used in fortifying vulnerable points and will afford the seaport cities much better protection in case of any trouble.

Relative to the moving of the headquarters of the Department of the Missouri, formerly Department of the Platte, Mr. Meiklejohn says that a recommendation was made for the removal to St. Louis. Kansas City and Leavenworth were also contestants for the location, but the secretary of war considered these cities and decided in favor of Omaha. His chief reason for this decision was Omaha's advantageous location on transcontinental railroads. The new division of the army makes the Department of the Missouri much more important than the old Department of the Platte, St. Louis being thrown under this command and the number of men in the department being increased to 2,000.

The day that Mr. Meiklejohn left Washington the use of the unleased buildings on the Omaha reservation was granted to the Transmississippi Exposition in addition to the license to use the grounds, which has been already eexcuted​ and delivered. It is expected that these grounds will be used as a camping place for troops in attendance upon the exposition. The War department has recommended that the military forces under the command of the Department of the Missouri be permitted to attend the Transmississippi Exposition and in all probability the recommendation of Department Commander General Coppinger will be concurred in in this matter. In addition to these forces Mr. Meiklejohn says he will leave no stone unturned to secure for the exposition a summer encampment of cadets from the United States Military academy.

The effort of Congressman Mercer to secure a visit of newspaper correspondents from all over the United States at the time of the opening of the exposition is, in Mr. Meiklejohn's opinion, a movement of great importance to the success of the exposition. He thinks that the presence of these newspaper men would give greater publicity to the magnificent condition of the grounds and the phenomenal success of the management than could be secured in any other way. Mr. Mercer's plan is meeting with favor and promises which have been made him assure that the scheme will be carried through.

WARM PRAISES FROM WEBB

ENTHUSIASTIC OVER THE OUTLOOK

Eastern Magnate Looks Over the Grounds and Admits His Astonishment—Wagner Cars and Union Pacific Lines.

Dr. William Seward Webb, president of the Wagner Palace Car company, and a number of friends spent yesterday in Omaha. The popular railroad magnate is en route from Mexico to New York, and he is in a hurry to get to the latter city in order to keep an appointment with Horace G. Burt, president of the Union Pacific railroad. His mission with President Burt, as announced in The Bee last Thursday, is to consider arrangements for placing a great number of Wagner cars on the Union Pacific road with the idea of ultimately having none but Wagner sleeping cars operated on the "Overland Route."

Just before leaving Omaha last evening Dr. Webb accorded an interview to a Bee reporter, and when asked if the people of the west might soon expect Wagner cars exclusively operated on the Union Pacific, smiled and said: "Well, perhaps. But as president of the company I am hardly in a position to discuss the matter. I certainly would like to see the Wagner company operate its cars on the Union Pacific, and I hope some day to see that a fact. I am now on my way to New York and will see President Burt of the Union Pacific there on Thursday in regard to the matter. There is nothing definite in regard to the subject, one way or the other, that can be given out at this time. If there were I should be only too glad to give it to The Bee. But you may look for some announcement along the line in which we have just been talking very soon, I think."

PRAISES THE EXPOSITION.

Dr. Webb was particularly enthusiastic over the buildings and grounds of the Transmississippi Exposition, which he had visited during the day. In speaking of his trip through the exposition grounds he said: "To say that we were all astonished is to put it very mildly, indeed. Such elegant buildings I have not seen in a long time. They compare favorably with anything that I ever saw, and in some respects even excel the World's fair buildings. The broad scope, the magnitude of the whole affair just about took our breath away. Anything that praises the progress thus far made and the prospects for a great exposition that you may write I'll endorse. I cannot say too much in favor of the affair. Was I favorably impressed? Why, young man, I was just carried away; we were all delighted. It's almost inconceivable that a western city should in such a short time build up an exposition like you have. The people of the east do not thoroughly appreciate what a big affair this is going to be. Why, from the way it looks now, it would be a credit to any government. I believe the exposition will be a great success, and it will do Omaha and the whole west an immense amount of good. The people of the east are gradually learning of its real proportions, and when the time comes a large number of them will come out to attend it."

"Dr. Webb, how did you find things further out west?"

"All right. Business seems good generally, so far as I could observe. We are just returning from a trip through Mexico, where we had an exceedingly pleasant time. We stopped for a while in Salt Lake City and in Denver. Both are fine cities and at both places they report business good and steadily improving. Today we have enjoyed visits to Fort Crook and the exposition, under the kind direction of General Coppinger, and from here will go right along to New York. As I told you, I have an appointment with President Burt in New York, but I shall be out to Omaha again soon."

PARTY AND ITS VISIT.

With Dr. and Mrs. Webb are: Mr. and Mrs. Townsend Burden, Mr. and Mrs. Purdy, Mr. and Mrs. Berd and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence, New York, and J. C. Yager, general manager of the Wagner Palace Car company. The latter joined the party in this city and while here had a short conference with General Manager Dickinson and Superintendent of Transportation Buckingham of the Union Pacific. The party came in from the west on their own special train about 11 o'clock yesterday morning. The train was switched from the tracks of the Union Pacific at Gilmore Junction and run to Fort Crook. There the party was met by General Coppinger and shown over the grounds and buildings of the fort. Yesterday afternoon was spent in Omaha, driving through the city and visiting the exposition grounds, in which all of the visitors appeared to be intensely interested. The party left for Chicago over the Northwestern at 6 o'clock last evening. The special train in which they traveled was one of the finest that ever passed through this city. It consisted of four Wagner cars, all of the latest design and handsomely furnished. They were the cars Ellsmere, Novara and Aladin from the Lake Shore limited and the cafe car from the Southwestern limited. The train was drawn out of here by Northwestern locomotive No. 783.

UNCLE SAM'S BIG EXHIBIT

COIN STAMPING PRESS TO BE IN OPERATION

Appliances for Maintaining the Fish Exhibit Have Been Shipped and Will Soon Be Put in Place.

Charles S. Kemper, representative of the Treasury department on the Board of Control of the Government building and exhibit, has notified the Department of Publicity and Promotion of the general character of the exhibit to be made by the Treasury department at the exposition. Mr. Kemper encloses a description of the exhibit, as follows:

"The administrative functions of the Treasury department may be divided into three branches—the accounting, the financial and commercial. The first of these consists in examining and revising every expenditure of the government, and no money appropriated by congress for the maintenance of the general government, or any of its branches, can be legally expended except upon the approval of the secretary of the treasury. This branch of the department, being purely clerical, cannot be illustrated by an exhibit.

GREAT MONEY MAKER.

"The financial branch of the department is illustrated by a complete set of all the currency issued by the government, from a 10-cent shinplaster to a $10,000 gold note. The process of coining the money of the government is shown by operating a coin press which has been in constant use in the Philadelphia mint for fifty-two years. It has a capacity of 90,000 dollars per hour, and, in coining a silver dollar, strikes a blow equal to the weight of 100 tons. In connection with the mint exhibit is also shown a complete set of the current coins of seventy of the principal nations of the world, and a full set of all the national medals authorized by congress.

"The Bureau of Engraving and Printing, in addition to showing all the paper money of the United States, will exhibit a plate printing press in operation, illustrating the manner in which United States notes are printed, and upon which will be printed a souvenir card of the exposition, showing the White House and capitol at Washington and portraits of the president and vice president.

"The commercial branch of the department has control of all matters pertaining to the collection of revenue, and, by analogy, congress has assigned to the secretary of the treasury the duty of enforcing all laws relating to domestic and foreign commerce of the United States, including the lighthouse establishment, the life saving service, the marine hospital service, the coat and geodetic survey and similar branches of government business.

LIGHTHOUSE EXHIBIT.

"The lighthouse establishment will exhibit a more complete assortment of light apparatus and furnishings than ever before shown, consisting in part of one large second order bivalve lens weighing over eight tons, one third-order lens, flashing red and white lights alternately, and one fourth-order lens, all of which will be shown in operation, together with all the lighting appliances in use by the department.

"The marine hospital service's exhibit is striking and meritorious. It is illustrative of the functions of the government in preventing the introduction and spread of epidemic diseases by the establishment of quarantine stations, where all vessels and passengers are examined by trained surgeons, and by the erection of government hospitals for the care and treatment of American and foreign seamen. It consists of models and photographs of quarantine stations and hospitals, hospital furnishings and fittings, disinfecting apparatus and surgical instruments.

"The Treasury department, through the medium of the coast and geodetic survey, is the custodian of the standard weights and measures of the United States; and, under the authority of congress, supplies each state with a set of standard weights and measures, from which all others are made and tested, and these will be exhibited by the survey, accompanied with models of the metric system."

 

Mr. Kemper states that in addition to the display made in the government building, to which the foregoing description applies, the life saving service will maintain on the grounds a model station, showing the construction of the stations maintained by the service on the lake and sea coasts, equipped with all the most improved appliances and manned by a full crew. Daily exhibitions will be given on the Mirror by this crew, showing the manner in which lives are saved from wrecked vessels, and the routine of life in this service will be shown.

LIFE SAVING STATION.

Bids for the construction of the life saving station on the exposition grounds will be opened by Superintendent Farnan March 25. This building will be a two-story frame structure, 30x40 feet, and will stand on the south side of the main court directly opposite the middle of the Mirror. It will contain a room for the large lifeboat with which daily exhibitions will be given, and in which will be stored all the paraphernalia which is in use in every station of the life saving service, including buoys of various kinds, life cars, life lines, small mortars for throwing lines to vessels, etc. The crew of the station will occupy quarters in the building and the living quarters and all other portions of the building will be completely equipped.

"The machinery and other appliances required for the operation of the fish exhibit in the Government building have been shipped from Washington and Superintendent Farnan expects to receive this material within a very few days. All of the machinery will be put in position at once and the tanks and other apparatus required for this exhibit will be completed as soon as possible in order that the fish may be installed in their new home at an early date and become acclimated before the warm weather begins.

The sea water required for the ocean fish will be brought from Marblehead Mass., and fourteen-tank cars containing this water are now on their way to Omaha. The salt water used for the fish exhibit will be kept in circulation by means of force pumps. The water is taken from the tanks and aerated before being returned in order to keep it in good condition. All of this work requires the use of a great deal of machinery and it is this which is daily expected at the grounds.

PUTTING ON FINISHING TOUCHES.

Preparations are being made for placing in position on the extreme top of the dome of the Government building the large statue, "Liberty Enlightening the World," which is ready to take its stand on this lofty pedestal, 150 feet above the level of the ground, the highest point on the exposition grounds.

The beautiful and shapely dome is visible from all parts of the city and when the huge figure is placed on top of the graceful lantern it will be a landmark, visible from every side. This figure of liberty is fourteen feet in height and weighs 2,000 pounds. It is of plaster and is in several sections. This figure was modeled by artists specially employed for that purpose by Alexander & Sons, the staff contractors for the Government building. These artists were given special quarters outside the exposition grounds and have been employed for several weeks in turning out this huge work. A small model of the figure was made in Washington under the watchful eye of the architect of the building and shipped to Omaha. From this model the large figure was made. It is a perfect reproduction of Bartholdi's famous statue in New York harbor and is a most fitting embellishment of the beautiful building being erected by the government on the exposition grounds.

A substantial staging has been constructed about the lantern and above the pedestal where the figure will rest when in position. An ordinary manhole in the floor of the lantern will serve to haul up the smaller portions of the figure, but the large pieces will be dragged over the outside of the done​. The statue will be assembled on its pedestial​, the several parts being securely fastened together with iron braces.

This work has been delayed by the high wind which has prevailed during the last week, but the preparations are nearly completed and the goddess will soon be at her post.

SUNDAY SCENES AT THE GROUNDS.

Great Activity Among Workers Watched by Interested Hundreds.

