Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition

 
No 04
V. 8
October 8- 1898 to November 25, 1898
Oct 1, 1898- Nov. 25
   

CONDITION OF THE WEATHER

Hour.Deg.
5 a. m.65
6 a. m.66
7 a. m.67
8 a. m.67
9 a. m.67
Hour.Deg.
10 a. m.67
11 a. m.68
12 m.70
1 p. m.72
2 p. m.72
3 p. m.72

SHOW IS ALL THEIRS

Chicago People Take Possession of Exposition Grounds and Buildings.

OMAHA'S HOSPITALITY IS ACCEPTED

Even Their Home Brand of Weather is Provided for the Visitors.

FORMALITIES ARE SOON OVER WITH

Ceremonies at the Auditorium Carried Out Under Schedule Arranged.

WARM CONGRATULATIONS ARE EXCHANGED

Mayors of the Two Cities and Presidents of the Exposition and Illinois Commission Vie in Saying Nice Things About the Situation.

Total admissions yesterday19,530
Total to date1,688,370

The radiant sunshine that welcomed the representatives of the Sunny South was pertinently succeeded by lowering skies and damp, misty winds when Chicago came this morning to pay her respects to the only exposition that has rivaled her own marvelous achievement. Is​ was as nearly a counterpart of the brand of weather for which the Windy City is famed as nature could suggest, and the visitors unpacked their mackintoshes and umbrellas and felt entirely at home. The clouds were draped in that slaty shade of gray that distinguishes the heavy canopy of mist that a stiff east wind blows up from Lake Michigan. The rain drizzled at intervals, with the same chilly persistence that it falls on Michigan avenue on several days of the 365, the southeast wind was damply suggestive of a journey over miles of angry water, and the Chicagoans had only to close their eyes and imagine that they could hear the muffled pounding of the insistent billows on the sturdy riprapping of the Lake Front. They had every reason to feel at home and they did. They showed their appreciation of the cordial sincerity of their welcome by simply taking possession of the grounds and lavishing their admiration on the show as enthusiastically as though they had not had a slightly bigger one of their own. They had come with the announced intention of making Chicago day one of the great events of the transmississippi show and the atmospheric inconveniences of the morning did not prevent them from carrying it into execution.

The delegations that were brought by the various railroads included some of the most notable figures in Chicago citizenship. Many of them were accompanied by their families and together they formed the biggest and most enthusiastic crowd that has visited the exposition. They swarmed into the Illinois building all through the morning and kept the pretty rotunda full of animation and pretty costumes. As the excursionists whose trains had been switched directly to the grounds joined those who came up from their down town quarters the pretty red badges were conspicuous all over the grounds and by 11 o'clock there were enough of them to fairly fill the Auditorium and still leave a representation in every other quarter.

Officials Finally Arrive.

The official party was belated but in the meantime the crowd was pleasantly entertained by the Omaha Concert band and was not perceptibly restless. The speakers and official guests arrived at 11:30 and were escorted to the stage by President Wattles and Mayor Moores and accompanied by nearly all the Omaha city officials. After an earnest invocation by Rev. T. J. Mackay, Chairman William H. Harper of the executive committee of the Illionis​ commission called the meeting to order and introduced President Clark E. Carr of the Illinois commision​ as the presiding officer. President Carr said to his Chicago hearers that, proud as they are of the splendor of their imperial city, they were now in the midst of that which had made that splendor, the great northwest. He introduced Mayor Frank E. Moores, who welcomed the visitors in behalf of the city of Omaha. He declared that every citizen of the west is proud of Chicago. He regards [?]ter, around which the universe revolves and feels a personal interest in its triumphs. But Omaha is to the transmississippi west what Chicago is to the whole country, and he expressed the belief that when his hearers had inspected the magnificent enterprise that they are here to visit they would be as proud of Omaha as Omaha is of Chicago. In conclusion he presented Mayor Harrison with the keys to the city and invited the visitors to take the fullest advantage of the liberties afforded.

In behalf of the exposition management President Wattles said that the inspiration and ambition of our people to build this exposition on the banks of the Missouri had been received from Chicago's great World's Fair, and, while this was but a shadow of the ideal, the west is proud of its child and is glad to welcome its distinguished visitors. He referred to the intimate commercial relations that exist between the Mississippi and Missouri valleys. Chicago is the great clearing house for the immense products of this fertile territory. Its business interests are so closely connected with the transmississippi territory that it is practically the great heart of the west. He spoke of its wonderful growth and transcendent enterprise and paid a high tribute to the progressive spirit of its citizens.

Mayor Harrison's Response.

In response to these sentiments Mayor Carter H. Harrison spoke of "Chicago" and his introduction was followed by a generous ovation. He said that they were here to return the thanks of Chicago for the designation of this day in honor of their city. They represented all nationalities, all politics and all creeds. They sometimes differed at home but they were a unit in extending to Omaha their sympathy and encouragement and their congratulations on its magnificent achievement. He declared that this celebration came at a time of glorious significance to this country. We had learned that the untried volunteers were of the stuff of which heroes are made and that Sampson, Dewey and Schley are worthy successors to Farragut and Perry. We are not only a peace loving nation but we have found that we have the ability to make our enemies on the battlefield desire peace rather than war.

Referring more particularly to Chicago, Mayor Harrison said that on most occasions a Chicagoan could not tell the truth about his city without being accused of exaggeration. The truth about Chicago seemed like an extravagant dream to the citizen of New York, or Boston or Philadelphia. But Omaha can understand Chicago. Her people had the same inherent spirit and the same pluck and enterprise had made each city what it is. In conclusion, he declared that not only on this occasion, but in every achievement of its future, Omaha commands all the sympathy and encouragement and inspiration that Chicago has to give.

Chicago and the West.

"Chicago and Its Relation to the West" was the subject of an able address by Charles G. Dawes, ex-congressman and assistant comptroller of the currency of the United States. After an enthusiastic hand clapping had greeted his introduction, Mr. Dawes said:

Twenty-seven years ago fifty of the leading citizens of Chicago gathered themselves in a little meeting under most distressing circumstances. Around them, in smoking and somber ruins, lay what had been but a few days before the magnificent city of Chicago. Their own homes had been burned over their heads; their property of all kinds was in ashes; around them all was desolation and cheerlessness and the future seemed as dark as the present. Some of these men rose and spoke of the city as destroyed and lost forever. Its rebuilding seemed to them impossible. To their minds the great Chicago, the city of their pride and affection, was numbered among the things of the past. But from among them there rose a young man who amidst depressing surroundings lifted his voice in remonstrance and in prophecy of the future. "Chicago will live," said he, "and live to be so mighty and so vast that this great fire will be but an incident in its past." And Chicago will thus live because beyond her there lies the giant forces, the teeming millions and the imperial area of the mighty west, which having before created Chicago as the necessary gateway to the east must re-create it under the same necessities." That speaker, now the secretary of the treasury of the United States, has lived to see Chicago re-created by the west and his prophecies fulfilled to the uttermost.

I have thought of no better way than by the telling of this incident to indicate the relation of Chicago to the west.

Chicago is the child of the west, dependent upon her for her prosperity and progress—almost for her very existence—and far be it from her to belittle the debt she owes [?]ern men, sustained largely by western resources, she feels the keenest and most vital interest in the west, and I believe the great west takes equal interest in this young giant among the cities of the world.

Some Hard Boiled Facts.

The details of the social and commercial relations between the west and Chicago, daily growing more intimate, daily growing more vast—relations which may well challenge the deepest attention of the student of economics and of American history—can receive from me today but a passing and superficial word. From this great section 125 passenger trains carrying over 12,000 people roll daily into the depots of the city of Chicago, and an equal number of trains depart daily from Chicago for the west. During the last year 20,000,000 bushels of western wheat, 116,000,000 bushels of western corn, 118,000,000 bushels of western oats and 17,000,000 bushels of western rye went to or through the great commercial gateway of Chicago. Of the 46,000,000 pounds of second class printed matter entered for the year ending June 30, 1896, at the Chicago postoffice, the authorities of the office estimate that from three-eighths to three-fourths went to the west. Taking the postoffice average of five pieces to the pound, we find that the total annual circulation of Chicago periodical issues in the west must be between 130,000,000 and 172,000,000 copies—a circulation of most surprising and portentious​ magnitude. The combined mileage of the railroads east and west of the Missouri river, binding and knitting together the west and Chicago in ties of common interest, is 67,180 miles.

But no catalogue of the evidences of the intimacy and vastness of the commercial and sociological relations of the west to Chicago can add to our sense of their importance.

Affects the National Life.

The degree of contentment and prosperity experienced by the western people under these relations of western cities like Chicago and Omaha to the western country is so important as affecting our national life and progress that these relations now command the interest and attention of the entire people of the United States. It is generally realized that when the social problems involved in them are solved all the internal problems which confront our young republic will be solved. These people—the people of Chicago and the west—are not waiting for other peoples or other nations to solve the great problems of today, but strong in the consciousness of their competency for the task they eagerly seek after right solutions.

The rapidity of the development of the west has in less than two generations brought them face to face with the problem of existence under all social conditions from the most primitive to the most complex.

What has thus happened before the eyes of one generation in the west has consumed several hundred years even in other sections of our country and in continental Europe thousands of years. Crowded into the lives of the people of the west has been the marvelous sight of an empire builded from a wilderness.

Past and Present.

We stand today in the midst of this magnificent exposition—an exponent of the highest art of the world—located in this beautiful city of Omaha with its complex nineteenth century civilization and architecture, and are startled by the thought that the Indians and buffalo which have been brought here as objects of curiosity lived in their native state upon this very site less than fifty years ago.

Little wonder is it that the people of the west are interested in these relations of the western city to the western community. The fingers of fate move in decades and not in centuries, in setting the problems for western humanity to conquer.

Little wonder is it that no solution seems too difficult of attainment for those who have seen such great transformation in the west through the successful solution of earlier problems, equally grave.

And now as the genius of America, at the close of a glorious war so bravely fought by a gallant army and navy under a great and wise president, stands upon the threshold of a dawning century and a dawning destiny, with her face toward the fair islands of the Pacific west placed by God's hand under her guardianship, little wonder is it that these people of the west, themselves but a short time ago the adopted children of the wilderness, should not doubt that the path of national duty toward the new western possessions shall again by the path of national glory.

On the Louisiana Purchase.

Cogressman​ J. R. Mann also received a flaering​ welcome from he​ audience. He discussed "The Louisiana Purchase," as follows:

We celebrate today the victories of peace and peaceful pursuits. Where a magic city and a beautiful exposition now stand the wild buffalo was chased by the savage Indian within the lifetime of many here. In the midst of this fitting celebration of the successes of our arts of peace, while enjoying the benefits of bounteous plenty and prosperity, it is proper to recall the history of those events which have made these western states an equal part of that nation which is today the embodiment of progressive civilization and which flies[?]

 

"Large streams from little fountains flow; tall oaks from little acorns grow." The little narrow fringes of settlements along the Atlantic coast has grown into an empire which sweeps across a continent and embraces the islands of the sea.

The Louisiana purchase more than doubled the national territory. It gave to our country the exclusive control of the mighty Mississippi and its tributaries. It planted our possessions on the Gulf of Mexico. It acquired for us the Columbia river and a coast line on the Pacific ocean. It brought into our country a region having the most fertile farm and grazing lands, as well as varied mineral resources, to be found in the world, and yet its acquirement was, as it were, only a chance shot.

Spain owned the entire western bank of the Mississippi river and the eastern bank below the Thirty-first parallel of latitude, the boundary line fixed by the treaty of 1795. After the war of the revolution our country west of the Alleghenies had begun to fill up with a class of sturdy and independent pioneer settlers. These settlements depended for transportation of their products wholly upon river navigation, the only outlet for which was through the mouth of the Mississippi, owned and controlled by Spain.

In 1800, by the secret treaty of San Ildefonso, Spain retroceded the province of Louisiana to France, but without delivering possession at that time.

It became evident to the statesmen of that time that we could have no lasting peace until we should possess one bank entire of the Mississippi river, with a consequent right to its free navigation.

Jefferson was president and did not believe that the constitution warranted the purchase of new territory, but overcoming his scruples he rose equal to the emergency and he commissioned James Monroe to act with Robert Livingston, then minister to France, in an effort to purchase that part of the Louisiana province east of the Mississippi, including New Orleans, from France, and congress appropriated the sum of $2,000,000 for that purpose.

War a Fortunate Incident.

"It is an ill wind that blows nobody any good." Fortunately for our own interest, France and England were then on the verge of another war. They had just concluded a treaty of peace, but each country was looking with dread suspicion upon the other. England viewed with grave objection the retransfer by Spain of the immense Louisiana province to France; and Napoleon, who was then the first consul of France and its ruler, quickly say that in case of war the English, with their superiority at sea, would immediately seize New Orleans and the Mississippi river valley. On Easter Sunday, April 10, 1803, he called two of his counselors who were most familiar with the foreign possessions and asked their advice. He said to them:

"I know the full value of Louisiana, and I have been desirous of repairing the fault of the French negotiator who abandoned it in 1763. A few lines of a treaty have restored it to me, and I have scarcely recovered it when I must expect to lose it. But if it escapes me, it shall one day cost dearer to those who oblige me to strip myself of it than to those to whom I wish to deliver it. The English have successively taken from France Canada, Cape Breton, New Foundland, Nova Scotia and the richest portions of Asia. They shall not have the Mississippi which they covet."

And after hearing from his advisers, one in favor of selling the province to the United States, the other in favor of retaining it, Napoleon said:

"Irresolution and deliberation are no longer in season. I renounces Louisiana. It is not only New Orleans that I will cede; it is the whole colony without my reservation."

Monroe and Livingston had no authority to accept the offer which was made to them by Napoleon.

They could not cable for instructions. They had no time to communicate with the home government by letter. Napoleon was not a Spanish diplomat; he wanted his offer promptly accepted or rejected.

Monroe and Livingston, however, proved equal to the ocasion​, and after negotiations, which lasted but a few days, the purchase was agreed upon, the United States to pay France the principal sum of $11,250,000 payable in stocks or bonds due in fifteen years, with interest, and the further sum of $3,750,000, to be paid by our government to American citizens having certain valid claims against France.

Had Its Opponents.

When the treaty became known in this country some of the haters of President Jefferson raised a violent outcry against its confirmation, and dire predictions were made about the danger of extending the country in violation of the constitution, and burdening the people with an immense debt for the purpose of buying an uninhabitable wilderness.

The treaty of purchase was dated April 30, 1803, was ratified in October following, and on December 20, 1803, the American flag was raised over New Orleans.

No one can measure the future possibilities of the states embraced in the Louisiana purchase. The development since the purchase in 1803 has been more splendid than an alchemist's dream. The future will [?]outrival the present and the past.

[?] value of the Louisiana purchase cannot yet be appreciated. In 1854 Omaha [?] a bare trading post. Its growth [?] as rapid as the mushroom which [?] in the night, but as strong and [?] the steel beams which constitute [?]

The acquisition of the Louisiana territory was the greatest prize ever gained by a nation at one time. By the stroke of a pen an empire changed hands. In a moment of doubt a construction was placed upon the constitution which authorized the vast increase of territory.

The Louisiana purchase will soon have a greater population than the country which sold it to us. A single false step might have lost us its possession. All the circumstances at the time of its purchase conspired to give us a single opportunity to gain an empire. The opportunity refused or neglected might never have come again.

The France which today maintains an army of more than half a million men because she was compelled to cede Alsace and Lorraine to Germany gave way to us a possession worth many times Alsace and Lorraine, and gave it in friendly peace.

Not one of us can look far into the future. The progress of a century has enabled us to utilize all our possessions. The lightning's fluid puts far distant territory in a moment's communication with the capitol. The expansion of our domain and the increase of our possessions made more keen the intellect and genius of our people. It broadened the hearts and deepened the souls of our citizens. With the new wants, caused by long distance and varied interests, came new ideas with which to supply those wants. New discoveries in the fields of science, art, mechanics, followed closely the new discoveries regarding the surface of our territory.

The last address was to have been made by Hon. William E. Mason on "Our Country." But the senator was unable to be present at the exercises, having been called to Washington on business Thursday. The program was concluded by the band playing "The Star Spangled Banner."

INVITE NEW YORKERS TO THE FAIR

Committee on Transportation Tells How Omaha Will Welcome Them.

NEW YORK, Sept. 30.—George L. Miller of Omaha is in this city, together with Hon. J. Sterling Morton, ex-secretary of agriculture. These gentlemen compose what is known as the committee on transportation for the Transmississippi and International Exposition at Omaha, whose purpose is to tender personally to persons in this city invitations to be present at the celebration of New York day at the Omaha exposition and also to invite a delegation to represent New York at the Peace Jubilee to be held at Omaha directly after the celebration of New York day.

Mr. Miller said: "We are anxious that New York City be represented. The west holds out the hand of friendship to New York and her men of affairs ask the men of affairs of New York to drop for a few days their work and accept the hospitality of the thriving city of Omaha.

"New York day will be celebrated on October 8. Dr. Depew will deliver an address and possibly there will be other addresses. We, on our part, will assure you a royal welcome and a good time.

"I want to thank the people of New York for the courtesies that have been extended to members of our committee and I only want a chance to reciprocate on the part of Omaha when your people come out to see our city."

FRUIT MEN READY FOR INSPECTION.

Iowa's Exhibit Changes Hands and All the Rest Are Hustling.

A change in the superintendency of the Iowa fruit exhibit in the Horticulture building became effective yesterday, J. W. Murphy of Glenwood succeeding J. J. Coleman, who has looked after the exhibit since its installation. The new man who takes charge of the Iowa exhibit is experienced in the fruit business and promises to put up an exhibit that will compare favorably with any in the building.

J. W. Stanton, treasurer of the Illinois State Horticultural society, returned from home yesterday, where he went a couple of weeks ago for the purpose of having a large supply of fruit sent here for exhibition during the closing weeks of the exposition. He says that from now until the close of the great show there will be no difficulty in securing everything that he will need. Illinois will feature apples and pears, while all of the varieties of grapes will be shown in abundance. The grapes will come from the growers and from the etate​ experimental station.

In order that the big crowds of today may have an idea of the possibilities of Nebraska as a fruit raising state Superintendent Youngers has covered his tables with peaches, having more on exhibition than all of the other states combined. Besides peaches the state is making a great exhibit of apples, plums, prunes and a large quantity of late summer fruit that was presumed to have been out of market weeks ago. Superintendent Walker of the Douglas county exhibit has and is putting up an exhibit that is even better than weeks ago, when it was pronounced the best in the building. Grapes is the strong card of Douglas county just at this time, but there are plenty of apples, peaches, pears and plums.

[?] Superintendent Nelson is showing more apples than ever before and all of them are of an excellent quality. The favorites are the big red ones, but there are plenty of others that are also admired.

Kansas keeps working away at its exhibit and it is constantly growing, Secretary Greef and Commissioner Glick having made arrangements for the shipment of fruit at regular intervals. Heretofore the non-arrival of fruit has been a serious drawback to the state exhibit, but now it is said that there will be no more trouble of that kind.

Music Last Night and Today.

The Wagner concert announced for last night brought out an immense crowd. It is safe to say that about every local musician of prominence was present. In spite of the high grade of music rendered, the vast audience seemed to be more enthusiastic ever than usual. It seemed as though many feared they would be unable to secure seats, so intense was the interest in the musical feast which had been prepared, but when the grand organ-like tones of the "Tannhauser" overture fell on the ear a sudden hush came over the assemblage. Never has this supreme work been heard here to greater advantage. It was given with an authority which at once removed it from the domain of criticism. In response to the determined encore the band gave Innes' "Love is King" two step, which seems to have leaped into universal popularity. Following this came the beautiful "Isolden's Liebested," from "Tristan." And then came the gem of the evening, the "Magic Fire" music from "Die Walkure," which was played with a perfection and delicacy which it is hard to believe possible from an organization composed almost exclusively of wind instruments.

Some of the announced numbers were omitted, unfortunately. This was owing to the necessity of giving some special feature in honor of the visiting Georgians and it took the shape of a series of illuminated pictures thrown on a screen by a stereopticon. Dewey and Hobson and the explosion of the Maine were all received with favor by those who had not yet seen this pleasing feature. The spectacular anvil scene and cannon accompaniment, which was announced for the concert tonight has been postponed in consequence of the inability of the electrical department to give the necessary attention to the details of the electrical effects, but will be given next week as soon as the immense preparations necessary for Chicago day have been completed. A special feature of the Sunday afternoon concert, which will be given in the Auditorium at 3 o'clock, will be Handel's celebrated "Largo" by band and organ, the organ obligato being played by Mr. Thomas Kelly. Much interest is being manifested in the request concert of Monday night.

Puebloes Putting Up a House.

Yesterday morning the Puebloes commenced the erection of their adobe house. The work was watched all day by numerous delegations of whites, who took a great interest in the proceedings.

When the Indians made their brick they dug their clay from a place near the center of their encampment and spread them about the hole to dry. Yesterday in commencing the erection of their adobe habitation they leveled off the ground around this hole and then with square and compass, both of which were crude instruments, prepared for laying the walls. First they placed plank upon the ground and covered the surface with mortar, mixed in the hole from which the clay for the brick was dug. Then the laying of the brick was commenced, each brick being laid to a line. The walls will be about seven feet in the front and six feet in the rear. The building will be 16x20 feet and will be covered with poles, on which will be spread hay, which in turn will be covered with earth. There will be a floor in the house and underneath will be a cellar, which will be the hole from which all of the material for the walls of the structure has been taken.

Sham Battle Plans.

Everything is in readiness for the sham battle that will take place at the Indian grounds at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon. Captain Mercer has put up his own seats and has accommodations for 5,000 people.

The battle will be between the Sioux and the Blackfeet, about 250 Indians appearing on each side. The Sioux will be under Goes-toWar, who will direct their movements from the eastern portion of the battlefield. The Blackfeet will undoubtedly be led by Little Man as head chief, with Looks High assisting. Both sides have been furnished with an abundant supply of ammunition and they promise to put up the hottest sham battle that has been seen upon the grounds.

Iowa Veterans.

Scores of gray-haired men wearing bright yellow badges were upon the exposition grounds. They were the surviving members of the First Iowa cavalry, organized June 13, 1861, and mustered out March 16, 1866. The old veterans had been holding their annual reunion at Council Bluffs and, having adjourned, concluded to spend a day at the exposition.

 

PLANS OF PRESIDENT'S PARTY

Assistant Secretary Meiklejohn, on Mr. McKinley's Request, Will Accompany the Executive.

WASHINGTON, Sept. 30.—(Special Telegram.)—Assistant Secretary Meiklejohn, on the request of President McKinley, will accompany the presidential party to Omaha. General Meiklejohn had intended leaving about October 15 and remaining in Nebraska until the close of the campaign. As Secretary Alger has decided not to go west, President McKinley extended an invitation to Mr. Meiklejohn, who accepted, as it would give him additional time in the state. As made up at present the president will be accompanied west by Secretary and Mrs. Wilson, Secretary Bliss, Assistant Commissioner Toner of the Indian bureau, Assistant Secretary Meiklejohn, possibly Secretary and Mrs. Hay of the State department, Executive Clerk George Cortelyou and several others to be decided upon later.

Senator Thurston today, at the request of President Wattles of the exposition, obtained the sanction of the president to a handshaking reception at the Government building on the afternoon of the 12th, immediately after the close of the life saving drill.

Secretary Alger today granted permission to General Joseph Wheeler to attend the Transmississippi Exposition.

The Milwaukee having refused to handle the second special from Washington, Chairman Babcock of the Transportation department of the exposition is in communication with other roads to perform like services for this train as for the presidential train.

North Daktota​ Waking Up.

North Dakota people are waking up to the importance of the exposition and many of them are coming, notwithstanding the long distance that they have to travel in order to reach Omaha. Yesterday a party of fifteen arrived from that state, all of whom will remain from a week to ten days.

The fruit exhibit of North Dakota is being increased, a large consignment of apples having arrived from Richland county. The apples are of this year's crop and are shown in jars. Miss Ford, who is in charge of the exhibit, has advices that grapes, plums and crab apples have been sent and the state will make a creditable display of fruit during the last month of the exposition.

CHICAGO'S BOAST REDEEMED

Promise of the Windy City to Make Omaha Hum is Fulfilled.

DISTINGUISHED CITIZENS LEAD COHORTS

Mayor Harrison and the Most Prominent of the Social and Business World of the Great Metropolis Come to Celebrate at Omaha.

Chicago, the giant metropolis of the lakes, was welcomed this morning by her smaller and more modern sister of the plains with every evidence of hospitality and with tumultuous greetings. Thousands poured out to bid her welcome at the depot gateways of Omaha and cheered her as her stalwarts, Mayor Harrison and the Cook County Marching club, marched between the crowds that lined the streets. "Omaha is yours" was the burden of the welcome that was extended to every wearer of the pink Chicago badges. There was not a discordant note in the entire welcome. Even the weather that was thought to be the most appropriate was furnished and the Chicagoans could not have helped feeling at home beneath the lowering skies and the light drizzle of rain that bedewed them—a reminder of the conditions that are not at all infrequent along the shores of Lake Michigan.

The Windy City turned out in a swarm. No estimate can be given of its number. There were thousands on the loaded specials and regular trains. Chicago fulfilled its promise, for it agreed to have thousands take part in the celebration of Chicago day. It was a representative crowd. Mayor Carter Harrison, the Cook County Marching club, the Union League club, the Marquette club, the Board of Trade, the thousands of others who were not banded together in associations—they represented the administration, the politics, the wealth, the business interests, the people of the great city of Chicago. This is Chicago day, not in name, but in reality.

Armies Gather and Melt.

Like Longfellow's Beleagured​ City, the stations that are terminals for eastern railroads were invested this morning by armies, and like the hosts of the poem, they came [?]noon were scattered and gone. They were armies of visitors from Chicago, on an invasion of peace, and they brought with them the air of hurry and hustle that pervades the atmosphere of their own metropolis. From a time not long after daybreak, when a yawning porter opened the doors of Union station for the day, until just before noon, when Old Sol found a rift in the clouds and shone for a few brief minutes, the twin depots by the viaduct presented scenes of unwonted activity. Long trains drew up alongside of the platforms, twisting over the curved tracks like huge serpents, and when they came to a stop passengers streamed down their steps by hundreds. There were all kinds and conditions of men, and women too; and all wore the pink button and ribbon that are insignia for Chicago day.

There were the multi-millionaire members of the Chicago Board of Trade and Union league, and paupers; men in whom were reflected eminent respectability and commercial success, and others whom it required the eternal vigilance of the police force and Pinkerton detectives combined to keep from breaking the laws of the land. And among the visitors the women were as numerous as the men, but they one and all were of the social ne plus ultra, in whose demeanor one reads the signs of patrician elegance and countless dollars. Then there was the usual quota from up the state, men who know how to hew wood and curry mules. They wore the orthodox heavy boots and slouch hats, and spent most of their time looking at the sights.

As is usual when there is a press of travel over the roads, most of the trains were late.

They were scheduled to arrive at different hours, but all happened to come pretty well together, helping to swell the throng of people at both stations.

Had Provided for a Jam.

Depot officials expected something of a jam about the Union and the Burlington depots, but this was avoided because the special and the regular trains did not come in bunched. The consequence was that, although there was a big crowd on the depot platforms from 7:30 o'clock in the morning when the first special was due, until the last train pulled in about 10:30, there was no confusion or rush. The arrangements at the depots to take care of the crowds were excellent. As soon as one of the specials was pulled in and was emptied of its passengers, it was drawn from the tracks to make way for the through trains or the following specials. The trains came in at such intervals that the task of keeping the tracks clear was made the more easy.

The big crowd congregated at the Burlington depot to witness and welcome the arrival of the Cook county democracy, but it did not materially hinder the visitors from reaching the viaduct, although it was continually augmented by the Chicagoans, who desired to await the coming of Mayor Harrison's train. The Union depot platform and stairs were also kept satisfactorily cleared. When the top of the viaduct was reached the visitors were forced to pass through another press, for hundreds of people lined the viaduct to witness the arrival of the specials. Any confusion that might have resulted from the crowds was avoided through the efforts of a large squad of officers, who had been detailed by Chief White to keep order.

The street car company furnished ample facilities for the transportation of the crowds to the heart of the city. Cars were kept running at frequent intervals, and a dozen extras were in waiting to carry the people when the final special arrived and the crowds dispersed.

BULLS AND BEARS AS VISITORS.

Chicago Board of Trade Comes Over Two Hundred in All to See Fair.

With flags flying from the engines the special trains of the "Board of Trade" left Chicago at 6 o'clock last night over the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul road with 200 passengers. The train consisted of eleven cars, a baggage, a dynamo, a buffet library, six sleeping, one compartment, two dining and a reception car, vestibuled and lighted throughout by electricity, under the supervision of Assistant General Passenger Agent Miller.

The train on which the visitors came was a most magnificent one, and was run in regal style. It was pulled by two of the Milwaukee's best locomotives, and a light engine was sent ahead to see that the track was clear. Three hundred millions were represented by the men on board, and the Milwaukee management felt the need of taking good care of its precious load.

In the compartment car were the officers of the "Board of Trade," President Z. R. Carter, Vice President Lyon and Parker with their wives and friends. Scattered about in the other cars were several of the directors. Messrs. W. B. Bogert, J. F. Barrett, James Nichol, George W. Stone, Lloyd J. Smith and families, Hon. W. H. Harper and C. C. Williams of the Illinois commission, Colonel E. C. Young and Lieutenant Colonel R. B. Harper of the First Illinois Cavalry and Hon. J. R. Mann.

The two forward cars were given to the bachelor members of the board and the newspaper men, Messrs. O'Neil and Tarren of the Record, Strong and Gregory of the Tribune, Stowe of the Chronicle, Michaels of the Inter Ocean and Howard of the Daily Trade Bulletin, the official Board of Trade paper.

The early hours of the evening were passed in dining and chatting and by 10 o'clock most of the party had retired. But in the "stag" cars things waxed merry, with story telling and singing till after midnight. Everybody arose bright and early to see as much of the wonderful agricultural country through which they were passing as possible. So perfect were the arrangements that even with 200 hungry mortals there was no confusion attending breakfast.

And when the train arrived at the union station at 7:45, eleven minutes ahead of schedule time, and thirty minutes ahead of any other special, the late risers were just leaving the tables.

As the train pulled into the station it was greeted by a sprinkle, but this in no wise dampened the ardor and enthusiasm of the guests. President Carter was met at the train by President Wattles and driven to the Paxton for a rest before the fatigue of the day. The other remained aboard and in a few minutes the train was hauled on the Union Pacific tracks, thence over the Missouri Pacific siding to North Twenty-fourth street where it will remain until tomorrow night.

The passing glimpse of the exposition on the way to their position invoked murmurs of surprise and admiration from the party, and no sooner had the train stopped than they hastened to get off and enter the grounds. By 9 o'clock the train was practically deserted.

Instead of going to hotels the party will live in the cars, eating dinner there tonight and breakfast tomorrow.

A most tasteful medal, with a head of Admiral Dewey on one side and an engraving of the "Board of Trade" building with Chicago clasping hands with Omaha on the other, symbolic of war and peace, has been prepared by McLain Brothers of the Board of Trade and the railroad company has presented a booklet description of the country traversed to each of the passengers.

Credit is due to the executive committee of the board, Messrs. Parker, Lyon and Bogert, and to Mr. Miller, the assistant general passenger agent, and Mr. Nash, the general western agent, for the perfect arrangement and service on the trains. Not an accident or the slightest trouble occurred to mar the pleasure of the party, and all are enthusiastic in praise of the trip.

The train will stand on the Missouri Pacific siding till 6 o'clock tomorrow evening, when it will be drawn to the Union station, and from there it will return to Chicago, arriving in time for business on Monday morning.

UNION LEAGUE CLUB'S SPECIAL.

Chicago's Great Organization Comes Through in Fine Style.

The members of the Union League club of Chicago, accompanied by their wives and daughters, arrived in the city to grace the celebration of Chicago day at the exposition on a handsome special train over the Northwestern line this morning at 10:15 o'clock at Webster street station. The party is one of the most notable that has visited the exposition, including 150 of the most distinguished citizens of the World's Fair city.