Many hundreds of people went to the exposition grounds on pleasure bent yesterday. The main court and bluff tract were overrun with crowds of sight-seers. Vehicles of every description thronged the bluff tract all day long, but the gates of the main court were closed against them. A large proportion of the visitors were strangers, who took advantage of a short stay in the city to visit the grounds and see what the exposition promises. The buildings and grounds were thoroughly inspected and the progress of the work was watched with a great deal of interest.

Residents of Omaha who had not visited the grounds for a week or more were amazed at the great changes which had in the meantime been made in the appearance of the grounds. These changes were especially noticeable on the bluff tract. This hitherto level piece of ground, unbroken by a tree or bush, has been changed into a forest of mature growth. A force of 200 men under the energetic direction of Rudolf Ulrich, a landscape architect of renown especially engaged to direct this work, has covered this sightly location with a growth of trees and shrubbery which has completely changed the appearance of the place. Instead of a fine stretch of land adapted for raising corn, it is now a beautiful park, with trees thickly dotting the scene and bushes and handsome shrubbery on every side. Winding walks are bordered by trees thirty or forty feet in height, with spreading limbs already showing the buds, which give promise of abundant shade. Thousands of bushes of every kind are distributed where their leafy growth will best add to the general effect, the whole producing a park-like effect, which promises to make this portion of the grounds the most attractive and popular resort within the exposition fence.

A puffing steam road roller, aided and abetted by a number of men and teams distributing cracked stone and gravel, is busily engaged in making macadam walks and drives all about this tract.

All was activity and the crowds seemed to derive great entertainment from watching the various stages of the work develop under the skillful hands of the workmen. The full force of men in all branches of the work were busily engaged in pushing things to the limit and the changes which have been wrought form the best evidence of how well this has been done.

The south viaduct across Sherman avenue and the two restaurants adjoining it are well under way and are being pushed as fast as possible, all the men being employed that can be handled to advantage. The same is true of the Moorish palace. This handsome structure is assuming huge proportions and is attracting great attention. Its unique form is the cause of considerable comment on the part of all who see it, the handsomely rounded dome and slender minarets, each and all surmounted by a golden crescent, forming a most attractive scene from every point of view.

The broad street which will form the central avenue of the Midway has been paved nearly to the north line of the Grand Plaza and has developed into a popular promenade for visitors to the grounds. By its means they reach the north viaduct and Power plant, both of which are well advanced and rapidly nearing completion.

In strong contrast to the liberal treatment of the bluff tract, with its winding walks, bordered and shaded with tall trees and its profusion of shrubbery, is the effect of the main court. As the work on both progresses the effect upon the visitor who passes from one to the other grows more pronounced. The main court is now reaching a stage where the casual visitor receives a lasting impression of grandeur and beauty and can see, in his mind's eye, the surpassing magnificence which the finished court will present.

Work is being pushed very energetically on the exedra which will enclose the east end of the tract and form a foreground for the towering restaurants beyond on the bluff tract. A force of 200 laborers has been employed for the last ten days in cleaning up the debris about the main buildings and in levelling the grounds and making preparations for the parking and laying of walks. This preliminary work has added greatly to the appearance of the court and is a promise of the beauty which may be anticipated. The earth removed in the leveling process is carried to depressions about the west end of the court and is thus made to serve a double purpose.

The scaffolding used by the staff workers has been removed from all except the Art and Government buildings. A force of workmen is employed in the interior of the Art building and some of the galleries are nearly completed. The fireproofing of the building has been about completed and work will soon be commenced on the exterior.

Work is being carried rapidly forward on the Government building and the great beauty of this magnificent structure is daily becoming more apparent. The exterior of both wings is well nigh completed and the handsome central portion is rapidly taking on a finished appearance.

Work in Idaho.

The Idaho Exposition commission is making encouraging progress in the collection of material for a fine exhibit showing the resources of that state. The state has been divided into districts and a member of the commission placed in charge of each district. Each county is supplied with an active committee working under the direction of a commissioner and special committee have been appointed to take charge of collecting the exhibits at central points and seeing to their shipment to Omaha. Chairman Gwin has recently made a tour of the state and is quoted by the Boise Statesman as saying that the work is being done in a most satisfactory and thorough manner and will unquestionably result in a fine collection of material being exhibited at Omaha.

Oregon Commission Acts.

A telegram from President W. S. Mason of the Oregon Exposition commission to President Wattles notified the exposition management that the arrangements made by Commissioner Dosch of Portland a few days ago were ratified by the Oregon commission. Mr. Dosch reserved 3,000 feet on the bluff tract for an Oregon building, 624 feet in the Agriculture building, 1,200 feet in the Forestry exhibit, 640 feet in the Liberal Arts building for an educational exhibit, 600 feet for a fish exhibit, 1,430 feet in the Mines building and 1,200 feet in the Horticulture building.

PLACE FOR CONVENTIONS

EXPOSITION MANAGERS FACE A PROBLEM

Negotiations for Halls Have Thus Far Been Very Unsatisfactory and Building One Seems the Only Solutions.

The providing of a large hall for the accommodation of the numerous conventions, congresses, etc., which will meet in Omaha during the coming summer is a matter which has become an especially live issue since the refusal of the trustees of the First Congregational church to allow that church to be used by the Woman's club between June and November in order to carry out the club's desire to co-operate with the exposition and provide a meeting place for a large proportion of the conventions.

A committee of the Woman's club and President Wattles of the exposition have held numerous conferences with the church trustees and it was generally understood that the matter was virtually settled and that the church was to be turned over to the women to be used every day except Sunday for congresses or conventions. There are about 100 conventions and congresses which will meet in Omaha during the coming summer, and the purpose of the Woman's club was to have a large proportion of the smaller gatherings, those where the attendance would not exceed 100 or so, meet in the church. It was a part of the plan to have a committee of women from the club act as hostesses for each of these conventions and look after the decorations of the church. The trustees took exception to the idea of having gatherings of men in the church, some of them being afraid that the men might put their feet over the back of the pews or smoke or do some other objectionable thing, notwithstanding the presence of the women of the reception committee. The trustees indicated their willingness to grant the use of the church if allowed to select the conventions or congresses which were to be allowed to meet there. The other parties to the agreement positively refused to be thus restricted and the refusal of the trustees to allow the church to be used for any conventions followed.

OTHER CHURCHES OBJECT.

Prior to the negotiations with the trustees of the First Congregational church the committee of the Woman's club interviewed the officers of some of the other down town churches. The trustees of the First Methodist church declined to consider any proposition looking to the use of that church for conventions of any kind. The officials in control of the Kountze Memorial church were willing to negotiate with the club representatives on the basis of $2,000 as rental, but stipulated that they must be allowed to select the gatherings which would meet in the church. Especial objection was made to the Congress of Liberal Religions and a proposition involving the holding of this meeting in the church would not be considered. As the club representatives and the exposition officials declined to have their course dictated by outside authorities the negotiations were dropped at that point Unity church was the only one of the down-town religious edifices which was offered without strings at a rental of $500, but the auditorium of this building is rather small and would accommodate only the smallest of the gatherings.

President Wattles has taken up the matter in another way and has written to the Commercial club asking that organization to take hold of the project to erect a temporary hall somewhere down town which shall have a seating capacity of about 6,000, so arranged that it may be divided into smaller halls to accommodate several small gatherings at the same time. The exposition management will head a subscription list for such a purpose with a liberal subscription and the Commercial club is asked to take charge of the matter and push it to early consummation.

President Wattles says this is the only apparent solution of this question. The negotiations for the use of the Coliseum have come to naught and the president says something must be done to provide a meeting place for the great conventions which will come, while the failure of the negotiations for churches and smaller halls makes it absolutely necessary that something be done at once to provide for the smaller gatherings.

ARRANGING FOR THE EXHIBITS.

Manager Bruce and Superintendent Hardt Mature Their Plans.

The headquarters of the Department of Exhibits will be removed to the exposition grounds April 20. Manager Bruce and General Superintendent Hardt will open an office in the gallery of the Manufacturers   building, and each of the other superintendents of the department will have an office in the building under his immediate charge. By May 1 the floor of each building will be marked out in such a way that each exhibitor may know just where he is located and on this date the installation will commence. The placing of many of the heavier exhibits will probably commence some time before this date, notably in the Machinery and Electricity building. By May 25 all exhibits will be required to be in place, and the time intervening before June 1 will be devoted to clearing away the debris and getting ready for the opening day. Between May 25 and June 10 no exhibits will be received under any circumstances, but after the last named date delayed exhibitors who can offer a good excuse for delay will be allowed to take the space assigned to them.

Colorado's Horticultural Exhibit.

Mrs M. A. Shute, secretary of the Colorado State Board of Horticulture, has notified the Department of Exhibits that she has on file guarantees for 1,230 square feet of space in the Horticulture building at the exposition and hopes to soon have enough to completely fill the 1,860 feet which have been reserved in this building for Colorado.

Can Accommodate Secret Societies.

Messrs Casper and Boydston of the special committee went out to the Nebraska building yesterday afternoon and decided, after making a careful examination of the various rooms, that the commission could provide desk room for twenty-six secret societies or other organizations by placing desks around in out-of-the-way corners in the rotunda on the first and second floors. The places available for such use are well lighted and can be used for such purpose without interfering with the other uses to which the building will be devoted. Governor Holcomb will be assigned a suite of two rooms on the second floor at the north end of the building, including the large room in the center of this end, which will serve as a reception room, and a smaller room in the northeast corner, which will serve as a private office. The corresponding room in the center of the north end of the first floor will be assigned to the Grand Army of the Republic. This room is 16x33 feet in size. No other society will be given the exclusive use of a room in the building. The exact uses to which the remaining rooms will be devoted have not been determined, but one or two will be used by the commission for offices, another will be assigned to the hostess of the building, Miss Butterfield, and the others will be used for waiting rooms for both men and women, telegraph room, check room, toilet rooms, etc.

FINE FOUNTAIN FOR THE MIRROR.

Novelty Designed by an Electrical Engineer to Be Constructed.

A novel and very beautiful fountain, designed by Luther M. Stieringer, the consulting electrical engineer for the exposition, has been approved by the executive committee and its construction will be commenced at once.

This fountain has been baptized "Nautilus" and it will occupy a conspicuous place in the Mirror. The central figure is a column of the Ionic order, fifty feet in height, on the top of which will appear the figure of Neptune, the gods of the seas, holding aloft his trident and commanding the broad expanse of water beneath his feet. About the base of this column, just below the surface of the water, will be thousands of jets which will produce the most marvelous effects with the sparkling water. When the fountain is not in action there will be nothing to break the placid surface of the water except the tall column, but when the word is given thousands of beautiful forms will be assumed and the sparkling fluid will be thrown to great heights in ever changing variety.

At night electric beams of brilliant colors will be thrown upon the sparkling water from an invisible source and the most startling and beautiful effects will be produced.

Working Out a Report.

The commission of the Nebraska Exposition commission which is to report on the number of employes required to conduct business until the close of the exposition spent the entire day behind closed doors working on the duties assigned it. In addition to reporting on employes the committee will recommend a division of these appointments among the members of the commission. It will also recommend the use to which the rooms in the Nebraska building should be devoted and make suggestions regarding the allotment of available funds among the several departments.

The consideration of the report of this committee will form the principal business before the Nebraska commission at its meeting tonight.

DIVIDE NEBRASKA BUILDING

COMMISSIONERS APPORTION THE ROOMS

Structure Offered for Acceptance and its Apartments Designated for Special Uses—Number of Employes Decided On.

The Nebraska Exposition commission completed its business and adjourned shortly after noon today. There was little business to be done, the disposal of the report of the special committee on employes and the setting aside of the various amounts for each department having made almost a clean slate.

Commissioner Whitford announced that the Nebraska building has been entirely completed and is ready for acceptance. At his suggestion a committee of two, Neville and Whitford, was appointed to make a thorough examination of the building in company with the architects and accept it if the work is found to be in compliance with the specifications and plans.

Commissioner Boydston and Dutton were appointed a committee to make arrangements for lighting the Nebraska building.

Superintendent Pegler of the poultry bureau tendered his resignation and it was accepted. Mr. Boydston nominated C. M. Richards of Omaha as superintendent of this bureau and the appointment was confirmed.

On motion of Commissioner Poynter Fish Commissioner Lew May was asked to make an estimate of the cost of making an exhibit representing the fish industry of Nebraska in connection with the fish exhibit in the Government building and submit the same to the next meeting of the commission.

LOCATING THE OFFICES.

According to the report of the special committee to designate the uses of the several rooms in the Nebraska building the first floor of the building will contain the following: Headquarters for the educational department; headquarters for the Nebraska Press association, telegraph and telephone rooms, postoffice, men's waiting room and toilet room, free check room, women's waiting room and toilet room, intelligence office, general registration room. On the second floor will be rooms set apart as follows: Private room and reception room for the governor, headquarters for the Nebraska Exposition commission, cloak room for the commission, a room for women's clubs and societies, office for the hostess of the building and the official stenographer, a room for a large collection of Indian relics belonging to the late General Crook. The north wall of the balcony on this floor will be occupied by the Nebraska Historical society, with a display of interesting relics. The report also finds that there is room in the angles and alcoves on both floors of the building for about twenty desks for the use of such fraternal societies as may desire to take advantage of this opportunity establishing headquarters in this building.

EMPLOYES NEEDED.

The force of employes to be engaged for the Nebraska building, includes one hostess at $75 per month, one assistant hostess at $60, one custodian at $65, one postmistress at $50, three janitors at $45 each, two policemen at $50 each, two messenger boys at $25 each, one clerk in the intelligence office at $60, two employes in the check rooms at $40 each, one porter at $1.50 per day, one general registry clerk at $50 per month.

The commission met in executive session last night to consider the report of the committee appointed at the last meeting to decide upon the number of employes required. The special committee found that in addition to the assistant secretary, bookkkeeper​ and typewriter, the care of the building will require forty-four employes, whose salary to the close of the exposition will aggregate $5,527.50. The amounts set apart for salaries in the several departments were as follows: Educational, $1,720; agriculture, $1,640; floriculture, $1,120; horticulture, $1,420; live stock, $770; dairy, $700; poultry, $230; apiary, $755; total salaries of employes, $13,607.50. Employes now on rolls, twenty, leaving twenty-four to be employed. The committee recommended that the total number of employes be divided among the six congressional districts in the state and that each member name the employes in his district, taking into account the number heretofore appointed.

The estimates for the expenses of the several departments were allowed as follows: Educational, $2,157.38; floriculture, $1,000; poultry, $600; apiary, $975; agriculture, $1,196.17; live stock, $3,000; dairy, $1,875; horticulture, $6,000; total, $16,803.55.

The salaries of the commissioners and expenses provided for by former action and by this report aggregated $93,093.51, leaving a balance of the appropriation amounting to $6,906.49.

The report of the committee was adopted, it being 11:30 p. m. when the doors were opened.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE DOINGS.

Program for the Opening Exercises Prepared by President is Endorsed.

The program for the exercises in connection with the opening of the Transmississippi and International Exposition has been ratified by the executive committee as prepared by President Wattles and the nature of the exercises which will inaugurate an enterprise fraught with such importance to the great transmississippi region is now definitely settled.

According to this program the exercises will commence with a grand military and civic parade participated in by organized bodies of all kinds, a large number of which have already signified their intention of coming to Omaha from other points. This parade will form down town at 10 o'clock on the morning of June 1, and will pass through the principal streets of the city to the exposition grounds, reaching there at 12 o'clock.

The exercises at the grounds will commence as soon as the parade reaches that point. These exercises will consist of music, prayer and the reading of an original poem composed for the reading of an original poem composed for the occasion and read by the author. President Wattles will deliver an appropriate address, followed by an oration by Chauncey M. Depew of New York. An address by Senator W. V. Allen will complete the oratorical portion of the program and communication will be opened by long distance telephone with President McKinley at Washington. The president will, at the proper moment, close the electric circuit which will start the machinery of the exposition and fire a grand salute to announce to the world that the Transmississippi and International Exposition has been opened promptly on time and is ready for the inspection of the multitudes.

At 3 o'clock the officers of the exposition and their wives will hold a reception on the grounds for the many distinguished guests and the inaugural exercises will be concluded.

Invitations to Messrs. Depew and Allen to participate in the opening exercises have been sent forward and favorable replies are anticipated.

In addition to taking action on the program for the opening day, the executive committee yesterday approved the action of President Wattles in calling upon the Commercial club to take the initiative in the matter of erecting a large convention hall down town for the use of the scores of conventions and congresses which will meet in Omaha during the coming summer. The committee authorized the president, in case the Commercial club agrees to take hold of the matter to pledge the support of the exposition to the scheme to the extent of $3,000, with the understanding that the hall is to be under the control of the exposition to the extent of providing for the conventions and congresses referred to.

The contract for painting and calsomining the interior of the buildings in the main court was awarded to W. H. Woerheide, the lowest bidder for the work.

Manager Reed was authorized to made a contract for a concession for a canal 1,000 feet in length which is to be bordered with California scenery and displays of California fruit of all kinds and other California products.

Chinese Actors Coming.

An Associated Press dispatch from Port Townsend, Wash., announces that the steamship Kienshin Maru arrived at that port from Hong Kong and Yokohama, bringing as passengers thirty Chinese actors who are the vanguard of 400 soon to land in the United States to participate in the exposition.

These actors are a part of the company which will occupy the Chinese village on the Midway, for which Hong Sling has the concession. Sling is expected in the city in the near future to being the work of erecting the Chinese village.

Wong Chin Foo, the Chinese commissioner, who has made plans for an elaborate display of Chinese goods and manufactured articles on the bluff tract, has written that he will be in the city in a few days to begin active preparations.

Tennessee Commission Organizes.

The Tennessee Exposition commission has organized by electing as chairman J. T. Essary, state commissioner of agriculture, and W. T. Davis as secretary. Mr. Davis, in addition to serving as secretary, will have charge of the educational department, a position which he filled in the Nashville exposition. In a letter to the Department of Exhibits, Secretary Davis says the Tennessee commission has appointed a committee to visit Omaha and make arrangements for an exhibit, which committee, he says, will reach Omaha in a few days.

More Western Beauties.

The contributions to the composite photograph which is to form the model for the woman's head on the exposition medal continue to be received by the Department of Ways and Means. The photographs of Mrs. Adelaide de Luna of Nex​ Mexico, Miss May Crossen of Carson City, Nev., and Miss Nevada Ryland of Reno, Nev., are the latest contributions, and these have been forwarded to New York to be merged into the composite picture.

 

Ask[?]

Manager Babcock of the Transportation department has written to the officials of the Union Pacific railway asking that the old car which served as a means of conveying the remains of the martyred president, Abraham Lincoln, on its last journey from Washington to Springfield, Ill., be resurrected from the scrap heap in the Union Pacific yards and put in condition for exhibition at the exposition.

Meeting of the Chorus.

The exposition chorus met last night in the assembly room in the city hall and rehearsed the heaviest parts of Strainer's "Daughter of Jairus." Owing to the severity of the weather there was a noticeable diminution of feminine voices, but those present worked hard nevertheless. Willard Kimball of Lincoln, the exposition musical director, was present, but the rehearsal was conducted by T. J. Kelly.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Department of Exhibits is preparing the rules for the Dairy bureau, and these will be promulgated within a few days. The premium list for short horn cattle will be issued in a day or two.

S. D. Kramer of Chicago, a music publisher, writes that he is about to publish a march entitled "Salute to Omaha," and he asks the privilege of calling it the official march of the exposition and placing on the title page a cut of one of the main buildings.

The rush of business in the several departments of the exposition has made it necessary to provide many of the departments with telephones, and the list of exposition 'phones is as follows: President's office, 1441; Transportation department, 2072; Concessions department, 1896; Buildings and Grounds department, 1899; Electrical bureau, 1875; secretary's office, 1898.

E. W. McConnell, a cyclorama expert, has arrived in the city to take charge of the construction of the cyclorama which will be erected on the Midway. This building will be 400 feet in circumference and about 45 feet in height. Construction on it will be commenced at once, and Mr. McConnell says everything will be in readiness for opening by May 25. The cyclorama will contain a scene showing the battle between the Merrimac and Monitor.

Gold Imports at New York.

NEW YORK, March 23.—Heidelback, Eickelheimer & Co. have announced $175,000; Lazard-Freeres, $125,000, and the National city bank, $100,000 in gold engaged for import.

WOMEN AN DEXPOSITION​ WORK.

Mrs. Henrotin Discusses Their Relation Before Woman's Club.

The First Congregational church was crowded last evening with the members of the Woman's club, friends and escorts, who gathered to hear an address by Mrs. Ellen M. Henrotin of Chicago, president of the General Federation of Woman's clubs. After a simple and graceful word of introduction from Mrs. Harford, president of the Omaha Woman's club, Mrs. Henrotin responded to the Chautauqua salute which was given her, and without preamble entered upon the discussion of a subject which, though she declined to state it, was chiefly concerned with expositions and women.

She touched upon the first great exposition instituted by the prince consort of England, and spoke of its effect in rousing other nations, noticeably Austria, to more industrial enterprise. She passed on to the Centennial at Philadelphia, associating with it the claims of the recent artistic development of this country and explaining how women were given association with it "if they would raise the money." She dwelt for a moment upon the late French exposition, where the women were permitted to hold a congress; a man, however, the commissioner of instruction, having been provided to preside and keep order, and reached the climax of her history in the Columbian exposition. Here, she said, began a movement in the governmental recognition of women, for every great government appointed its women commissioners. This fact was largely due to the tact of Mrs. Potter Palmer, whom she characterized as "a statesman."

Mrs. Henrotin thought the material exhibit in the Woman's building scarcely representative of woman's work—which is not of a material sort. "A woman," she said, "is not an originator, she is a co-ordinator. Look how she brings into relation the parts of education. A few years ago higher education was a thing apart, now women bring the child from the kindergarten into the higher education. The one is a part of the other."

From this point the speaker elaborated the history of the club movement. Forty years ago man brought into the home the raw material and women converted it to living uses. Spinning, weaving, dressmaking, nursing, all the industrial functions were developed in the home, but gradually, as factories assumed these function, the woman grew out of her position as an economic factor. From being a producer she became a money spender. Then came her desire for training, for education, which grew at last into the idea that knowledge to be valuable must be transmitted. Hence the large department club.

Illustrations were given of the altruistic work of these clubs. "Giving and receiving are one," said the speaker. "A woman brings to the club her best —a sacred and beautiful thing—but whatever it is she simply follows her bent, which is constuctive​, educational, nonresisting."

Mrs. Henrotin is a slight, graceful woman, with a pleasant voice, which she uses without effort. She was charming last evening in a gown of brocaded satin and mouseline de soie of a delicate pink color.

At the conclusion of Mrs. Henrotin's address the president introduced "our own Mrs. Stoutenborough" of Plattsmouth, president of the Nebraska Fereration​ of Clubs, who was received with applause and the Chautauqua salute. She said she looked through country, and not city, spectacles, and then she went on to say how large a factor she believed the Woman's club to be in moulding the intellectual life of the small community. She answered convincingly the objector who believes the club hinders the woman's work in the church and that other critic who thinks the club interferes with home duties "Society may endanger the home life," she said, "so may dress, but the club never does; we do better teaching than that."