The train left Chicago at 6:30 o'clock last evening, and ran by the way of Missouri Valley, Ia., and Blair, Neb., crossing the river at the latter point and coming down on this side of the river. The train was composed of the most elegant cars in the service of the company, and was solid vestibuled throughout. Back of the two big locomotives that brought the train in were these cars: Buffet library car; compartment cars, "Sappho" and "Hebron;" drawing room sleeping cars "Potosi," "Exeter," "Surrey" and "Sussex;" dining cars "Illinois" and "Chicago" and Chicago Northwestern railway private car No. 404.

Hiram R. McCullough, second vice president of the Union League club and third vice president of the Northwestern system, was the ranking officer of both organizations aboard of the train. Secretary Will H. Clark of the Union League club assisted in looking after the comfort of the leaguers. At Missouri Valley General Agent Kuhn of the Northwestern met the party, and presented a large box of flowers from General Manager Bidwell of the Elkhorn. At the Webster street station General Manager Clarkson of the exposition, General Passenger Agent Lomax of the Union Pacific and other prominent Omahans were present to receive and to greet the visitors. Special trolley cars were provided and conveyed the party directly to the exposition grounds. Saturday and Sunday will be spent on the [?]   [?] be used for hotel purposes. The Omaha club will be the down town headquarters of the party, and apartments at the Illinois building answer the same purpose on the exposition grounds.

Some of the Party.

Among those who are members of the Union league party are the following: Messrs. and Mesdames F. W. Upham, William H. Cook, E. G. Pauling, Walter C. Nelson, R. T. Whelpley, J. T. Stockton, L. E. Harding, A. Schmitt, C. A. Goodyear, Frank H. Baker, D. F. Crilly, W. H. Gray, George C. Fry, Frank E. Johnson, F. E. Spooner, H. S. Smith, Oliver Sollett, A. F. Banks, R. A. Bower, E. D. Weary, General John McNulty, J. S. Jones, A. J. Harding, F. T. Simmons, William Garnett, jr.; De Witt C. Hull, L. W. Noyes, G. E. Highley, J. Fred Wilcox, B. A. Eckhart; Misses Belden, Louise C. Marshall, Crilly, Clara Tomlinson, Mary E. Reid, Mrs. W. D. Salisbury; Messrs. Hiram R. McCullough, C. C. Cheney, George E. Marshall, Thomas S. Cruttenden, Malcolm Lawrence, S. A. Treat, Dr. George M. Chamberlain,, William Watson, jr.; C. J. Dorrance, Fred Fitch, M. K. Bowen, W. E. Selleck, William T. Eaton, John Critchell, C. M. Nichols, Burton Johnson, C. W. Hinckley, Hugh McLennon, W. G. Jerrems, J. O. Whitaker, Captain H. E. Robinson, A. C. Mather, W. E. Pratt, George K. Dauchy, V Falkenau, Charles T. Boal, John B. Mallers, C. E. Follansbee, J. A. Agee, Clift Wise, C. B. Beardsley, E. F. Gobel, J. E. Shepherd, John S. Belden, J. P. Soper, R. M. Dyer, Charles Truax, W. J. Woods, J. B. Woodruff.

The Union League club of Chicago is one of the best known organizations in the United States. Since its incorporation on December 19, 1879, it has been the promoter and the supporter of innumerable public movements and enterprises for the good of Chicago, Ill., and the nation. It has been especially friendly to the Transmississippi exposition; this is natural in view of its close connection with the World's Fair. The plan of the Columbian exposition was conceived and largely carried out within the Union League club, and Thomas P. Bryan, who represented the World's Fair abroad, was the president of the Union league last year.

One Day it Celebrates.

A patriotic movement, to which the Union league has given great attention in recent years, is the public celebration of Washington's birthday in Chicago. Through the medium of this club the observance of the day has been general there. A liberal appropriation is made each year for carrying on public exercises in honor of the Father of the Country. Last year ex-President Benjamin Harrison delivered the address of the day to an audience of 5,000 in the Chicago auditorium, while patriotic exercises were held in fifty public schools. Sixty thousand copies of patriotic songs were distributed among the school children and some of the songs found their way all over the country, request for additional copies later coming from schools in Colorado, Nebraska and the Dakotas. On the same day 35,000 flags were distributed gratis.

The plans for the Chicago peace jubilee were first formed in the Union League. Though at its start the club was a republican organization, it is now non-political. Republicanism prevails among the membership, but there are many democratic members. It is a matter of note that all of the members are sound money men. The membership is divided into four classes. There are 1,200 resident members, 300 non-resident members and a lengthy roll of army and navy members. The honorary membership is extremely limited, and the following are the only men who have received this honor: William McKinley, Benjamin Harrison, John M. Harlan, Henry W. Blodgett, Shelby M. Cullom, John M. Schofield, Chauncey M. Depew, Melville W. Fuller, Levi P. Morton, Nelson A. Miles, Joseph P. Gary, David J. Brewer and Henry B. Brown.

Officers of the Club.

The present officers of the Union league are: Alexander H. Redell, president; George A. Follansbee, first vice president; Hiram R. McCullough, second vice president; John C. Nelly, treasurer, and Will H. Clark, secretary. The clubhouse, on Adams street, near Dearborn, opposite the government site, is one of the most elegantly equipped clubhouses in the United States. The building is of brick and stone and the apartments are spacious and handsomely appointed. On one unusual day recently there were 285 prominent citizens of the Chicago club engaged in various committee meetings in the clubhouses. Secretary Clark keeps a press album, in which is pasted all clippings concerning the club. The daily addition to this album is at the rate of 200 per day.

The condition of membership in the Union League is absolute and unqualified loyalty to the government of the United States. The primary objects of the association are: To encourage and promote by moral, social [?] and protect the integrity and perpetuity of this nation. To inculcate a higher appreciation of the value and sacred obligations of American citizenship; to maintain the civil and political equality of all citizens in every section of our comon​ country, and to aid in the enforcement of all laws enacted to preserve the purity of the ballot box. To resist and oppose corruption and promote economy in office, and to secure honesty and efficiency in the administration of national, state and municipal office.

PRIDE OF CHICAGO'S DEMOCRACY.

Cook County Marching Club Gives Omaha a Chance to See.

Lowering clouds and a misty rain did not dampen the enthusiasm of the Cook County Marching club upon its arrival in the city this morning, but the members were considerably fatigued by their repeated marching and cheering at way stations along the line of their journey to this city, which made their train over two hours late in reaching Omaha.

At 8 o'clock about 300 members of the Jacksonian club marched to the Burlington depot to receive their distinguished party visitors, and the two hours' wait in the rain failed to drive many of them away, for they made a good showing so far as numbers were concerned in the parade afterward through the city. Hundreds of other people gathered at the depot to see the Chicago party come in, and the accommodations of the Burlington depot were tested nearly to the limit without the aid of the passengers brought on the special trains.

It was about 10:30 when the train bearing the Chicago democrats pulled in. It was composed of nineteen cars, the first being a baggage car, and the last being Mayor Harrison's car. The train was pulled by two engines. The marching club lost no time in turning out, and the calls of the captains of the different companies to "fall in" were promptly obeyed. There were about 500 in the club, all wearing dark suits, silk hats, white gloves and carrying cased umbrellas. With the club was the Cook County Democratic band, with sixty-five pieces, and the drum and bugle corps of the First Illinois regiment, which has but recently returned from Santiago, composed of sixteen pieces.

Major James H. Farrell was commander-in-chief of the club, and gave the command to march when the companies had been formed. In fact, he virtually assumed command of the parade. When the club started up the roadway, leading from the tracks, the Jacksonians, who had been waiting on the viaduct, fell into line. Three battalions of police, commanded by Sergeants King, Halter and Iler, led the way. They were followed by a band, and this in turn by the Jacksonians. J. E. Riley was marshal of the local part of the parade, and his assistants were Arthur Metz, E. E. Howell, John Moynihan, George Strathman and John D. Ware. Following the Jacksonians came the Omaha city officials, with Mayor Moores, acting as an escort for Mayor Carter H. Harrison, all on foot. The Chicago band and drum corps were next. The marching club was led by a detachment of Chicago's city officials, who are also members of the club.

The visiting democrats made a pretty show. They marched in good order and at intervals executed maneuvers on foot and gave a drill with their umbrellas. The line of march was on Tenth to Farnam, to Twelfth, to Douglas, to Sixteenth, to Farnam, and then down Farnam to Fourteenth, where the line was broken at the Paxton hotel. All along the line Mayor Harrison was greeted with cheers as soon as he was recognized, and he responded to the greeting by lifting his hat. The whole club came in for a share of the honors and was frequently cheered as it marched along.

The club will remain in the city until tomorrow evening, when it will again board its special train to return home. While in the city the Jacksonian club will do everything possible to make the visitors welcome, and the club rooms have been thrown open to their use, with plenty of refreshments for those who wish them. Mayor Harrison and his immediate party, including members of the Chicago city government, will be the guests of Omaha city officials.

Bee

RECEPTIONS AT THE HOTELS.

How the Distinguished Guests Were Welcomed to Omaha.

The Board of Trade party, having come over the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, were early at the Paxton hotel, where President Z. R. Carter, Vice President R. S. Lyon, George J. Brine of Armour & Co., George H. Webster, president of the Armour Elevator company; Colonel E. C. Young of the First Illinois cavalry and others of the party soon established headquarters in parlor 51. Chairman W. H. Harper of the executive committee of the Illinois commission also arrived with his party. President Clark E. Carr of the Illinois commission came in from Galesburg on the Burlington ahead of the Cook County Democracy train. Senator William Mason and George H. Heafford did not come.[?] what of a hitch in the arrangements at the Paxton and kept President Gurdon W. Wattles of the exposition management, Colonel Harper of the Illinois commission and General Manager T. S. Clarkson waiting for some time for their arrival. When they did at last reach the Paxton it was getting along toward 11 o'clock. The delay did not lessen the enthusiasm of their reception, however, and as soon as the Omaha Military band struck up "A Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight," heralding the approach of the parade of the Cook County club and the marching club of the Jacksonian club, cheer after cheer broke from the crowds which had assembled on the sidewalks anticipating their coming. No time was lost by Mayor Moores and Mayor Carter Harrison of Chicago in getting into a carriage and driving at once to the exposition, but the members of the Cook County Democracy concluded to take lunch at the Paxton before going to the grounds.

The approach of the Cook county democracy's marching club under the command of Marshal James H. Farrell, and headed by the DeBaugh band of sixty-five pieces, was an inspiring sight. To the tune of "The Wabash" they filed up to the Fourteenth stret​ entrance, four abreast in open order, amid the shouts of the spectators. Mayor Moores and Mayor Harrison marched side by side, umbrellas in hand at a carry after the style of the old military tactics. As they broke ranks and walked into the Paxton the following took carriages in the order given and went immediately out to the grounds: Mayors Moores and Harrison, President Clark E. Carr and Chairman W. H. Harper of the executive committee of the Illinois commission. President Gurdon W. Wattles, Comptroller Charles B. Dawes of Chicago, President Z. R. Carter of the Chicago Board of Trade and Colonel E. C. Young of the First Ilinois​ cavalry. Vice President R. S. Lyon and George J. Brine of the Chicago Board of Trade and Charles C. Williams of the Illinois commission. General Manager T. S. Clarkson of the exposition, Commissioner C. E. Keeler and E. C. Cropsey of Dixon, Ill. The local city councilmen and city officials followed in the next carriages.

For the social functions of the day the following special committees were selected to represent each organization and club:

Board of Trade: President Z. R. Carter. Vice President R. S. Lyon and George J. Brine.

Union League club: Vice President H. R. McCullough, General John McNulty and Fred W. Upham.

Marquette club: President E. G. Pauling, W. R. Rennacker and Lloyd J. Smith.

Standard club: Simeon A. Kohn, Milton A. Strauss and Norman Slorsheim.

Athletic club: President D. M. Lord. John H. Jones and C. K. Wooster.

The railroads: C. A. Goodenow of the Milwaukee, W. B. Kniskern of the Northwestern and W. H. Purdy of the Rock Island.

A detail of twenty-seven men under command of Sergeants Iler, Halter and King, together with all the available detectives guarded the crowds from the criminal element at the depot and maintained order. Chief White in person attended to the formation of his men in the parade and led it over the greatest portion of its route.

General Passenger Agent Daniels.

George H. Daniels, general passenger and ticket agent of the New York Central, is in the city. He came on his private car Corsair this morning. His car was switched to the exposition grounds, where it will remain until Monday.

KEYSTONE DAY AT OMAHA.

The Pennsylvania Commissioners will Go to the Exposition in Fine Style Sunday.

Next Wednesday, Oct. 5, will be Pennsylvania day at the Trans-Mississippi exposition, at Omaha, Neb. A private car will leave Philadelphia at 4:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon and will pass through this place Monday over the Pennsylvania lines, enroute to the exposition. The commissioners are: President, Col. John W. Woodside; Vice President, Col. Thos. Potter, Jr.; Treasurer, Thos. Bradly; Secretary, Wm. A. Conner; Chairman of Executive Committee, Col. George Knox McCain; Executive committee, Dr. J. Roberts Bryan, I. O. Nissley, Dr. F. C. Johnson, C. S. Overholt, Joshua D. Baker, T. L. Kennedy. The other commissioners are: Thomas M. Jones, George M. Wanbaugh, James G. Derringer, F. H. Zerby, Livey S. Richards, P. C. Boyle, Hiram Young, Richard H. Couch, Asa Acker Blahslie, Robert E. Wible.

Postmaster General Charles Emory Smith, orator of the day, will be with the party, accompanied by his wife. Probably 15 or 20 ladies, wives and [?]

The trip will be made over two of the finest railroads in the country, the Pennsylvania and the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul. The party goes over these roads through the courtesy of John P. Potts, of Williamsport, Dis. Pass. Agent of the latter road, and George W. Boyd, agent of the former. It will no doubt be a delightful trip.

The Fair will be open all this month, and as the rate is low, a large number of people from this section will likely attend. That it has been a success is attested by the fact that it opened with a debt of $250,000, which has been wiped out, and will close with a surplus. All who have attended speak of it as being equal in many respects and superior in others to the World's Fair.

 

The Cook County Democratic club was between 400 and 500 strong. Congressman James R. Mann, accompanied it and nearly every candidate for a county position in the coming election, as well as about all the city office holders. Mayor Harrison, Congressman and the club generally was informally welcomed at the Paxton by President Wattles of the exposition, and the following members of the Illinois commission: Colonel W. F. Harper, L. O. Goddard, O. Williams, C. H. Keeler and the president of the commission, Colonel Clark E. Carr.

A few of the more noted members of the Cook County Democratic club are the following, as they registered ata​ the Paxton: John Powers, its president; City Attorney Miles Devine, Chairman Thomas Gahn and Secretary Burke of the democratic committee, Walter Thomas Mills, the well known democratic orator, Attorney M. V. Gannon, formerly of Omaha; James H. Farrell, the club's marshal; Alderman O'Brien, Ballenberg and Cook, Chief of Police Joe Kipley, James McAndrews, building commissioner; Robert E. Burke, oil inspector; Charles Thornton, corporation counsel; John Shubert, smoke inspector; Inspector of Police Hartnett; Howard S. Taylor, city prosecuting attorney; Thomas Gaines, candidate for county treasurer; Fred Eldred, candidate for county clerk; Judge George Kersten, candidate fo rsheriff​ of Cook county; James J. Gray, the north town assessor; Frank E. Davidson, superintendent of the sewer department; A. J. Toolen of the Board of Public Works; City Treasurer Ernst Hummel; Peter Kiolbassa; ex-Alderman Robert Mulcahy; Street Commissioner John Doherty; Corporation Inspector John W. McCarthy; James C. Martin, candidate for county judge; James Markham, Chief Kipley's secretary; Vincent H. ePrkins​, candidate for president of the Cook county board; C. C. Stilwell, chairman of the Sixth district congressional committee; Emil Hoechster, candidate for congress for the Sixth district; City Clerk William Seffler; ex-Alderman John Colvin, Judge A. J. Sabbath; John Dullard, sergeant at arms of the city council; T. J. Corcoran ,secretary of the civil service commission of Chicago; Frank W. Solon, superintendent of the street and alley cleaning department; Frank Ryan, superintendent of the water pipe extension, and Lieutenant George Perry of the city detectives.

Some Other Delegations.

A special train from Chicago, carrying several delegation from various Chicago clubs, arrived at the Webster street station over the Northwestern line shortly before 11 o'clock this morning. The train left Chicago at 7:30 last evening and ran one hour behind the Union League special. On this train the Chicago Athletic club occupied two cars; the Marquette club, one car; the Standard club, one car, and a number of members of the Chicago Board of Trade, two cars.

The regular "Overland Limited" train of the Northwestern was run in three sections, and all of these came into the city at the Union depot. They were from one to two hours late on account of the extraordinary number of special trains on the road between Chicago and Omaha last night. All of the three sections of the regular train were well filled.

Incidents of the Affair.

The badges worn by the Cook County Marching club were made especially for this occasion. They are very handsome affairs of blue silk plush.

Out of the thousands of people who crowded the Burlington and Tenth street depot platforms to witness the arrival of the trains fully 65 per cent were women.

William Pinkerton, head of the Pinkerton Detective agency, and Chief of Police Linden of Philadelphia, with Chief of Police White, welcomed Chief of Police Kipley of Chicago at the depot.

So closely were the crowds guarded by the local detectives and Pinkerton men that not one case of pocket-picking was reported and it was a rich field for this class of criminals about the densely crowded depot platforms.

One of the local marshal's aids, who was riding a fractious horse, was thrown from the animal's back at the corner of Tenth and Dodge streets. He was not injured and pluckily mounted the animal again amid the cheers of the marchers.

Among the Northwestern officials on the Union League special were: General Passenger Agent Kniskern, Assistant General Passenger Agent Ferguson, General Agent Kuhn and Division Superintendent Ashton. The train was brought in by Conductor Cook.

As Mayor Harrison stepped from his car a young, handsome and very stylishly dressed woman, unknown to him, presented him with a very large bunch of American beauty roses. A card attached bore this, "From a former Chicagoan." The act was loudly applauded.

In the Cook County Marching club the Chicago police department was represented by nearly fifty men, headed by Chief Kipley, Inspector "Jack" Hartnett, Captain Matt Homer and "Jimmy" Markham, private secretary to the chief. Company F contained fifteen central office detectives.

LIBRARY CONGRESS SESSION

President Lane of the American Association Presides at the Meeting.

VALUE OF LIBRARIES TO COMMUNITY

Various Phases of the Subject Are Handled by Speakers Who Have Made a Study of the Matter Under Consideration.

The transmississippi congress concluded its discussions this morning and adjourned. The first paper was one by Mis​ Electra Dayton, the librarian of Dayton, O., on emphasized the necessity for proper training for the cataloguing feature of library work and the establishment of training schools. This paper was discussed fully by William Richard Watson of Pittsburg, the assistant librarian of the Carnegie library there.

The next subject taken up was the relation of the library to other formal educational work. Papers were read on its relation to the public school by Purd B. Wright, librarian, of St. Joseph, Mo.; its relation to the college, by William C. Lane, president of the American Library association and librarian of Harvard university, and its relation to the club (the woman's club in particular), by Mrs. T. K. Sudborough of this city. The general trend of the discussion of these papers was that librarians and teachers should come closer together in educational sympathy. Miss Kate McHugh, assistant principal of the Omaha High school; Miss Virginia Dodge, librarian of Cedar Rapids, Ia., and William Wallace and Mrs. W. W. Keysor of this city all took part in the discussion. The views expressed on Mrs. Sudborough's paper were that woman's clubs should not conflict with the public libraries.

Resolutions of appreciation of the hospitality of Omaha were adopted and Victor Rosewater and Miss Edith Tobitt, the local librarian, expressed the obligation of this city to the visitors.

President Lane Presides.

At last evening's session of the Transmississippi Library congress William C. Lane, librarian of Harvard university and president of the American Library association, was introduced as chairman for the evening. He spoke briefly of the librarian's privilege of imparting knowledge and power to his fellow men and of his responsibility as a public servant. "The program to follow," he added, "will deal with the missionary aspect of the public library. Librarians have what they know to be good and it is their wish to impart it and the purpose of the speakers tonight will be to make that conception more clear and broad." The general subject was announced to be "The Value of the Library to the Community," and the different phases of the material, the social and political and the spiritual values were taken up.

The material good which the library brought with it was presented by Henry J. Carr of the public library of Scranton, Pa., who said that there was no expenditure of public money which brought such an immediate and extraordinary return as that invested in libraries. They are less expensive, he said, than prisons and reformatories and a great deal more effective. Mr. Carr outlined the history of the growth of public libraries in America from the origin of the crude school district libraries in 1835 to the first important gain, when a free library law was passed in New Hampshire in 1849. The next important date in library annals was 1853, when the convention was held in New York which proved the forerunner of the American Library association. The first material value in a library, Mr. Carr said, was naturally in the tangible worth of the volumes and other property attached to it. A more presumptive but none the less real value was in the feeling of ownership taken in it by citizens, thus stimulating pride in their community. Its value to workingmen in their pursuits was pointed out as well as to the unemployed tradesman who is in need of a wholesome distraction.

Value in Other Ways.

The social and political value of a public library was spoken of by Charles R. Dudley of the city library, Denver, Colo. He said that our government was run on the theory that every citizen was a political expert. Although it is a thinking age, he remarked, it is too often the case that people are ready to let the other man do the thinking rather than make the exertion themselves. No physician would be allowed to practice, said Mr. Dudley, and no lawyer would be called to a case without specialized knowledge along his line and the American citizen should similarly learn of the science of government from infallible sources. Preparation to hold public office should be made a matter of the most thorough study and at present branches of political science are taken up very seldom in high schools and are often only elective in colleges. The library is able to take up a large share of this burden and can offer material more trustworthy than hearsay or newspapers.

The same topic was discussed by Superintendent C. G. Pearse, who mentioned incidents in his experience with school children showing the good brought to them by the public library. Many children, he said, who have had no opportunity at home to acquire good breeding or to learn social usages get an invaluable glimpse into higher things from books in which pleasant views of life are taken. They obtain a taste for good reading that will last beyond their school lives.

The value of the public library to the education of the individual was spoken of by Miss M. E. Ahern, editor of Public Libraries, Chicago. She remarked upon the unsuitable reading which had formerly been offered to children in public schools when they had grown up in the narrow and unfruitful atmosphere of McGuffie's readers. Only 10 per cent of the students who enter public schools, she said, ever reach the high school, the large majority falling out either from the necessity of earning a livelihood or through the poor judgment of their parents. To such as these the library offers a boundless field of self-culture. If the lives of men who toil seem to them commonplace and narrow they have a refuge in a realm as unrestricted as the world's history, where they may commune with the greatest minds that have come to earth. To the tradesman the public library is an Aladdin's lamp, which opens a new and unsuspected world of beauty. A short discussion on the same theme followed by Johnson Brigham, librarian of the Iowa State library, Des Moines. He presented the view rather of a taxpayer who saw the necessity of the distribution of clean and elevating literature among his neighbors. A few remarks along the same line followed by W. P. Payne of the public library, Nevada, Ia.

Spiritual Benefits Also.

Rev. Mary A. Safford of Sioux City, Ia., concluded the program with an earnest and scholarly address upon the spiritual value of the public library to the community. She said that the library was a blessing not only to those who read but to all who even indirectly felt its influence. The debt of religion to the library, she said, is far greater than is usually realized for religion not grounded in intelligence is nothing higher than superstition. Religion, she added, cannot rise above the level of the popular intelligence. It is not enough to mean well; good intentions must be wedded to right thinking. So much of wrongdoing and suffering is brought about simply by ignorance that the library becomes a most important factor in the uplifting of the nation's life. The palliative measures of penal institutions are valuable because they are necessary, but they are not so important as those which are preventive. The speaker did not deplore the fact that a large amount of the present reading is in fiction, for she said that in this commercial age the stimulus was helpful to the imagination and broadening in its tendency.

LECTURES AT THE ART CONGRESS.

American Painters and Golden Age of Italian Art Discussed.

There was an improvement in the attendance on the Art congress yesterday afternaan​, but the same feminine predominance was apparent which characterized the audience in the morning. The lecture was by Charles Francis Brown, an instructor in the Chicago Art institute, and his subject was "American Painters." He illustrated his lecture by the aid of a stereopticon, the room being darkened for the purpose, and the pictures were thrown on a canvas stretched over the front of the pipe organ.

The lecturer said he had been impressed by the logical arrangement of some of the exhibits in the Government building at the exposition, showing the development in some particular branch. He mentioned the hammer which is shown in the crude shape of stone which was used centuries ago and the finely finished article which is used by the skilled workmen of today in accomplishing the development of the trades. The same is true, he said, of the display in the Art building and he would seek to illustrate this development in the course of his lecture.

Mr. Brown divided the history of American art into three periods. The first was the colonial or revolutionary period, closing with the death of Gilbert Stewart; the second extended down to 1878, when the Art Student league and the Society of American Artists were founded in New York and the third, or modern period, covered the time   from 1878 to the present. In the beginning American art was under the influence of the English and Italian school, but since American students began to go abroad for their education and training the influence of France and Germany is more noticeable.

The speaker then gave a short sketch of the different American artists, with criticisms of some of their work, beginning with Benjamin West, the first American painter, following with John Trumbull, John Copley, Gilbert Stewart and others down to those well known today. Throughout it all specimens of the work of the artists were thrown upon the canvas for the benefit and instruction of the audience. The lecture was entertaining and of great value to all interested in art culture.

Miss Caulfield's Lecture.

Miss Anna Caulfield gave a lecture before the art congress at the First Congregational church last evening, on the "Golden Age of Italian Art," illustrated with stereopticon views in colors, which to many was a revelation in art, poetry, philosophy and history all combined. She has been strongly impressed with the natural trinity of architecture, sculpture and painting and for an hour treated her charmed audience to a most instructive transition from the Gothic to the Renaissant in architecture and painting in a very philosophical resume of the progression from the thirteenth century in Florence to the sixteenth century in Rome and Venice. Mrs. W. W. Keysor introduced her.

Her endeavor was to answer the questions, "How shall we awaken an interest in art in America?" "How shall we convince the people that art is something more than a mere form of amusement?" and "How can it be best introduced into our cities, our schools and our homes?" We need eye culture as well as soul culture, she said, speaking more particularly of the American people, and she advised that we turn from God's art in nature to man's art in architecture, sculpture and painting. The American people can do as did the ancients—cultivate a love of beauty from the continuous scene of the beautiful in which this country abounds in its natural scenery. She stepped aside a little to add a word of praise to the Transmississippi Exposition as an object lesson in art.

Stress was laid upon the value of color and she rather deprecated the decoration of homes with pictures in black and white and brown and white. The women's clubs, she thought, could awaken an interest in art by going about it the proper way. An awakening in the direction of art, however, she said, is going on in America as in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries there was a revival in Europe in the Renaissance. The capitol at Washington and the congressional library building she had thrown onto the screen to emphasize this point and by way of comparison with Florentine architecture in the Duomo which, having grown from a study of the Pantheon, had become the original of all great domes from St. Peter's at Rome to the national capitol. As a treatment of the subject of architecture itself the lecture was a most profitable one to her listeners.

Her Stereopticon Views.

Her stereopticon views were of a very high order, numerous and versatile. They covered everything of note from the day of Lorenzo the Magnificent in Florence, to Michael Angelo's frescoing of St. Peter's and the vatican in Rome and the masterpieces of Titian in Venice. Fra Angelico's works of spiritual beauty in his religious paintings, Andrea del Sarto's faces, Raphael's madonnas, the style of Leorardo da Vinci and Giorgioni's pageantry scenes all found a place in her interesting sweep of the four centuries. Florence she considered the heir of Rome's magnificence and Venice that of the marine beauty of Constantinople, each inheriting a special feature of the respective divisions of the Roman empire. Form was the prevailing characteristic of Florentine art and color that of the Venetian. Her illustrations were brought to a happy finale by a reproduction of Titian's Assumption and a moonlight scene of the grand canal of Venice, for which she was compensated by spontaneous bursts of admiring applause from the select audience which had accompanied her in her entertaining tour from the Armo to the Tiber and thence to the "bride of the Sea," whose doge lives now only in the immortalization that has come from Shakespeare's pen and Titian's brush.

This morning at 10 o'clock Miss Isabelle McDougall, art critic for the Chicago Post, will talk on "Municipal Art." At 11 o'clock L. H. Griffith will speak on "Practical Application of Art Education." This afternoon at 3 o'clock Lorado Taft will lecture on "French Sculpture." This lecture will close the congress.

CHICAGO WILL DO OMAHA ALL TODAY

Lakeside City People Expected to Take In the Exposition and See the Sights.

Famous Cook County Democratic Club With an Immense Band of Music Will Storm the City and

Twenty Sleeping Cars Filled With the Crack Marching Club of the World Arrives in Omaha Early Saturday Morning on Special Trains.

CARTER H. HARRISON,
Mayor of Chicago.
BLOMGREN BROS. & Co. CH.

Today, according to the exposition calendar, is Chicago day at the exposition, and the indications are that the event will be a hummer—a record breaker. The Chicago excursion proper is under the auspices of the Cook County Democratic club, and that noted organization will come in full force. This is perhaps the most remarkable political organization in the country today. It is a powerful body, and has grown in numbers and influence. While it is not a "machine" controlling body, it is an organization that runs the political affairs of the democracy of the Lakeside city to a large extent. In the membership are men of all conditions and social standing in the party. Chicago is rapidly growing to the proportions of the political center of the northwest, and this club is no small factor in the work of organization and controlling the party in that city and in Illinois.

This club keeps up its organization year in and year out. From time to time meetings are held—social meetings, business meetings, and during campaign times, frequent business meetings in which great events are discussed. The organization, as some one has said, is always in the saddle, ready for business. When distinguished men of the faith visit Chicago this club does the nice thing in a royal manner. Notable days in democratic history are commemorated in a becoming way by this organization. The club never does anything by halves. The motto of the club is, "What is worth doing at all is worth doing well."

The anniversaries of this club, such as Jefferson and Jackson days, and other notable ones in democratic history, are events, not alone in the history of Chicago, but of consequence also to the country and party the country over. Nothing in the way of splendor and magnificence in the way of arrangements and program are left undone.

 

This club has a membership of thousands—men of all conditions, from the day laborer on the streets to the millionaire in his palace. They meet from time to time, and discuss matters of much interest to the city, county, state and nation and themselves as individuals.

MARCHING CLUB.

Inside the club proper is an organization known the world over as the "Marching club." This is an organization within an organization. It is composed of the real workers, those who are ready in season and out of season to go forth in behalf of the party principles. They are what might be called the "rough riders" in Chicago political affairs. On them depends largely the work of the great organization. During campaigns this club meets night after night to plan, devise, suggest, execute plans calculated to bring about desired ends. In short the "Marching club" is the cabinet for action.

In times of peace this wing of the organization takes pleasure and business trips to different places, carrying cheer and astonishment with them. Their trips are events not only in the history of the club's life, but in the annals of the places visited, as well. When they go they go in royal style. They do the thing up in elegance—and money is no object with them. Some years ago the Marching club went to Syracuse in a train, the car service alone costing $7,000. The club went to Nashville to the exposition last year and the car service account alone was larger by considerable than was the cost of the Syracuse trip.

SOME NOTABLE TRIPS.

The trip of seven days through the south during the Cotton States exposition at Atlanta, Ga., in 1895, was a memorable one. The club participated in Chicago day services in Memorial hall and serenaded all the Illinois dignitaries assembled on that occasion, who were Governor Altgeld, Chairman Ferdinand Peck, General Wheeler of the national guard, A. S. Trude, George Adams and Chief of Fire Department Swenie. Governor Atkinson of Georgia and the mayor of Atlanta were also serenaded. They were received by the staff officers of the governor and leading citizens. Other points visited were Memphis, Tenn., where they were received by the Tennessee committee, composd​ of leading office holders and citizens; Birmingham, Ala., where they were received by the mayor and citizens of that beautiful and enterprising city, and serenaded by the ladies in charge of the Chrysanthemum exhibition, held there are the time, and stops were also made at Tuscaloosa and Holly Springs, Miss.

When Governor Boies was inaugurated at Des Moines, this club was a feature of the exercises. It was the admired of all. This trip was one of the most noted in the history of the club, and consumed five days, during which time the weather was extremely cold, the thermometer registering 10 degrees below zero on inauguration day. Two hundred members and forty musicians from the First regiment band made up the company.

SURPRISE FOR GOTHAMITES.

When Mayor Van Wyck was inaugurated at New York the club was the seven days wonder of Gotham. The body paraded to Tammany hall and won eulogies as the finest appearing body of men that ever marched down Broadway. A reception was given them next day by Tammany. On the return home a stop of five hours was made at Niagara Falls. Upon arriving in Chicago 500 citizens, headed by a band, received them as conquering heroes and gave them a reception and banquet in Oriental hall.

The trips and triumphs of the club have been many. October 7, 1897, the club made an invasion of the southland and added another peace victory to the many laurels won on civic battlefields. The famous "swing around the circle" in October, 1897, into the heart of the campaigns of Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee will live in political history. As a result democracy triumphed at Lafayette, Indianapolis, Louisville, Cincinnati and Nashville, where the county democracy sojourned and was entertained. The parades of the organization awakened great enthusiasm, with Mayor Harrison at the head—a plain democratic mayor marching in line with "the boys."

Saturday is Chicago day, and that does not mean that only the famous Cook County Democratic club will be here. That club comes, to be sure, as a body, to swell the ranks and to place organization behind the exercises. energy. Mayor Harrison will be here. Thousands of people will be here—people of all political faiths as well as people who have no political home. It is Chicago day—a day in which every loyal Chicagoan can take part and enter into the exercises with freedom and He responds to "The Mayor," and his address will be the chief one of the day. Others will speak, and the Auditorium exercises will be somewhat out of the usual.

To give a list of the prominent people who will be here would be an impossibility. President Powers of the noted club will head the list; ex-President Burke, Mayor Harrison, ex-Governor Altgeld, leading judges, noted members of the Chicago bar, men famous on 'change, county and city and state officials, and two or three congressmen, and Senator Mason is of the pary​.

This will be the club's only real extensive outing for 1898, and it is their purpose to make it an affair worthy of the great young city of which it is a representative. They come to have a good time; to show the people of Omaha a good time; to meet and greet old friends, and to form new ones; and incidentally to make a display worthy of the name of Chicago. A Chicago man expressed the idea when he said: "They would come to Omaha loaded, and would unload—and maybe, some of them fill up again."

PARADE IN BURLINGTON.

Months ago the club decided to come to Omaha, to see the exposition and to do Omaha. From time to time committees have visited the city perfecting arrangements for the outing, and plans at both ends are now perfected, and are on a scale at once grand and magnificent.

While here the Paxton hotel will be headquarters. The club will arrive in the city Saturday morning, leaving Chicago at 2:30 p. m. Friday. They have chartered twenty sleepers for the members of the club alone. Two engines will draw this immense train. Enroute the train stops briefly at Monmouth, Galeburg and Burlington. At Burlington, Ia., the club leaves the car and makes a parade through the principal streets, early Saturday morning. There are 500 in the marching party. The famous club band of seventy pieces furnishes the music. Arriving in Omaha the club will fall in and march from the depot to the Paxton.

While here a street display will be made, and the parade at the exposition Saturday afternoon will be something worth seeing.

In addition to the marching club a large number of Chicago people will come, and it is estimated that at least 10,000 people from that city will be in Omaha today.

ROBERT E. BURKE,
Secretary of Cook County Democratic Central Committee.
ALDERMAN JOHN POWERS.
President of Cook County Democracy.
 
VINCENT M. PERKINS.
GEORGE KERSTEN,
Democratic Candidate for Sheriff of Cook County, Illinois.
FRED E. ELDRED,
Democratic Candidate for County Clerk, Cook County, Illinois.

GEORGIA'S DAY A RED LETTER

Statesmen and Orators From the Great Cotton Commonwealth Here.

They Come in Force to Exposition---Generous Tribute to the West---Pioneer and Children's Day, Also,

Nebraska's past, present and future, its labor, its achievement and it promise met by chance on the exposition grounds yesterday. The territorial pioneers and the old settlers were there to see epitomized the results of forty or fifty years of effort in the land beyond the Mississippi—the conquest of the prairie schooner which President Olson the other day called the grandest sort of battleship. Their sons and their daughters were there to feel satisfied with their present undertakings, and their grandchildren were there to share in pride for the past and to be filled full of hope for the future.

ALL CHILDREN'S DAY.

It was all children's day, too—a day for the youngest and the oldest. No one knows just how many of the little people there were, but they piled off every train that arrived in the morning. The most imposing body of them came in from Blair on a special about 9:30. There were about 1,000 of them. They made a pretty looking army as they marched from the Elkhorn station into the grounds and down the boulevard to the main part. They were in the general charge of Superintendent N. K. Fowler of the Blair schools, but the detachment from each township and school district in the county had its own chaperon.

Bundles and packages were deposited at the Children's building and then the grounds were free to the excursionists. There were no formal exercises, and the only special entertainment for the children was a display of Japanese day fireworks on the plaza at 1:30.

 

OLD SETTLERS, ALSO.

There were, of course, fewer of the old settlers, but there were many for them. They moved about the grounds more slowly than the children, but they were yet lively enough to see the exposition. They made headquarters at the Nebraska building, where shortly after noon a reunion was held.

GEORGIA TO THE FORE.

The day was further distinguished by a visit of the prominent citizens and the Press association of Georgia, with exercises in the Auditorium at 11 o'clock. The southern excursionists met at the Georgia building and marched to the Auditorium to the music of the Omaha Concert band.

Ex-Governor Northen presided. He said that the people of Georgia were here to congratulate the brave men who had made the exposition so grand a success in the face of such serious discouragements at the start. The south had been in the exposition business and the governor said that he thought at the time that the Cotton States' exposition was second only to the World's fair. He believed he was now safe in saying since he was 1,000 miles from hime​, that the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition had not been surpassed by any other ever held. (Cheers.) The governor referred to the same spirit that had moved both the north and the south in the war with Spain, and declared that the conflict was worth all its cost in money and blood, because it had wiped out forever the last vestige of sectionalism. (Cheers.)

The greeting for the exposition was extended by President Wattles. His commendation of the enterprise shown by Georgia in participating in the exposition was received with much applause, as well as were his remarks regarding the disappearance of the remnants of sectional animosity. Not less well received were his remarks regarding the prosperity of the new south and his prediction that it would soon be working up in its own factories its own cotton.

EDITOR RICHARDSON ELOQUENT.

Henry Richardson, editor of the Atlanta Journal, and one of the prominent members of the Georgia commission, was profuse in his praise of the substantial and the more airy splendors of the exposition. He did it with a great deal of fervor and a great deal of wit, and found frequently before him a thousand laughing faces. He declared that here about the main court were shown more grandly the works of man than at any other time and place. "And," said he, "if that be treason, let Chicago and Atlanta make the most of it." He repeated with great satisfaction the facts regarding the attraction of northern capital and northern men to the south and shouted that they were welcome. They would rather have down there good, regular, well-seasoned American citizens, with American traditions and American spirit than the population continually dumped down in New York from foreign shores. "We appreciate," said he, "what the northwest has done for the south and we want more of you."

Discussing the resources of Georgia and its agricultural advantages, Mr. Richardson entered on a cheer-causing part of his address when he began talking about one flag and one patriotism. He has, as a boy, he said, seen the city of his hope riddled with federal shells and fired by federal torches, and yet, today, when one there turned his eyes toward the sky he saw nothing but an array of American flags, and devotion to the common interests of the whole country was nowhere so strong as in the empire state of the south.

Manager Rosewater of the department of publicity and promotion followed with an address more particularly to the members of the Georgia Press association and on the theme of the work of the press in contributing to the success of the exposition.

SPEAKS OF GEORGIA PRESS.

Response was to be made by Captain John Triplett, vice president of the Georgia Press association and editor of the Thomasville Times, but he contented himself with acknowledging the courtesies extended, and introduced Colonel J. H. Estelle of Savannah.

Colonel Estelle said he felt like repeating the old story of the queen of Sheba, but Mr. Richardson had already told that, and he would speak of the Georgia press. He commended it for its boldness through many trying times and for its honesty at all times. He and and his friends would carry back the most pleasant recollections of the exposition, profoundly impressed with its beauty and with the power and intelligence that produced it.

After "The Old Kentucky Home" by the Omaha Concert band the final address was delivered by John Temple Graves, whom the chairman said all Georgia regarded as a second Henry W. Grady.

JOHN TEMPLE GRAVES.

Mr. Graves began with a very gracious compliment to the president of the exposition and his associates for their great accomplishment. With much fluency and apt description he spoke of the exposition and the spirit of the people of west. He aroused the most ardent enthusiasm as he spoke of the interests of his section and pronounced the Nicaraguan canal the logical outcome of the Spanish war, and was cheered at the end of every sentence as he progressed in his chief theme—a reunited country, and a north and south linked by new commercial and industrial ties.

TERRITORIAL PIONEERS.

Oldest Settlers of Nebraska Gather in Numbers to Rejoice.

That Nebraska is not so young as she used to be one must admit after a glance at those who gathered at the Nebraska building yesterday responsive to a call for a meeting at noon of the Territorial Pioneers' association, ex-Governor Furnas president and W. R. Bowen secretary. Long before noon the building was a hive of activity—a gray and venerable activity. White beards, bald crowns and bent shoulders were much in evidence; but so also was the spirit of fire and courage which has made these men worthy to bear the name of pioneers.

Prior to the meeting no definite plan or program had been arranged for the day's entertainment, the purpose of the meeting being to perfect arrangements for such manner of celebrating as would be most acceptable to the guests. Nor did there seem any urgent desire for any form of enjoyment other than that of exchanging greetings and renewing old-time friendships. So busy were the graybeards with this pleasure that the meeting had not been called to order at the hour of 12:30.

It was expected that other old settlers' associations would join with the Territorial Pioneers' association in this celebration. The Lancaster County association had signified its intention of doing so, but at the last moment this plan was abandoned and the only organized body concerned in the festivities is that of the Territorial Pioneers.

The afternoon meeting was called to order at 1 o'clock by the president of the association, ex-Governor Furnas, with about 200 members present.

Governor Furnas, in addressing the assembly, said this was the most largely attended meeting of the association which has yet been held, despite the fact that the material available for the making of members is constantly decreasing. He spoke briefly of the astonishing contrast between the condition of the territory a generation ago and its condition in this great exposition year—a contrast impossible in any other country within so limited a period of time.

Secretary Bowen read the minutes of the meeting of last year, which was held at Lincoln. The secretary also submitted the financial report and report of auditing committee.

Ex-Governor Furnas then briefly outlined the purposes and objects of the organization of the association, which has in view the preservation of some authentic record of the days of territorial pioneering. He urged the increase of membership, which is available to all who came to or was born in Nebraska prior to March 1, 1867. Children of such pioneers, if born in Nebraska, are available for membership in the second class. It is desirable that there be the largest co-operation among old settlers for furthering the purposes of the organization before death shall make such co-operation impossible.

The association has adopted a specially designed and characteristic badge of bronze, the design being a buffalo head, inclosed within a horseshoe.

Robert W. Furnas was re-elected president of the association for the ensuing year. W. R. Bowen was also re-elected as secretary.

At the conclusion of the formal business of the meeting many of the members were called upon for five-minute addresses. Ex-Governor Boyd was the first to respond to this call, and spoke feelingly of the early days, and hopefully of the days to come. He was followed by Colonel Champion S. Chase, who urged the need of attempting to preserve the "inside" of territorial history while its makers are still living.

Major D. H. Wheeler spoke of the conditions that prevailed in Nebraska in the '50s, when cottonwood timber was legal tender, and when there was a race of real estate boomers who must have put the modern boomer to shame.

Short speeches were also made by Dr. Daniel Freeman, Beatrice; Isaac Hascall, Omaha; Dr. Harvey L. Link, Millard; Dr. George Smith, Omaha; John B. Furay, Omaha; A. Yost, Fontanelle, and others, all in reminiscent mood. The remainder of old settlers' day celebration was a go-as-you-please.

Missouri Editors at the Exposition.

Fifty Southwest Missouri editors and their wives are at the Mercer. Yesterday after a brief informal session the party left the hotel in a body for the exposition. Press Commissioner R. W. Richardson was on hand and presented each editor with tickets to the exposition. The southwest editors will stay over Sunday in the city.

WANT ANOTHER VIEW.

Georgia Editors Plan to See Salt Lake and Revisit Omaha.

The Georgia editors were up betimes yesterday. At 9 o'clock they assembled in the parlors of the Millard to discuss and arrange plans for a western trip. The entire party was present, the meeting being very interesting. It was decided to go to Denver, at any rate, the party already having an invitation to that point. A committee was appointed to complete arrangements for that outing; also the committee to see if arrangements can be made to go to Salt Lake, many of the editors being very anxious to go to that city while in the north. That committee was requested to do all in its power to arrange for the Salt Lake trip.

It was further decided to leave Omaha for Denver, Saturday evening, spending three or four days in Denver, returning to the city next week and spending two or three days more at the exposition. Should arrangements be perfected to go to Salt lake they will return to Omaha October 8, spending the 9th and 10th at the exposition.

After the meeting the editors went in a body to the exposition, and held an informal meeeing​ in the Georgia state building, at 10:30 just previous to the Auditorium building.

Chicagoans Coming.

The hotels are already filling up with Chicagoans, and there are at this time several hundred people from that city in Omaha. Every incoming train adds to the number, and by evening at least 1,000 Chicagoans arrived to participate in the exercises. These are the advance guard, coming to complete arrangements, and to avoid the rush today. Commercial men, representing Chicago houses, are coming in very fast. There have been several hundred of them at large in Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska and the Dakotas, and almost to a man they are rolling into Omha​. Many of them live in Chicago, and their families will meet them here. Some are members of the Cook County Democratic club, and come to have a lark with their comrades. The Paxton, Murray and Millard are filling up with Chicagoans. At each of these hotels quarters have been engaged for weeks in advance for today, and the indications are that the hotels will have few idle rooms Saturday night.

Indian Sham Battle Saturday.

Great commotion and turmoil will again disturb the Indian congress this afternoon at 4:30 o'clock, for at that hour the six Sioux tribes and their friends, consisting of one or two of the smaller tribes, will wage conflict with every other tribe in the village. It will be another of the sham battles that have become the drawing cards of the grounds on the day that they occur, preceded by a grand review by tribes in which Geronimo and his Apaches dash up the last of all.

Accommodations for seating 3,000 people in the shape of solid plank tiers thoroughly braced have been provided. The Indian braves will have their usual number of Springfield carbines and blank cartridges.

Notes of the Exposition.

The fireworks tonight in honor of Chicago day will be on a scale not before witnessed. More than double the quantity of fireworks ever yet used on the grounds will be sent up.

October 20 has been set apart as Eastern Star day. There will be no formal exercises. The local members of the order will entertain visiting members from all points.

General Superintendent Newell of the Chicago & Easern​ Illinois railroad will be one of the visitors tomorrow. He will be attended by a party.

The special cars of President Purdy of the Rock Island and of George H. Daniels, the general passenger agent of the New York Central, stand near the railroad entrance. They and their friends will remain over tomorrow.

The St. Paul & Omaha road brought in twelve coach loads of children to the exposition. The Union Pacific had three extra loads from Columbus, and the Burlington brought in 10 0children​ from Minden.

 

MORMON NOTABLES COMING

Three Members of Presidency, Snow, Cannon and Smith, Will Lead.

Accompanied by Governor Wells and Utah Officials, Will Arrive October 18 or 20.

Eight of Cannon's Sons and Daughteas​ From Five Families Visit Exposition--Going East to College.

Dignitaries of the Mormon church have advised Superintendent Whittaker of the Utah displays that they will arrive in a large party to view the exposition October 18 or 20. In the party will be the three members of the presidency of the Mormon church, the president proper, Lorenzo Snow, recently elected to succeed the later President Woodruff; the first councilor, George Q. Cannon, ex-territorial delegate and father of the present United States Senator Cannon, and the second councilor, Joseph F. Smith. Perhaps the governor of Utah, Hon. Heber M. Wells, will be a member of the party, which will also include several other officials of both the church and the state.

The Utah exhibits are now being visited daily by a dozen or more young people en route from their Utah homes to eastern colleges. Among the number during the last two days have been four sons and four daughters of George Q. Cannon, three of the sons bound for Cornell university and the others for other eastern institutions. It is said of the distinguished churchman that he has four or five families. Although now having renounced polygamy, he is most generously providing for each of his families, and is giving all of his children liberal educations, his immense wealth so permitting.

He was president of the Trans-Mississippi in this city two years ago last winter, which by reolution​ fixed upon Omaha as the representative city of the Trans-Mississippi states for the exposition.

SALMON HATCHING OUT.

One of the interesting features of the fisheries exhibit in the Government building, which became especially so yesterday, is the hatching out of a large number of Quinat salmon. Twelve days ago a large quantity of the delicate pink eggs were received from the government hatching station on the McCloud river at Baird, Cal. The eggs had been in the water twenty-five days, and in the ordinary course of events they would have remained in water at the temperature of 48 degrees, and would not have been hatched for several days yet. So most of the eggs are now being kept.

But one jar was put in Missouri river water at the temperature of 68 degrees, the water being gradually warmed to that point, and these are the eggs that yesterday began bursting open for the active little salmon with big food sacks fastened to them, so heavy they cannot swim for two weeks yet until the food is absorbed, although they are ambitiously trying. It is feared that the little fellows will be more delicate than those raised in colder water.

CANADIAN DAY.

Canadian day has been fixed by the dominion government at October 15, so Mr. Mathew A. Hall, British vice consul of the Canadian-American club, has wired from Ottawa. He went a few days ago on the mission in behalf of the exposition. To make the day truly representative of Canadian interest and enterprise, it is announced that a large delegation of prominent Canadian officials will arrive to participate in the events of the day, in which it is believed that they will be heartily seconded by the 2,000 Omaha Canadians, as well as the large number from the Trans-Mississippi territory.

SPECIAL RAILWAY PARTIES.

Six special cars with parties of people prominent in railroad circles will be on the tracks within the exposition grounds this morning. A New York Central party consists of General Passenger Agent George H. Daniels, Mrs. Daniels, Miss Harriet M. Daniels of New York; Mrs. L. B. Hamlin, Miss Maud Hamlin, Mr. A. W. Hamlin and Mr. Clinton Hamlin of Elgin, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Dickinson, Mr. Mansel Clarke and Mr. R. T. Crane, jr. They arrived last evening on the New York Central private car "Corsair," but will occupy two cars during their stay. A Rock Island party consists of President W. G. Purdy, the Misses S. E. Purdy, E. F. Purdy and B. A. Purdy, Mr. C. F. Drake and Miss A. B. Sanger. General Superintendent J. C. Stewart, wife and daughter of the Omaha are expected today, as are also a party of Port Arthur officials and their families.

Secretary of Agriculture Wilson has written the National Flax, Hemp and Ramie association that he will be in the city during peace jubilee week, and will be pleased to participate in the contemplated flax fiber congress. Plans for the congress have not been definitely formed as yet, save that it will be held during the second week in October.

WITH THE DAKOTAS.

It is anticipated that during the next few days the North Dakota agricultural exhibit will be greatly augmented by a collection of the best agricultural products of the state direct from the state fair being held this week at Mandan, and later by another collection from the Grand Fork street fair, a fall festival peculiar to the larger North Dakota cities, the one at Grand Forks being held October 5, 6 and 7, including all kinds of fruit and cereal displays, Midway and balloon attractions, and Paine's Fall of Santiago produced on the Red river. The Richland county collection of Wealthy and Duchess apples has been largely increased.

South Dakota day is October 6, but as yet Mr. J. E. Pilcher, superintendent of the Black Hills mines exhibit, has received no definite information of the program save that Hon. C. E. Davis of Deadwood will deliver the opening addresses. It is rumored, however, that extensive preparations are being made, and that a large delegation from the Black Hills region at least, will be here. Mr. Pilcher has just received a miniature working model of a ten-stamp gold mill, and in operation shows the work of the two five-stamp batteries, one with clean plate and the other amalgamated with quicksilver.

NEW BRIGHTON HONORED.

T. L. Kennedy Selected as One of the Twenty-two Commissioners of Pennsylvania to Attend the Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha on Pennsylvania Day.

By request of the management of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition, now open at Omaha, Nebraska, Governor Hastings appointed twenty-two commissioners to represent the State on Pennsylvania Day, which will be October 6th, 1898. Among those appointed are Col. John W. Woodside, president; Col. Thomas Potter, vice-president; Thomas Bradley, treasurer; William A. Conner, secretary; George Knox McCain, chairman executive committee; T. L. Kennedy and others. The commission is composed of practical representative men and Governor Hastings is receiving praise for his wise selection.

The exposition is intended as a counterpart of the World't​ Fair, and in points of exhibits in electricity and fine buildings, is said to be the finest ever attempted in the United States.

John A. Wakefield, formerly of New Brighton, is secretary of the exposition, and by the selection of Mr. Kennedy as a member of the commission, Beaver county should certainly feel honored.

The commission will leave Philadelphia to-morrow evening at 4:30 o'clock and will pass through New Brighton early on Monday morning. It will be one of the few commissions that go outside of the state whose members pay their own expenses, so far as the state is concerned. However, the Pennsylvania Company, through George M. Boyd, general passenger agent, has kindly tendered free transportation over their lines and also furnished special cars. The Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad Company, through John R. Pott, general passenger agent, kindly furnishes transportation over that line from Chicago to Omaha and return. Mr. Boyd and Mr. Pott will accompany the commission in person.

Mr. Kennedy stated to a TRIBUNE reporter to-day that the state of New York has a large building erected on the exposition grounds which has been tendered to the Pennsylvania commission for use as a headquarters on Pennsylvania day. The offer has been accepted and the building will be used on that occasion, when the address of the day will be delivered by Postmaster General George Emory Smith. Mr. Smith and his wife will accompany the commis-[?]

SECOND TO CHICAGO

Omaha's Exposition Leads All Others in Point of Attendance.

WORLD'S FAIR HONORS TRANSMISSISSIPPI

Visitors from the Windy City Take Full Possession of the Grounds.

MADE TO FEEL VERY MUCH AT HOME

Weather Man Prepares a Lake Michigan Fog for Their Benefit.

EXERCISES ARE UNUSUALLY INTERESTING

Speakers Exchange Compliments and Congratulations of Undoubted Sincerity and Unite in Exalting the West and Its Resources.

Total Admissions Yesterday21,255
Total for the Week128,854
Total to Date1,709,635

True to its promise and its well known hustling ability Chicago came to the exposition yesterday and made its visit the biggest, liveliest and most enthusiastic municipal celebration in the history of the exposition. And incidentally Chicago day will be remembered as the date on which the Transmississippi Exposition made good its promise that it would be the biggest exposition since the World's fair. Last night the total attendance passed the record of the total attendance of the Nashville exposition with several thousands to spare. In its six months of existence 1,703,328 people passed through the gates of the Nashville show. At the end of the fourth month the Omaha record was within 15,000 of the total Nashville attendance, and yesterday added this and thousands more. The total attendance at the Atlanta exposition, which was also a six months' show, was 1,287,863, and that at the Midwinter fair was also decidedly less than that at Nashville.

The radiant sunshine that welcomed the representatives of the Sunny South was pertinently succeeded by lowering skies and damp, misty winds when Chicago came to pay her respects to the only exposition that has rivaled her own marvelous achievement. It was as nearly a counterpart of the brand of weather for which the Windy City is famed as nature could suggest, and the visitors unpacked their mackintoshes and umbrellas and felt entirely at home. The clouds were draped in that slaty shade of gray that distinguishes the heavy canopy of mist that a stiff east wind blows up from Lake Michigan. The rain drizzled at intervals, with the same chilly persistence that it falls on Michigan avenue on several days of the 365, the southeast wind was damply suggestive of a journey over miles of angry water, and the Chicagoans had only to close their eyes and imagine that they could hear the muffled pounding of the insistent billows on the sturdy riprapping of the Lake Front. They had every reason to feel at home and they did. They showed their appreciation of the cordial sincerity of their welcome by simply taking possession of the grounds and lavishing their admiration on the show as enthusiastically as though they had not had a slightly bigger one of their own. They had come with the announced intention of making Chicago day one of the great events of the transmississippi show and the atmospheric inconveniences of the morning did not prevent them from carrying it into execution.

Make Their Presence Manifest.

The delegations that were brought by the various railroads included some of the most notable figures in Chicago citizenship. Many of them were accompanied by their families and together they formed the biggest and most enthusiastic crowd that has visited the exposition. They swarmed into the Illinois building all through the morning and kept the pretty rotunda full of animation and pretty costumes. As the excursionists whose trains had been switched directly to the grounds joined those who came up from their down town quarters the pretty red   grounds and by 11 o'clock there were enough of them to fairly fill the Auditorium and still leave a representation in every other quarter.

During the afternoon the clouds scattered and the drizzling rain of the morning was succeeded by occasional bursts of sunshine that were suggestive of real Nebraska weather. This gave the visitors an opportunity to see the show under the most favorable conditions, and they made the most of it. They furnished a big crowd at the sham battle, and the Cook county democrats were so thoroughly enthused with the scrappy tactics of the aboriginal contestants that they wanted to colonize them for delegates to the next county convention. This band concert and the special fireworks display in the evening caught the fancy of the visitors, and then they proceeded to give the Midway a little the warmest turning over it has had yet. Most of them will remain over Sunday, and the Innes band will play two exceptionally attractive programs. The feature of the afternoon concert in the Auditorium will be the rendition of Handel's Largo by the band and the Auditorium organ manipulated by Director Kelly.

Officials Finally Arrive.

The official party was belated but in the meantime the crowd was pleasantly entertained by the Omaha Concert band and was not perceptibly restless. The speakers and official guests arrived at 11:30 and were escorted to the stage by President Wattles and Mayor Moores and accompanied by nearly all the Omaha city officials. After an earnest invocation by Rev. T. J. Mackay, Chairman William H. Harper of the executive committee of the Illionis​ commission called the meeting to order and introduced President Clark E. Carr of the Illinois commision​ as the presiding officer. President Carr said to his Chicago hearers that, proud as they are of the splendor of their imperial city, they were now in the midst of that which had made that splendor, the great northwest. He introduced Mayor Frank E. Moores, who welcomed the visitors in behalf of the city of Omaha. He declared that every citizen of the west is proud of Chicago. He regards it as the center, around which the universe revolves and feels a personal interest in its triumphs. But Omaha is to the transmississippi west what Chicago is to the whole country, and he expressed the belief that when his hearers had inspected the magnificent enterprise that they are here to visit they would be as proud of Omaha as Omaha is of Chicago. In conclusion he presented Mayor Harrison with the keys to the city and invited the visitors to take the fullest advantage of the liberties afforded.

In behalf of the exposition management President Wattles said that the inspiration and ambition of our people to build this exposition on the banks of the Missouri had been received from Chicago's great World's Fair, and, while this was but a shadow of the ideal, the west is proud of its child and is glad to welcome its distinguished visitors. He referred to the intimate commercial relations that exist between the Mississippi and Missouri valleys. Chicago is the great clearing house for the immense products of this fertile territory. Its business interests are so closely connected with the transmississippi territory that it is practically the great heart of the west. He spoke of its wonderful growth and transcendent enterprise and paid a high tribute to the progressive spirit of its citizens.

Mayor Harrison's Response.

In response to these sentiments Mayor Carter H. Harrison spoke of "Chicago" and his introduction was followed by a generous ovation. He said that they werewe are here to return the thanks of Chicago for the designation of this day in honor of their city. TheyWe represented all nationalities, all politics and all creeds. They sometimes differed at home but they were a unit in extending to Omaha their sympathy and encouragement and their congratulations on its magnificent achievement. He declared that this celebration came at a time of glorious significance to this country. We has learned that the untried volunteers were of the stuff of which heroes are made and that Sampson, Dewey and Schley are worthy successors to Farragut and Perry. We are not only a peace loving nation but we have found that we have the ability to make our enemies on the battlefield desire peace rather than war.

Referring more particularly to Chicago, Mayor Harrison said that on most occasions a Chicagoan could not tell the truth about his city without being accused of exaggeration. The truth about Chicago seemed like an extravagant dream to the citizen of New York, or Boston or Philadelphia. But Omaha can understand Chicago. Her people had the same inherent spirit and the same pluck and enterprise had made each city what it is. In conclusion, he declared that not only on this occasion, but in every achievement of its future, Omaha commands all the sympathy and encouragement and inspiration that Chicago has to give.

Chicago and the West.

"Chicago and Its Relation to the West" was the subject of an able address by Charles G. Dawes, ex-congressman and assistant comptroller of the currency of the United States. After an enthusiastic hand clapping had greeted his introduction, Mr. Dawes said:

Twenty-seven years ago fifty of the leading citizens of Chicago gathered themselves in a little meeting under most distressing circumstances. Around them, in smoking and somber ruins, lay what had been but a few days before the magnificent city of Chicago. Their own homes had been burned over their heads; their property of all kinds was in ashes; around them all was desolation and cheerlessness and the future seemed as dark as the present. Some of these men rose and spoke of the city as destroyed and lost forever. Its rebuilding seemed to them impossible. To their minds the great Chicago, the city of their pride and affection, was numbered among the things of the past. But from among them there rose a young man who amidst depressing surroundings lifted his voice in remonstrance and in prophecy of the future. "Chicago will live," said he, "and live to be so mighty and so vast that this great fire will be but an incident in its past." And Chicago will thus live because beyond her there lies the giant force, the teeming millions and the imperial area of the mighty west, which having before created Chicago as the necessary gateway to the east must re-create it under the same necessities." That speaker, now the secretary of the treasury of the United States, has lived to see Chicago re-created by the west and his prophecies fulfilled to the uttermost.

I have thought of no better way than by the telling of this incident to indicate the relation of Chicago to the west.

Chicago is the child of the west, dependent upon her for her prosperity and progress—almost for her very existence—and far be it from her to belittle the debt she owes. Willingly, freely, she acknowledges and rejoices in it. Peopled largely by western men, sustained largely by western resources, she feels the keenest and most vital interest in the west, and I believe the great west takes equal interest in this young giant among the cities of the world.

Some Hard Boiled Facts.

The details of the social and commercial relations between the west and Chicago, daily growing more intimate, daily growing more vast—relations which may well challenge the deepest attention of the student of economics and of American history—can receive from me today but a passing and superficial word. From this great section 125 passenger trains carrying over 12,000 people roll daily into the depots of the city of Chicago, and an equal number of trains depart daily from Chicago for the west. During the last year 20,000,000 bushels of western wheat, 116,000,000 bushels of western corn, 118,000,000 bushels of western oats and 17,000,000 bushels of western rye went to or through the great commercial gateway of Chicago. Of the 46,000,000 pounds of second class printed matter entered for the year ending June 30, 1896, at the Chicago postoffice, the authorities of the office estimate that from three-eighths to three-fourths went to the west. Taking the postoffice average of five pieces to the pound, we find that the total annual circulation of Chicago periodical issues in the west must be between 130,000,000 and 172,000,000 copies—a circulation of most surprising and portentious​ magnitude. The combined mileage of the railroads east and west of the Missouri river, binding and knitting together the west and Chicago in ties of common interest, is 67,180 miles.

But no catalogue of the evidences of the intimacy and vastness of the commercial and sociological relations of the west to Chicago can add to our sense of their importance.

Affects the National Life.

The degree of contentment and prosperity experienced by the western people under these relations of western cities like Chicago and Omaha to the western country is so important as affecting our national life and progress that these relations now command the interest and attention of the entire people of the United States. It is generally realized that when the social problems involved in them are solved all the internal problems which confront our young republic will be solved. These people—the people of Chicago and the west—are not waiting for other people or other nations to solve the great problems of today, but strong in the consciousness of their competency for the task they eagerly seek after right solutions.

The rapidity of the development of the west has in less than two generations brought them face to face with the problem of existence under all social conditions from the most primitive to the most complex.

What has thus happened before the eyes of one generation in the west has consumed several hundred years even in other sections of our country and in continental Europe thousands of years. Crowded into the lives of the people of the west has been the marvelous sight of an empire builded from a wilderness.

Past and Present.

We stand today in the midst of this magnificent exposition—an exponent of the highest art of the world—located in this beautiful city of Omaha with its complex nineteenth century civilization and architecture, and are startled by the thought that the Indians and buffalo which have been brought here as objects of curiosity lived in their native state upon this very site less than fifty years ago.