After recess the platform was cleared and Miss Stella Hamilton announced a drama to be given by the younger women of the club. It consisted of a representation of the various nations of the earth in consultation with Columbia over the Transmississippi Exposition. Miss Harford as England, Miss Byrne as Germany, Miss Chandler as France, Mrs. Caldwell as Holland and Mrs. Patrick as Columbia has leading parts and the performance was enlivened by local specialties, by a song from Scotland—Mrs. Fitt—and by "The Choir Invisible," which in the persons of Messrs. Wheeler, Hazelton, Copeland and Haverstock discoursed music just outside the door. The major domo, Miss Allen, assisted as a whistler in the closing ode, "Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean," and the audience rose and joined in the chorus, after which most of those present came forward to be presented individually to Mrs. Henrotin.

Mrs. Henrotin was entertained at luncheon at the Millard by the Woman's club today. She will return to Chicago tonight.

HOME FOR THE FINNY TRIBES

FISH EXHIBIT AT THE EXPOSITION

Arranging the Big Tanks Which Will Form the Government's Aquarium is Now Well Under Way.

Active preparations are being made for the exhibit to be made by the Fish commission in the Government building. The nature and extent of this exhibit make it necessary to make rather elaborate preparations for the installation of the finny tribes which will take up their residence in the Government building some time during the month of May. Mr. G. A. Snyder, an officer of the Fish commission, is in the city to give the work his personal supervision and under his direction the work is rapidly taking form.

The fish exhibit will occupy the west half of the north wing of the Government building. The aquarium for the display of live fish will naturaly​ form the most attractive portion of this exhibit, and it is in connection with this that the preparations spoken of are being made. This aquarium will form three sides of a rectangle, the long side being about ninety feet in length and the two shorter sides being each thirty feet long. Entrance will be had through the outer ends of the short sides. The entrances to the aquarium will be handsomely finished with imitation rock work, having the appearance of entrances to a tunnel, with a high arch surmounted by a statue representing Neptune, while at the base of the arch, on either side of the entrance, will be mermaids and dolphins and other ornamental figures. The interior of the tunnel will be constructed to represent rock work. At either side will be a long row of glass tanks resting on a base of rough rocks, while from the top of the tanks will spring the arch of the tunnel. The arch will be hung with stalactites and the whole character of the tunnel will be that of a passageway through an underground cavern.

WILL MAKE FISH VISIBLE.

The only light in this tunnel will be that which penetrates through the glass tanks and the water contained in them. The bottom of each tank will be covered with white sand and the back will be painted a light color. Shells and other natural objects will be strewn about to give the tank the appearance of nature. The effect of this construction will be to make the inhabitants of the tanks plainly visible. In the angles formed at the turns in the tunnel will be large circular tanks, which will be decorated with aquatic growth and lighted by clusters of electric lights. Bright colored fish will swim about in these tanks, reflecting the rays of light from their glistening sides.

To properly instal land​ maintain this aquarium for the display of live fish requires an immense amount of detail work. In order to keep the water in the tanks at the proper temperature and in proper condition as to cleanliness it is necessary to install a complete outfit of machinery. The sea water especially requires considerably attention. It is shipped here in large tank cars and is used over and over, every drop of it being carefully saved until the exposition is over. It is passed through a coil which brings it to the proper temperature and is then introduced into the tanks, the overflow being caught by troughs beneath the tanks and returned to the large reservoir beneath the floor of the building. After passing through a filter which removes all the foreign matter, it is pumped into a large reservoir above the aquarium, and thence through the temperature coils to the tanks. In the tanks the water is aerated by means of rubber tubes fitted with wooden ends. Air is forced into these tubes and finds its way out through the pores of the wood, permeating all of the water. About 40,000 gallons of sea water is required to keep the tanks full and supply the system of reservoirs used in connection with the plant.

FOR FRESH WATER FISH.

The fresh water is fed into a reservoir and passes from this through cooling coils where the temperature is lowered to the proper point fo rthe​ cold water fish, such as brook trout, etc., or through other coils which changes the temperature to such point as may be required. It then passes into the glass tanks, an dfrom​ thence into a waste pipe which carries the overflow to the lagoon.

The tanks in which the fish will be shown are in Omaha, having been shipped here from Nashville when that exposition was closed. They will be put in position very soon. The machinery for the plant is expected daily and this will be installed as soon as received.

The display of live fish is not the only showing that will be made by the Fish commission. In the space enclosed by the sides of the tunnel will be shown stuffed fish and casts of all kinds of fish and marine monsters. Models of vessels used by the commission for investigating the depths of the ocean and models of fish hatcheries and numerous other appliances used by the commission will be shown.

EXHIBITS BEGINNING TO ARRIVE.

First Installment from the East Comes in Unexpectedly.

The first installment of exhibits has arrived. Several prospective exhibitors from New York shipped a number of show cases which arrived to perplex the Exhibits department. None of the buildings on the grounds are in shape to receive exhibits, as the painting of the interior is yet to be done. Contracts for this work has been executed, but it will be several days before the first building is completed. The Mines building is in the hands of the painters and will be finished on the inside in a short time, but in the meantime the goods in question will ha evto​ be stored down town. The warehouse of the Transportation department has not yet been located, and no plans have ben​ made for it, but the arrival of th eexhibits​ referred to will probably hasten this work.

In the same connection Superintendent E. D. Johnson of the Agricultural bureau of the Nebraska commission, appeared at exposition headquarters and aske dto​ be shown the space assigned to Nebraska in the Agriculture building. As that building has not been accepted from the contractor he was asked to wait a little longer before beginning his work of installing the Nebraska exhibit.

Managers Return from the East.

Manager Z. T. Lindsey of the Ways and Means department and Manager Rosewater, of the Publicity and Promotion department have returned from an extended trip in the east in the interest of the exposition. The results accomplished by this trip have already been announced in the telegraphic dispatches in The Bee and there is little to be added. The Indian bureau is proceeding in its preparations for the great Indian congress as though the bill had been passed, the officials having assurances that it will become a law very soon. The officers of the mint at Philadelphia are preparing the dies for the exposition medals and the Postoffice department is rushing work on the special exposition postage stamps, which will be issued about May 15. Negotiations are pending for the services of the Marine band and no doubt is entertained about this famous organization being seen at the exposition.

Bids on Additional Buildings.

Bids were opened at the office of the Department of Buildings and Grounds at noon for the construction of the Arch of States and exedra forming the main entrance to the grounds and the new building to be erected on Twentieth street north of the Manufactures building, to be known as International hall. The bids were as follows:

Arch of States and exedra: Carpentry—Asa Philpot, $3,175; R. C. Strehlow, $3,350; George Moore & Sons, $7,555; Thomas Herd, $3,700; William Goldie & Sons company, $4,470. Staff—Frank A. Siefert, $3,301; Smith & Eastman, $3,125; Alexander & Son, $5,175.

International Hall: Carpentry—Westlake Construction company, $6,160; R. C. Strehlow, $6,475; George Moore & Sons, $7,986.50;   Asa Philpot, $5,450; A. G. Wahlstrom, Thomas Herd, $5,775; William Goldie & Sons company, $6,440. Staff—Frank A. Siefert, $3,381; Smith & Eastman, $1,496; Alexander & Son, $4,163.

OLD COLISEUM FOR CONVENTIONS.

Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben Willing to Give Up Their Den.

The Coliseum may be transformed into a huge convention hall to accommodate the bigger gatherings to be held here during the coming summer. This possibility is a result of a joint meeting of members of the exposition board, Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben and Commercial club yesterday afternoon. The meeting was attended by Mayor Moores, G. D. Wattles, W. R. Bennett, J. E. Utt, G. A. Andreesen, C. A. Wilhelm, Clement Chase, J. E. Baum and Major Wilcox.

The meeting was called for the purpose of devising some means of securing or building a large hall. All the discussion centered about the Coliseum building, however, from the fact that the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben offered to turn it over for the purpose on condition that they were provided with suitable quarters for the construction of floats and for their meetings. These quarters will be in the shape of sheds about the building.

No conclusion was reached, but Major Wilcox and President Wattles of the exposition were appointed a committee to visit the Coliseum and its surroundings for the purpose of making an estimate of the cost of transforming the building into a convention hall and of erecting sheds. This committee will report at a meeting to be held this afternoon at 4 o'clock.

It is believed that the Coliseum will afford a suitable and big enough hall if the cost of putting it into shape is not too large. The building will seat about 10,000 people.

Evidences Interest of Texans.

Dr. George L. Miller has received a letter from Allen Blacker of El Paso, Tex., which indicates the remarkable interest of Texas people in the Transmississippi Exposition. Mr. Blacker was thirty years ago a prominent citizen of Omaha and is now as prominent in the southern state. During the last presidential campaign he was the political editor of the El Paso Tribune.

Mr. Blacker wrote to Dr. Miller for the purpose of securing some facts about the exposition and cuts of the main buildings to be used in a special exposition edition the Tribune proposes to issue. His request was turned over to the Department of Publicity of the exposition which will supply the Tribune with everything wanted. In the letter Mr. Blacker writes:

"Texas proposes to attend largely and is now organizing for the work. The publisher of the El Paso Tribune is contemplating a Nebraska-Texas edition and asks me to assist him in the work. We calculate upon an edition of 20,000. There will be a large attendance from Texas at the exposition if it is not too expensive, and a very creditable contribution, whatever it may cost. Texas has surpluses to exchange with Nebraska, besides a large coast which Texans fondly compare with the Mediterranean."

Railroads Help Advertise.

The large lithographed bird's-eye view of the exposition grounds just issued by the Department of Publicity and Promotion is in great demand by the railroads. The Burlington and Northwestern roads have each applied for 2,000 of these for posting in the large towns along their lines and in their stations. The Elkhorn has also asked for a large supply. These lithographs are not for general distribution, and the department is having great difficulty in supplying the demand for them. They are being posted in every nook and corner of the United States, and are put in such a way that they will be preserved for a long time.

NOTICE.

Matter of application of the Transmississippi and International Exposition (Inc.), for liquor license.

Notice is hereby given that the Transmississippi and International Exposition (Inc.), did upon the 18th day of March, A. D., 1898, file its application with the Board of Fire and Police Commissioners of Omaha for license to sell malt, spirituous and vinous liquors on the Transmississippi and International Exposition grounds, Fifth ward, Omaha, Neb., from the 1st day of January, 1898, to the 1st day of January, 1899.

If there be no objection, remonstrance or protest filed within two weeks from the 19th day of March, A. D., 1898, the said license will be granted.

TRANSMISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION.
By GURDON W. WATTLES, President.
Attest, JOHN A. WAKEFIELD, Secretary.
M19 d12t
Applicant.

WORKING UP THE CONGRESSES

WOMEN'S COMMITTEES VERY ACTIVE

Delegates to the Federation Meeting at Denver Will Visit in Omaha for Two Days in June.

Arrangements for the congress of Woman's clubs, to be held in connection with the exposition, are in an advanced stage, and the preliminary details have been worked out. The presence in Omaha of Mrs. Henrotin, president of the National Federation of Woman's Clubs, has contributed very materially to the efforts of the congress committee to perfect the details of this meeting.

The congress will be held June 18 and 19. Arrangements have been made, whereby the special trains from Boston, New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Minneapolis and other points, carrying their loads of delegates to the meeting of the National Federation of Woman's Clubs at Denver, will stop in Omaha, June 18, for the purpose of enabling all these women to attend the congress and visit the exposition. The morning will be given up to a visit to the exposition and in the afternoon the first session of the congress will be held in the Auditorium on the exposition grounds. In the evening a session will be held at some point downtown. Both sessions will be devoted to the discussion of economic questions, and the congress committee have well grounded hopes that Mrs. Clara de Graffenreid, assistant to Carroll D. Wright, United States commissioner of labor, will address one of these meetings.