Little wonder is it that the people of the west are interested in these relations of the western city to the western community. The fingers of fate move in decades and not in centuries, in setting the problems for western humanity to conquer.

Little wonder is it that no solution seems too difficult of attainment for those who have seen such great transformations in the west through the successful solution of earlier problems, equally grave.

And now as the genius of America, at the close of a glorious war so bravely fought by a gallant army and navy under a great and wise president, stands upon the threshold of a dawning century and a dawning destiny, with her face toward the fair islands of the Pacific west placed by God's hand under her guardianship, little wonder is it that these people of the west, themselves but a short time ago the adopted children of the wilderness, should not doubt that the path of national duty toward the new western possessions shall again be the path of national glory.

On the Louisiana Purchase.

Cogressman​ J. R. Mann also received a flaering​ welcome from he​ audience. He discussed "The Louisiana Purchase," as follows:

We celebrate today the victories of peace and peaceful pursuits. Where a magic city and a beautiful exposition now stand the wild buffalo was chased by the savage Indian within the lifetime of many here. In the midst of this fitting celebration of the successes of our arts of peace, while enjoying the benefits of bounteous plenty and prosperity, it is proper to recall the history of those events which have made these western states an equal part of that nation which is today the embodiment of progressive civilization and which flies the most beautiful and beloved flag ever lighted up by the sunshine or kissed by the breezes.

"Large streams from little fountains flow; tall oaks from little acorns grow." The little narrow fringe of settlements along the Atlantic coast has grown into an empire which sweeps across a continent and embraces the islands of the sea.

The Louisiana purchase more than doubled the national territory. It gave to our country the exclusive control of the mighty Mississippi and its tributaries. It planted our possessions on the Gulf of Mexico. It acquired for us the Columbia river and a coast line on the Pacific ocean. It brought into our country a region having the most fertile farm and grazing lands, as well as varied mineral resources, to be found in the world, and yet its acquirement was, as it were, only a chance shot.

Spain owned the entire west bank of the Mississippi river and the eastern bank below the Thirty-first parallel of latitude, the boundary line fixed by the treaty of 1795. After the war of the revolution our country west of the Alleghenies had begun to fill up with a class of sturdy and independent pioneer settlers. These settlements depended for transportation of their products wholly upon river navigation, the only outlet for which was through the mouth of the Mississippi, owned and controlled by Spain.

In 1800, by the secret treaty of San Ildefonso, Spain retroceded the province of Louisiana to France, but without delivering possession at that time.

It became evident to the statesmen of that time that we could have no lasting peace until we should possess one bank entire of the Mississippi river, with a consequent right to its free navigation.

Jefferson was president and did not believe that the constitution warranted the purchase of new territory, but overcoming his scruples he rose equal to the emergency and he commissioned James Monroe to act with Robert Livingston, then minister to France, in an effort to purchase that part of the Louisiana province east of the Mississippi, including New Orleans, from France, and congress appropriated the sum of $2,000,000 for that purpose.

War a Fortunate Incident.

"It is an ill wind that blows nobody any good." Fortunately for our own interest, France and England were then on the verge of another war. They had just concluded a treaty of peace, but each country was looking dread suspicion upon the other. England viewed with grave objection the retransfer by Spain of the immense Louisiana province to France; and Napoleon, who was then the first consul of France and its ruler, quickly saw that in case of war the English, with their superiority at sea, would immediately seize New Orleans and the Mississippi river valley. On Easter Sunday, April 10, 1803, he called two of his counselors who were most familiar with the foreign possessions and asked their advice. He said to them:

"I know the full value of Louisiana, and I have been desirous of repairing the fault of the French negotiator who abandoned it in 1763. A few lines of a treaty have restored it to me, and I have scarcely recovered it when I must expect to lose it. But if it escapes me, it shall one day cost dearer to those who oblige me to strip myself of it than to those to whom I wish to deliver it. The English have successively   taken from France Canada, Cape Breton, New Foundland, Nova Scotia and the richest portions of Asia. They shall not have the Mississippi which they covet."

And after hearing from his advisers, one in favor of selling the province to the United States, the other in favor of retaining it, Napoleon said:

"Irresolution and deliberation are no longer in season. I renounce Louisiana. It is not only New Orleans that I will cede; it is the whole colony without my reservation."

Monroe and Livingston had no authority to accept the offer which was made to them by Napoleon.

They could not cable for instructions. They had no time to communicate with the home government by letter. Napoleon was not a Spanish diplomat; he wanted his offer promptly accepted or rejected.

Monroe and Livingston, however, proved equal to the ocasion​, and after negotiations, which lasted but a few days, the purchase was agreed upon, the United States to pay France the principal sum of $11,250,000 payable in stocks or bonds due in fifteen years, with interest, and the further sum of $3,750,000, to be paid by our government to American citizens having certain valid claims against France.

When the treaty became known in this country some of the haters of President Jefferson raised a violent outcry against its confirmation, and dire predictions were made about the danger of extending the country in violation of the constitution, and burdening the people with an immense debt for the purpose of buying an uninhabitable wilderness.

The treaty of purchase was dated April 30, 1803, was ratified in October following, and on December 20, 1803, the American flag was raised over New Orleans.

No one can measure the future possibilities of the states embraced in the Louisiana purchase. The development since the purchase in 1803 has been more splendid than an alchemist's dream. The future will far outrival the present and the past.

The value of the Louisiana purchase cannot yet be appreciated. In 1854 Omaha was but a bare trading post. Its growth has been as rapid as the mushroom which springs up in the night, but as strong and certain as the steel beams which constitute the superstructure of its great buildings, and it is but an example of the genius of the west.

The acquisition of the Louisiana territory was the greatest prize ever gained by a nation at one time. By the stroke of a pen an empire changed hands. In a moment of doubt a construction was placed upon the constitution which authorized the vast increase of territory.

The Louisiana purchase will soon have a greater population than the country which sold it to us. A single false step might have lost us its possession. All the circumstances at the time of its purchase conspired to give us a single opportunity to gain an empire. The opportunity refused or neglected might never have come again.

The France which today maintains an army of more than half a million men because she was compelled to cede Alsace and Lorraine to Germany gave way to us a possession worth many times Alsace and Lorraine, and gave it in friendly peace.

Not one of us can look far into the future. The progress of a century has enabled us to utilize all our possessions. The lightning's fluid puts far distant territory in a moment's communication with the capitol. The expansion of our domain and the increase of our possessions made more keen the intellect and genius of our people. It broadened the hearts and deepened the souls of our citizens. With the new wants, caused by long distance and varied interests, came new ideas with which to supply those wants. New discoveries in the fields of science, art, mechanics, followed closely the new discoveries regarding the surface of our territory.

The last address was to have been made by Hon. William E. Mason on "Our Country." But the senator was unable to be present at the exercises, having been called to Washington on business Thursday. The program was concluded by the band playing "The Star Spangled Banner."

During the course of the exercises Chairman Harper read the following cablegram which was received during the morning from Ferd W. Peck, commissioner-in-general from the United States to the Paris exposition:

GENEVA, Oct. 1.—William H. Harper, Chairman Illinois Commission, Omaha: Paris exposition greet Chicago day at sister exposition.

PECK,
Commissioner General.

After the exercises in the Auditorium Mayor Harrison's party was escorted to Markel's casino, where they were banqueted by the members of the executive committee and the city council. The party occupied the long table on the north side of the room on the second floor of the north restaurant. Aside from the dinner there was no set program and speeches were not indulged in. After dinner the party broke up and the time between then and the sham battle was devoted to visiting the exposition buildings.

Chairman Harper of the transportation committee left for Chicago at 4:30 yesterday afternoon.

RECEPTION TO THE CHICAGOANS.

Major and Mrs. Hambleton Keep Open House for the Guests.

The Chicagoans were given a reception at the Illinois building last evening from 9 until 11 o'clock. Along the walks and among the trees surrounding the structure 1,000 incandescent lamps had been strung to light the way of the visitors to the warm welcome of Major and Mrs. Hambleton. Within, the rooms were hung with evergreens and decked with roses. The punch bowl stood in a conspicuous place near the entrance. The orchestra, stationed on the balcony, furnished music for the occasion.

Out on the veranda members of the Cook county democracy and the Union League club, forgetting politics, spoke only of the beauties of the exposition, or watched at a distance the display of fireworks whose scattering stars lighted the sky in the north.

Nearly 500 guests called during the evening to pay their respects to their fellow citizen, the major, and do homage at the shrine of their mother state. It was the unanimous verdict of all that Illinois had done itself proud at Omaha. All agreed that there was no better state building on the grounds and united in congratulating Major Hambleton on the beauty of the home that he has made his during the summer, and spared no praise for the taste and art displayed in its decoration for their reception and entertainment.

The headquarters of the Union League club in the north room upstairs were especially inviting and had its share of guests until a late hour.

PENNSYLVANIA'S DOUBLE DAY.

Celebration at the Exposition to Be Followed by Picnic at the Park.

Pennsylvania day at the exposition is Wednesday, October 5. The headquarters for Pennsylvanians on that day is to be at the Nebraska State building. Postmaster General Smith is to deliver the oration. Governor Hastings and staff, with a large party of prominent Pennsylvanians, are to be present. Ten thousands Nebraska Pennsylvanians are expected. Badges and buttons for Pennsylvanians can be obtained at Balduff's, Dalzell's and several other places in town. The Pennsylvania basket picnic will be held on Thursday, October 6, in Hanscom park. All Pennsylvanians are cordially invited. A program of short addresses by General Manderson, Governor Holcomb and other prominent Pennsylvanians, interspersed with plantation melodies and songs, instrumental and vocal, will be rendered. Everybody who attends is expected to be on the grounds in Hanscom park by 11 a. m. as refreshments will be served at 12 o'clock. Every person from far and near is invited to bring their own basket, as it is to be a typical Pennsylvania basket picnic, consisting of meats, sandwiches, cold slaw, salads, apple butter, scrapple, pumpkin pie, cake, cider, etc. The headquarters for the picnic people until 10 o'clock of Thursday, October 6, will be at the Young Men's Christian association building in Omaha. Street car accommodations run direct from there to the park. A beautiful souvenir Pennsylvania button has been prepared and can be obtained from any of the committee by applying for the same. One hundred and fifty Pennsylvanians have been appointed on the reception committee and everything has been done that was possible to make this a great day for Pennsylvanians in the west. One county has promised to send 500 representatives and other counties all over the state are expecting to send in large delegations.

ALL READY FOR THE STOCK SHOW.

Hundreds of Cars of Fat Stock Received and Hundreds More Coming.

The live stock show, which opens on the North tract Monday and which includes cattle, horses, jacks, jennets, mules, sheep and swine, promises to be one of the greatest exhibitions of its kind ever held in the United States. The entries number 2,550 animals, nearly all of which will be here. For the accommodation of the stock fifty-one barns have been erected, with 192 horse, 400 cattle, 332 swine and 186 sheep stalls and pens.

Yesterday was a busy time with the owners of the stock and also with the exposition people, as trainloads of animals were arriving from early morning until late at night, coming from almost every state and territory in the union, as well as some from Canada. While Monday is the opening day of the show it is not expected that all of the stock will arrive before Tuesday morning, as that exhibited at the Illinois state fair at Springfield will not leave its destination. Two hundred and fifty carloads of stock arrived yesterday and as much more is billed to come in today. The stock that has arrived up to this time is of excellent quality and most [?] fairs previously held. One ewe, in particular, ha arrived that has just been brought from England, where it took first prize in the Cotswold class a few weeks ago.

The horse show will be good, but it may not compare favorably with some of the shows held years ago, as it is a difficult matter to find any large number of fine horses in the country, breeders having gone out of the business to quite a large extent.

The judging at the show will not begin until Thursday morning. For the purpose of showing the animals before the judges and the public a large amphitheater has been erected, capable of seating several hundred persons. This is located just inside the east entrance to the grounds and is directly in the rear of the Dairy building.

GIVEN A GREAT SHAM BATTLE.

Chicagoans and Others See What Savage Warfare Was Once Like.

Nearly all the Chicagoans and thousands of other visitors witnessed the sham battle fought yesterday afternoon between the Sioux and their allies and the Blackfeet and their allies. The battle was preceded by the usual parade of the members of the Indian congress, all in gala attire.

The preliminaries having been disposed of the forces divided, the Sioux and their supporters going to the east end of the field, while the Blackfeet and those who were to fight with them occupied the ground at the west end of the camp. Then the fight was on and unlike some that have been seen upon former occasions this one was a draw.

With the grandstand crowded and thousands standing along the ropes, with hundreds of spectators perched upon the roofs of surrounding buildings, the shrill notes of the bugle were wafted over the field and the fight was started. A party of Sioux had been out in Blackfeet territory hunting buffalo and two of them had been captured. A council of war had been held and it had been decided that they should die at the stake. Following out the text of the decision the two braves, Comes Running and Falls-As-He-Runs, were brought out into the open space and in full view of the audience. The first was tied to a stake and a fire kindled about him, while the latter Indian was securely roped and laid upon the ground to be disposed of at a later date. Around the unfortunate Indian the Blackfeet danced and howled, waiting for the flames to reach their victim. Not satisfied with this method of torture, however, they added to the misery of their victim by throwing dust in his eyes and prodding him with the burning ends of sticks.

Luck Was with Them.

It is probable that Comes Running would have journeyed to the happy hunting ground had it not been for an incident. Two other Sioux had heard that there was game in the vicinity of the spot that had been selected for the burning and happened to be close by when their comrades were prepared for the slaughter. At about the same time, however, their presence was discovered and two fearless braves were sent out from the ranks of the Wichitas to dispatch them. The Wichitas went, but they never came back, for the Sioux ambushed them, brained them with the butts of their guns and tearing their scalps from their heads, fled to the camp of the Sioux, where they gave the alarm. Within a remarkably short space of time the Sioux came riding down upon the Blackfeet and fired a volley into their ranks. The volley was returned and then the fighting became general. In the early part of the fight Big Brave, the chief in command of the Blackfeet, was killed by being tomahawked by Goes-to-War, who was leading the Sioux. The fight was a hand to hand encounter and was one of the most exciting scenes of the battle.

As Big Brave fell to the ground his scalp was torn off by Goes-to-War, who waved the gory trophy over his head and gave vent to a war cry that was taken up and echoed over the entire field. For an instant after the fall of their chief the Blackfeet seemed dismayed and there were indications that they were about to retreat. Right at this moment Touches-the-Cloud, a Cheyenne, assumed command and riding into the thick of the fight and waving his wand high above his head, cheered the wavering ranks on. The fight, however, was not for Touches-the-Clouds at this time, for in another part of the field his forces had become routed and the men were rapidly riding away, followed by the Sioux who were doing great damage to his columns. The old chief saw that the fight was lost, and starting to fly, discovered that he was alone, surrounded by half a hundred savages who thirsted for his blood. Clubbing his gun and urging on his pony, he rode against the ranks of the Sioux, cutting his way through and reaching his retreating men in safety.

 

Exterminating the Blackfeet.

In this fight the Sioux killed and captured nearly half of the Blackfeet and their allies. They dead they scalped and the captives they conducted to the open space and prepared for burning them at the stake. One man, Dust Maker, was lashed to the identical pole to which he had assisted in lashing a Sioux but a short time previous and around him was kindled a bright, blazing fire. Around this fire the Sioux danced and howled, executing the same dance that is employed when business is intended. The squaws came in for their share and assisted in torturing the captive. Around and around the Indians danced, while the mounted red men circled about and gave vent to the most unearthly yells. Just as the man was about to give up the ghost the Blackfeet, who had been creeping up on the Sioux, arrived with reinforcements and engaged the Sioux in a most desperate battle. They dismounted from their ponies and turning them over to the squaws and children to hold, secreted themselves behind stumps and trees and opened a fire upon their enemies with telling effect. The Sioux retreated under the galling fire, but were rallied by Goes-to-War and his aid, Medicine Horn, both of whom seemed to be everywhere present. By directing the fire of their men, although outnumbered two to one, they held the Blackfeet off, piling the ground with the dead. What would have been the result of the battle cannot be predicted. It was nobody's fight when the supply of blank cartridges run low, which was the signal for the cessation of hostilities.

Even after the firing had been concluded the Indians gave the audience a fine exhibition of hand to hand conflicts. A dozen or more Indians engaged in such an encounter right in front of the grand stand, showing the methods in fighting at close range.

The sham battle interested the visitors immensely and was declared to have been one of the best things ever seen.

Welcome to the Plumbers.

Among the Chicago visitors in the city yesterday were John S. Kelly, national president of the Journeymen Plumbers' union; John Mitchell, president of the Chicago local union, and Frank Kennedy, president of the examining board for union plumbers in Chicago. They were the guests of the Omaha Plumbers' union, No. 16, and at the close of the regular union meeting last night were tendered an informal reception at Labor temple. A welcoming address was made by John M. Buggy, presdient​ of the local union, and there were responses by the visiting brothers and also by Andrew Young, chief inspector of the Chicago Board of Health, who was of the party.

MUSIC LAST NIGHT AND TODAY.

Innes Band Wins More Praise—Programs for Sunday Concerts.

In spite of the somewhat unfavorable weather and the counter attractions brought about by the extra features in honor of the Chicago day visitors, two immense crowds attended the concerts of Innes and his band yesterday. It was a disappointment to many that the spectacular features were not given in the evening. This was not, however, the fault of Bandmaster Innes. It is promised that the necessary arrangements will be at once proceeded with and that the first of these spectacular productions will be given at the festival concert next Saturday night. The disappointment did not interfere, however, with the enjoyment of the big crowd, as Innes and his players seemed to lay themselves out in such shape as to create an extra amount of enthusiasm as each number of the concert followed one on top of the other. Heidelberg, the undoubtedly great piccoloist, caught them on his solo. His playing was for all the world like the song of a bird. Some of the notes were as thin as paper and about as long as the flash of a fire-fly, but they could be heard by the most remote auditor. Innes and his magical trombone set them wild again. The "Jubel" overture with its concluding hymn, "America! My Country 'Tis of Thee," brought the vast assemblage to its feet with such bursts of patriotic enthusiasm as it was good to look upon. The classicists, who are so fond of Innes because he appeals to them, were especially catered to by Wagner's magnificent "Tannhausser" overture and two songs by Mendelssohn, "Farewell to the Forest" and the "Spring Song." This last, by the way, is one of the most remarkable things that Innes does, in the judgment of many people. It is his own transcription of a delicate composition written especially for piano and the beautiful arpeggio effects which he brings in here with his reeds are not only mysterious but absolutely astounding.

The "Hunting Scene," a descriptive idyl by Bucalossi, made one of the hits of the night. Heppner, the solo trumpeter of the band, quietly slipped out and in the distance gave a faint response to the calling of the hounds, which had been sounded by one of the cornetists in the band. Then came the [?]

A-hunting we will go,
A-hunting we will go,
Tantivy, tantivy, tantivy,
A-hunting we will go.

This brought down the house and formed the climax of an evening of sensations. The program for the concert which will be given in the Auditorium this afternoon at 3 o'clock is of especial interest and is as follows:

PART I.

Overture—TannhaeuserWagner
Ave MariaSchubert(Transcription by Lux.)
Comin' Through the Rye (air varia for piccolo)HeidelbergMr. H. Heidelberg.
Grand Fantasia on the Works of Beethoven
Love Is King (march)Innes

PART II.

Symphonic Poem—Last Days of the TerrorLitolff(This magnificent work describes in unmistakable tones the horrors of the French revolution. The ravings of a brutalized mob—the "Marseillaise," at first in triumph, but now in sadness—Robespierre himself meeting death at the guillotine, the awed hush of a country dazed by such a stupendous saturnalia of carnage, all are vividly pictured in this tone poem, which earned for its young composer a place among the foremost of French musicians.)
LargoHaendelOrgan obligato by Mr. Thomas J. Kelly.
(a) Part Song (for brass band) Farewell to the Forest
(b) (for reed band) Spring SongMendelssohn
Inflammatus (The Judgment Day), from Stabat MaterRossini
Solo for TromboneMr. F. N. Innes
Gloria, from Twelfth MassMozart

A grand concert will be given by Innes and his band on the Grand Plaza tonight at 7 o'clock, for which this is the program:

PART I.

Overture—FestLassen
Two Hymns—
(a) Park Street
(b) Nearer My God to Thee
Trombone Solo—Air VariaZimmermannMr. Leo Zimmermann.
Second Hungarian RhapsodyLiszt

PART II.

Overture—The MartyrsDonizetti
(a) Intermezzo—Cupid's Story
(b) March—Love is KingInnes
Song of Old Ireland (popular fantasia)Moore
Love Feast of the ApostlesWagner

Rounded Out with Fireworks.

Chicago day was rounded out with a most magnificent display of fireworks, hundreds of rockets, shells and bombs. There were numerous set pieces, all designed by John Due for the occasion. There was the "Welcome Chicago," a large picture of Mayor Harrison and then there was the cow that kicked over the lamp that set fire to and burned the old city of Chicago. As a companion piece, there was Mrs. O'Leary, the owner of the cow. In addition to this there was a large seal of the city, the acrobat and the phoenix, but better than all of this was the great display of bombs fired in connection with the burning of the city, which was represented on canvas by a street 400 feet in length, many of the buildings so arranged that when the bombs exploded the building tumbled down and apparently burned. The finale was a statue fifty feet high, designated as "I Will," representative of the new Chicago, built since the big fire.

Along the Midway.

There was a hot time on the Midway last night. It was not a riotous time, but just a jollification, participated in by the thousands of Chicagoans and others who were there for the purpose of seeing the sights. The shows opened early and continued in business until a late hour, all doing a good business. It as​ a jolly crowd and every member of the great gathering was in the best of humor.

From dark until midnight the street was packed and the clarion voice of the barker mingled with the laugh of the pleasure seeker who looked at the pictures, slid down all of the inclines and patronized all of the soda water establishments in his round.

FOR CHARLES EMORY SMITH

Reception to the Postmaster General in the Court of The Bee Building Next Wednesday Night.

A public reception will be tendered to Charles Emory Smith, postmaster general and editor of the Philadelphia Press, in the court of The Bee building on the night of October 5. The postmaster general will precede the presidential party by several days in order to deliver the address on Pennsylvania day, and the reception has been planned to enable the postmasters and newspaper men of the west to greet him personally. The Bee building will be brilliantly illuminated and decorated for the occasion, and the long lines of red, white and blue incandescents will blend in pleasing unison with flags and bunting. Within, the court will be resplendent with foliage and draperies, and the distinguished guest will be welcomed by an assembly of notable people. The Bee has sent personal invitations to 1,100 western postmasters and it is expected that a large proportion of them will be present to receive their chief. Other invitations to newspaper men of the west [?]

JUBILEE RATES ANNOUNCED

Omaha Lines Give Out the Passenger Tariff for the Week.

NOT SO LOW AS HAD BEEN LOOKED FOR

Promise of Record Breaking Rates Not Fulfilled and Some Criticism is Endangered—What a Railroad Man Thinks.

A meeting of the passenger representatives of the lines west of here held a meeting yesterday and decided upon reduced rates to Omaha during Peace Jubilee week, October 10-15. It was resolved that lines would act independently of the Western Passenger association and D. B. Caldwell, who is employed by that organization as chairman, was so notified.

The rate that will be made from all points within 150 miles of Omaha is one fare for the round trip, with a minimum rate of $1. Beyond the radius of 150 miles a rate of 1 cent a mile will apply, with a minimum rate from such territory fixed at $4.50. Tickets will be sold at these rates on October 10, 11, 12 and 13, and October 17 will be the latest date for the return trip.

That these rates are a signal disappointment to those interested in the success of the Peace Jubilee is most apparent. From the intimations given out from time to time by passenger men here it was believed that the Peace Jubilee rates would be the lowest ever made to Omaha, as the occasion is to be undoubtedly the greatest. Two weeks ago the passenger men said that it would be unwise to announce the jubilee rates as they would be so low that travel in the meantime will be held back. It's hard to see why anyone should hold back to travel on the rates announced, as they are about the same as are granted the most ordinary conventions that come along.

This opinion is entertained of the Peace Jubilee rates not only by outsiders, but by well posted railroad men who are not so close to the general passenger departments but that they can talk. Said one of them to a Bee reporter: "I understand the jubilee rates are high in comparison with the attraction; there can be no doubt about that. Lower rates have been made to Omaha for the Nebraska State fair. I do not know whether there is any chance of having the rates lowered or not, but certainly they ought to be.

Some Singular Excuses Offered.

"It's amusing to anyone but a passenger man to hear the explanations the general passenger agents give for keeping the rates up. I heard a couple of them say that if lower rates were made their lines could not supply sufficient passenger equipment. There never was a line that could not get hold of all the cars it needed if it new sufficiently ahead of time of the travel expected.

"The real reason for the rates is that the general passenger agents want to go before their general managers and presidents with statements showing that they have acted as wise conservers of revenue. They make money on the traffic they do handle and get patted on the back for their shrewdness, but they lose lots of traffic that would yield good earnings.

"The rates for Ak-Sar-Ben week and for Jubilee week are reasonable enough from remote points, but they are altogether too high from nearby points. One fare for the round trip from points within 150 miles for a peace jubilee with President McKinley and his cabinet here is not a fair rate at all. I heard one passenger man say that the crowds would come any way no matter what rates were made, so the railroads were justified in getting all of the money they could out of the business. I do not consider this is the wisest course to pursue, and the error may be discovered later on.

"The general passenger agents have bulled the situation throughout the exposition, as they did during the World's fair, yet you will find passenger men all over the west today telling you how admirably the World's fair rates were handled. The great error with the campaigns for lower rates here has been that they have been mis-directed. Had a movement been started for lower rates from nearby points instead of from remote points the situation would have been better today. The great bulk of the support of the exposition comes from points within a radius of 250 miles of Omaha."

 

END OF LIBRARY CONGRESS

Librarians Conclude Their Business and Take an Adjournment˙

SESSION PROVES TO BE PROFITABLE ONE

Numerous Important Topics Ars​ Discussed and Resolutions of Appreciation of Hospitality of Omaha Are Adopted.

The transmississippi congress concluded its discussion Saturday and adjourned. The first paper was one by Miss Electra Dayton, the librarian of Dayton, O., on special training for library work. She emphasized the necessity for proper training for the cataloguing feature of library work and the establishment of training schools. This paper was discussed fully by William Richard Watson of Pittsburg, the assistant librarian of the Carnegie library there.

The next subject taken up was the relation of the library to other formal educational work. Papers were read on its relation to the public school by Purd B. Wright, librarian, of St. Joseph, Mo.; its relation to the college, by William C. Lane, president of the American Library association and librarian of Harvard university, and its relation to the club (the woman's club in particular), by Mrs. T. K. Sudborough of this city. The general trend of the discussion of these papers was that librarians and teachers should come closer together in educational sympathy. Miss Kate McHugh, assistant principal of the Omaha High school; Miss Virginia Dodge, librarian of Cedar Rapids, Ia., and William Wallace and Mrs. W. W. Keysor of this city all took part in the discussion. The views expressed on Mrs. Sudborough's paper were that woman's clubs should not conflict with the public libraries.

Resolutions of appreciation of the hospitality of Omaha were adopted and Miss Victor Rosewater and Miss Edith Tobitt, the local librarian, expressed the obligation of this city to the visitors.

President Lane's Address.

Perhaps the most interesting paper was by President Lane of the American Library association. Briefly he said:

The public library has three main functions—the provision of entertainment, information and inspiration, in the last giving assurance of a continuity of progress in matters intellectual and moral. The duties of the college library lie in the same three directions, but the function of providing entertainment sinks into comparative unimportance, because, while the public library naturally uses this as the best means of attracting its readers in the first place, the college librarian can take it for granted that the love of learning is already planted and it is his duty in co-operation with the professors to direct and encourage this. The collection of the literature of information and the literature of power (or inspiration) demands all his energy, and his attention is principally directed toward organizing this in accordance with the needs of the various departments of instruction. The chief value of a library to a college is that it provides the means of forming a habit of independent judgment and the formation of such a habit should be the principal aim of college training.

Simple study of text books requires little aid from the library and has little educational value; the true college method of study should be to send the student to various sources of information and opinion and require him under guidance to draw his own conclusions. For this co-operation of the library is essential. Such a method of study has an important effect on the character. It begets a respect for truth, accuracy, open-mindedness, clear discrimination, qualities supremely worth cultivating. The bearing of this ideal of college study on the problems of library administration was then considered.

Principle of Classification.

The principle underlying a classification for college libraries should be to group the books according to the needs of the different departments of instruction. In classifications usually adopted by public libraries English history, English biography, English travel, etc., are shelved in different parts of the buildings, but in a college library they belong together for the sake of the use made of them by the students of English. Even with this principle as a guide the librarian will find many vexing problems in settling the details of his classification, but he must try to decide all these questions on the ground of practical usefulness rather than by some philosophical system.

In many college libraries there is a strong tendency to break up the general collection into a group of sectional libraries. The demand for this is generally strongest from the scientific departments, which want to have each its own library in connection with its laboratory. No field of science or literature, however, can be absolutely fenced off from other fields, though some cases admit of separation with less incon-[?]ways a certain common ground, in which the workers in various fields have common interest. If any scientific section of a library is separated off in this way enough non-technical works should remain in the central library to satisfy the ordinary demands of the non-professional reader.

The subjects of catalogue, loan system, selection of books were briefly touched on. Finally the use of a college library by men of learning coming from any part of the country was spoken of as its highest field of usefulness in which it contributes to the real advancement of learning. This use justifies the enormous expense at which a great college library (such as that of Harvard university) is carried on, and for this reason Harvard and other colleges always give an eager welcome to scholars coming from a distance to make use of their treasures.

Library for Woman's Clubs.

Mrs. Sudborough's paper stirred up a great deal of animated discussion. On one hand it was thought that a woman's club should have a library complete for the purposes of the club, but there were others who expressed the radical opinion that very little more than a dictionary and some exclusive feminine literature were essential to an organization of this kind. The idea was expressed that everything that could should be done to make the public library the one great source of information to the public, and, if possible, lesser libraries should be more or less discouraged; that is to say, that no effort should be made by the Woman's club in the direction of a gathering of literature that might in any way detract from the value of the public library.

Mr. Rosewater's remarks just before adjournment were by way of emphasizing the interest that had been taken in the congress by out-of-town librarians. More than sixty people identified with library work throughout the country had lent their presence to the congress and added their quota of good suggestions. Of the states represented in addition to Nebraska there had been Colorado, South Dakota, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois, not counting the special guests from points in the farther east.

Invitations were extended to attend the meeting of the Iowa state meeting at Cedar Rapids and the convention of the American Library association at Atlanta next summer.

Close of the Art Congress.

An informal talk on "Municipal Art" by Miss McDougal of Chicago occupied the attention of the Art Congress yesterday morning. Miss McDougal laid great stress on the fact that our American cities would be much more beautiful, artistically, if more care were spent in the selection of subjects and quality made the criterion rather than quantity. She spoke of the education it was to the poor to see fine architecture and sculpture and urged the need of their adoption as an offset to unpleasant home influences.

Mr. Griffith, the art director of the exposition, talked interestingly upon the practical applications of art in matter of daily life.

In the afternoon Lorado Taft of Chicago spoke upon "Modern French Sculpture." After citing the reasons why Paris is the work shop of the workers in clay and deprecating the work of Americans abroad and at home, Mr. Taft proceeded to trace briefly the three stages of sculpture, the classic, renaissance and modern. By the aid of stereopticon views the different styles and masterpieces were reproduced with interpretations and explanations by Mr. Taft.

MISS CHICAGO SETS A RAPID GAIT

Omaha's Big Sister by the Lake Comes in With Breezy Step to Take a Look at the White City of '98.

Cook County's Regiment of Democracy Files Into the Town Like a Conquering Army—Assisted by Other Organizations Scarcely Less Warlike—Reception at the Grounds—Speeches at Auditorium.

MISS CHICAGO.

Chicago day at the exposition was inaugurated by as fine a specimen of Chicago autumnal weather as the oldest inhabitant of the Lakeside city had ever seen. The sky was overcast with a thick curtain of gray clouds at an early hour and a driving, penetrating drizzle filled the air at intervals while a brisk wind completed the combination which made the visitors feel perfectly at home as soon as they alighted from their trains.