June 19, being Sunday, no meeting of the congress will be held in the morning, but in the afternoon there will be a session at some point downtown, which will be addressed by Mrs. Celia Parker Wooley and Mrs. Caroline Bartlett Crane.

The congress committee has also made progress with the formation of a Woman's Christian Temperance Union congress. The general committee of arrangements and the local committee have been appointed and the work of arranging the program will be taken up. The general committee consists of these women: Mrs. Helen M. Barker of Chicago, treasurer of the National Waman's​ Christian Temperance union; Mrs. Louise S. Rounds of Illinois, Mrs. Mary J. Telford of Colorado, Miss Bell Kearney of Mississippi, and Mrs. Mary C. Upham of Wisconsin. This committee is charged with the duty of preparing the program for the congress and fixing the date for the event. The local committee which will have charge of the entertainment of the congress, comprises the following women: Mrs. S. M. Walker of Lincoln, president of the Nebraska Woman's Christian Temperance union; Rev. Mary Girard Andrews of Omaha, president of the Omaha union; Dr. Freda Lankton and Mrs. George Tilden of Omaha, and Mrs. E. B. Towle of South Omaha.

ASSISTANCE FROM WASHINGTON.

Government Officials Do All They Can to Aid the Work.

Congressman D. H. Mercer has written to President Wattles regarding securing from the War department the tents necessary for the military encampment which is to be maintained in connection with the exposition. It is proposed to equip the camp grounds with tents and various other necessaries and an effort is being made to induce the War department to loan the exposition the necessary tents for the occasion. Mr. Mercer writes that the matter can probably be arranged. He says Assistant Secretary of War Meiklejohn has taken hold of the matter and the prospect for securing the tents is promising.

Mr. Mercer also writes concerning the projected special trains from Washington to Omaha for bringing to the exposition on the opening day the Washington correspondents of the great metropolitan newspapers and the members of both houses of congress. The congressman says that E. C. Snyder, the Washington correspondent of The Bee, has been commissioned by the Department of Publicity and Promotion to take up the eastern end of the negotiations with the railroads and has the matter well in hand. Mr. Mercer says he is lending the movement all the assistance in his power and believes it is the best move that could possibly be made. He says that Washington is the temporary home of the brightest and brainiest newspaper men in the world, and they are enthusiastic over the idea of making such a trip to Omaha under such circumstances, and have made many inquiries regarding the matter. Mr. Mercer declares that such a move would be the best advertisement that the exposition could possibly secure, and he urges that nothing be left undone to carry it to a successful issue.

Assistant Secretary of War Meiklejohn urged this same matter upon the exposition officials when he was in Omaha and emphasized very strongly the great advantage the exposition would derive from the widespread advertisement given the opening of the great show in all the big papers of the country.

SPACE IN NEBRASKA BUILDING.

Secretary Campbell Makes an Explanation to the Public.

Secretary Campbell of the Nebraska Exposition commission is greatly annoyed by reports which are being circulated by unknown parties to the effect that the Nebraska commission is charging for exhibit space in the Nebraska building on the bluff tract. Mr. Campbell wants it distinctly understood that no exhibits are allowed in the Nebraska building under any circumstances and consequently no charge can be made for space in the building for exhibits. The building is intended solely for social functions and to serve as headquarters for Nebraskans and such others as desire to avail themselves of Nebraska's hospitality. The Nebraska Historical society and the owner of the extensive collection of Indian curios gathered by the late General Crook have been given space in the building in which to exhibit the rare and curious articles comprising these collections, but these are in the nature of decorations rather than exhibits in the ordinary sense. With these exceptions no exhibits will be allowed in the building.

The secretary also wishes to remind those desiring to exhibit Nebraska products that space is furnished free in the main exposition buildings by the Nebraska commission upon application to the proper superintendent and free transportation is furnished by the railroads to and from the exposition.

Texas Contributes a Beauty.

The photographs of the representative beauties of the transmississippi states still continue to come to Manager Lindsey of the Department of Ways and Means for use in making the composite photograph which is to represent the embodiment of the beauty of the entire west. The latest acquisition is the portrait of Miss Ida May Archer of Austin, Tex., whose photograph has been forwarded to New York to be included in the composite photograph for the exposition medal.

Pennsylvanians Make Plans.

Former residents of Pennsylvania now living in Omaha and vicinity are preparing to make a showing at the exposition. While they will not take any steps looking to the erection of a building, they will establish headquarters on the grounds, where they will receive the visitors from the Keystone state, and extend to them such favors as may seem meet and proper.

At noon today a number met in the rooms of Superintendent Houck in the court house and formulated plans. While committees were not named, it was decided to have a man at headquarters constantly, for the purpose of giving information concerning the exposition, the city, county and the state. Later on a meeting will be held at which officers will be elected and the program for entertaining will be outlined.

Samples from Montana.

The shipment of minerals from Montana for the exposition has commenced, and the great samples of products from the mines of Montana will begin to arrive in Omaha within a few days. A striking feature of the first shipment of material was a five-ton block of coal and a 5,000-pound slab of copper matte. The coal was taken from the Sand Coulee Coal company's mine at Sand Coulee. It is eight feet long, six feet wide and four and one-half feet thick. It is bituminous coal and weighs five tons. The slab of copper matte is from the Anaconda works at Anaconda. Mr. Sutherlin, vice president for Montana, has returned home and will commence at once the shipment of his exhibits to Omaha.

Railroads Help Advertise.

The large lithographed bird's-eye view of the exposition grounds just issued by the Department of Publicity and Promotion is in great demand by the railroads. The Burlington and Northwestern roads have each applied for 2,000 of these for posting in the large towns along their lines and in their stations. The Elkhorn has also asked for a large supply. These lithographs are not for general distribution, and the department is having great difficulty in supplying the demand for them. They are being posted in every nook and corner of the United States, and are put in such a way that they will be preserved for a long time.

Arizona People Wake Up.

The Chamber of Commerce of Phoenix, Ariz., has taken up the matter of having that territory represented at the exposition, and has appealed to the governor to appoint a commission of three members to see that an exhibit is made. The business men will be called on to raise a fund of $2,000 with the understanding that the legislature will refund the amount subscribed. The meeting at which this action was taken was attended by General C. F. Manderson and C. E. Llewellyn, the representative of the Department of Publicity and Promotion of the ex-[?]

 

Participation by Massachusetts.

The prospects for participation by Massachusetts in the exposition are improving. Commissioner Bickford, the general eastern representative of the exposition, has held a number of conferences with Governor Wolcott and with members of the legislature, and the latest reports from Boston are to the effect that a bill will be introduced in the legislature, providing for the appointment of a Massachusetts commission and the erection of a building to be modeled after the old state house and to cost between $12,000 and $15,000. The bill will also provide for the expenses of the governor and his staff in attending the opening of the exposition.

Tennessee Commission Coming.

A committee representing the Tennessee Exposition commission will arrive in Omaha at an early hour tomorrow morning to inspect the exposition grounds and make proper arrangements for participation in the gre[?] by their state. This committee consists of John T. Essary, chairman of the commission; W. T. Davis, secretary, and Theodore Cooley of Nashville.

The visitors will be taken in charge by Major T. S. Clarkson soon after their arrival and will be escorted to the exposition grounds and to the headquarters in the Paxton block. At noon they will be entertained at luncheon by President Wattles.

Dr. Webb Informs New York.

Dr. W. Seward Webb, the member of the New York Exposition commission who was in Omaha last Sunday, at which time he visited the exposition grounds, has kept his promise to advertise the exposition as soon as he returned home. In an interview appearing in the New York Herald he praises the Transmississippi Exposition to the skies and declares in unequivocal terms that New York must certainly be represented in no mean manner. He urges the legislature to appropriate an amount sufficient to enable the commission appointed by Governor Black to make a creditable showing.

Missouri Guards to Camp Here.

The St. Louis Republic says there is a move among the members of the Missouri National guard in the northwestern part of the state to have the encampment of the Second regiment held at Omaha and to induce the guards in other sections of the state to join in this movement. All plans for holding the annual encampment at St. Joseph have been abandoned and the project to camp at Omaha during the expesition​ is meeting with strong favor.

Duluth is Coming.

The people of Duluth and St. Louis county, Minnesota, are making preparations for an exhibit showing the resources of the country around Duluth. They have raised the county's quota of the fund for a state exhibit, and have now taken up the work of making a county exhibit. The local members of the Minnesota commission have taken charge of the matter and have asked the people of that section to bring in their suggestions as to the form of the exhibit.

Denver Commission's Work.

The canvassing committee of the Denver Exposition commission is meeting with the most flattering success in its efforts to raise $6,000 required to erect a city building and make a good exhibit of Denver's resources. Subscriptions have been received from the most unexpected sources and the committee raised $4,000 with little or no effort before the work was well started. A plan is now under consideration for erecting a much larger and finer building than was first contemplated.

Maryland's State Participation.

A bill appropriating 3,400 for state participation in the exposition is pending in the Maryland legislature. The Baltimore American says that if state participation is desirable, a much larger amount should be appropriated. This is the balance that was left from the appropriation made for the World's fair, and the American suggests that several times this amount should be set aside in order that the state may be well represented.

Arizona Commission Named.

The Arizona Exposition commission is the latest addition to the exposition family, Governor McCord having just appointed a commission of eighteen members, representing all of the twelve counties in the territory. These commissioners are called to meet in Phoenix April 2 for the purpose of organizing and beginning the work of having Arizona properly represented.

Exposition Notes.

Captain F. K. Deffry of the Neely Zouaves, Memphis, Tenn., has written to President Wattles regarding an engagement for his company and band for ten days during the summer. He lays great stress upon the drawing powers of his organization, and wants to be paid a good fee in addition to being furnished with camp grounds, etc.

Manager Babcock of the Transportation department is making efforts to secure from the Western Passenger association a stopover privilege for the Christian Endeavorers who will pass through Omaha July 3 en route to the convention of this organization at Nashville, Tenn. He has also written to the passenger agents of the Omaha lines asking them to assist in the matter.

Fred A. Wood of Cedar Rapids, Ia., president of the National Association of Firemen, has called a meeting of the executive committee of the organization to be held in Omaha April 9 and 10 for the purpose of conferring with the exposition authorities regarding the details of the arrangements for the national tournament of firemen, which is proposed to be held during the exposition.

P. M. Wright of Columbia, Mo., has a pair of turkeys, which break all previous records for weight in this country or Canada, and he will exhibit then in Missouri's section at the exposition. The hen weighs thirty-two pounds and the gobbler tips the beam at fifty pounds. Mr. Wright says the weight of the pair is half a pound better than the best Canadian record, and a pound beyond the best weight in the United States.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.

Sealed bids for the construction of the Boy's and Girl's building on the Exposition grounds will be received until 11 o'clock Wednesday, March 30, 1898.

Plans and specifications can be seen at the Superintendent's office, Fifteenth and Spencer streets or sets will be furnished bidders at cost.

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids.

F. P. KIRKENDALL,
Manager Grounds and Buildings Department

Transmississippi and International Exposition

OMAHA, Neb., March 25, 1898.

M26-27-28-29

WATTLES PLANS FOR A TENT

ACCOMMODATIONS FOR BIG CONVENTIONS

President of the Exposition Decides to Drop the Coliseum and Downtown Auditorium Propositions on Account of Cost.

The negotiations which have been pending for the use of the den of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben as a convention hall for the large conventions, which will be held in Omaha during the exposition have been dropped and another method for providing for these conventions will be adopted.

President Wattles, who has been acting as a committee to represent the exposition by virtue of the fact that the executive department is charged with the duty of providing such accommodations, visited the old Coliseum building yesterday, in company with an architect, to examine the building and determine the extent and cost of the changes necessary to fit the place for use as a convention hall. It was found that it would be necessary to make a number of changes in the interior of the building, and also to meet the requirements of the knights by erecting a temporary shed for housing the floats during the construction of these adjuncts to the fall festivities. The total cost of the work necessary to be done was estimated by the architect at about $8,000. It was estimated by the architect that the construction of a temporary auditorium at some convenient point down town would cost about $20,000.

After receiving this information, President Wattles decided that neither method could be carried out by the exposition management alone, and as no assistance is in sight, he decided to adopt another course. He will endeavor to secure a large tent, which will be erected at some convenient point down town, where it will serve for the largest gatherings. Mr. Wattles says that there will be but three or four gatherings of great size and the tent could be made to answer for these, while the smaller conventions can be cared for in the halls and theaters down town and in the auditorium on the exposition grounds.

By adopting this course President Wattles hopes to accommodate all of the conventions without friction.

UNION LABOR HAS A GRIEVANCE.

Serves Notice that the Wage Agreement is Being Violated.

A rumble of impending trouble with organized labor was heard at the meeting of the executive committee yesterday afternoon, when a formal notice was received from the officers of the Building Trades council announcing that at the last meeting of the council a resolution was adopted declaring that the exposition management had violated the agreement with organized labor by employing laborers to do carpenter work and paying electrical workers less than the union scale. The exposition officials were notified that unless action was taken within forty-eight hours to right these alleged grievances the Building Trades council would take action under its rules.

This matter was referred to a special committee, consisting of Managers Kirkendall and Rosewater and President Wattles, to confer with the committee of the Building Trades council and report upon the situation and the remedy which should be adopted.

The grievance of the Building and Trades council is understood to be that laborers are employed by the electrical construction bureau to make rough board boxes to be used for underground conduits for electric wires, it being claimed that this work should be done by carpenters at the regular scale. Another alleged cause for complaint is that Superintendent Rustin of the electrical bureau is employing men to do electrical work and compelling them to work ten hours for $2.50 per day, whereas it is claimed that the union scale calls for eight hours' work at 30 cents per hour.

Certain of the exposition officials say, concerning the last named grievance, that at the time when the exposition decided to pay the union scale of wages the schedule submitted by the representatives of organized labor did not contain any mention of electrical workers, and it is claimed that the Electrical Workers' union was not in existence at that time. It is further stated by these same officials that inquiry among the electric construction companies reveals that $2.50 per day is more than was paid by them for labor at the time the exposition directory fixed the scale of wages.

In addition to considering this matter the executive committee was presented with a request from the Woman's Board of Managers, asking to be given the control of the main court for two hours on a date to be afterward fixed, the women desiring to work up a great celebration in honor of the inauguration of work on the Girls' and Boys' building. They proposed to have a short program of exercises in honor of the occasion, consisting of speeches by two or three well known men and speaking by three young people, one to be chosen by the schools of Omaha, another by the schools of South Omaha and the third by the schools of Lincoln. The program included a grand march about the grand court behind a brass band, with High school cadets as marshals to see that the youngsters kept in line. The women proposed to turn a neat little sum of money into the building fund by charging each child 10 cents for a vote for the speakers, the 10 cents to pay for a ticket to the grounds. The gates were also to be turned over to the women, according to the proposition, and in this way a considerable sum was expected to be realized.

The executive committee thought the element of danger in the scheme was too great to consent to it, however, and the request of the women was denied.

Plans were ordered drawn for the Transportation warehouse and work on them will be pushed and the building erected at once. The structure will be 50x100 feet and will stand on the north tract east of the Transportation building.

PRESS GANG WANTS ACCOMMODATION

Will Ask the Exposition Management to Provide Quarters.

The executive committee of the Nebraska Press association will meet in Omaha Monday afternoon, arriving on the Burlington at 4:05 p. m. The committee will confer with the exposition authorities regarding accommodations on the grounds for members of the association during the exposition.

When the Nebraska Exposition commission designated the use to which the rooms in the Nebraska building should be devoted they set aside a room on the main floor, 16x33 feet in size, for the use of the Nebraska Press association, but some of the members of the association think this is not sufficient and they will ask the exposition management to arrange for more commodious quarters. In the preliminary plans made for the Service building to be erected on Twentieth street just north of the Administration arch, a large room was shown on the second floor for representatives of newspapers, and it has been proposed to turn this over to the Nebraska Press association for the use of its members and of visiting newspaper men. These matters will be discussed with the executive committee of the association on its arrival and ample accommodation for all newspaper representatives will be provided.

 

GOVERNOR LEEDY READY TO ACT.

Kansas Commission Will Be Named on Monday.

Governor Leedy of Kansas has at last given positive and definite assurances that he will name an exposition commission for that state and announced that fact to the Department of Publicity and Promotion by telegraph yesterday as follows:

The Kansas commission at the Omaha exposition will be appointed next Monday.

J. W. LEEDY.

The governor has said all along that he would appoint a commission as soon as he had assurances that a sufficient amount of money would be forthcoming to enable the state to participate in a creditable manner. After considerable agitation of the subject three Kansas railroads agreed to contribute $5,000 each, making $15,000, provided the citizens of Kansas would raise a like amount. Governor Leedy refused to not, however, until he knew that the money would be forthcoming from both sides and his pertinacity in this report has prevented the appointment of a commission. It is presumed that the money has been raised or that the governor has positive evidence that it will be forthcoming at the proper time or he would not have made the announcement contained in the telegram heretofore quoted.

Praise for an Educator.

The last issue of the National Journal of Education, one of the leading educational publications of the United States, includes a very flattering editorial comment on the latest work of State Superintendent W. W. Stetson of Maine, who has been secured as one of the general speakers for the Transmississippi Educational congress. The Journal says: "State Superintendent W. W. Stetson's report of the schools of Maine for 1897 is one of the greatest educational documents of the day, as it is of all time. There has never been a greater contribution to the cause of rural schools than that section of the report which is entitled, 'A Study of the Schools of Northeastern Maine.' No other man in any land or age has treated rural schools more intelligently and more helpfully than is here done. This ought to be printed in large quantities that all may have it who need it. Indeed, it should have as large a circulation as the famous fifth annual report of Horace Mann.'

Iowa Senate's Action.

President Wattles received a telegram from Senator Pusey of Council Bluffs, a member of the upper house of the Iowa legislature, announcing that the senate had passed the exposition bill appropriating $20,000 additional for Iowa's participation in the exposition.

This will necessitate returning the bill to the house for concurrence, that body having passed the bill with an appropriation of $30,000. The friends of the measure hope to have the amount increased to $25,000 before the bill finally becomes a law.

Iowa has already appropriated $10,000 for participation in the exposition, the last legislature having made a preliminary appropriation of this amount. The Iowa Exposition commission appealed to the legislature at the beginning of the session to make an appropriation of $47,400 in order to enable the commission to erect a suitable building on the exposition grounds and make a creditable showing.

Will Not Use the Den.

Exposition authorities have considered the proposition of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben to permit the exposition to use the Coliseum for assembly purposes providing that buildings be furnished in which the work on floats and other preparations for the pageant could be carried on. Estimates as to the cost of constructing temporary sheds for the floats and repairing the Coliseum building so that it will be suitable for conventions show that an expenditure of $8,000 would have to be made and the exposition authorities do not feel like putting so much money into a building which will be used for only a few of the very large conventions. At present it seems that it will be necessary to get along with the auditorium at the grounds and such halls and churches as can be secured downtown.

OKLAHOMA SWINGS INTO LINE.

Governor Barnes Appoints a Board of Commissioners.

GUTHRIE, Okl., March 25.—(Special Telegram.)—Governor C. M. Barnes today appointed J. C. Post of Kingfisher, S. T. Carrico of Alva, J. C. North of Northville, C. W. Points of Shawnee and M. Burke of Perry commissioners from Oklahoma to the Transmississippi Exposition. J. C. Post is chairman of the commission. The commission will begin at once the work of raising funds and preparing a territorial exhibit. Governor Barnes, in appointing the commissioners, admonished them that they would fail in their duty if Oklahoma is not as well represented at Omaha as any western state. Support is promised by a number of territorial organizations.

A CONTRACT WITH HIMSELF.

If the executive committee of the exposition proposes to permit one of its members to recommend a contract with himself, and then permit him to carry that contract into effect with himself, it should develop the plan to the limit.

A good start has already been made. For instance, one of the first discoveries made by Manager Rosewater was that he could very profitably rent an office in his building to himself as exposition manager. The other managers had their offices in the Paxton block, but Manager Rosewatr​ preferred to deal with himself, so he rented an office from himself for himself in the Bee building at $20 per month. In doing this he is reported to have had a violent debate with himself, but finally agreed with himself as to the terms.

When, however, it came to the $3,200 item, Mr. Rosewater had little difficulty in getting together with himself. He was unanimously of the opinion that it would be a good thing for himself to pay himself $3,200 for advertising the exposition.

The only question was whether he would make it $5,000. His discussion with himself on this point was interesting but brief. "Why," said he to himself, "should I pay myself more than $3,200 now? I can make another deal with myself at any time. This is good for a starter." So it happens that Mr. Rosewater only recommended expending $3,200 on himself.

The executive committee should now make a deal with each of its members for some nice fat contract. Let the plan be carried to its legitimate conclusion. Mr. Rosewater might like a concession or two. Give him the exclusive right to sell newspapers on the grounds. Let Mr. Reed have something, Mr. Lindsey and the others on the committee. Carry to its legitimate conclusion and natural end the idea of dividing the swag so happily entered upon in permitting Mr. Rosewater to do business with himself.

If the committee follows out this program it will at least be consistent.

QTESTIONS​ FOR THE COMMITTEE.

One of the great questions in exposition matters now is whether the members of the executive committee propose to rest under suspicions raised by their action or whether they will rescind the resolution voting $3,200 into the pockets of one of their members?

Another great question in exposition matters is whatever the executive committee proposes to shut of all free advertising heretofore given in western newspapers by subsidizing the newspaper belonging to a member of the committee.

Heretofore the public has had confidence in the executive committee. Such errors as it has committee have been overlooked because errors of judgment are always likely to occur.

This, however, is not such an error. It is an immoral act and a breach of trust for six trustees to vote trust funds into the pockets of one of themselves.

If this act stands, confidence falls and the exposition suffers.

Every member of the executive committee knows he has done wrong. Every member knows it was done for Rosewater's benefit, and not for the good of the exposition. Every member of the committee except one did it reluctantly and only because Rosewater bullyragged it through.

Why not reconsider?

The exposition can stand the loss of $3,200, no doubt, but the management cannot stand the loss of public confi-[?]

TO ENTERTAIN THE VISITORS

Another Bureau is Added to the Exposition.

WORK OUTLINED FOR WOMEN OF OMAHA

They Are Expected to Look After the Social Functions in Connection with the Great Transmississippi Show.

President Wattles has taken up a matter in connection with the social features of the exposition which has heretofore received no attention, but which has an important bearing upon its ultimate success in certain directions. Up to this time no arrangements have been made for providing for the entertainment of distinguished guests, except such entertainment as would be afforded by a visit to the grounds and participation in the exercises attendant upon the ceremonies which may be held there.