Special trains were the rule, the various Omaha-Chicago roads vieing​ with one another to see which could furnish the finest equipment for the big crowds which came in on every road. Vestibule trains containing all the latest improvements in the way of luxuries for the travelers were supplied in every case and even an expert would have found difficulty in determining which party fared the best.

The board of trade delegation was the first on the scene and very soon after their arrival the Paxton hotel lobby and the streets in the business districts were liberally dotted with the fluttering ribbon badges which were distributed by the new arrivals. The badge was a button and fluttering ribbon, all of bright pink with the word "Chicago" in large letters and other lettering appropriate.

These trains commenced rolling into the city at an early hour and from that time until noon the influx continued without abatement until the streets of Omaha were filled with the prosperous and well-fed citizens of the northwest's metropolis and everything had a Chicago air which carried enthusiasm with it. The streets and business houses were gaily decorated with flags and bunting, badges were everywhere and everybody and everything had a holiday air in keeping with the importance of the occasion.

In addition to the arrivals on the special trains the regular Chicago trains were all filled with people from Omaha's elder sister, and before noon the various badges carried by the different organization from the city by the lakes were in evidence on every hand.

The Cook County Democratic Marching club was delayed about an hour by numerous stops along the road and arrived about 10:30 o'clock. The Jacksonian club and a delegation of city officials met the club at the depot and escorted it through the principal streets, the greatest enthusiasm being manifested by the great crowds which lined the streets along the entire distance. A salvo of cheers marked the presence of the club at all points and the fine appearance of the organization excited the greatest admiration. The World-Herald office came in for a salute.

CAME FROM ALL DIRECTIONS.

The distinguished citizens and citizenship of Chicago was not content with striking Omaha on one side only. The board of trade excursionists, for example, piercing the town on the east, shot clear through it and got back at it first on the south side and then on the north side, for the train was run out to Summit, there switched and then run up to the north side of the grounds where the twelve coaches stand.

The rumor was that the Union league crowd would execute a somewhat similar maneuver, coming over the river at Blair and running down on the Elkhorn also, to the north side of the grounds.

The short of it is that the tactics of the four invading armies were thoroughly mysterious and bewildering. The Cook County Marching club was reported late. This was for a time at least suspected to be a ruse under which some sort of flank movement would be executed. Certain it was that the city seemed to be catching it on all sides and from directions the least anticipated. The ingress could no more have been warded off than a rainstorm. In fact a real little rainstorm accompanied it as if still further to becloud the movements of the advancing detachments.

NO GENERAL PARADE.

There was no general parade to the grounds. The visitors found their way out there, whereupon many of them rubbed their eyes, thought themselves dreaming, believed it was five years ago, and that they had simply gone down once more to Jackson park.

RALLY AT ILLINOIS BUILDING.

Of course headquarters were at the Illinois building, and Major and Mrs. Hambleton had taken good care that the guests should have a fitting reception. American flags and bunting had been stretched over the front portico of the building and a bower-like effect was given to the whole interior by the [?]   spots. Smilax, palms, asparagus and culled flowers abounded in profusion, and appeared in pretty designs wherever the architectural features permitted. Particularly beautiful was a curtain of asparagus over the mantel in the gentlemen's parlor, the corners being hidden with American beauty roses tied with white ribbon.

The badges, the daintiest ribbon badges yet seen on the exposition grounds, were distributed at this building as fast as the visitors called to register. In the afternoon a continual concert was furnished by the Sutorius Mandolin club of this city and it was the plan that at night music should be rendered by Kaufman's orchestra and that frappee and claret punch should be served.

The majority of the Chicago visitors who came on the numerous special trains will return home this afternoon or evening, although some of them will remain in the city for several days. The special trains are sidetracked north of the exposition grounds on the tracks of the Missouri Pacific and are used by the travelers as headquarters and for lodgings. The Milwaukee train was connected with the electric light service of the exposition and brilliantly illuminated last night.

COOK COUNTY DEMOCRACY.

A Regiment of the Finest Campaigners Comes in Style.

An enthusiastic welcome was given the Cook County Democratic Marching club when it arrived at the Burlington depot at 12:20 yesterday morning. The big train was three hours late, due to stops en route to parade and the weight of its nineteen coaches.

Over 200 members of the Jacksonian club, with the Omaha Military band in the lead, and several thousand Omahans belonging to all parties were at the depot and exchanged cheers with the Chicagoans.

It was planned that the prominent visitors should ride in carriages to the Paxton, but Mayor Harrison declared that he wanted to march along with the boys, and did so, the Omaha city officials also falling line.

The DeBaugh band of seventy pieces and the First Illinois regiment bugle corps from Santiago furnished music while the procession marched up Tenth to Farnam and thence over Twelfth and Douglas, Sixteenth and Farnam to the Paxton, where an informal reception was held.

There was a great deal of enthusiasm all along the line, despite the light drizzling rain, and the Chicagoans expressed themselves as highly pleased with their reception.

J. E. Riley of the Jacksonians was grand marshal of the parade, assisted by Arthur Metz, E. E. Howell, J. R. Monihan, John D. Ware and George B. Strathmann as aids. Mayor Moores and every member of the city council, and almost all of the city officials, were also in the parade. Three platoons of police marched at the head of the parade.

Compliments on the appearance of the Cook County Democracy, as it showed up in the line of march, every man with new plug hat, Prince Albert coat and cane or umbrella, were many and hearty. Cheers for "the finest," "the bravest and the best" and for the "Chicago boys" were given all along the line.

Among the prominent people were: Mayor Carter H. Harrison, Chief of Police Joseph Kipley, William Loeffler, city clerk; J. J. Corcoran, secretary of the civil service commission; John Dullard, sergeant-at-arms city council; Thomas Gahan, candidate for county commissioner; H. S. Taylor, city prosecuting attorney; Fred Eldred, candidate for county clerk; M. V. Gannon, formerly of Omaha, ex-president of the Irish Land league; Judge George Kersten, candidate for sheriff; A. J. Tollen, assistant commissioner board of public works; J. J. Gray, candidate for assessor; F. E. Davidson, superintendent of sewer department; John C. Schubert, chief sewer inspector; Ernest Thummell, city treasurer; Alderman John Powers, president of the Cook County Democratic club; A. A. Baldenberg and Cook; M. J. Devine, city attorney; Fred Eldred, citiy​ sealer and candidate for county clerk; John Daugherty, street commissioner; Frank W. Solon, formerly of Omaha, now superintendent of the streets and alley cleaning bureau; Judge James C. Martin, candidate for county judge; ex-Alderman Robert Mulcahey, Mike McFadden, the "King of the Pats;" Charles Thornton, corporation counsel; Lieutenant George Perry, of the city detective force, and nine detectives; Vincent H. Perkins, north town supervisor and candidate for president of the county commissioners; C. C. Stillwell, chairman Sixth congressional democratic committee; Emil Hoechster, democratic candidate for congress Sixth district; Walter Thomas Mills, the Chicago orator; James McAndrews, city building inspector; Inspector Hartnet Heidelmeier and Lieutenants Colloran, Perry and Matt Homer of the police department.

THREE FAMOUS BANDS.

The music of the Cook County Democracy parade was furnished by the famous DeBaugh band, W. C. DeBaugh, leader. This organization of seventy pieces has accompanied the club on its many pilgrimages. The band has been present at all the really notable gatherings at which the famous club has been a part. It was at the two inaugurations of President Cleveland, the inauguration of Mayor Van Wyck of New York, the Cotton States exposition at Atlanta, the Nashville exposition, and the inauguration of Governor Boies of Iowa.

CAME FROM SANTIAGO.

The famous First regiment, Illinois volunteer drum and bugle corps is here with the club. They were present at the Santiago fight, and spent seven weeks in that city. They were in the hottest of the fight at El Caney, and throughout that historic struggle. Sergeant E. L. Prescott is in charge of the bugle corps.

They are now home on thirty days' furlough, having arrived in Chicago September 10. In addition to the regular corps, C. H. Tolbin of the Second Illinois, and Sergeant McKay of the Seventh, are with the Santiago buglers.

 

The Santiago drum corps, also with the First Illinois, on the right center, near Roosevelt's Rough Riders, are with the party. This famous drum corps is composed of Sergeant William D. Codman, Henry Johnson, jr., William E. Smith, Albion Wagner and L. D. Johnson. This was the drum corps of the First Illinois state militia, and has been in existence since 1878, having a long and eventful history.

Sergeant Codman, speaking of the Santiago battle, said:

"It was hot; we were in the trenches two or three days, and kept our drums rattling. We were near the famous Rough Riders, and saw plainly the heroic conduct of these men. They never wavered, and in the face of a withering fall of lead and fire crowded on step by step toward Santiago. It was a thrilling and never-to-be-forgotten sight. And hot—my gracious, we have no conception of hot weather—sultry, and no refreshing water to drink. But our boys fought like tigers, and the world knows the result."

MARCHES INTO GROUNDS.

The long line of special cars containing the club reached the ground shortly after 1 o'clock, stopping at the big gate just north of Pinkney street. The line was formed at Sherman avenue with three platoons of police in the lead and the club, band and drum corps immediately behind them.

The various companies formed quickly and the long line entered the grounds with Special Commissioner McGarvie as pilot.

Passing over the main viaduct from the bluff tract to the main court the parade reached the broad plaza about the lagoon from the east end of the Mines building. This point of entrance created a most favorable impression on the marchers and many expressions of astonishment were heard as the classic beauty of the main court burst upon the view without warning.

The line of march extended along the south side of the lagoon to the bridges at Twentieth street, and thence north and east through the Administration arch and the Midway to the Illinois building where the parade was dismissed.

Without further formalities the members of the club dispersed and were soon distributed over the grounds.

OFFICIAL PARTY GOES OUT.

At 11 o'clock the official party left the Paxton hotel for the exposition. A dozen carriages were in waiting, and when the marching club rounded the corner at Fourteenth and Farnam, Mayor Harrison and Mayor Moores left the ranks, entering carriages. In the first carriage were the two mayors, President Clark E. Carr, and Colonel Harper of the Illinois commission.

George J. Brine, Vice President Lyon and C. C. Williams of the board of trade were in the next carriage. The members of the board of trade and prominent people of Chicago filled the ten other carriages. President Wattles and Major Clarkson being in the third carriage.

Friday night at 11 o'clock the county democracy's special train pulled into Burlington. There were hundreds of people at the depot, and the reception was an enthusiastic one. The club, headed by the band, took a spin through the streets. Thousands of people were out, the streets being lined with the people. After a march of thirty minutes the club returned to the train, at which place 10,000 people had assembled, when the train pulled out amid the wild hurrah of 10,000 voices.

In the party at Burlington were the mayor, the city officials and hundreds of prominent men of all political parties.

ALL SACS AND FOXES MOURN

Natawattamie Goes to Happy Hunting Grounds After a Mortal Wound.

Bold Warrior While Chasing a Sioux Steps on a Nail and His Medicine Men Cannot Cure.

But This Does Not Stop the Sham Battle Which Thousands of Chicagoans Enjoy--Geronimo and the Ladies.

Natawattamie, a Fox brave, yesterday went to the happy hunting grounds of his fathers, where the squaws do all the work and the bucks don't have to hustle for stuff to eat. Not in the heat of battle did he die; not when the smoke drifted o'er and unlucky prisoners were sizzling at the stake; not while bravely trying to scalp an enemy, but washed clean and white and with his clothes off did he breathe his last between white sheets in St. Joseph's hospital.

The late Natawattamie was a bold warrior, though, and to his ardor in one of the earlier battles of the present campaign is attributed his death. While rushing to his death one of his Sioux enemies he stepped on a nail and retired from the firing line a cripple. Natawattamie objected to taking the white doctor's medicine, and in the mixture of that with the Indian medicine which the Fox medicine man prescribed Natawattamie took to his bed and was in a few days suffering from malarial fever. He was taken to the hospital, but grew worse daily and yesterday died, after a visit from several friends, to whom he pathetically appealed to take him home, that he might die as an Indian and not as a common paleface.

WEDDED A WIDOW.

Shortly before leaving his native southern heath Natawattamie was wedded to the Widow Opohomock, who, with her child, survives him. Last evening they and their Fox neighbors were very busy sewing the dead husband and father a handsome burial suit of rich black and colored clothes. This afternoon at 2 o'clock the friends of the dead man mounted on their ponies will form the cortege to Swanson's undertaking parlors, from whence the remains will be escorted to Rev. C. H. Savidge's church at Eighteenth and California streets and from there to the cemetery.

Because of this death the Fox and Sacs tribes went into mourning yesterday afternoon, indicated by hanging all of their wearing apparel on the outside of their tents, and did not participate in the grand review or the sham battle.

All of the other Indians did, however, and the way the Chicagoans enjoyed the treat and asked questions was a marvel. The crowd was a crush, at least 15,000 people filling the seats and surging against the ropes till the last shot was fired. All of the various Chicago organizations were given reserved seats directly in front of the heavy killing and scalping.

GRAND REVIEW BEGINS.

At 4:30 the grand review began, first by the interpreters advancing to the grand stand and flanking so that they passed in front of the whole line of spectators. The squaws and children and "infantry" warriors, gaily attired, followed in the same manner, and then came the dashing mounted warriors, each tribe dressed in its own peculiar garb, or absence of garb, as the case might be, and artistically spread coats of paint, artistic because of 400 or more designs, no two were alike.

Each tribe introduced and then the Big-I-Am, the chief, rode up all alone, pompous as the owner of the fattest hog at the county fair, and led his bucks away.

Then every man, woman and child marched up, tribal front, a salute was fired by the warriors, non-combatants retired, and the war forces, the Sioux, Cheyennes, Kiowas and Wichitas on the one hand, and all the other tribes immediately drew off and became bitter enemies.

The Sioux and their friends under the redoubtable Goes-to-War, with Black Eagles as chief of staff and astute Towanconi im and Touch-the-Clouds in charge of divisions, went to the east, while the allied enemy under Big Brave and his chief of staff, Dust-Maker, with White Swan, the Custer massacre survivor, Blackbird, and Apache Josh as division commanders, pulled off to the west. Old Geronimo also participated in this battle, his first at the exposition, and rode around with a gun, but acted principally as a board of strategy for the allied tribes. Every man held a 45 caliber Springfield carbine.

A Sioux brave was captured and tied to a tree. Fuel was piled about his feet and a council of war was held to see if the fun should proceed further. The ayes had it unanimously, and a dance was arranged to put Cat Bird in a cheerful frame of mind preliminary to his departure from the earthly fire to that of the hereafter. The rescue came and the battle was on. The Sioux drove the allied forces from the field.

Immediately after the fight a throng of lady admirers surrounded old Geronimo, and it was an hour or more ere the smiling old fellow was released.

As if a battle were not enough for one day, the Apaches last evening gave a "wall dance," the principal occasion of which seemed to be a quantity of left-over cartridges, which were fired off inconnection​ with the ceremonies of the dance, a light and airy step for an Indian dance, apparently one of intense joy. Even old Geronimo, despite his 68 years, hopped out into the ring, clad in gray coat, a pair of white drawers and moccasins, and tripped the light fantasie for half an hour with the ease and grace of a gay young buck.

Several distinguished arrivals are expected at the Indian congress shortly, among them Chief Joseph of the Nez Perces, who once upon a time led General Howard a merry chase of 1,700 miles across western deserts and mountains, and in his old days is able to come and enjoy the great exposition; Chief Red Cloud of Pine Ridge, American Horse, Sitting Bull's family, and Hollow Horn eBar​ and Two Sticks, prominent in the late Sioux war.

Much attention in the village to the adobe house being biult​ by the Pueblos. They dug a hole for the cellar, mixing the mud with straw and making sun-dried brick about the size of each of four ordinary kiln-dried brick. They are building the house about fifteen by twenty feet on the ground, seven feet high in front and six in the rear, and will cover it with a roof of poles and brush.

The Crow Creek Indian Agency Indian band will arrive October 7.

Attendance by Months.

Four calendar months of the exposition closed Friday night and there has been some inquiry as to the attendance by months. The attendance has been:

June—Paid, 166,882; free, 122,469.

July—Paid, 187,654; free, 144,030.

August—Paid, 311,943; free, 162,234.

September—Paid, 413,571; free, 179,597.

The big days in September were September 1, Kansas City day, when the attendance was 26,210; the 21st, Iowa day, when the attendance was 39,090, and the 22d, Modern Woodmen day, when the attendance was 52,725.

Passes Nashville Show.

Nashville's record is already broken by the Omaha exposition. For six months Nashville kept open the gates of her exposition, and closed with a total attendance of 1,703,328, and called it a famous success. Last night, with four months and a day, the Omaha exposition had a total of admissions of 1,709,635, or more than 6,000 better than Nashville ever had. As for Atlanta, the total of admissions at her exposition was but 1,287,863, also open six months. Yesterday's attendance was the best of the week, 21,255.

Exhibit for Sportsmen.

Standing beside the Los Angeles exhibit in Horticultural building, that of the game fish of Santa Cataline, the great pleasure resort of Southern California, attracts attention. Mr. G. W. Thompson, conducting it, has mounted specimens of the leaping tuna, the yellow tail, black bass and other food fishes of the waters of the island. The exhibit is at once thrilling to the sportsman and tantalizing to him who has not had a chance to indulge in the excitement of angling for these big fellows.

Meiklejohn, Not Alger.

Washington, D. C., Oct. 4.—Secretary Alger has concluded that he will be unable to accompany the president to Omaha, and has requested Assistant Secretary Meiklejohn to take his vacation at that time and to accompany President McKinley as the representative of the war department. Mr. Meiklejohn will therefore go west with the presidential party October 10, and, after the exercises, will enter the campaign in Nebraska, and will make speeches for the republican ticket every day until the election.

Exposition Notes.

The Nebraska building is being handsomely rigged up in the Ak-Sar-Ben colors, so as to be in perfect style next week.

Workmen were busy wiring the avenues of the bluff tract and approaches to buildings for electric light during Ak-Sar-Ben festival week and peace jubilee week.

The 100 high school pupils, brought in Friday by Prof. Thomas of Kearney county, remained over today.

Close to the kitchen wall in the northwest corner of Markel's cafe yesterday was a hot boiler, which set the wall on fire, and the flames instantly shot up two stories and threatened the whole building. Prompt work by the fire department brought the damages down to where $25 worth of lath and plaster will make them good.

Open house was kept at the Illinois building last evening for the Chicago guests. The rooms were artistically decorated, an orchestra played sweetly and ices and punch were served to the hundreds of visitors.

The executive committee last evening engaged the Omaha Concert band for another week, and received advices to the effect that Fremont children's day had been postponed from tomorrow to October 17.

W. N. Babcock, manager of transportation, telegraphed yesterday from Washington that the presidential party would consist of thirty-eight in all.

 
W. Herald Oct 2
Did not have this

The Chinese theater in the Chinese Village was packed to overflowing last night with people who had heard that Ching Ling Foo, the great Chinese magician, was going to perform a number of new tricks. The large audience was astonished and mystified at the wonderful performances of this wonderful man, but it was awe-stricken and dumfounded​ when, right before its very eyes, he severed Hok Wai's head from his shoulders. The feat was so cleverly performed that many in the audience thought for a moment that there was one dead Chinaman and possibly there was, but in a moment Ching Ling Foo stopped the flow of blood, placed the head back on the shoulders and the boy walked off the stage very much alive.

GREATER THAN ALL THE REST

Will Be the Peace Jubilee to Be Celebrated in Omaha Next Week.

Presidential Visit Heads the List of Special Events, End of Which Is Remarkable.

For Every Day Attractions Are Offered Which Will Bring Multitudes of People to the City.

Peace Jubilee—that's the first five days of next week—has now developed a forecast of stirring events and rare treats that will bewilder the magnificent crowds hoped for and expected for a certainty. Day by day the details are being perfected as more and more distinguished statesmen and generals announce their intentions of being present, as the plans for a six days' carnival of music weave themselves into shape and as schemes for spectacular pyrotechnic displays give promise of turning the nights into wonderlands of weird beauty.

Not for a moment was it anticipated at the inception of the peace jubilee plan that such a galaxy of brilliant men of the day could be gathered within the exposition gates, nor that such unparalleled ways of royally entertaining the distinguished visitors, and the ever welcome public, would be opened to the management.

Briefly, the history of the coming jubilee is that President Wattles asked for and received permission of the exposition directory to execute the comprehensive plans he had formed for the grand western carnival in celebration of the return of peace, immediately after the signing of the protocol between our country and Spain.

It was deemed most fitting for such an event that the president of the United States should participate, and to a committee of prominent citizens, headed by Senator Thurston, was entrusted the duty of inviting the president to come to Omaha. His acceptance on September 3 to participate October 12 fixed upon that week, the one previously hoped for as the ideal, the time for the peace jubilee.

President Wattles and his staff immediately began their work; 3,500 special invitations were sent broadcast through the nation and several committees of prominent and public-spirited men were sent east to extend personal invitations.

ARRANGEMENT OF DAYS.

In general, the program designed for the week, as promulgated in a daintily illustrated souvenir, is for Monday, Mayors' day; Tuesday, Governors' day; Wednesday, President's day; Thursday, Army and Navy day; Friday, Civil Government day, and for Saturday, the festival of innocence and joy to celebrate the great jubilee of peace just ended, a Children's jubilee, in which a grand patriotic chorus by 1,000 children will be the climateric​ conclusion.

Monday or Mayors' day will begin with the opening exercises of the jubilee at the Auditorium at 11 a. m., an address by the mayor of Omaha and the mayors of the principal municipalities of the country, followed by luncheon to prominent guests, sham battle of the Indian tribes and spectacular fireworks in the evening. This is also Missouri day, which will be especially observed by state day exercises at the Auditorium at 2:30 p. m. by addresses by distinguished Missourians.

Tuesday or Governor's day. Exercises at the Auditorium at 11 a. m., including a welcome by Governor Holcomb of Nebraska and addresses by Governor Adams of Colorado, Governor Clough of Minnesota, Governor Shaw of Iowa, Governor Richards of Wyoming, Governor Barnes of Oklahoma and other governors from the Trans-Mississippi states.

HANDSHAKING CARNIVAL.

Not the least interesting event of the day will be the great north and south handshaking carnival at 2 p. m. At that hour a distinguished northern orator will deliver an address at the Government building, while at the same time an equally noted southern orator will address the public from the arch at the east end of the lagoon. Bands at either end will discourse popular military airs most appropriate to the north or south, as the audience may prefer, and at a given signal both bands will lead the now peace-loving friends of the north and south to the half way meeting place, the Administration Arch, where the bands will join in the "Star Spangled Banner," and the handshaking will begin.

Wednesday, "President's day." Exercises from the grand band stand on the Plaza at 11 a. m. Addressed by his excellency, President McKinley, and Charles Emory Smith, postmaster general. Luncheon to distinguished guests; luncheon to Mrs. McKinley at Omaha club; reception at Government building; military and spectacular parade; sham battle of Indian tribes, and spectacular fireworks, afternoon and evening.

Thursday, or "Army and Navy day." Exercises in the Auditorium at 11 a. m. Addresses by General Nelson A. Miles, John D. Long, secretary of the navy; Russell A. Alger, secretary of war; General Joseph Wheeler, General W. R. Shafter, General James H. Wilson and perhaps President McKinley.

In the evening at 7 o'clock will be a great campfire, in charge of General T. S. Clarkson, ex-commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic. At that hour members of renown of the Grand Army of the Republic and Confederate Veterans' association, including nearly all of the generals present will participate.

Other events of the day will be luncheons, ascension of war balloons, sham battle of Indian tribes and spectacular fireworks.

Friday, "Civil Government day." Exercises in the Auditorium, in which members of the president's cabinet, representatives of the supreme court, senators and representatives and other civil officers of national repute will participate. The usual special events of the afternoon and evening will be given.

PRESIDENTIAL PARTY.

Saturday, "Children's day," is a problem that is being worked out by experienced hands, and is growing brighter as liberal encouragement is being given by exposition and parents.

For every day and every evening in the week will be entertaining events. Innes' renowned New York band has prepared a series of concerts, something in magnificence beyond that of which the warmest Omaha admirers of past concerts have not yet dreamed; there will be spectacular fireworks of splendor yet unknown to the west, and in the Indian congress, the most varied ethnological aggregation ever gotten together in America, will occur war dances each night, and grand reviews and sham battles every afternoon save when actual fatigue may cause a postponement for a day only. The weather permitting, the now famous Santiago war balloons will ascend daily at 4 p. m., while a complete war signaling exhibit will be operated daily, and without fail the sea coast life saving service exhibition will be given on the lagoon daily at 3 p. m.

The latest advices as to the arrival of the presidential party are that it will leave Washington by two special trains Monday at 10 a. m., arriving in Omaha Tuesday, October 11, at 10 p. m., and will include President and Mrs. McKinley, the secretaries of war, the navy and the treasury, the postmaster general and a large delegation from the diplomatic corps.

GREAT STOCK SHOW.

Commissioner Dinsmore Hustles to Keep Up With Arrivals.

"No, I can't begin to tell you of all the arrivals for the live stock show," said Stock Commissioner Dinsmore last evening. "I know that I was awakened four times last night to get up and let in exhibitors who had just arrived with stock, that I have been on the jump all day caring for the new arrivals, and am now waiting for a special train of twenty-six car loads from the Illinois state fair at Springfield.

"Among the arrivals that particularly attracted my attention today was a fine flock of sheep shipped in from Denfield, Ontario; a string of seventeen magnificent Clydesdales from St. Cloud, Minn., and a string of thirty-two high bred horses from Illinois.

"You may say," he continued, "that the sheep and cattle for their individuality equal anything ever shown in the world of their breeds; they will easily be classed among the finest ever shown in the United States. The cattle are very strong in individual character, and to see them will be a treat that lovers of stock cannot well forego."

It is anticipated that today there will arrive from Atchison, Kas., a new variety of cattle, developed by Mr. W. W. Guthrie, from a foundation of Shorthorn cows and Hereford bulls. The animals have red bodies, white faces and are hornless, a peculiarity, since neither of the parent stocks are hornless, unless freaks. The new stock has been built up from the original foundation stock and will invite inspection.

After Wednesday morning at 6 o'clock no more stock will be received, although it is probable that the bulk of the exhibits will be in today. Judging will begin Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock.

For the benefit of spectators, a capacious amphitheater has been built overlooking the three show rings, and on those rings, beginning Wednesday, all four lines of stock sheep, cattle, swine and horses will be exhibited at the same time from 9 a. m. to 12 m., and from 1:30 p. m. to 5 p. m. This being farmers' week special facilities will be afforded the farmers to have first and best opportunities in viewing the displays.

NATAWATTAMIE'S BURIAL.

Provided With Ham Sandwiches, Etc., for His Journey.

Natawattamie has been laid to rest, and according to western parlance, is now a "good Indian." He was the Fox brave who died in the hospital Saturday, leaving Opohomock, his widow, and one child as survivors. Great were the preparations made for the burial yesterday afternoon. His Sac and Fox friends arrayed the body in the finest moccasins in the village, a pair of rich black cloth leggins and a nice new Indian blanket, making the body quite handsomely dressed.

For the long journey to the happy hunting grounds they placed in his coffin a ham sandwich, several doughnuts, a pie, half a pound of candy, a package of smoking tobacco and a pipe, a plug of chewing tobacco and other delicacies. Fearing that he might become thirsty they bought a bright new dinner pail with a tin cup on the top, filled it with water and placed it with the food.

The cortege of Sac and Fox warriors and their near neighbors, mounted on ponies, and the women and children loaded in government wagons, left the village for Swanson's undertaking parlors at 1 p. m. yesterday. From there they took the body to the people's church, where Rev. C. W. Savidge talked in a simple and earnest manner of the dead man and his future life.

Over 1,500 white people thronged about the church during the ceremonies, and at the close filed through the little church to view the remains. When all were through and the friends were left with their dead each approached the corpse, grasped the cold right hand and held it in silence for half a minute. This impressive ceremony over the body was placed in the hearse and accompanied by a few friends was taken to Forest Lawn.

REMARKABLE ROADWAY.

Martin Dodge Has One Built on Exposition Grounds.

Martin Dodge, the government good roads expert, who has been at the exposition during the past three weeks, has completed one of the most remarkable pieces of roadway ever seen in Omaha. It is just north of the Dairy building and consists of two parallel plates of steel, each eight inches in width, slightly hollowed toward the middle and inner edge, three-eighths of an inch thick, and set in cement on a base of broken rock at distances equal to the width of ordinary road vehicles. Besides being held firmly by the cement at distances of seven and one-half feet, iron cross ties connect the plates to prevent spreading.

It is maintained by Mr. Dodge that this style of roadway is the cheapest built hard road that can be built; the most durable without exception, and presenting a surface that permits the greatest traction obtainable, that of a perfectly smooth steel surface, as he purposes demonstrating by practical tests with engines and vehicles. Each of the continuous steel plates, Mr. Dodge says, forms an ideal bicycle track.

For the present Mr. Dodge is working up interest for the good roads congress that is to convene at the Nebraska building next Saturday. Delegates have been appointed by the governors of the several states and interesting and educational benefits in the good roads work will be many. Sessions will be held at 10 a. m. and 2 p. m. and 7:30 p. m. The wheelmen, farmers, road supervisors and all others interested in good roads are cordially invited to attend.

CANADIANS WILL COME.

Minister of Interior Already Promised and Many More Expected.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Ottawa, Oct. 2.—Matthew A. Hall of Omaha is in Ottawa in connection with the Trans-Mississippi exposition now in progress there. He is here for the purpose of personally extending to Lord Aberdeen, the lieutenant governor of Ontario, and the members of the dominion and Ontario cabinets and the Quebec conference invitations to the big peace jubilee, which is to be held in Omaha in connection with the fair, from October 10 to 15.

Another object of Mr. Hall's visit is to arrange for a Canadian day, which it is proposed to have October 13 at the fair. It is proposed to have a large number of distinguished Canadians at the exposition on that day, when there will be a banquet in honor of the Canadian visitors.

The minster​ of the interior and the secretary of state have already signified their intention of accepting the invitation and other cabinet ministers will also attend.

Mr. Hall is British vice consul in Omaha and considers this a most opportune time, on acount​ of the war, to bring Canadians and Americans into closer relations.

CHICAGO IN FIRE.

Saturday's Display of Fireworks Suggestive and Beautiful.

Chicago day was a glorious success. No feature of the day in Omaha was more marked than was the fireworks Saturday night. As expressed by one, "The day came in in splendor and closed in a blaze of glory." Of the many displays by the Due Fireworks company, John Due operator, not one, perhaps, eclipsed the Chicago display. It was original in design and unique in arrangement.

The features started with a royal handshake, representing Omaha giving Chicago a hearty handshake, the word "welcome" appearing in fire in the design. This was followed by the mammoth seal of Chicago. The picture of Mayor Harrison, exceedingly lifelike, called out the hearty applause of the assembled thousands.

The illustration of Mrs. O'Leary's family cow kicking over the lantern, starting the great fire out of which came Greater Chicago, was original and was much admired. This was followed by the burning of the city, a wonderfully realistic production. The closing piece of the special display was the "I Will" statue of Miss Chicago, towering fifty feet high, being, no doubt, the tallest piece ever exhibited. One thousand rockets and bombs in great numbers, large and powerful, followed.

 

STOCKMEN HUSTLING

Breeders Getting Ready to Astonish the World with Their Exhibits.

MANY FINE ANIMALS ALREADY HERE

Transmississippi Live Stock Show Will Be a Successful Display.

MONDAY GETS BUT A SMALL CROWD

Threatening Weather Has a Most Depressing Effect on the Attendance.

OUTLOOK FOR THE WEEK IS VERY GOOD

Attractions that Should Bring Big Crowds to the City Are on the Schedule and the Managers Expect Throngs.

Total Admissions Yesterday15,238
Total to Date1,724,873

Monday has never been a big day at the exposition in point of attendance. Strangers visiting the city usually come later in the week and the city people, after spending Sunday on the grounds, are content to pass Monday by. There were no special features on the program for today. So even with the most favorable weather, the attendance would not have been large. Those who passed through the turnstiles this morning knew that it was not a day to see the grounds and buildings at their best. But turning their coat collars up around their ears and thrusting their hands into their pockets they faced the chilling wind that blew across the Main court and hurried into the nearest building. When once inside they found much to interest them. They were free to inspect the exhibits without the annoyance of a crowd. It is a flattering commentary upon the substantial attractions of the exposition that so many people should pay it a visit on a day so uninviting, when there is no special feature on the card.

Those who attended today did not belong to any particular class of visitors. They wore no badges. The silk-hatted Chicagoans had left. A number of the breeders of live stock, who are putting in their exhibits back of the Dairy building, found time to inspect the show, but most of them were busy in getting their pets into the most presentable shape for the eyes of the critics later in the week.

Live Stock Men Hustling.

The live stock exhibit nominally opened this morning, but only about a half of the animals are yet in the barns. The entries that have been at the state fair at Springfield, Ill., are now on the way and are expected to arrive this evening. By tomorrow most of the entries will be in the barns. There was a bustling about the barns this morning. Beds were being made, ditches dug and a rattling of hammers driving the last nails into the stalls. Big fat 1,900-pound Herefords were blinking with contentment while being curried and petted by their attendants. Flocks of sheep and herds of cattle were being driven between the barns and into their quarters.

In view of the fact that this week and next will be devoted to the live stock exhibit, the management of the exposition has determined to call this week Farmers' week, and an especial effort will be made to attract as many as possible. The Farmers' institute managers meet at the Commercial club rooms Tuesday and Wednesday and there will be a meeting in the amphitheater on the live stock grounds Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

Tuesday is Michigan day at the exposition. How many Wolverines will be in attendance cannot be determined, as there have been no exercises prepared for the celebration of the occasion and no word has been received by the management in regard to a special excursion. Wednesday will see a big crowd on the grounds. Ohio and Pennsylvania will join in swelling the attendance. The Buckeyes will hold their exercises at the Auditorium in the morning and the Pennsylvanians in the afternoon. It is expected that the latter delegation will arrive tomorrow. They come in a special car and are now on the way. The feature of Pennsylvania's exercises will be the address by Postmaster General Smith, who will speak not only for the audience at the Auditorium on that occasion, but also for [?] voice the present administration and will be published in a number of the newspapers throughout the union. Friday will be New Jersey, P. E. O., and Knox college day and Saturday is New York, Twin City and Good Roads day.

FIXING FOR THE LIVE STOCK SHOW.

Busy Scenes Around the Barns Denote the Intense Interest Felt.

Around the live stock barns on the North tract there was nothing to indicate that yesterday was the Sabbath. From early morning until late at night, cattle, horses, hogs and sheep were being received and taken away to the barns, where they will be housed until the close of the live stock show that opens today. Yesterday and last night 100 cars of stock came in and half as many more are due to arrive today.

While the live stock show opens today, the exhibits will not be fully ready for inspection before tomorrow, as most of the time today will be consumed in locating the entries, putting the stalls in shape and grooming the animals after their long journey in the cars. The stock that has arrived is the best that has ever been seen in the west and the entries are more numerous than even at the World's Fair, which was the record breaker until now.

Last night in speaking of the live stock show Superintendent Dinsmore said: "I am satisfied that it will be years and perhaps centuries before there will be another such exhibition of fine animals. I am confident that never in the history of the country were there such a lot of cattle, sheep and hogs brought together. I have been in the live stock business all my life and have attended all of the fairs during the last twenty years, but at no time have I seen such a lot of animals. This is due, I think, to the fact that four-fifths of the cattle and sheep of the United States are raised in the west. Hence it is not such a difficult matter to get the animals here.

"The sheep are the best ever exhibited in any country and there will be a ring of Herefords that will be world-beaters. All of the cattle are good and I feel confident that our live stock show will be a success in every particular."

PENNSYLVANIANS ARE COMING.

Representatives of the Quaker State En Route to Omaha.

PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 2.—The Pennsylvania commissioners to the Transmississippi and International Exposition today left in the special car Belfast for Omaha, where they will take part in the ceremonies incident to Pennsylvania day, Wednesday, October 5.

Postmaster General Smith, who is to deliver the Pennsylvania day oration, accompanied the commissioners. The departing commissioners were John W. Woodside, Thomas Bradley, Dr. J. Roberts Bryan, I. O. Nissley, C. S. Overholt, Dr. F. C. Johnson, T. Livingston Kennedy, L. S. Richards, P. C. Boyle, Hiram Young, W. C. Gretzinger and G. C. McKain.

The party will reach Omaha on the morning of Pennsylvania day. After delivering the oration at the exposition Postmaster General Smith has been invited to make a number of speeches, political and patriotic, before returning. Dates have been arranged to October 21. Leaving Omaha he will speak as follows: Topeka, 7th; Wichita, 8th; Denver, open date; Omaha, 12th; Columbus, O., 15th; Crawford, Ind., 17th; Chicago peace jubilee, 18th and 19th; Dayton, 20th, and Cleveland, 21st. The political speeches will be confined to Kansas and Ohio.

SUNDAY CONCERTS BY INNES.

Great Band Master Delights Large Audiences at the Exposition.

Innes' concert at the Auditorium yesterday was a most enjoyable occasion and brought such a jam as made the vast building all too small for the big assemblage. Even the society element was largely in evidence. Whether the magnificent performances of the band or whether it may be that the rare taste displayed by the leader in the makeup of his programs is the reason, there is no questioning the fact that Omaha people who have been in the habit of going to see the big show twice a month may now be seen sitting in front of the music stand day after day and night after night. With them it seems to be simply a case of there being "but one Wagner and Innes is his prophet."

Among the many notable features of yesterday's concerts were Handel's Largo, magnificently given by Mr. Thomas J. Kelly in conjunction with the band, and who, in response to the determined encore which followed, gave the always popular Intermezzo from the "Cavalleria." Innes' own solo, "Inflammatus," was of course the occasion for some more unrestrained enthusiasm. The two Mendelssohn songs, [?] Song," were given—the first by the brass instruments alone and the second by the reed choir—with a finish and delicacy which shows the wonderful virtuosity to which the band has been brought.

Mr. Zimmerman's trombone solo in the evening concert was received with a demonstration of favor that must have been gratifying in the extreme to this brilliant artist. Such runs, roulades, trills and tours de force generally as were performed by this phenomenal player with seeming ease are usually confined to the flute, cornet or clarinet. The set program was largely added to by the innumerable encores which greeted almost every number. In these patriotic selections largely predominated and each was received with displays of patriotism which did one good to see.

The "Request" program which is announced for tonight's concert will be scanned with considerable interest by those who are curious to see just what shape such a program will take here. Innes says that so far as his experience goes the taste for good music appears to him to be on about as high as plane here as anywhere else he has played, and certainly the program of tonight, which is made up entirely of selections requested by the patrons of the concerts, goes far to substantiate the statement.

NEBRASKA'S NEW VEGETABLES.

Antelope State Takes the Shine Out of Its Rivals' Displays.

People who have labored under the delusion that Nebraska is a land where poor crops are the rule have only to look over the state exhibit in the Agriculture building, which has been greatly augmented during the last few days.

When the exposition first opened, the state did not attempt to show anything in the vegetable line, being content to show the best corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye and flax ever seen. A few weeks ago, however, vegetables were added to the exhibit and the showing has been kept up ever since, being renewed each week. The exhibit now is the finest of any and is of such a character that it is the envy of every other exhibitor in the big building. The vegetables are even larger than those grown in the valleys of the states where the crops are pushed along by chinook winds and irrigation, and then everything is so clean and fresh.

Sugar beets, which have become a leader with the Nebraska farmer, are shown in endless profusion. This year they are unusually large and are as solid as rocks, thus giving them great sugar producing properties. The new corn in the state exhibit is even better than that of last year, many of the ears ranging from twelve to sixteen inches in length.

Twin City Excursionists.

Exposition Commissioner Field, who is in charge of the Minnesota building, has received advices from the chairman of the committee who is working up the Twin City excursion that will come to the exposition next Friday night, the members of which will remain here until the following Wednesday. He says a great deal of interest is being worked up in Minneapolis and that the indications are that thousands of the residents of the two cities will be here. They will come in special trains and many of them will sleep in their cars durinr​ their stay. The roads, he says, must have made a very satisfactory rate for the occasion.

The people who are coming down from the two big cities of Minnesota expect to take part in the exercises of Peace Jubilee week and are all anxious to see and meet President McKinley. As this is the only opportunity they will have of meeting him while he is making his western tour, it will be an inducement for many of them to visit the exposition, who otherwise would not come.

While the excursions will start from Minneapolis and St. Paul, people at the stations en route will be picked up and brought along, as the same cheap rate will be applied to Minnesota towns this side of the two big cities.

Coming Here from Texas.

Assistant General Passenger Agent Lupton of the San Antonio & Aransas Pass railroad has written to Prof. Atwater of the Texas exhibit that he will arrive in the city Wednesday and will likely remain until after the exercises of Peace Jubilee week, though he may have to return to Texas to accompany the excursions that will come from the south.

Mr. Lupton says in his letter that the North and South Handshaking carnival grows more popular each day and that the indications point to the attendance of a large number of the boys who wore the gray during the 60s and fought against those who wore the blue. He says that they regard this occasion as the greatest opportunity to cement the bonds of friendship that now exist between the two sections of the country. In addition to the large delegations and prominent men of the south, Mr. Lupton expects to bring along several bands of music to participate in the [?]

 

While the Aransas Pass railroad has no terminals in Omaha, arrangements have been completed by which solid trains of coaches and sleepers will be run direct from San Antonio, thus allowing the people of Texas to reach here without change of cars.

Three from Texas.

Charles Peterson, E. B. Cole and Leopold Cahn, members of the Texas Exposition commission, are in the city to remain until after the jubilee week festivities. Assistant General Passenger Agent Lupton of the San Antonio & Aransas Pass railroad, who has had much to do with pushing the Texas interest in the exposition, will arrive Wednesday and will assist the commissioners in outlining the part that Texas will take in the jubilee.

Commissioner Peterson, speaking of the jubilee week, said: "Our people are taking a great interest in the affair and I expect that hundreds of them will be here next week. Mr. Lupton's road has made a very low rate and it is going to bring in many people from our state and the intermediate points along the line and its connections in the other states of the south."

Distinguished Canadians Coming.

M. A. Hall, British vice consul for Omaha, who is in Canada arranging for British and Canadian day at the exposition, writes to Manager Rosewater as follows from Ottawa under date of September 29:

Hon. Clifford Sifton, minister of the interior, and Charles W. Speers of the same department and other distinguished Canadian statesmen have promised to be at Omaha on October 15 to celebrate British and Canadian day, and I have just written to Dr. A. H. Hipple, chairman executive of the committee of the British and Canadian-American exhibit, to see that proper arrangements are made. I go from here to Quebec city to deliver the remainder of the invitations to the Peace Jubilee, as Sir Wilfred Laurier and two or three other members of the dominion cabinet are down there.

Emergency Hospital Record.

E. J. Parratt, the clerk at the Emergency hospital, has filed the report of the institution, showing the business transacted from June 1 to October 1. The report is made up from the books which he has kept. This report shows the total number of cases to have been 1,516, of which 1,146 were the result of illness and the balance brought about by accidents. The ambulance made 337 trips. Of the cases treated in the dispensary there were 1,003 and in the wards 513. The amount of money received from patients aggregated $110, of which sum $71.07 has been covered into the exposition treasury.

Ask Us Something Easy.

OMAHA, Oct. 1.—To the Editor of The Bee: I would be pleased with information concerning the powers and methods of the assistant executive officer in the concessions department of the Transmississippi Exposition. Has he absolute power to arbitrarily discriminate between applicants for concessions without giving the applicant a chance to be heard? Is it within his providence to exact of one person cash only for the payment of space and the next moment turn the same space over to another party, taking a worthless due bill or I O U for the amount? Such an instance is of record within the week just past and it looks very much as if Mr. Wadley is either in partnership with the concessioner or is using unlimited gall in favoring a questionable applicant in petticoat attire over a legitimate applicant for straight business purposes. The writer of this being the party first entitled to consideration will make a complete statement to your board for their information. Very respectfully,


AN APPLICANT.

BURIAL OF A DEAD BRAVE

Sac and Fox Indians Prepare a Deceased Brother for His Entry to the Happy Hunting Grounds.

With the solemn rite and grotesque ceremonies of a religion of superstition, half a hundred Indians of the Sac and Fox tribes carried the body of a brother brave to its last resting place in Forest Lawn cemetery yesterday afternoon.

It was a curious and unique proceeding—the preparation of the dead, the funeral service, and finally the interment, and many hundred people were present to observe every weird detail of it. The deceased braves name was Nah-tow-waw-pe-moh. He was stricken with malarial fever Friday, and preferring to rely on the cures of the Indian medicine man, rather than take the prescriptions of physicians, he was not moved to the hospital until Saturday when it was too late to save his life.

At the morgue a group of copperskins worked for hours preparing their dead for burial. They carefully braided the long black hair, weaving in bits of bright colored ribbons and tying the ends with beaver tails. They ornamented the ears with earrings in the form of tiny tomahawks. They they applied the war-paint, and when their task was finished left the lifeless countenance of the brave bearing the marks and coloring with which he was accustomed to appear in battle. They wrapped him in a long winding sheet or shroud made of soft blue material worked with multicolored beads in countless designs. Then there was buckskin breeches with blue silk trimmings, and moccasins covered with tiny shells, and when the deceased brave was suitably attired to ensure a propitious entrance into the happy hunting grounds he was a curious representation of all in life that Indians find beautiful.

When the body was placed in its sombre casket, room was found for a lunch pail containing edibles, and a leather sack which held the articles that are indispensable to an Indian's everyday life. They were the orthodox long-stemmed pipe, a package of smoking tobacco and a plug of the same plant. In addition to these there were a soup bowl and spoon, this being done in accordance with the religious belief that dead men must have sufficient food when they arrive in the hunting ground to last until they can kill some game. The funeral cortege consisted of an express wagon in which the squaws rode, a wagon to carry the casket, while the men followed on ponies.

At the graveside the brave's arms were freed from the shroud and all of his former friends and relatives indulged in a farewell handshake, the final details of the ceremony.

Indians at the Omaha Fair

THE Indian Congress at the Trans-Mississippi Exposition was organized with a view to assembling representatives of every tribe of Indians on this continent, and that idea inspired the Indian Bureau at Washington to avail itself of this rare chance to present an ethnological exhibit never before attempted, and the like of which probably never can be again produced. Accordingly, Congress appropriated $40,000 for a great Indian encampment at the Trans-Mississippi Exposition now in progress at Omaha. This unique exhibit is better known as the Indian Congress. The Indian bill, approved by President McKinley on June 30th of this year, authorized this large expenditure with the sole object of presenting to the American people an opportunity to view representative types of every Indian tribe. It was entirely a case of persuasion, the government making no attempt to force them to leave their homes. Many of them who agreed to go, bade a sad farewell to their tilicums fearful lest they would not be returned to their friends and families. They have been unwillingly moved about from place to place in the past and many have died broken hearted on the way. The memory of this, perhaps, made them hesitant before deciding to leave their reservation again, even for a time.

Once at Omaha, comfortably housed and well fed, they seem to understand what the Indian Congress means, and are satisfied and happy. Going around among the different tribes and talking to the chiefs through interpreters one discovers that the principal fear they had, when they were told they would meet other Indians, was that it would be necessary to renew the old tribal feuds and fight again the battles of their ancestors.

This is best demonstrated by a letter one of them wrote the second day after his arrival. He went to the office and dictated the following to be addressed to his squaw left behind in Arizona: "Am here all right. Not afraid any more. See five new tribes never saw before. Won't have to fight other Indians. Having good time. Like it all right." The agents were instructed to send old men and as far as possible head men, who would typically represent the old time Indian, subdued, but otherwise uninfluenced by the government's system of civilization. These instructions were faithfully followed, and as a result the Indian Congress is composed of hundreds of the best types of the various tribes. There are today the remnants of at least seventy tribes extant, but some of these are but mere remnants and many have never been under government control. Thirty-four reservations have been established, embracing about forty-five distinct tribes. All the tribes that are of any interest from an aboriginal standpoint are to be represented at this Congress before the close of the Exposition. Some have become so civilized, like the Creeks, Choctaws, Chickasaws, Cherokees and Seminoles, united and known as the "Five Civilized Tribes," that their presence would add little interest from an ethnological point of view. The government has not assembled at Omaha its more civilized, but its wilder protégés, and the tribes it has conquered with most bloodshed are the most prominent at the Congress and the ones eagerly sought by visitors.

When the Congress was formally opened, August 4th, delegations from thirty-five tribes were camped on the grounds, aggregating five hundred Indians. The northwest corner of the extensive Exposition grounds is given up exclusively to the big Indian camp. There they are living in primitive style, housed in tepees of tent cloth, birch bark wigwams, or rush mat wickiups, each tribe adopting its original style and manner of habitation. The most notable tepee is made of buffalo skin, and represents the typical home of the Blackfoot tribe, which has become rare and valuable with the rapid extermination of the buffalo.

The Indian Congress is by far the most unique feature of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition, and in many ways the most interesting as well. It is the first time in history that such an undertaking has been accomplished, and in all probability will be the last. The aboriginal race of Americans is fast dying. Civilization is slowly exterminating the red skins. The system of allotting them land and allowing it to be leased to white people, thus giving the Indians an income amounting frequently to $1,000 per year, is rapidly ruining them. Plenty of money to spend for liquor and nothing to do is surely killing off the Indians, and every year the tribes grow smaller.

The object of the Congress is to represent the different Indian tribes and their primitive modes of living; to reproduce their old dances and games; show their manner of dress; illustrate their superstitions and recall their almost forgotten traditions; prove their skill in bead embroidery, basket weaving and pottery; and most important of all, to afford a comparison of the various Indian types and a study of their characteristic and tribal traits. Although members of one delegation cannot talk to those of another, except where fate has thrown two distinct tribes upon one reservation, they nevertheless take keen interest in watching the dances, the dress and the war trappings of their strange neighbors. Only a few of the younger ones who have attended school can speak English, but they are nearly all hospitable to visitors, extending their hand and saying "How" by way of salutation. Each delegation has its interpreter, who is sometimes a full blood, but oftener half or quarter breed. Occasionally he is a white man, who has spent his life among the Indians and knows their language and habits.

The scene, particularly at night, is intensely picturesque. Small cooking fires scattered around the field dimly light up the strange picture, throwing a soft red

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glow upon the decorated tepees or casting them in half shadow. Across the trails prance the stalwart braves, lavishly decked out with gay blankets, with richly beaded vests and pouches and moccasins, bristling with war bonnets of eagle feathers, decorated in every conceivable manner, with jingling bells, tiny looking glasses, fur colors, silver and brass bracelets, bear-claw necklaces, small pelts, buckskin leggings and all manner of indescribable trinkets. The slatternly squaws, or klootchmen, as they are known in Chinook jargon, sit crouched around the wigwam caring for the sleeping papooses. A scrawny mongrel cur, known as the "squaw dog," faithfully guards the entrance.

 

SUMMER SMILES YET

Autumn's Chill Again Banished from the White City's Precincts.

SHARP BATTLE OF THE SEASONS OVER

Old Sol Ends the Debate in Favor of the Warmer of the Twain.

MORNING VISITORS ARE NUMEROUS

Day's Attractions Hold Nothing Special, but Crowds in Attendance.

STOCK SHOW TAKES ON MUCH LIFE

Exhibitors Not All Ready, but Enough Are There to Attract Many Who Are Interested in the Breeding and Care of Fancy Animals.

Total Admissions Yesterday15,264
Total to Date1,740,820

The clouds were hanging low over the exposition grounds this morning as the turnstiles began to click off their daily record of sight-seers. And when the first squad of visitors passed through the gates with overcoats tightly buttoned it seemed that the soft melodious Indian summer had given way for good to the melancholy days of October. One looked for the finger marks of Jack Frost on the foliage and gave a sigh for the beauties that would soon be faded. But as the day wore on the leaden canopy became flecked with patches of white. Then bursting through the tissue in the east the clear blue brushed aside the veil and at noon Old Sol was smiling again on the little garden patch of earth's treasures which he has had so great a part in beautifying.

All through the morning it was a struggle between the seasons. Drear autumn had pinned the veil and said "The White city shall be mine." Radiant summer, grappling with her rosy arms, cried "Mine a little longer," while old Sol from behind his curtained throne dimly viewed the contest. Then remembering the carnival of Ak-Sar-Ben and the many preparations that the management had made for the next two weeks, he broke in the arena, scattered the storm legions and blew his warm breath on the shivering mortals and presented the chalice to summer.

There are a great many more visitors on the grounds today. They are strangers in the city who have come to witness the parade of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben this evening and Thursday evening and to view the fair during the day. They expect to remain all the week and are taking all the time that is necessary to give the various exhibits a close inspection. This morning the two points of attraction were the Government building and the live stock exhibit.

The stockmen have now got things in good shape and the barns are nearly all filled. There are a few of the entries yet to come in. But those that are already on the grounds are fine enough specimens to delight even those who are most ignorant of fine breeds of stock. To the enthusiast the show is an eye-opener. It is the general comment that when the animals appear in the ring the judges will have a hard time in awarding the ribbons.

Today was marked on the programs as Michigan day. But the Wolverines made no preparations for its celebration, and very few made the journey. No special features were carded for the day's entertainment except a sham battle by the Indians at 4:30 this afternoon.

This will be fought along lines similar to those of the battles that have been given during the last three weeks. The Sioux will be pitted against the allied tribes and there will be a rumpus about a prisoner who has been captured and is about to be burned at the stake. After the battle is over and amicability is again established then will be a grand war dance participated in by all the tribes.

Tomorrow will be full of speech making and band playing. It is Ohio day, Pennsylvania day, Mercer County (Ill.) day and Topeka day. The Buckeyes will hold their exercises in the Auditorium at 11 o'clock in the morning, and the Pennsylvanians at the same place at 2:30 in the afternoon. The visitors from Mercer county and Topeka will not evidence their presence except by a pro-[?]se wearing of badges.

SHAM BATTLE COMES ON TODAY.

Indians Will Give Another of Their Justly Celebrated Entertainments.

The Indians will engage in another of their sham battles at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon and, as upon former occasions, the Sioux will ride down upon the eastern portion of the congress grounds, attacking a large party of Blackfeet and their allies, who have captured a Sioux, who has been out upon a hunting excursion and who has been doomed to die at the stake. They will arrive in time to rescue their comrade and in the mix-up that will follow they will slaughter a number of the Blackfeet, or at least that is what they will pretend to do. The Blackfeet, however, reinforced, will renew the attack and will defeat the Sioux, who will be driven off, leaving many of the dead and wounded behind.

In connection with the sham battle, the Indians will give a correct representation of a war dance as it was executed years ago when they were the monarchs of the plains and before they commenced to draw rations from the government.

During the evening, after the battle, all of the Indians will participate in a friendly dance on the grounds, directly in front of the reserved seats and under the rays of the electric lights that have been placed about the space.

OHIO PARTY HEADED FOR OMAHA.

Governor Bushnell and Staff Coming to Participate in Ohio Day.

CHICAGO, Oct. 4.—Governor Bushnell of Ohio, and his staff reached Chicago today and left on the Burlington for Omaha to take part in the exercises of Ohio day at the exposition. The party will return home by way of St. Louis. The governor was accompanied by Major Bushnell, and his staff consists of the following: Adjutant General H. B. Kingsley, Quartermaster General P. Orr, Surgeon General Joseph Lowes, daughter and son; Aides-de-camp Colonels David L. Cockley, Charles B. Wing, wife, daughter and Miss Timus of Cincinnati; Charles R. Fisher, Julius Fleischmann and wife, Robert McKinley and wife, Albert Brewer and wife and the Hon. Charles L. Kurtz.

INNES PREPARES SOME TREATS.

Great Band Master Has Further Delights in Store for Omaha.

During the present week Innes' band will introduce a number of innovations. The pregrams​ show that the concerts of the current week include every possible kind of good music. Next Friday's concert is to be again devoted exclusively to the works of Wagner, though with an entire change of program from the one given last week. On Saturday night Innes will produce for the first time here one of his spectacular anvil scenes, entitled "The Forge in the Forest." Much interest has been created in the Innes spectaculars, and the giving of this piece is awaited with universal interest. The scene opens with sunrise in the forest. The singing of a multitude of birds and the whirr and chirp of insects are heard. Then will come the music of the cathedral chimes in the distance. Morning prayer is the next thought conveyed by the music. A storm follows, the lights go out and a corps of musical blacksmiths in costume march out and take their places at an old-time forge occupying one side of the stage. And then comes the musical tones of the carefully tuned anvils, which will give forth some entirely novel electrical effects.

The "request" concert was given last night in the Auditorium, as it was felt that the weather was too cool to give it on the Plaza. The performance was the occasion of a great deal of enthusiasm from the big crowd of music lovers, which, in spite of the many encores lengthening the concert out considerably, stayed right through until the closing notes had been played and the musicians had packed their instruments and left the stage. Weber's overture, "Oberon," which opened the concert, received an authoritative rendition. After the inevitable encore which followed, Schubert's well known "Serenade" was given with the charming delicacy for which the band is already noted. Then came the gem of the evening, "Les Preludes," by Liszt. This remarkable work was given with a grandeur which at once impressed itself upon the great crowd as a performance of unique ability. A delightful dance suite pleased the lovers of the lighter vein, as did also the director's own "Love Is King" two step. Innes' trombone solo, "The Two Grenadiers," was received with the usual demonstrations of enthusiasm, and one of the most successful concerts of the series was brought to a finish by a brilliant rendition of the well known "Zampa" overture.

MISSOURIANS WILL BE ON HAND.

Governor Will Head the Party Coming to the Exposition.

ST. LOUIS, Oct. 4.—Governor Stephens and family, with his military staff and the state officials and their families, will visit the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha on Missouri day, October 10. The party will go over the Burlington route, reaching Omaha by way of Kansas City, and will remain over the 12th, President McKinley's day. Low rates have been made by the Burlington, Missouri Pacific and other roads running to Omaha, and many thousand Missourians expect to take advantage of them.

Topeka Coming in Force.

TOPEKA, Kan., Oct. 3.—(Special Telegram.)—Several hundred citizens of this place will leave tomorrow for Omaha, to be present at the exposition on Topeka day, Wednesday. Special trains will be run on all roads. The Sante Fe will carry the Karnival Knights, an organization of young men which manages the carnival feature of the fall festivities each year. With the Karnival Knights, as their guest, will go Miss Anna Rose of Hilo, Hawaii, this year's queen, and Major Boyd's company of girl cadets. Major Boyd received an order from the adjutant general of Nebraska today, permitting him to bring his cadets, armed with their Springfield rifles, into that state.

Notes of the Exposition.

The Chinese minister at Washington has accepted the invitation of the management to be present and participate in the peace jubilee next week. Three members of the Chinese legation will accompany him.

Anticipating a big rush of business as a result of the opening of the live stock show, numerous of the lunch stands and trinket venders are moving over onto Twentieth street, between the West Midway and the north gates of the grounds. Many of them got settled in their new locations yesterday and all did a prosperous business, as about every person who attended the exposition went out Twentieth street and took a look at the fine show of animals.

Captain Leeson, commissioner from New Mexico, has received advices from his home at Silver City notifying him that a large quantity of fruit has been shipped. It includes grapes, peaches, pears, apples and pomegranates. While he will not make any competitive exhibit, he will place this fruit in the Minnesota building, where it will be kept for a few days, after which it will be given away. The fruit ought to be here the last of this or the first of next week.

Cold weather and bleak winds have a depressing effect even upon Indians. On account of the unfavorable condition of the weather yesterday few of the redskins ventured outside of their tepees. Their dances that are the regular afternoon and evening features of the camp lost much of their snap and were cut short. If the weather is fine today they promise to make up for lost time and put up some dances that have seldom been excelled since the establishment of the camp upon the grounds.

People who have labored under the impression that the exposition guards lack the authority to make arrests will find that they have made a mistake in the event that they make an attempt to resist if they are caught in any violation of the law, the city ordinances or the rules of the exposition. This morning fifty of the guards will be sworn in as special police to continue during the exposition. The men who will act as special officers have not yet been designated, but they will be named by the mayor and confirmed by the Fire and Police commissioners.

The big attendance that is expected to come with the Ak-Sar-Ben week festivities started in last night and is expected to continue during all of today, at least. Last night the Missouri Pacific brought in 1,600 people from Marysville, Kan., and intermediate points, while the Elkhorn brought in a party of 1,000 from Valentine and other points along the line. Most of the people who came last evening visited the exposition last night and will go again today. They came for the purpose of remaining three or four days, going to the exposition during the day and watching the parades at night.

 

KEYSTONE STATE VISITORS

Distinguished Pennsylvanians Who Come to Attend the Exposition.

PERSONNEL OF THE OFFICIAL PARTY

Members of the State Commission and Others High in the Life of the Great Commonwealth Here to Celebrate with the West.

Pennsylvania's official party, which is to represent that state at the celebration at the exposition tomorrow, arrived in Omaha this morning over the Milwaukee road. There is one disappointment connected with its arrival in that Governor Hastings, who was confidently expected to be present, was unable to come. The governor has been giving his personal attention to the sick and wounded Pennsylvania soldiers who have returned from the front, and felt he could not abandon this work for the length of time required to make the western trip. With the party, however, is Charles Emory Smith, postmaster general in President McKinley's cabinet, who will deliver the oration at tomorrow's exercises.

The Pennsylvania commission is headed by John W. Woodside, president of the Atlantic Snuff company and one of the leading manufacturers of Philadelphia on the Cotton States and International Exposition at Atlanta, a member of the national commission of Pennsylvania at the Chicago World's fair and has been associated in some way with every international celebration or episode in the United States in the last quarter of a century.

Thomas Bradley, treasurer of the commission, who accompanies the party, is also one of the leading business men of Philadelphia. He is engaged in the provision trade and is one of the heaviest shippers in that line on the eastern seaboard.

One of the State's Editors.

Colonel George Nox McCain is one of the editors of the Philadelphia Press. He received his newspaper training in Pittsburg, where for eight years he filled editorial positions on the Dispatch, subsequently becoming one of the owners of the Commercial Gazette. He was afterwards Washington correspondent of the latter paper. For services rendered the government of Venezuela during his visit there in the late boundary excitement in that country Colonel McCain was decorated by President Crespo with the Order of the Liberator.

Among the members of the commission in professional life, is Dr. J. Roberts Bryan, also of Philadelphia. He is a member of the Philadelphia Pathological society, Philadelphia Pediatric society and Phiadelphia​ County Medical society.

I. O. Nissley is publisher of the Middletown Press, one of the largest newspapers in the central part of Pennsylvania.

Christian S. Overholt, the dean of the commission in point of years, is a retired banker, merchant and manufacturer of Westmoreland county, although now residing in Philadelphia. He retired a third of a century ago and became president of the First National Bank of Mt. Pleasant.

One of the most successful newspapers in Pennsylvania is the Wilkesbarre Record of which Dr. Frederick C. Johnson of the official party is editor.

Another prominent newspaper editor with the commission is Livy S. Richard, editor of the Scranton Tribune. Mr. Richard is a native of Ohio, who began his newspaper work at La Port, Ind., in 1888.

Joshua D. Baker is widely known as the manager of the Hotel Lafayette in Philadelphia. For thirty years he has been identified with the hotel life of Pennsylvania.

From the Western Section.

In western Pennsylvania at New Brighton, Thomas Livingston Kennedy, another manufacturer on the commission, has his home. He is president of several manufacturing concerns.

The one member of the commission who knows more about the great oil industries of the Untied States is P. C. Boyle, editor and proprietor of the Oil City Derrick. Mr. Boyle, who is a veteran of the late war, is known to every man in the United States who has ever been identified with the petroleum industry. Mr. Boyle has been prominent in Pennsylvania life for a quarter of a century and is best known to the newspaper world as one of the directors of the Associated Press.

The colleges and universities and the educational life of Pennsylvania are represented by William C. Gretzinger, Ph. D., registrar of Bucknell university, Lewisburg, Pa., Mr. Gretzinger is one of the youngest members of the commission, but he is at the business head of one of the largest educational institutions in Pennsylvania with the exception of the University of Pennsylvania.

Hiram Young is the dean of Pennsylvania journalists, being the oldest active newspaper man in the state. He is editor and proprietor of the York Daily Dispatch. During President Harrison's administration he was postmaster of York.