The social functions which are a necessary adjunct to the complete success of the entertainment of distinguished guests of the exposition city will be taken in hand at once and an organization effected for formulating plans for this feature of the exposition and carrying out these plans. The president has determined to call upon the women of Omaha to lend their valuable aid in this work and in order to get the work started he requested authority of the executive committee to appoint ten women as the executive committee of the Bureau of Entertainment. This authority was granted and President Wattles will make his appointments known within a few days.

The Bureau of Entertainment will form an important auxiliary to the Executive department of the exposition. On this bureau will devolve the duty of providing suitable entertainment for distinguished visitors, especially the wives of the governors and other distinguished dignitaries who will visit the city during the exposition. This will include the holding of receptions, the giving of dinners and such other social functions as the exigencies of the occasion may seem to require. The members of the bureau will be expected to hold themselves in readiness to lend their presence at any and all times as may be required for receptions and other events of a social nature and also to throw open their homes for the entertainment of honored guests.

Working on Exposition Music.

Musical Director Kimball has spent a busy week after his return from St. Louis, where he entered into negotiations for some strong attractions. The musical department of the exposition is growing in magnitude and attractiveness every day. With the orchestra of forty men, direct from Theodore Thomas, and under the directorship of Arthur Mees, Mr. Thomas' assistant, there will be no difficulty in regard to instrumental forces, and this orchestra is assured now beyond doubt.

Those who predicted failure in securing an adequate chorus if $5 had to be paid have been incorrect in their prophecies. The five months of free concerts have loomed up before the musical people, and many have felt that they were receiving the amount of their fee back again from what they learned at rehearsals, not only by reason of the instructions of the conductor, but also on account of the extraordinary opportunity of singing with such a large body of good musicians. Some of the most prominent local musicians have been at rehearsals and have expressed themselves as pleased and surprised.

Mr. Kelly, choral conductor, has now announced that owing to the large number of good voices received during the last ten days that at Tuesday night he will state that he will receive just six more contraltos, four tenors and five bassos. No more sopranos will be accepted for the present.

The rehearsals have been open to the public for the last few weeks, but Mr. Kelly has enforced a new rule, which is that no outsiders will be admitted into the rehearsal room, in defense whereof he says that strangers come in and receive an unfair impression of the work if the singers are engaged in extricating tangled skeins of harmony.

 

COLD WEATHER AND THE FRUIT.

Orchards of Nebraska in Good Condition and Uninjured.

Superintendent Taylor of the Horticulture bureau of the Exhibits department has been interested in learning the effect of the recent cold snap on the fruit trees of this section, as the destruction of the budding crop would seriously interfere with a successful display of Nebraska fruit. He was especially anxious concerning the peach crop, as one of the events of the fruit carnival is to be a peach day, when the luscious morsels will be distributed free to all comers, and any blight to this crop would be a serious blow to the success of this feature of the exposition.

A few days ago Prof. Taylor wrote to J. M. Russell of Wymore, Neb., the owner of the largest peach orchard in the state, and asked about the effect of the cold on the peach trees. A reply to this letter has just been received, in which Mr. Russell says that the frost touched a very few of the buds, but he remarks that it was a good thing for the trees, as there were too many buds coming to assure a good crop of desirable fruit. He says there will be a very large crop of peaches beyond question.

Praise for an Educator.

The last issue of the National Journal of Education, one of the leading educational publications of the United States, including a publications of the United States, includes a very flattering editorial comment on the latest work of State Superintendent W. W. Stetson of Maine, who has been secured as one of the general speakers for the Transmississippi Educational congress. The Journal says: "State Superintendent W. W. Stetson's report of the schools of Maine for 1897 is one of the great educational documents of the day, as it is of all time. There has never been a greater contribution to the cause of rural schools than that section of the report which is entitled, 'A Study of the Schools of Northeastern Maine.' No other man in any land or age has treated rural schools more intelligently and more helpfully than is here done. This ought to be printed in large quantities that all may have it who need it. Indeed, it should have as large a circulation as the famous fifth annual report of Horace Mann.'

Indiana Almost Ready.

Governor Mount of Indiana has indicated that he is about ready to take action in the matter of appointing an exposition commission for that state and he has called a conference of the presidents of the Indianapolis Board of Trade and Chamber of Commerce and a large number of the most prominent business and professional men in the state to meet in his office, March 29, to discuss the situation and decide whether a state commission shall be appointed. There is no legislative appropriation in Indiana, but the governor has announced that he believes the necessary funds can be raised by private subscription and a good exhibit made. A number of the large manufacturers of the state have announced their intention of making exhibits, whether anything is done by the state or not.

Pennsylvania Club Meets.

A meeting of the Pennsylvania club was held yesterday at noon in Major Clarkson's office. Rules and bylaws were framed which porvide​ among other things that a second vice president be appointed from each county in the state. Any native-born Pennsylvanian and his wife and children over 18 may become members of the club. A regular initiation fee of 50 cents will be charged each male member residing in Douglas county. The regular meetings will be held at 1 o'clock p. m. on the first Saturday in each month at Major Clarkson's office. It is desired that all native Pennsylvanians call at the office of W. G. Shriver, 1403 Farnam street, and register their names. The next meeting will be held at the same place Saturday, April 2, and all Pennsylvanians are invited to attend.

Plan for Irrigation Exhibit.

A. M. Allen, president of the Cozad Irrigation company, has notified the Irrigation bureau of the Exhibits department that the commissioners of Dawson county have appropriated funds for making an exhibit of the irrigation system in use in that section of Nebraska, and Mr. Allen says that everything is now in readiness for making a fine showing. Arrangements have been made by which the irrigation exhibit to be made by the Agricultural department of the government will be made on the ground occupied by the Dawson county exhibit. This will show not only the irrigation system, but will show its practical effect on the forestry and grass displays made by the Agricultural department.

MORE CONVENTION ARE SLATED.

Dates of Gatherings to Be Held in Omaha This Season.

The dates of meeting of fifty-seven conventions, together with the prospective attendance, have now been secured by Secretary Utt of the Commercial club. As the dates were obtained The Bee has published them on the last two Sundays. Last week Secretary Utt compiled the following list:

National Council of Women, last week of October, May Wright Sewall, president; Indianapolis, Ind. Delegates, 200.

Liberal Congress of Religions, October 18, continuing one week, Rev. Jenkins Loyd Jones, 3939 Langley avenue, Chicago, Ill. Delegates, 200.

Convention of General Federation of Women's clubs, June 18, Frances M. Ford, secretary; Omaha. Delegates, 400.

State Federation of Women's clubs, second week in October, three days, Mrs. Draper Smith, Omaha (State). Attendance 300.

National Household Economic association, third week in October, Miss Ellen F. Marshall, secretary; 1882 West Twenty-second street, Chicago (National). Attendance 300.

Congress of Music, five days beginning June 3, Homer Moore, chairman; Omaha (National). Attendance 500.

Congress of Social Economics, second week in September, Victor Rosewater, local chairman; Omaha (National). Attendance 200.

Congress of Child Study, last week in June, Mrs. Grace B. Sudborough, chairman; Omaha (National). Attendance 100.

Congress of Christian Activities, from eight to ten days about middle of September, Rev. F. A. Warfield, chairman; Omaha (National). Attendance 500.

American Institute of Electrical Engineers, July 5 to 8, inclusive, R. B. Owens, secretary; Omaha (National). Delegates 200.

Swedish Epworth league, June 22, John S. Swenson, secretary; Omaha (Interstate). Attendance 200.

National Eclectic Medical association, June 21 (National). Attendance 400.

American Association of Fairs and Expositions, October 26, Robert W. Furnas, secretary; Brownville, Neb. (National). Attendance 150.

National Association of Postal Clerks, June 14, G. A. Wood, secretary; West Medford, Mass. (National). Attendance 200.

Nebraska Saengerbund, August, Max Teierman, secretary; Arlington block, Omaha (State). Attendance 300.

State Association Retail Liquor Dealers, June 7 to 9, inclusive, William Maloney, secretary; Douglas street, Omaha (State) Attendance 500.

National Congress Retail Liquor Dealers, August 22-27, John Tierney, secretary; 302 North Sixteenth street, Omaha (National). Attendance 4,000.

The American Maize Propaganda, October, B. W. Snow, secretary; Marquette building, Chicago (National). Delegates 50.

Preparing Chinese Exhibit.

Wong Aloy and Wong How, representatives of Wong Chin Foo, the Chinese commissioner of the exposition, are in the city to begin the active work of preparing their exhibit. They say their first duty will be to provide a stopping place for their 250 Chinamen who will begin arriving in Omaha very shortly. The first bunch, consisting of fifteen or twenty artisans, mechanics and artists, will arrive some time next week, and in the meantime they say a lodging house for them must be found. Wong Chin Foo, the principal in this exhibit, will arrive in Omaha early next week and the active work of erecting the Chinese building on the bluff tract will commence at once.

Arizona Commissioners Named.

The commission appointed last Thursday by the governor of Arizona for the purpose of seeing to it that the resources of Arizona are properly represented at the exposition consisting of the following members: Maricopa county, J. T. Barkely, B. Heyman, Winfield Scott; Pima county, Charles R. Drake, Selim Franklin, Colonel J. B. Breathitt; Yavapai county, E. B. Gage, H. J. Allen and Governor F. A. Trittle; Pinal, W. R. Stone; Yuma, J. H. Carpenter; Navajo, William Campbell; Graham, Colonel M. J. Egan; Cochise, Ben Williams; Gila, Captain E. H. Cook; Coconino, T. A. Riordan; Apache, Albert F. Porter; Mojave, W. J. R. Halsey.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Wisconsin Exposition commission has been increased by the addition of Willard E. Carpenter of Waupaca, who has been appointed by the governor.

Joe Schwartz, or "Geraldine's Indian," as he is known all about the exposition grounds, has resigned his position as night watchman at the office of the Department of Buildings and Grounds.

The executive committee yesterday awarded to Julius Loester the contract for making and installing the statuary for the Liberal Arts building for $1,650 and the statuary for the Horticulture building for $2,750.

The special committee appointed by the executive committee to confer with a committee from the Building Trades council regarding the difficulty in regard to the wages paid the electrical workers on the exposition grounds, Messrs. Kirkendall, Rosewater and Wattles, will meet at 10 o'clock this morning with the committees from the Building Trades council, Messrs. Breen, Shrum and Bell, and endeavor to arrive at some agreement regarding the matter.

The latest application for permission to operate an amusement concession on the Midway is that made by Prof. John Albert, who wants to operate an aquatic exhibition. He proposes to install a glass tank twenty-five feet long, twelve feet wide and twelve feet high. This will be filled with filtered water and in this liquid the professor and his family of boys will disport themselves in many ways, performing various acrobatic feats beneath the surface of the waters, diving into the tank from a great height and performing a number of startling and amusing feats.

QUEEN'S LACE HANDKERCHIEF

MOUCHOIR MADE FOR EMPRESS EUGENIE

Woman's Board May Secure a Remarkable Piece of Handiwork for Show at the Exposition During the Summer.

The Woman's Board of Managers has received a proposition from Miss Helen D. Williams of Nashville, Tenn., to place on exhibition at the exposition a lace handkerchief valued at $$1,500​, and the women are considering the advisability of securing the precious article.

The handkerchiew​ has quite a history. It was made in Neufchatel, Switzerland, about 1850, by two poverty-stricken women whose eyesight was destroyed by the severe strain of the work. It was intended as a gift to Empress Eugenie, but after its completion is passed into other hands than those of the empress, and was exhibited at the Paris exposition of 1850, and at the London exposition of 1862. It finally came into the family of Miss Williams, and was shown at the World's fair and at the Nashville exposition.