Other members of the commission are Thomas J. Keenan, jr., of Pittsburg, Thomas M. Jones and George M. Wanbaugh of Harrisburg, J. H. Zerby of Pottsville, Asa Packer Blakeslee of Mauch Chunk, and James P. Deininger of Sullivan county.

Among the women accompanying the commission are Mrs. John W. Woodside, Mrs. Joseph Martin, Mrs. Thomas Bradley, Mrs. George Nox McCain, Mrs. I. O. Nissley, Mrs. Frederick C. Johnson, Mrs. L. S. Richard, Mrs. P. C. Boyle and Mrs. T. Livingston Kennedy.

John R. Pott of Williamsport, Pa., district passenger agent for the Milwaukee road, has charge of a party to this city and will take advantage of his sojourn in Omaha to call upon some old railroad friends who are now in the harness here.

In the absence of Governor Hastings, it is understood that John W. Woodside, president of the Pennsylvania commission, will officially represent that state in the ceremonies tomorrow.

Others in the party not mentioned are Clarence Edward Dawson of Lewiston, private secretary to the postmaster general, and A. B. Dunning, representing the Scranton Times, who is a delegate to the good roads parliament to be held in Omaha next Saturday.

The visitors will regulate their visit in the city according to their own convenience, some to continue their travels in the west and other to return direct to their homes. Several will spend the week here. The members of the party are registered at the Millard.

EXPERTS ON FARM MATTERS

Managers of Farmer Institutes Holding a Convention in Omaha This Week.

Interest in the live stock exhibit at the exposition interfered with the morning attendance at the meeting of the Association of Farmers' Institute Managers at the Commercial club to such a degree that no official business was attempted. There are about twenty members of the association in town and they make the Mercer hotel their headquarters. Meetings for discussing methods and means for increasing the scope of the society will be held this afternoon and tomorrow.

This afternoon papers will be read on "The Value of Object Teaching in Farmers' Institutes," by Dr. J. C. Curryer of Minnesota, and "The Place and Value of One-Day Institutes," by Prof. Clinton Smith of Michigan.

D. D. Denise, president of the State Board of Agriculture of New York, and C. C. Brown, director of the Institute of West Virginia, are among the association's guests.

THEY DON'T WANT HIM.

One Party Whom Exposition Managers Hope Will Stay Away.

There is one famous personage who will not be asked to come to the exposition and who will be kept away if possible, should he indicate any inclination to come. This is none other than the renowned Jack Frost. Lately the managers have begun to dread that he might take a notion to pay the exposition a visit, and indeed some annoyance from him sooner or later is considered inevitable. Perhaps the most apprehensive persons in this respect are Mr. Hadkinson, superintendent of the landscape on the Bluff tract and Mr. Unger, superintendent of the landscape in the main court.

They have had cause to be proud all summer because visitors would be continually saying how beautiful was the garden effect here produced. The average date for a killing frost in Nebraska is September 8, but so far not a flower or a leaf on the ground has been touched, and the superintendents have been gratified at the unusual vigor and hence the lasting beauty of varied bloom and green. The colors are as profuse and as vivid as in midsummer and the delight to the eye is as great as when the breezes were milder and the rays of the sun warmer.

Special pains, in anticipation of the large crowds and the array of distinguished guests, are being taken with the stretches of grass and the beds of foliage and bloom just now. Hose and rakes and the skillful pruning knife are kept going.

EXHIBITORS IN A SWEAT

Preliminaries for Judging and Awards Serve to Make Them Suspicious.

Circular Sent Out to Superintendent of Each Building to Provide for Jurors.

Names to Be Announced Later and Report on Prizes to Be Ready for Publication by October 25.

Monday's Admissions15,264
Total Admissions1,740,820

Now comes the time when the hitherto friendly exposition exhibitor begins to grow suspicious of his neighbor, and fearing that somebody is going to give him the worst of some "bad deal." It is the time when the preliminaries for the official judging of exhibits is to begin.

Circulars have been sent by the department of exhibits to the superintendents of the various exhibits in all buildings, save those where the exhibits consist of perishable goods and are judged differently. These include the thirteen judging regulations recommended by the bureau of jury on awards and the further request that the exhibitors in each section select one juror for that section to act with another juror selected by the bureau of juries in the selection of a third juror. All selections, whether made by the bureau or not, must meet with its approval. In the selection of the exhibitors' juror is where each exhibitor realizes that his neighbor has evil intentions against him because the neighbor doesn't believe that the first exhibitor's ideal juror, happening to be from the same town, is the best man.

Altogether there will be about sixty judges chosen in this manner. Their expenses will be paid, but no compensation is attached, as the position will be honorary. It is anticipated that their names will be ready for announcement October 11; that their work will be completed October 18 or 20, and that their reports will be passed upon by the committee on awards in time for publication October 25. Each exhibitor feeling aggrieved at the decision of the judges may appeal to the committee on awards within forty-eight hours, accompanying the appeal by a fee of $10. Thus the committee is given time for the adjudication of affairs.

Judge J. M. Woolworth is chairman, and J. E. Utt is assistant chairman of the committee on awards.

EXCURSIONS TO EXPOSITION.

Kansas, Ohio, Pennsy and New York Parties to See White City.

The Missouri Pacific yesterday brought in the Otoe club of Kansas on a special train of thirteen coaches. There are 600 people in the party, and they will remain several days.

The Rock Island will bring in two special trains of Ohio people Wednesday morning. The trains, composed entirely of Pullman cars, will be switched to the Missouri Pacific tracks at the exposition grounds, and the people will live in them while here. C. E. Styles is in charge of the party.

G. A. A. Green, traveling passenger agent of the Missouri Pacific at Indianapolis, brought in a party of 100 people from Southern Indiana yesterday.

The Northwestern will have a solid Pullman train from New York the morning of October 8, filled with prominent Empire State men, come to celebrate New York day.

The personally conducted exposition excursion arranged by the Pennsylvania road came in this morning over the Milwaukee road. It was not so large as anticipated, being a little early for Pennsylvania day.

LITERARY CONGRESS OFF

The movement to have a meeting of literary people in Omaha has been abandoned. The meeting was to have been held today at the public library building, and a number of well known men and women of letters had been invited, and were expected to be present. Among those prominently mentioned in connection with the gathering were Hamlin Garlan, who was to have delivered an address on modern literature and the authors of today. Mr. Garlan is unable to be here, and other interested in the movement cannot come, so the congress of literary workers has been abandoned for the present at least.

 

THEIR MAJESTIES OF THE PASTURE

The Great Live Stock of the Exposition Is Now Open.

Thirteen Hundred Animals Here and Trains Constantly Arriving---Finest Stock in the Country Here.

The north wind which began blowing Sunday afternoon had become uncongenial by yesterday morning, so that outdoor conditions did not correspond on the grounds with the fascinating objects and scenes. One could not be certain that the Monday crowd was larger than usual, while nothing indicated that it was smaller. The visitors were wrapped in overcoats and jackets, and the inhabitants of offices not already provided with some artificial heating apparatus were inquiring about the prices of oil stoves.

To one class of creatures, and newly arrived on the grounds, the lower temperature was welcome. This was the fat stock, the enormous and slow moving cattle and hogs that had to be made active enough to get them from the cars to their stables and stalls.

The great live stock show opened this morning. Said Director Dinsmore: "I have had to do with two international stock shows and with the main western fairs for fifteen years, and I may say that the quality of the stock here is equal to or better than I have ever seen before, while in point of numbers the show is second only to that at the World's Fair.

There are to be about 2,700 animals of all classes at this exhibition. Half of these are here now and trains have been coming in all day. One of them was from the Illinois state fair at Springfield and contains the pick of the stock there.

By 9 o'clock tomorrow morning the greater part of the stock will be housed on the grounds, and stragglers will be dropping in until Thursday. Twenty-two states and Canada will be represented in the stables. The display from Canada will consist chiefly of sheep.

The stables have been wired, so that the stock may be seen at night better than a menagerie usually can be, for the lighting will be better.

Judgment will begin Thursday morning. There is a ring for the horses and cattle, one for the sheep and another for the hogs. The judges are:

Horses—F. M. Welchell of Des Moines and Joseph Watson of Hastings.

Cattle—Richard Gibson, Denfield, Ont.; Claude Makin, Lawrence, Kas.; T. J. McCrarey, Highland, Kas.; David McKay, Fort Wayne, Ind.; H. C. Taylor, Wisconsin; J. H. Coolidge, Illinois; C. F. Curtis, Iowa.

Swine—F. M. Laile and N. H. Gentry of Missouri and W. E. Spicer of Illinois.

Sheep—G. W. Hervey of Omaha and John A. Craig of Iowa.

Mr. Gentry will also be the judge of mules and asses.

The premiums offered by the exposition aggregate $35,000, and the special premiums raise the total to about $50,000.

A live stock parade through the Midway and the Bluff Tract had been thought of, but the suggestion was dropped because of the gravel coating of the avenues, it being feared that some of the animals might be injured. But it may be that on certain days the rings may be filled at a stated hour, so that the stock may be seen readily on all sides.

STOCK ANIMALS HERE.

Exhibits Which Are Already in the Barns.

The following stock animals have been placed in the barns since the report of yesterday:

HEREFORD CATTLE.

Peter Mouw of Orange City, Ia., has ten head of fine animals, in age, calves to breeding cows. One cow, 4 years old, weighs 2,000 pounds, and one 2-year-old bull, 2,000 pounds.

C. H. Elmendorf of Turlington, Neb., six head, in age, calves to 3-year-old cow, a 2-year-old bull that weighs 2,200 pounds is an excellent animal and is attracting much favorable comment.

Gudgell & Simpson of Independence, Mo., have ten head fine show cattle, in ages from calves to aged cows.

Stewart & Hutchins, Greenwood, Mo., seven head. A 6-year-old cow weighing 1,700 pounds was a second prize winner at the World's fair as a yearling. She is probably the only World's fair representative of this breed that will be at this show. This herd has a 2-year-old bull weighing 1,800 pounds and yearling that weighs 1,500 pounds.

A. F. Huwaldt of Randolph, Neb., has five head, 2-year-olds to aged cows; one cow 10 years old, which has each year produced and raised a calf.

Scott & March of Belton, Mo., six head; a 2-year-old bull that weighs 2,040 pounds, [?]

RED POLLS.

The S. McKelvey & Son's herd of Fairfield, Neb., which was in the fire on their way to the fair, is in the stables and presents a sorry sight. There are eleven head in this herd, calves to aged cows. One bull weighs 2,300 pounds. A beautiful cow and her sucking calf are so burned that the skin on their necks is wrinkled and shrunken. They are evidently in great pain, but every attention possible is given them, and it is believed they will recover without any serious blemish.

Two other calves are more dangerously burned and are in apparent great distress. It is thought one of these will lose both its eyesight and its ears. The skin on the back and sides is crisp and blacked.

When Mr. McKelvey found the car on fire he opened the car door and eight head jumped from the car while the train was in motion. This saved them from a worse fate. The cattle thus escaping jumped in a sand pit and were not injured much by the fall. The cattle were brought to the fair, as the owner desired to have them under his own care in the treatment. Mr. McKelvey was severely burned about the hands and face.

J. W. Martin, Richland City, Wis., has eleven head, calves to aged bull and cows. The stock bull weighs 2,300 pounds and the best cow 1,700 pounds.

GALLOWAYS.

Edward Paul, Dundee, Minn., ten head, calves to aged cows and bull. The 7-year-old bull took first prize as a 2-year-old at the World's fair and first prize as aged bull in 1895 at Illinois, Minnesota and Missouri state fairs. He is a fine animal.

Mr. Paul has in connection with his Galloway show a display of robes which far excel all buffalo robes to be found in the market. They are very fine and pliable and prove that the Galloway cattle have a quality in this direction that no other breed can fill.

HOLSTEINS.

W. Chappel of Normal, Neb., has ten head of these milkers on exhibition.

H. C. Glissmann of Omaha has ten head. The classes are pretty well filled by both these exhibitors, and quality good.

J. C. Doubt of University Place, Neb., has nine head. A 2-year-old bull that weighs near 2,000 pounds. He has a crack butter cow, Sharondora, which he has entered in the butter contest.

JERSEYS.

George C. Hill & Son of Rosendale, Wis., have thirteen head of calves, two old cows and breeding bull. He claims a big butter record.

M. Hilgert of St. Joseph, Mo., has twenty head, representing a fine dairy herd. The individuals are fine and show good breeding.

E. E. Day of Weeping Water, Neb., has five head of Jerseys and two Herefords.

Miller & Sibley of Franklin, Pa., have nineteen head, all ages.

R. D. Button of Cotton, New York state, has three yearlings that he thinks will open the eyes of the western dairymen.

SWISS DAIRY CATTLE.

Squires & Son of Blue Earth City, Minn., have twelve head of these fine cattle, representing every age from calves to breeding cows and bull. This is the only herd of this breed now on the grounds, and are attracting some special attention from the dairymen.

SHORTHORNS.

Charles C. Norton of Corning, Ia., has six head of red Shorthon cattle, very nice animals, and are in for a strong show in prizes.

John Creswell of Bonaparte, Ia., has eight head of red and road cattle, representative of his large home herd. They are good individuals.

ABERDEEN ANGUS.

D. N. Syford, Lincoln, Neb., has seven head of these cattle, showing both young and old. His yearling bull, "Nightingale Highness," 26,013, is a fine specimen and weighs 1,350 pounds. He was a prize winner as a calf at the Lincoln fair last year and promises to make things lively for all competitors in the yearling class at the big show.

A Chicago beef packer remarked that "he was just right, after the Jack Sprat idea, neither too lean nor too fat." This rather remarkable calf is a grandson of the celebrated "Abbess of Turlington," who took first prize over all beef brands at the World's fair in 1893.

SHEEP.

Thomas Taylor of Waynesville, Ill., has eleven head of merinos from his flock of registered sheep.

Blakely & Evans of Grinnell, Ia., twenty-nine head of delaine merinos.

E. D. King of Burlington, Kas., sixty-seven head of merinos from his flock of 700. This is a large display of sheep to come from one flock, and not only fills all classes, but doubles the entries in each and has a few left, which are for sale and delivery any time.

Mr. King is the big sheep man of Kansas and is will known among exhibitors throughout the west.

C. H. Ballinger of Lexington, Neb., has thirty head of Shropshires and will fill all classes in this breed. Mr. Ballinger's sheep are in their usual fine show shape, and, as usual, he has some fine specimens. Ballinger is a skillful handler and care taker and his flock shows it.

Ed Wineland of Avoca, Ia., has forty-two head of Oxfords and Shropshires, lambs to breeding ewes and aged rams. Mr. Wineland has a fine lot of sheep on exhibition and he is very justly proud of his pets. He will fill all classes in both breeds.

Gibson & Walker of Denfield, Ontario, Can., have thirty head of Lincolns.

 

PENNSYLVANIA DAY.

The Commissioners from this State Enjoy Themselves at Omaha.

Things to be Seen at the Trans-Mississippi Exposition Described by the "News" Correspondent—Charles Emory Smith Makes the Address of the Day—The Pennsylvania Club Gives a Picnic.

EDITOR NEWS:—Well "Pennsylvania Day" at the great Trans-Mississippi Exposition is a thing of the past, and a great day it, or rather they, were in the way of speech-making and cordial meeting and greeting among the visitors and the one time Pennsylvanians, who now call Nebraska home.

The members of the State Commission appointed by Gov. Hastings to represent Pennsylvania at Omaha, accompanied by Hon. Chas. Emory Smith, Postmaster General of the United States, and his wife, and the wives of the Commissioners, left Pittsburg last Monday morning, Oct. 2d, arriving in Chicago that evening, where they were met by some of the members who had preceded them. The journey from Chicago to Omaha was over the St. Paul route, through central Iowa. Omaha was reached early Tuesday morning, the party going at once to the Hotel Willard, where they were most comfortably entertained during their stay. Tuesday was spent in resting and a little sight seeing, this particular party taking a trip around the grounds, and viewing the beautiful buildings and colonnades connecting them from the outside; spending some time in the Art Gallery, which contains some very interesting works of art. Then we saw a drill by the U. S. Life Service Guard on the lagoon. They rescue a sailor supposed to be clinging to the mast of a sunken vessel, by shooting him a rope and then sending out a life preserver. Then the life boat goes out and the guard recovers a drowning man and resuscitates him. In coming in their own boat is upset a number of times by the raging waters of the lagoon (aided by the efforts of the men), and it is quite interesting to see them "bob up serenely," clinging to the boat. We also visited the Indian camp, where over five hundred Indians of thirty-five different tribes are encamped, in charge of an army officer. They have a sham battle every day which is very interesting. The next day was "Pennsylvania Day." First the Pennsylvania party were lunched in great style, and amid much mirth and good feeling, by the Exposition management at Menkel's restaurant on the grounds; then the public exercises were held in the auditorium. Speeches were made by President Wattles, of the Exposition management, Mr. John Woodside, of Philadelphia, Chairman of the Commission. Senator Manderson, of Omaha, then, in a witty speech, introduced the distinguished guest and orator of the day, Hon. Chas. Emory Smith. Mr. Smith was listened to by a large audience, who cheered to the echo his many witty and patriotic utterances. After the meeting, the ladies of the party were tendered a reception by the Omaha ladies at their parlors in the Mines and Mining building. A reception was given Mr. Smith in the evening at the Bee building in the city. All the postmaster in the state were invited and many postal employees.

On Thursday the "Pennsylvania Club" gave a picnic at Hanscom Park to the visitors from the Keystone state. The club numbers over 1,200 members, and there are over 15,000 voters living in Nebraska who were once residents of Pennsylvania. Mr. Smith again made a bright, well-received speech. At night there were most magnificent fireworks.

And then we stepped down from the pedestal of honored guest to make room for Ohio and New York, who in turn are having their day, but we hear the attendance on Pennsylvania Day was greater than on any distant state day thus far, although Ohio brought 360 people on a special train, and New York had Chauncey Depew and a large delegation and also has a nice state building on the ground.

The Omaha Exposition is certainly a stupendous success, a most interesting, elevating and educational exhibit, and you can find all the amusements you desire on the Midway or the Streets of All Nations or the Indian Camp. The government exhibit is much larger and finer than at the World's Fair. The buildings are more beautiful, the connecting colonnades adding to the beauty and also to comfort by protecting from heat or rain.

New Brighton can well be proud of her son, John A. Wakefield, who is the wide-awake, courteous, far-seeing, indefatigable secretary of the exposition management and to whom a large measure of its attraction, completness​ and success are due. Some of his colleagues said to us "Wakefield is a marvel to us. No one can do half as much or do it as well." The wisdom of these public spirited men, who planned this great exposition, has been demonstrated by the benefit which has already accrued to Omaha. The street car lines have been extended, the great trunk lines have increased their facilities at Omaha and already two more of the great railroads have signified their intention to build into the city. The great annual festival of the Ak-sar-ben (spell it backward) was held this week and we all gazed spellbound at the gorgeous pageants, which drew 100,000 people on Tuesday and Thursday nights, to see the floats representing scenes from Irving's Alhambra on the first night and on the second an electrical parade wherein twenty large floats of various conceits, lighted by 2,000 electric lights, paraded the principal streets and on Friday night the grand ball and crowning of King and Queen Ak-sar-ben for the year. The great castle, larger than the Pittsburg Exposition building, all decorated with the club colors, red, green and yellow, (as was every building and person in the city) was only moderately lighted when the Knights of Ak-sar-ben marched in dressed in most elegant and gorgeous costumes of all nations, and notions. Then the king marched in attended only his pages and ascended the steps to the throng, which was flanked by a hundred beautifully dressed ladies in waiting. Then came marching twenty maids of honor, all in white, and as the lovely young queen, Miss Grace Allen, appeared, 20,000 electric lights suddenly flashed out, thickly studding the 32 arches of the roof. The queen was crowned and then dancing began. Never had our staid Beaver county eyes witnessed such a gorgeous sight as the lights, the palms, the red, yellow and green trimmings, the beautifully dressed women and fine music by two bands. The Ak-sar-ben Club is composed of citizens, and its object is the business advancement of Omaha. We turn our backs with regret and shall always remember the beautiful exposition, the gay carnival and hospitable Omahaians. Lone live Omaha.


T. L. K.
 
 

OHIO DAY GOES OVER

Formal Exercises Postponed Twenty-Four Hours Owing to Railroad Delay.

PENNSYLVANIANS CELEBRATING TODAY

Ceremonies at the Auditorium This Afternoon Are Well Attended.

TOPEKA PEOPLE MAKE A DEMONSTRATION

Seven Hundred of Them Manifest Their Presence at the Fair.

STOCK SHOW GETS A GOOD START

Exhibitors Have Their Animals Ready for Inspection and the People Are Already Spending Much Time Admiring the Noble Brutes.

Total Admissions Yesterday19,999
Total to Date1,760,821

Today is Ohio, Pennsylvania, Mercer county, Illinois, and Topeka day. The various delegations and those who wore no badges did not begin to come until somewhat later than usual owing to the festivities attendant upon the carnival parade of last evening. But by the middle of the forenooon​ it could easily be seen that the fourfold attractions slated for today would draw their full share of visitors.

The Ohio day exercises were to have been held in the Auditorium at 11 o'clock. At that time the hall was comfortably filled and the Omaha Concert band was warming up the audience for the proper reception of the distinguished speakers from the Buckeye state. When the number was finished General Manager Clarkson stepped to the platform and announced that the Ohioans would not hold forth this morning on account of the failure of several of the delegation to arrive in time for the exercises. Three train-loads from Toledo, among whom is Samuel L. Jones, mayor of that city, and one of the speakers, had been delayed five hours in making the trip. They will arrive in the city this afternoon. The exercises which had been prepared for today will be carried out tomorrow morning at 11 o'clock. They will consist of an introductory address by President Gurdon W. Wattles, an address of welcome by Governor Holcomb on part of the state of Nebraska, an address of welcome by Hon. John L. Webster in behalf of the exposition, and responsive addresses by Asa J. Bushnell, governor of Ohio, and Samuel L. Jones, mayor of Toledo.

The Pennsylvanians arrived yesterday, bringing with them members of the governor's staff and representatives of various business interests and trade organizations. They hold their exercises in the Auditorium at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon. After the introductory address by President Wattles and the address of welcome in behalf of the exposition by Senator Charles F. Manderson, Hon. John W. Woodside, chairman of the Pennsylvania commission will respond. This will be followed by an address by Hon. Charles Emory Smith, postmaster general of the United States.

Mercer county, Illinois, sends a train load of visitors to the grounds this morning. They made their headquarters at the Illinois building, but held no exercises. The Karnival Knights of Topeka were more demonstrative. They came 700 strong and brought with them the Ladies' Cadets corps of that city, who marched around the grounds headed by a fife and drum corps and attracted considerable attention. Miss Anna Rose, a native of Hilo, Hawaii, and queen of the Kansas Karnival was also with the party. The visit of the Topekans to the exposition today is the grand finale of a carnival that has been held in that city for the last week.

The live stock exhibit continues to be a magnet drawing the crowds to the north end of the grounds. The animals have practically all arrived and are in readiness to be led into the judgment ring. The first showing will be made tomorrow morning in the amphitheater west of the dairy building.

Tomorrow has been designated South Dakota day. A special train will haul a number of visitors from that state to the exposition. They will make no special demonstration, but spend the day at the grounds and witness the electrical parade of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben in the evening.

PENNSYLVANIA AND THE WORLD.

Postmaster General Smith Speaks of the Keystone State.

Hon. Charles Emory Smith, postmaster general in President McKinley's cabinet, was the orator of the day at the Pennsylvania exercises this afternoon. He said:

This is Pennsylvania day. It is dedicated to the friendly interest of the great commonwealth of the east in this splendid monument of the energy and public spirit of the west. Philadelphia is the mother of American expositions. She has seen with pride how the Centennial of 1876 has been followed by a series of brilliant exhibitions and she has encouraged and supported them with the same patriotic zeal which prompted her own pioneer effort. She is here today through her representatives to congratulate you on this stately and impressive creation, on these dazzling scenes of beauty and activity, which typify the artistic achievements and the industrial progress of this mighty transmississippi region.

Pennsylvania feels another interest in this imposing exhibition. To the sturdy, enlightened and enterprising citizenship which has created this noble commonwealth she has contributed an honorable share. Her blood flows in the veins of this vigorous offspring of the adventurous spirit and thrift of the older sections. Her children are among the pillars of your state. One of her sons was for years your distinguished and honored senator and still adorns and illuminates your civic life. Pennsylvania blends in high degree the composite racial elements and the fruitful heritage of ancestral diversity which have enriched and strengthened the American people; and steadfast, stable and solid as she is, firm as the keystone of the arch she symbolizes, she has none the less joined in the onward march and infused something of her own characteristics in the upbuilding of this great empire of the west.

Events Move Swiftly.

We have moved during the last six months in the swift current of stupendous events which have recast the maps and spanned the wide horizon. We have just emerged triumphant from a short but crucial and momentous war, which has carried forward history and unveiled destiny. The halo it has shed on American arms and the glory with which it has exalted the American name fills us with just pride and exultation. Reluctantly accepted by the president only under the supreme mandate of humanity and justice, once undertaken the unerring seriousness of its aim, the unfaltering vigor of its direction and the unbroken sweep of its success stand unmatched on the pages of war. The renown of the American navy, always brilliant and never equalled, man for man and gun for gun, was sustained and enhanced in every clash of the struggle. An army of 250,000 men was summoned from the ranks of citizenship, organized, equipped and made ready for action. Every soldier who fought was transported beyond the deep. The whole scene of the war was on foreign soil and in a tropical clime, under burning skies and drenching torrents, with the blight of fever and the danger of pestilence. In the face of such difficulties, what a swift and unerring triumph!

With our monumental victory we face a new epoch in the history of the republic. We come to a broader outlook, whose deep import it is well for us to consider. The world knows our ampler reach and our larger destiny and we feel it. No true American can be insensible to the increased respect for our country and the higher conception of its mission which the marvelous revelations of this war have inspired in all lands. The embattled farmers at Lexington "fired the shot heard round the world," and not less distinctly and significantly did the opening shot of this war under the glittering consellations​ of the Orient resound in every capital of the globe and awaken a new understanding of America's onward movement.

One of Great World Powers.

It is recognized that the United States advanced to its place as one of the great world powers, and whatever may be our wise policy, whatever may be the measure of our just restraint or our legitimate ambition, no American can fail to feel an honorable pride in the new distinction and the new consideration never before approached, which American heroism and American statesmanship have brought to our republic. The world's acknowledged tribute is the measure of its estimate of the potency of our new position. Our use of that position will be the measure of our wisdom and rulership. Equal to every crisis in the past, we shall deal with this emergency in the true American spirit. It makes us responsible for Cuba. It gives us Porto Rico. It plants our outpost on the farther side of the globe. Whatever we hold, whether it be more or less, will be held, not for territorial aggrandizement, but solely in acceptance of responsibilities which Providence has laid upon us. Men lightly talk of "imperialism." Our imperialism is not territorial lust, but benignant trade expansion and civilizing influence, and our flag is at Manila, not in any spirit of spoliation, not in either the greed or the glory of con-[?]ng force of a Providential guidance, at the ripe hour in the development and requirements of our national growth.

It is treated in many quarters simply as a question of territorial expansion, but that is a secondary and incidental consideration. The great and overshadowing question is one of commercial openings. The heart of the issue is not mere territory, but trade necessities and facilities. Beyond and behind and beneath this departure lies the broad problem of America's destiny in the commerce and civilization of the world. If we are to fulfill that destiny we must have commercial expansion, and it is a profoundly significant fact which shows a guiding hand that overrules the will of man that this war should have come just as this great necessity begins to be realized. The opportunity matches the need.

Time and Opportunity.

The universal acceptance of its obligation to stretch forth its civilizing hand where the fate of war has carried it, the fortunate possession of an established emporium on the very theater of the world's seeking have brought the occasion and the duty together. Is it not for enlightened American statesmanship, watchful of American interests, to use the opportunity, not in territorial avarice, but for commercial extension and civilizing influence in the Orient with the base and bulwark that are needed for its support? Shall we be worthy of this high mission? I have full faith in my countrymen. I believe in the spirit and the capacity of the American people. This war and its tremendous question has given us a new elevation and dignity and purpose. How it has dwarfed and diminished our domestic differences and our petty contentions? How it has kindled the patriotic fires and quickened the true national instinct! How it has lifted us to a higher plane of public consciousness and to a broader view of national greatness! In the large work before us of governing and developing our new possessions, of ameliorating and advancing the condition of the new peoples who have been brought under the protecting folds of our flag and of achieving the fullness of the possibilities within our grasp there is call for all that is best in our American courage and statesmanship and character.

There is call for thoughtful, conscientious and patriotic devotion on the part of the people. Dealing with these great questions which the future of our country and its relations to the world make necessary calls for no narrow partisanship. Let us leave our partisanship to domestic issues; let us limit our family contests to the family circle; let us with patriotic spirit end them at our own shores, and when we come to confront foreign countries and nations involving our honor, our dignity and our interests before the world, let us stand united as one peaple​, forgetting that we are repblicans​ or democrats and remembering only that we are all Americans together.

With single purpose and with unerring wisdom our executive has called his aides and associates in the great work from all parties and all sections, and through all the conflict and all the settlement his sole thought has been the welfare and glory of his country. It was for the American people to meet these new questions in the same lofty spirit of patriotism, with open eyes for the broader career before us and open hands for the higher duty and destiny of the republic.

Notes of the Exposition.

H. A. Heath of the Kansas Farmer, published at Topeka, Kan., is in the city and will remain during the live stock show, reporting the same for his paper.

After the Ohio day exercises which will be held at the Auditorium today the members of the Omaha Ohio club will banquet Governor Bushnell and party at one of the Viaduct restaurants.

The Nebraska section of the Horticultural building has been decorated with the Ak-Sar-Ben colors. Several of the exhibitors from outside states have caught the inspiration and have put up bits of the tri-colored bunting.

Hon. John L. Pennington, one of the early territorial governors of South Dakota, is in the city visiting the exposition. At the present time Mr. Pennington is a resident of Alabama. He is on his way to Yankton, S. D., to spend a few days visiting friends.

The members of the International Association of Flax and Fiber Growers met in the Montana building yesterday afternoon and discussed the advisability of holding a meeting next week. It was decided to meet and invite Secretary Wilson of the Department of Agriculture to deliver an address before the club. It is understood that he will be here with the president's party and that he is willing to talk upon the subject of fibers and fiber culture.

 

AT THE GROUNDS AS GUESTS

Postmaster General Smith and Other Distinguished Pennsylvanians Go to the Exposition.

Postmaster General Charles Emory Smith and members of the Pennsylvania commission attended the exposition this morning as guests of the Buckeye state officials, shortly after breakfast time. Several members of the Pennsylvania club's reception committee, including Prof. J. P. Gillespie and Mr. Barr, called at the Millard hotel and passed an hour or two chatting with the visitors from the Keystone state about incidents of the Ak-Sar-Ben parade and the big picnic that will occur tomorrow. Today the Pennsylvanians are guests of the exposition officials and Ohioans jointly. Tomorrow they will be entertained by people from their own state.

It was nearly 11 o'clock when the postmaster general accompaniel​ by Mrs. Smith appeared in the hotel lobby, prepared to attend the exercises at the exposition. He was joined by Mr. and Mrs. John W. Woodside and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bradley. After greeting friends and acquaintances and chatting with them for a while, the party took a car for the exposition. They were the last to start, for half an hour earlier Mrs. George Nox McCain, accompanying her father, Christian S. Overholt, had taken their departure, and at intervals between that time and 11 o'clock members of the commission and their wives left in small parties of four or five. Among those who attended the exercises were: Dr. J. Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Nissley, Mr. and Mrs. Livy S. Richard, Joshua D. Baker, Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Kenedy, P. C. Boyle, William C. Gretzinger, Hiram Young and C. E. Dawson.

The Pennsylvania day picnic will begin tomorrow at 11 o'clock. The speaking will occur at 1 o'clock and among those who are to deliver addresses are Postmaster General Charles Emory Smith, General Charles F. Manderson, John W. Woodside and Governor Silas A. Holcomb.

WOMAN'S BOARD WINDS UP

Closing Session of the Body Made a Most Enjoyable Affair.