The handkerchief is eighteen inches square and the lace work is said to be of remarkable fineness and delicacy. In each of the four corners is a small house. This is out one-quarter of an inch square, but the vines running over the cottage are shown with exactness and the shrubbery about the house is worked out in all the details. Wild animals in the woods surrounding these houses are perfect in every detail, the hair on the boars and the spots on the leopards being shown with distinctness. A tropical forest extends entirely around the handkerchief, and numerous wild animals are shown running about between the trees. Bananna​ and cocoa trees are shown in full bearing. It is said that the pattern for this wonderful handkerchief was completed, in order to prevent a

The Woman's Board of Managers is considering the matter of securing an old manuscript bible as an exhibit in the educational section. The precious document belongs to the estate of the late Dr. Louis Loewe, member of the Royal Asiatic association, Oriental languages to the Royal College of Perceptors​, etc. The date of the ancient manuscripts composing the book is unknown, except in one instance, where it is related that the writer of the text finished his labors in 1496, but the absence of illuminated initial letters leads scholars to conclude that the manuscript is very old. The book is bound in tortoise shell covers with silver clasps and ornamentation. It contains 493 leaves and is of the following dimensions: Seven and three-quarters inches long, five and one-half inches wide and two and one-half inches thick. The arrangement of the books is different from that adopted for the modern editions of the bible.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.

Sealed bids for the construction of the Boy's and Girl's building on the Exposition grounds will be received until 11 o'clock Wednesday, March 30, 1898.

Plans and specifications can be seen at the Superintendent's office. Fifteenth and Spencer streets or sets will be furnished bidders at cost.

The right is reserved to reject any or all bids.

F. P. KIRKENDALL,
Manager Grounds and Buildings Department

Transmississippi and International Exposition.

OMAHA, Neb., March 25, 1898.

M26-27-28-29

NOTICE.

LITTLE ROCK, Ark., March 23rd, 1898.

Sealed proposals will be received by me until 12 m., April 6, '98, for the material and construction of the Arkansas State building, to be erected at the Omaha Transmississippi and International exposition at Omaha, Neb.

Plans and specifications may be seen at the office of Frank W. Gibb, architect, Little Rock, Ark., and at the office of the commissioner of grounds and buildings at the Exposition, Omaha, Neb.

The board reserves the right to reject any or all bids and to furnish any of the material that may be required in the construction of said building.

W. D. MATHEWS, Secretary,
Board of Commissioners for Arkansas.
 

LIGHT FOR THE EXPOSITION

GLORIES FOR ELECTRICITY IN FULL USE

Expert Stieringer Plans Effects Grand in Conception and Almost Magical in the Results Produced.

Detailed plans for the illumination of the exposition grounds have been completed. They disclose a comprehensive scheme in harmony with the architecture and surroundings of the exposition. The general plan is unique in character and unlike anything heretofore done. This work has been in the hands of Luther M. Stieringer of New York, one of the foremost electricians in this country. He has been connected with the illumination features of all the great expositions in this country and is known in electrical circles for the magnificent effects he has accomplished in the illumination features of all the great expositions in this country and is known in electrical circles for the magnificent effects he has accomplished in the illumination of beautiful settings. He is attached to the Transmississippi and International Exposition as consulting electrical engineer and has spent several weeks in this city deciding upon the plans for the illumination of the entire grounds. Mr. Stieringer was especially captivated with the magnificent opportunity for electrical illumination afforded by the beautiful setting of the main court. He declared repeatedly and enthusiastically that no electrician had ever been offered the grand opportunities for enchanting effects that are embodied in the arrangement of the buildings constituting this portion of the grounds.

No words can adequately convey the beauty of the scene which will open before the visitor to the exposition grounds. Incandescent lights will form the sole source of illumination in the main court. The soft glow of these fairy lamps will make every nook and corner, every pillar and pilaster, each arch and dome glow with a soft light, bringing out all the latent beauty of the classic architecture and making the whole scene resemble a dream of beauty. No cold glare from an arc light will disfigure the scene and add a harsh element to the soft and rhythmic beauty of the picture. The arc lamps used for illuminating the interior of the main buildings will be so placed that no direct rays from them will pass out of any of the windows to strike the visitor like a discordant note.

OUTLINED IN LIGHT.

Incandescent lights will be everywhere. Each building will be outlined with glowing bulbs. The architectural features of each classic structure will be emphasized with an array of lights. Along the cornice, around each window, about the cap of each column and pilaster, outlining each dome and pinnacle, will be seen the electric firefly, its soft glow bringing out the beauty of the architecture of which it will appear a compotent part.

Surmounting the posts of the railing around the lagoon will be clusters of the tiny bulbs and neat standards placed near the fronts of the main buildings will support similar clusters, all throwing a radiant glow over the scene. The bridges across the lagoon, the island in the center, the colonnades between the buildings, all will be outlined with light.

A striking feature of the illumination will be the fountain at the west end of the lagoon. At the base of the west lobe of the trefoil forming the Mirror will stand a handsome column supporting a statue of the water god, Neptune. This column will be of artistic design, its base being formed of four prows of Norse vessels. The figure of Neptune will be of heroic size, and the entire decoration will be in keeping with the beautiful and stately Government building, which will form the background for the column. About the base of this column will be innumerable jets of sparkling water, rising and falling at the command of the sovereign. Standing guard about these varying forms will be a chain of water lilies, each bud bearing within its petals a bulb, which will glow and flash when darkness covers the scene, keeping watch that none of the sparkling fluid passes out of the confines of the chain. At night this fountain will be a marvel of beauty. Beams of varicolored light will bombard it from a hidden source and the glittering globules will assume all the hues of the rainbow at the bidding of Neptune's rival, the god of Electricity.

SEARCHLIGHTS IN PLAY.

Adding to the enchanting beauty of the scene will be the effects produced by searchlights. Powerful rays will glance and glitter on surrounding objects, making them stand out in the darkness with startling distinctness. The beautiful gilded dome of the Government building, surmounted by a gigantic state of Liberty Enlightening the World, will be made to sparkle and glow in the rays of the searchlight like a ball of fire, and other starling effects will be produced in various parts of the grounds by means of the searching rays of these powerful creations of recent invention.

The electrical effects in the other parts of the grounds will be exceedingly pretty and every portion will be brilliantly lighted.

The illumination of the grounds and buildings will be made on a scale unexcelled even by the effect obtained at Chicago in 1893. Not less than 2,155 kilowatts in dynamos and transformers have already been ordered from the General Electric company for purely illuminating purposes. In detail the contract covers four 125 2,000-candle power light brush are dynamos of the multi-circuit type; four 120-kilowatts and two 180-kilowatt alternating current, high periodicity dynamos, operating at 1,040 volts, together with 840 kilowatts in transformers of different sizes. Current for various power purposes will be supplied from a generator of 225-kilowatt capacity, operating at 500 to 550 volts. The arc lamps will number 600, of 2,000 candle power each. These are to be either the double or single carbon type, at the option of the General Electric company, but if the latter are used they are to be arranged for fourteen-hour service. The contract also calls for the necessary exciters and all the switchboard appliances for the operation of the above machines.

Some idea of the size of the dynamos called for may be obtained by comparison with the dynamos called for may be obtained by comparison with the dynamos running at the Nineteenth street power house of the street railway company. These ponderous pieces of machinery are of 100-kilowatts, 500-volts capacity.

OREGON DECIDES ON ITS COURSE.

Portland People Head the Movement for State Representation.

Henry E. Dosch of Portland, Ore., a member of the Oregon Exposition commission, who visited Omaha recently to make arrangements for participation by his state in the exposition, has imparted to his colleagues a measure of the enthusiasm which he imbibed while in Omaha. Mr. Dosch is an expert in exposition work, having been at the head of movements in his state for showing to the world the resources of Oregon and the expedition with which he transacted business in Omaha was a proof of his familiarity with the subject. He came with full power to decide whether his state should take part or not. He looked over the ground and within twenty-four hours had determined upon the plan and scope of that state's participation, had selected his space in the several buildings, aggregating 6,000 square feet, selected a site for the Oregon building, telegraphed the Portland papers what he had done and started for home. That he did not rest when he reached home is shown by the reports in the newspapers. As soon as he reached home a meeting of the Oregon commission was called at Portland and Mr. Dosch submitted his report to his colleagues. Concerning this meeting the Portland Oregonian has this to say:

Mr. Dosch, who will have general superintendency of the Oregon display at the Transmississippi fair, has returned from a flying trip to the exposition city. He is fully enthused about the fair and when he had made his verbal report to the committee their collective and individual stock of knowledge was greatly increased. Mr. Dosch, by good luck and friendly assistance, got hold of the best available space left which had been set aside for certain states, but for which contracts had not been closed in time. Oregon secured the site allowed for Iowa, but as Iowa's representatives did not show up on time the preference was given to Oregon.

H. B. Hardt, a former Portlander, now of the Department of Exhibits, had a warm place in his heart for Oregon and was anxious to give this state the best advantages at his command. Five minutes after Mr. Dosch had conditionally bargained for a desirable site for an "Oregon cabin"—for headquarters—and space for the mining display the governor and secretary of state of Iowa walked into the room and announced they would complete the arrangements for Iowa's space. The feelings of the executive can be better imagined than described when Mr. Dosch informed him that Oregon was to have representation there. It afforded the executive committee no small amount of satisfaction to ascertain that this state had secured reserve room on the ground floor of the department of mines and horticulture.

Mr. Dosch said that the Kansas delegation, which came after him, was forced to go up into the gallery for space. The gallery is not by any means nearly so desirable a place.

The executive committee of the state commission has ratified Mr. Dosch's acts at the Omaha fair and has notified President Wattles at Omaha to that effect. It now remains—indeed, it becomes incumbent upon the people of the state—to come to the rescue and back up the commission in its work.

The state building, it has been decided, will be a characteristic log cabin. The place where it will be situated is very central and it will be an excellent spot for the state headquarters. It is opposite the Horticultural buildings, on one of the main thoroughfares and convenient to the Twentieth street cars. It is designed to provide the "cabin" with Oregon papers, plenty of Oregon literature and Oregon views. The cabin, plans for which have already been discussed, will be a unique resting spot.

Careful consideration has been given to the question of finances by the committee. Today a representative body of the commission will start upon a tour of Portland banks to solicit their subscriptions, which will head the list.

BRING ORDER OUT OF CHAOS

BUILDINGS ARE NEARING COMPLETION

Landscape Artists Are Busy Shaping Up the Grounds—Features of the Midway Are Put in Evidence.

The exposition grounds continue to present a scene of the greatest activity and the changes which are being made in the general appearance of every part of the grounds are being wrought with great rapidity. A large force of men is employed in the main court, large gangs being busily engaged in setting electric light standards, planting shrubbery, making roadways, and doing the thousand-and-one things which are necessary to furnish a proper setting for the beautiful buildings which stand out in bold relief on every side.

The contractor for the docking about the lagoon has covered each post of the railing with a handsome form of staff and the heavy iron rail between the posts has been painted black. At the east end of the lagoon a heavy balustrade is being put in place and a coping one foot in width will soon extend all around the lagoon.

Work has been commenced on the bridges which will span the lagoon at Twentieth street. The planking has been torn away from the banks at this point and solid concrete piers will be constructed at each side of the lagoon and at each side of the island. High arched bridges will rest on these piers and add very materially to the beauty of the scene.

PUT ON FINISHING TOUCHES.

The statuary on the Administration arch is all in place. This is the first building to be thus adorned and the handsome figures which are seen above the cornice of this building form a striking addition to the appearance of the structure.

The calsomining of the interior of the Mines building is well advanced and this building will be entirely completed within a very few days and ready for occupancy. The staff contractors are cleaning up a few odds and ends about the base of the building and the concrete for the floor of the main entrance is being put down.

The contractor, who will calsomine the interior of the other main buildings, is installing his compressed air machine