WORK REVIEWED AND COMMENTED UPON

President Sawyer's Address Covers the History of the Exposition—Toasts at Luncheon Show the Spirit of the Women.

The Woman's Board of Managers met in the boys' parlor of the Girls' and Boys' building at 10 o'clock yesterday morning for its quarterly and last meeting. The out-of-town members present were Mrs. Sawyer and Mrs. Field of Lincoln, Mrs. Kerr of Ansley, Mrs. Hunter of Broken Bow, Mrs. Dutton of Hastings, Mrs. Hollenbeck of Fremont, Mrs. Giffert of West Point, Mrs. McDowell of Fairbury and Mrs. Key of Council Bluffs. The president, Mrs. Sawyer, delivered her parting message to the board in a speech so forcible and brilliant that the ladies immediately demanded possession of it that it might by put in permanent form for a keepsake.

Mrs. Sawyer began her address by noting the two distinct features of this, as of all expositions, namely, the products of industry and the evidences of culture; the first, useful arts; the second, liberal arts. After paying tribute to the administrative ability which has brought together such an exhibit of material things. Mrs. Sawyer said: "To many visitors the material features of the exposition, its buildings and grounds, its exhibits and entertainments, its beauty and variety, constitute the whole of the exposition, nevertheless the immaterial and incorporeal features are essential and omnipresent, just as the light and air are inseparable from all material exhibits. The intangible features, the evidences of culture, are the true exponents of progress. That this transmississippi region—a hundred years ago an unknown wild—should make the close of this century glorious by this vision of intrinsic and relative beauty, this accumulation of resources, this expression and appreciation of aesthetic and ethical standards that the existing standard of taste should demand and receive so much, is worthy of no[?] part of the exposition is [?] rare flower. We admire and praise it the more, perhaps, because it is so fleeting. We nurture a flower because we know it is a sheath for the golden secret of a seed, the germ and promise of future life. In like manner should we cherish the invisible influence of the exposition, which will live after the visible forms have passed away, because they foretell the hopes of future years. The thought-moulding, character-forming aspiration and impulses, the lifting of ideals, such are some of the sacred seeds maturing in the heart of this incomparable bloom."

Work of Education Bureau.

Mrs. Sawyer then referred to the comparison some times made between the Board of Lady Managers of Chicago and the Bureau of Education of the Transmississippi Exposition, a comparison for which there is no more basis than there is between a watch and the woman who carries it. "But a watch," she continued," that fulfills the purposes for which it was created self-reliant and independent. This bureau was deputed by the directors of the exposition to do special work. Therefore it has not been and was not intended to be a significant or integral factor in the material development of the exposition." Mrs. Sawyer reviewed the educational exhibit over which the bureau has had jurisdiction, the congress work and the Girls and Boys' building, demonstrating forcibly the ideas for which each stands in the exposition. Following the address of the president, the secretary reported the detail of the various lines of work. She stated that exact figures could not be given while there were still outstanding accounts, but that the Girls' and Boys' building might be considered free from indebtedness. The approximate cost has been $10,000. The subscription of the children amounted to $3,000, the subscription of Mrs. Kimball to $1,000, and the proceeds of The Hatchet, with the receipts from exhibits and concessions, make up the balance. She reported that the Congresses of Music and of Art had been most successful and that a number of other congresses were about to convene under the auspices of the bureau. She also stated that the Monetary and Library congresses were initiated by the bureau and that for all the educational congresses its machinery had been called into use.

Among several unexpected pleasures of the morning was a visit from General Manager Clarkson, who congratulated the women upon their very successful work and thanked them for co-operation and assistance. Having begun upon the extension of courtesies the women were apparently in no haste to stop. Mrs. Harford offered a resolution of appreciation of the services of the president, Mrs. Sawyer, "who by her untiring devotion to the work on the executive committee, or the congress committee, in the presentation of plans, at great physical inconvenience, and in time of sore personal bereavement, has so largely contributed to the success achieved." This was passed, with applause, and Miss McHugh immediately presented a resolution formally recognizing the valuable work of the secretary. This being acted upon, Mrs. Towne proposed a vote of thanks to the executive committee.

Luncheon and Toasts.

By this time luncheon was announced and the women were soon seated at long tables spread in the reading room. These were furnished with the finest of linen and china, and decorated with red and yellow roses. The luncheon was in charge of Mrs. Tilden and the hand-decorated menu cards were provided by Miss McCague.

When the physical necessities of the company had been met, the president, Mrs. Sawyer, called to order and announced as the first toast, "The Bureau of Education. How Camest Thou in this Pickle?" which was responded to by Mrs. Kerr of Ansley. Mrs. Kerr treated the subject from a humorous standpoint, remarking upon her satisfaction that the toastmistress had decided that the bureau belonged in the pickle jar, rather than in the soup tureen. She declined to state how we got in, but thought we were in a fair way to get out with credit.

Mrs. Hollenbeck of Fremont spoke of "Woman's Sphere" from the sentiment of "A Crust of Bread and Liberty." The speaker deprecated the spelling of "sphere" with too large a capital letter, believing that "the most intelligence, wisdom and physical strength is required in the home, and the most responsibility and happiness is found in motherhood."

Miss McHugh discoursed upon "The Genus Homo" from the standpoint of a woman's reason, "I think him so because I think him so." She announced as the chief interest the "genus boyo," and said that the hope of development in the genus homo lay in holding the same standards for Thomas Jefferson as for Tirzah Ann; that she might [?] of pettiness, and he to her standard of purity. Miss McHugh congratulated the board on its opportunity of studying the abstract from the concrete, and said, "If I am to attribute to the whole class the qualities found in the individual, the genus homo must possess the frankness and honesty of our friend, Mr. Hardt, and the suavity and unvarying kindness of the head of our department, Mr. Bruce."

Mrs. McDowell spoke on "Finances, the Root of All Evil," announcing herself to be a believer in all the metals there were and in the free and unlimited distribution of them all. She had been sufficiently interested in the subject to buy a book, but her husband couldn't explain it to her, and she concluded that a woman's chief power lay, after all, in making $1 do the work of $5.

Mrs. Ford brought out the necessity in public life of "The Scapegoat," dwelling upon the pleasures of his life, especially pointing to the fact that at the end he could get away into the wilderness and never be heard of more.

Mrs. Field of Lincoln presented "Woman as a Classified Exhibit." She said: "It is quite enough to be a thinking, conscientious human being without having in addition the burden of all the news and notices with which we are labelled in the woman's page of the daily press." Mrs. Field also expressed her satisfaction that there is no woman's building in our exposition and no distinction in the work of the sexes.

To Mrs. Dutton of Hastings was assigned the appropriate sentiment "Like Olive Plants Around Thy Table." Mrs. Dutton, in the names of Miss Anita Dutton, shared honors with Master Thomas Munro of South Omaha and Master Joseph Reed of Council Bluffs, all of whom had been born into the board since its organization. Mrs. Dutton believes that every mother in the land is a heroine and she thinks that if Dewey had had the conquering of one of the children of the present day he might have been considered a martyr instead of a hero.

Mrs. Towne closed the exercises by toasting the executive committee to the sentiment "A Very Little Meat and a Good Deal of Table Cloth." She gave great credit to the committee for its work, especially in the organization of the congresses which she said had been of exceeding value to the few who had been wise enough to take advantage of them.

During the afternoon the women were given the courtesies of the Midway and they visited the principal attractions there in a body.

PLANS FOR PRESIDENT'S TRIP

Final Arrangements Are Made for the Handling of Special Trains.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 4.—(Special Telegram.)—Final arrangements were made today by Manager Babcock of the Transportation department of the Transmississippi Exposition with Manager W. M. Greene of the Baltimore & Ohio as to the running of the second special to Omaha. As outlined, the train carrying representatives of the government, army, navy, diplomatic corps and newspaper men, will leave Washington at 8 o'clock Monday morning. The Northwestern will furnish the entire equipment for this train, consisting of private car 428, combination baggage and buffet car and three sleepers, which will be assembled in Washington on Saturday. The Baltimore & Ohio will supply the dining car as far as Chicago Junction, the Northwestern attaching a dining car at Chicago for the run through Iowa. It is the plan now to have this special precede the president's train, which will leave Chicago half an hour after the other gets away, in order to reach Omaha in time to give the occupants a chance to participate in the parade.

While the personnel of the president's train is still incomplete, it is known it will include Mr. and Mrs. McKinley and maid, Secretaries Bliss and Wilson, Assistant Secretary of War Meiklejohn and Assistant Secretary of the Navy Allen, Captain and Mrs. McWilliams, J. Addison Porter, secretary to the president, and Assistant Secretary Cortelyou. At Omaha Secretary and Mrs. Gage and Secretary and Mrs. Smith will join the party and return with them to Chicago. A representative committee of the exposition will join the president at Chicago and make up the train into Omaha.

The train carrying government officials and other distinguished citizens will make no stops between Chicago and Omaha. It is now contemplated by the Baltimore & Ohio railroad to give the train to the Northwestern line outside of the city and not run into the Baltimore & Ohio station at all, thereby saving considerable time, and returning the same program will be observed.

South Dakotans Coming In.

South Dakotans are arriving for the purpose of participating in the South Dakota exercises, which will be held in the Auditorium Friday. Yesterday Vice President McKinney and Secretary Davis of the commission arrived. Governor Lee, with the members of his staff, will arrive tonight or early tomorrow morning. Those Dakotans who are here state that there will be quite a number of their people present.

 
 

MISSOURIANS WILL BE ON HAND.

Governor Will Head the Party Coming to the Exposition.

ST. LOUIS, Oct. 4.—Governor Stephens and family, with his military staff and the state officials and their families, will visit the Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha on Missouri day, October 10. The party will go over the Burlington route, reaching Omaha by way of Kansas City, and will remain over the 12th, President McKinley's day. Low rates have been made by the Burlington, Missouri Pacific and other roads running to Omaha, and many thousand Missourians expect to take advantage of them.

Today at the Indian Congress.

This afternoon at 4:30 o'clock the Wichita Indians brought up from Oklahoma by Prof. James Mooney, the government ethnologist, will give their unique horn dance, which always attracts so much attention when performed upon the reservation. The dance is both warlike and religious in its significance, being intended as an invocation of the war gods of the tribe and the protecting power of the buffalo spirit. For this reason it is sometimes known as the buffalo dance.

The warriors of the tribe, assisted by the young men of the allied Cheyennes, Arapahoes and Kiowas, all striped and painted, with their rifles in their hands and mounted horseback upon gaily decorated ponies, will lead the procession from the grass house, around the circle of the camps, to the center of the parade ground, where all will dismount and the chief, Tawaconi Jim, will deliver an address of welcome in his own language to the white visitors. This will be interpreted at the time in the sign language for the benefit of the other tribes, giving a practical example of the beautiful gesture speech in use among all the Indians of the plains. The women join with the men in the dance, which differs materially in step and figure from most Indian performances and winds up with the closing song of the celebrated ghost dance.

In the evening at 7 o'clock the women of the Assiniboines, assisted by those of the Crows and Blackfeet, will perform the scalp dance, of which we have all heard, but which has never before been witnessed outside of the Indian country. This dance belongs to the women alone. Dressed in the costumes of their warrior husbands and with their faces painted black, the sign of death, they exult over the scalps of their slain enemies. The scalps—genuine ones, brought down by the Assiniboines—are carried in the dance, stretched over hoops at the ends of long poles.

Delightful Concerts.

Two musical events of peculiar importance are set for next Friday and Saturday nights. Innes will have another Wagner program. It contains the "Love Feast of the Apostles," a wonderfully vivid picture of the well-known biblical episode. Then there is something from "Lohengrin." Going from the strictly classical Wagner one night to the "Forge in the Forest" with electrical and scenic effects the next shows how quickly this band undergoes the transition from an orchestra to a military band. "The Forge in the Forest" is a delightful piece, full of weird melodies and given with the foliage, forge, anvils and scenery presented under subdued lights it will doubtless thrill every spectator.

Both Director Innes and Superintendent Kelly are greatly worked up over the Peace Jubilee, one of the prominent features of which is to be a children's carnival. They have secured from the executive committee a special rate of 15 cents for each child for that one day, Saturday, October 15. Each child taking part in the singing of the jubilee number, which is to be performed, will have a nice little souvenir of the occasion presented to him or her. A petition is now in circulation among all the concessionaires asking them to throw open their concessions on this day to all the children for a uniform admission fee of 5 cents. Mr. Innes is to personally supervise the training of the grand chorus of children and he promises something in the way of a sensation when the carnival comes off. A unique feature of this day will be the singing of a group of Chinese children dressed in their picturesque costumes. Arrangements are also under way for the appearance in this festival, which will be given at 4 o'clock in the afternoon of Saturday, October 15, of several well known and talented local instrumental child soloists. A boys' drum and fife band will be secured and altogether the children's carnival promises to be one of the big successes of the entire exposition.

Fussing About the Fakirs.

The exhibitors in the Agriculture building are up in arms over the influx of fakirs who have found their way into the structure during the last few days. They are getting up a petition, which is being signed very generally. In the document they declare that unless these people are driven out of the building they will cover up their [?] last few days scores of the fakirs who are selling cheap jewelry and trinkets have been let into the building until they block up nearly every aisle, making it impossible to get along. Many of them are so persistent in trying to sell their wares that they are insulting, especially to women who visit the building for the purpose of inspecting the exhibits. These salesmen are largely those who have occupied outstands during the summer, but since the cooler weather they have succeeded in getting inside, where they hawk their wares from morning until night. Their presence gives the interior of the building the appearance of a large auction house.

PRESIDENT'S OMAHA HOME

Rooms Selected for the President and Mrs. McKinley at the Club House.

Police Will Serve as Guards and the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben Will Act aa​ Escorts of the Party.

Arrangements for the coming of President McKinley and party next week are being pushed vigorously. The president, Mrs. McKinley, Secretaries Gage, Bliss, Smith and Wilson, with their wives, will be entertained at the Omaha club. Ex-Senator Manderson is president of the club, and ex-officio member of the various committees. Arrangements are in the hands of the house committee, of which Edward P. Peck is chairman. This committee meets every evening to plan, devise and arrange details, and proposes to leave nothing undone that should be done to the end that the presidential party is royally received and entertained in a manner worthy of the exalted position of the distinguished guests, and the standing of the city and west, whose guests the party will be.

There are thirteen suites of rooms in the club house. The house is located at the northwest corner of Twentieth and Douglas streets. The building is three stories high. The apartments selected for President McKinley are on the third floor, room No. 4, commanding a splendid view of the city, looking south and southeast. The apartments are being placed in elegant shape and will present a charming and attractive appearance.

For the four cabinet officers who will also be entertained by the club, elegant suites are being arranged. The president, Mrs. McKinley, Secretaries Gage, Bliss, Wilson and Smith, with their wives, maids and private secretaries will complete the club guests.

Mrs. McKinley's apartments are on the main or ground floor, in the northeast corner of the building. There are three rooms in this suite, and they are being put in admirable order for the reception of the first lady of the land. The suite is composed of reception room, bed room and maid's room, all connected. These rooms will be outfitted throughout with new furniture. The best to be had will be placed for the comfort of Mrs. McKinley. A chair is being made, after the pattern of the one at the White house home, for Mrs. McKinley. It is an invalid chair, and will be arranged for carrying her up and down the stairs and about at her pleasure. Attendants have been arranged for, and will be constantly at the call of Mrs. McKinley from the moment of the arrival of the party in the city until their departure.

The party comes in Tuesday evening over the Northwestern railroad. There will be a large body of policemen at the depot to act as official guard. In addition to the police there will be 200 or 300 Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben to escort the party to the club rooms.

During the stay of the president in the city a large detail of policemen will act as guards at the building, and only those known to have business within will be admitted to the building.

The matter of guard for the president and escort has been placed in the hands of the chief of police, and he will manage that feature of the program, detailing the men who will have the honor of presidential guard and escort.

There are few more elegantly furnished places in the west than the rooms of the Omaha club. In addition to the present handsome appointments of the building, the inner furnishings will be rich in added decoration, pictures and flowers being placed in profusion, and the exterior will be tastily decorated, the national colors forming no small part of the decorations.

The presidential party will be met at the depot by the mayor, Senator Thurston, ex-Senator Manderson, Major Clarkson, President Wattles and members of the reception and entertaining committees, and returning the visitors and citizens will go direct to the club rooms.

ANIMALS HAVE THEIR TURN

Live Stock Show Will Tomorrow Be a Great Sight for Knowing and Ignorant.

Thursday the Flower of Herds Will Be Picked Out for Prizes and Blue Ribbons.

Still the Porkers and Bovines From Everywhere Come to Be Admired--Today the Exhibits Will Be in Fine Shape.

Tuesday's Admissions19,999
Total Admissions1,760,821

At 9 o'clock tomorrow will begin the real circus at the live stock show, something that city people who can't tell a Poland China hog from a guinea pig and know no more about milking a cow than operating a Gatling gun, can sit in a big, comfortable amphitheater with 2,999 other people as comfortable as in a parquet seat at the Creighton and enjoy the moving panorama of high-bred flesh and blood.

Then the judging of the stock will begin, and on three show rings within the half inclosing amphitheater will be shown the best collection of horses, sheep, swine and cattle without exception gotten together in America this year. From then on till October 20 the oval will be alive with blooded stock each day from 9 a. m. to 12 and from 1:30 to 5 p. m.

Stock is still arriving from all parts of the United States and will be received until 6 o'clock tomorrow morning, somebody being ready to admit it any time tonight. Commissioner Dinsmore and Superintendent Elmendorf have been busy as bees locating the choice arrivals and will today have everything in spick and span shape, all streets and alleys cleared of hay and the debris incident to moving stock, and ready for the thousands of visitors expected.

There is good reason for expecting them by thousands from the way they swarmed through the streets all day yesterday and admired the blooded beauties of many a prize ring.

FINE CATTLE HERE.

Show Stock Among the Arrivals of Tuesday.

The following are additional arrivals of show stock since yesterday's report:

Jersey cattle—J. E. Robbins, Greensburg, Ind., fifteen head, in ages from calves to aged cow and bull. There are in this herd two imported cows, Jersey Venture and Pearl Pensey. For two years Jersey Venture was the second prize cow on the Jersey islands. It required $2,000 to induce her owner to sell to the present owner, Mr. Robbins. Venture Lad, a 1-year-old bull, a calf of this famous cow, has taken first prize and sweepstakes at Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin state fairs.

Abderdeen Angus—J. E. Evans, Aberdeen, Ia., fifteen head, calves, yearlings and 2-year-olds. The majority of this display are steers for the fat stock show. They are fine animals.

W. A. McHenry, Denison, Ia., twelve head. His 1-year-old bull weighs 2,000 pounds, a yearling bull 1,650 pounds, a bull calf 1,050 pounds. One aged cow 1,900 pounds.

A beautiful 2-year-old heifer, 1,650 pounds, took champion prize at Minnesota fair over all breeds. Another heifer weighing 1,500 pounds took second in class. There are in Mr. McHenry's herd four yearling heifers that average in weight 1,250 pounds.

At the World's fair the two cows, Abbess and Progress, of this herd were the first and second prize cows over all breeds. Nellquinne III., a 2-year-old heifer, was champion over all breeds at the same show, and a yearling bull from same herd was second champion over all breeds.

Herefords—W. S. Van Natta of Fowler, Ind., has three head, two steers for the fat show and one bull. The bull is a yearling and weighs 1,600 pounds. He was a prize winner at the Illinois state fair. Clem Grave of Bunker Hill, Ind., has a bull calf on exhibition that was a prize taker at both Indiana and Illinois state fairs.

F. A. Nave of Attica, Ind., has [?] head, two 2-year-old bulls wei[?] pounds each. Dale one of th[?]

 

Duke of Fairview II., a bull calf, took sweepstakes over all under 2 years old at Illinois state fair.

Shorthorns—George E. Ward of Hawarden, Ia., has ten head. His 4-year-old bull, St. Valentine, weighs 2,600 pounds, was winner of sweepstakes at Indiana and Illinois state fairs.

Gold Dust, a 2-year-old bull, won first in class at the above state fairs. His weight is 2,000 pounds. Monarchs Lady, a fine cow in this herd, has been following close after Mary Abbottsburn, the noted prize winner of America. They have been in the show ring together and Monarchs Lady has taken second in class. This herd emphasizes the roan color as prize winners. They are beauties.

C. W. Sanborn of Omaha has two Shorthorn steers entered for the fat stock show, both 3-year-olds, and weigh respectively 2,000 and 2,300 pounds.

Galloways—J. H. McAllister of O'Neill, Neb., has ten head ranging in age from calves to aged cow and bull.

T. J. Davis & Son of Triumph, Ill., have fifteen head of very good animals of all ages and will be in the contest in all classes.

Holstines—Henry Stevens & Son of Lacona, N. Y., have fifteen head and will show in every class from calves to aged cow and bull.

Brown Swiss Cattle—E. M. Barton of Hinsdale, Ill., has seventeen head. In this herd are several sweepstakes winners. Their latest conquests were at the state fairs of Wisconsin and Illinois.

Devons—John Hudson of Moweaqua, Ill., has fourteen head of Devons representing all ages. The herd bull weighs 2,100 pounds. There are three steers for the fat stock display. Mr. Hudson imported the original stock to start his herd and has kept within these lines of breeding ever since. His animals are regarded as great beauties by many cattle raisers.

Sheep—J. N. Grau of Asherville, Kas., has three Delaine Merinos, a ram and two lambs.

A. F. Gamber of Wakeman, O., has fifteen head of Delaine Merinos, a full display of these very popular sheep, and will contest for the prizes in class from lambs to aged ewe and ram.

Charles Cook of Cyrus, Neb., has three French Merino rams. These specimens are quite a curiosity to many visitors; they are very large and carry immense fleeces of nice wool.

Robert Taylor of Abbott, Neb., has thirty-five head of Hampshires, Lesters and Merinos.

George Harding & Sons of Waukesha, Wis., shows forty head of Cotswolds of all ages.

George McKerrow of Sussex, Wis., has eighty head of Oxfords and Southdowns, all ages. He is prepared to fill all classes and then have a reserve to satisfy buyers who want to get some of his stock.

George Allen of Allerton, Ill., has Twenty-four head of Shropshires. He has been on the fair circuit for some time and has great confidence in his stock as winners.

R. Stuyvsant of Allamuchy, N. J., has fourteen head of the horned Dorset sheep on exhibition. These sheep are comparatively new to this district of the country and are receiving much attention from visitors. Mr. Stuyvesant says his exhibition of sheep are all American bred except one ram. This is claiming to be the greatest prize winning flock of Dorsets in America.

THE PENNSYLVANIA PARTY.

Commission Made Up of Brightest Men of Keystone State.

The Pennsylvania commission of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, appointed by Governor Daniel H. Hastings, is composed of some of the leading manufacturers, business men and editors of the old Keystone state. The party reached Omaha yesterday morning over the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad in their special car, and are quartered at the Millard. Accompanying the commission as its guest is Hon. Charles Emory Smith, postmaster general, who is to deliver the oration today, Pennsylvania day. He was the editor-in-chief of the Philadelphia Press for fifteen years prior to his appointment as postmaster general. Under President Harrison's last administration he was ambassador to Russia. The postmaster general is accompanied by Mrs. Smith.

The Pennsylvania commission is headed by John W. Woodside, president of the Atlantic Snuff company and one of the leading manufacturers of Philadelphia. He was secretary of the Tennessee Centennial commission of the city of Philadelphia, chairman of the citizens' commission of Philadelphia on the Cotton States and International exposition at Atlanta, a member of the national commission of Pennsylvania at the Chicago World's fair, and has been associated in some way with every international celebration or episode in the United States in the last quarter of a century. He had charge of having the design made for the famous medal of award for the Chicago World's fair, [?]

Thomas Bradley, treasurer of the commission, who accompanies the party, is also one of the leading business men of Philadelphia.

Colonel George Nox McCain, chairman of the executive committee of the commission, is one of the editors of the Philadelphia Press. He received his newspaper training in Pittsburg, where for eight years he filled editorial positions on the Dispatch, subsequently becoming one of the owners of the Commercial Gazette. He was afterward Washington correspondent for the latter paper. He has been an extensive traveler, visiting among other places the interior of Venezuela during the late boundary excitement. For services rendered the government of Venezuela Colonel McCain was decorated by President Crespo with the Order of the Liberator. He is a member of Governor Hastings' staff, with the rank of lieutenant colonel, is a member of the Society of the War of 1812, of the University club of Philadelphia and is widely known as one of the foremost political writers in his native state.

Among the members of the commission in professional life is Dr. J. Roberts Bryan, also of Philadelphia. He is a member of the Philadelphia Pathological society, Philadelphia Pediatric society and Philadelphia County Medical society. Dr. Bryan was assistant physician of the Children's hospital in Philadelphia for a number of years.

I. O. Nissley, member of the executive committee, is publisher of the Middletown Press, one of the largest and most influential newspapers in the central part of Pennsylvania.

Christian S. Overholt, the dean of the commission in point of years, is a retired banker, merchant and manufacturer of Westmoreland county, although now residing in Philadelphia. Mr. Overholt is the uncle of Henry Clay Frick, the active head of the great Carnegie enterprises.

One of the most successful newspapers in Pennsylvania is the Wilkesbarre Record, of which Dr. Frederick C. Johnson, also a member of the executive committee, is editor. Dr. Johnson was born at Marquette, Mich. A graduate of the medical department of the university of Pennsylvania, he entered journalism, and became one of the proprietors of the Wilkesbarre Record.

One other prominent newspaper editor of the quartet in Omaha with the commission is Livy S. Richard, editor-in-chief of the Scranton Tribune. Mr. Richard is a native of Ohio, who began his newspaper work at La Porta, Ind., in 1888. In 1892 he accepted a position as associate editor of the Tribune, and became its editor-in-chief in 1894. Under his direction the Tribune has taken a foremost place among the influential interior journals of the state.

Joshua D. Baker is widely, intimately and favorably known as the manager of the Hotel Lafayette in Philadelphia. He is of Quaker stock and has come by his hotel experience through a long line of hotel ancestry.

In Western Pennsylvania at New Brighton, Thomas Livingston Kennedy, another manufacturer on the commission, has his home.

The one member of the commission who knows all about the great oil industries of the United States is P. C. Boyle, editor and proprietor of the Oil City Derrick. Mr. Boyle, who is a veteran of the late war, is known to every man in the United States who has ever been identified with the petroleum industry.

The colleges and universities and the educational life of Pennsylvania are represented by W. C. Gretzinger, Ph. D., registrar of Bucknell university, Lewisburg, Pa. Mr. Gretzinger is one of the youngest members of the commission, but he is at the business head of the largest educational institution in Pennsylvania, with the exception of the university of Pennsylvania. He is active and prominent in the business and social life of Central Pennsylvania.

Hiram Young, esq., is the dean of Pennsylvania journalists, being the oldest active newspaper man in the state. He is editor and propritor​ of the York Daily Dispatch. During President Harrison's administration he was postmaster of York.

Other members of the commission are Thomas J. Keenan, jr., of Pittsburg, Thomas M. Jones and George M. Wanbaugh of Harrisburg, J. H. Zerby of Pottsville, Asa Packer Blakeslee of Mauch Chunk and James P. Deininger of Sullivan county.

PORCINES ON EXHIBITION.

Poland China Boar Weighs More Than a Half Ton.

The whole south side of the live stock grounds is filled with hogs. Everybody is well pleased with the display, and many declare it to be the finest collection of swine that has ever been seen in the state. The pick of the stock from the half dozen best hog producing states is there. It is of all the common ages and in size ranges from the pig of a few weeks old up to A. J. Tecumseh, Thomas Stevenson's Poland China boar that weighs fifty pounds more than half a ton. There are any number of animals in the pens that run up to 700 and 800 pounds. John Blain of Pawnee [?] old, and weigh 540 pounds apiece.

This is just an indication of the general quality of the stock in this department. In the lot are a great many prize winners, and some of the exhibitors have the honor of displaying a yard or two square of premium badges.

Up to the present time the exhibitors are:

Poland Chinas—Harvey Johnson, Logan, Ia.; C. M. Irwin, Wichita, Kas.; J. Mandelbaum, Blue Hill, Neb.; Hoover & Harrison, Oskaloosa, Ia.; Thomas Stevenson, Fairfield, Ia.; J. H. Van Buren, Quimby, Ia.; D. F. Risk and Risk & Gabbert, Weston, Mo.; Kirkpatrick & Gresham, Connor, Kas.; D. S. Roush, Grand Island, Neb.; A. W. Albertson & Son, Inwood, Ia.; William Uhe & Sons, Papillion, Neb.; John O'Connell, Malcolm, Neb.; John Blain, Pawnee City, Neb.; J. R. Watts, Waterloo, Neb.

Duroc Jerseys—John Henderson, Panora, Ia.; D. S. Roush, Grand Island, Neb.; G. W. Trone, Rushville, Ill.; W. H. Taylor & Sons, Lincoln, Neb.; William Roberts & Son, Paton, Ia.; H. B. Louden & Son, Clay Center, Neb.; C. H. Searle, Edgar, Neb.

Berkshires—J. W. Townley, Octavia, Neb., Seven Oak farm, New Sharon, Ia.; John B. Thompson, Plattsburg, Mo.; Harris & McMahan, Lamine, Mo.

Victorias—George F. Davis, Dyer, Ind.

Chester Whites—John M. Ketcham & Sons, Love Lake, Mo.; Van Derslice Bros., Cheney, Neb.; G. W. Trone, Rushville, Ill.

Essex—L. E. Mahan & Co., Malcolm, Neb.

GLIMPSES OF THE MIDWAY.

Old Plantation Is Adding to Its Unique Show.

The program at the Old Plantation has been greatly improved lately and while the show has been very superior it is better today than ever. The cake walk is better, the camp meeting scene is better and the buck and wing dancing and the quartet singing elicits enthusiastic applause. Since Mr. McConnell decided to reduce the price of admission from 20 to 10 cents the attendance has been something enormous. Mr. McConnell claims that his show now enjoys the patronage of 25 per cent of all Midway visitors and from the way the people pour into the Old Plantation at each platform, one is inclined to believe that Mr. McConnell is very modest in his statements. The Old Plantation is a great show and the people, especially the Omaha people, appreciate the fact.

Fritz Mueller's new place, the Live Stock Exchange, near the stock exhibit, is a success, as is every enterprise that he takes hold of. It is centrally located, the building is handsome and inviting and when the visitors steps inside he gets the best for the least amount of money. Beer, fresh and pure, is kept on tap and cold lunches of all kinds are on sale. Schlitz Pavilion, of which Mr. Muller is proprietor, is crowded every day, not only with old customers, but new ones who have heard so much of the place.

A new feature of the entertainment at the German Village is the pie eating contest. The last one gave such genuine pleasure and satisfaction that the management has decided to have another. A dozen urchins and rag muffins will take part and three prizes will be given to the three who finish first. The contestants will eat the pies from ordinary pie pans, placed on the bottom of chairs. Contestant's​ hands will be tied behind them and they will be forced to get on their knees while eating. The contest will take place in the next two or three days and when it takes place a large crowd is sure to attend.

After considerable delay, trouble and expense the management of the Great Omaha Wild West Show has succeeded in raising the quarantine on the Mexican bulls and today at 4 o'clock a bull fight will take place in the Wild West Show. Five professional bull fighters have been secured and the fight promises to be very interesting and sensational. From all indications the large grand stand will be packed this afternoon.

ENTERTAINED BY THE TRIBES.

Scalp Dance Will Be a Unique Attraction.

Two characteristic Indian tribal dances will be given this afternoon and evening, both unique and entertaining. At 4:30 the Wichitas and friendly tribes will give the horn dance peculiar only to the Wichitas. It is a ceremonial prayer originally for the increase of the buffalo, but since none are left to increase the prayer is for the return of the big ruminant of the plains. Towanconi Jim, the chief, will give an address in Wichita, which will be interpreted in the sign language.

This evening will be given the scalp dance, both unique and grewsome​, by the Assinaboines and their northern neighbors. It is most peculiar as an Indian dance in that it is danced by the women only, with blackened faces,   wearing their warriors' costumes and dangling from long poles the scalps captured by their warriors in the last victorious campaign. Prof. Mooney, who has arranged for the dances, says that it is a style like that adopted by the young women of today in wearing soldiers' field hats, cross guns and other ornaments of war at its victorious conclusion. In the dance, however, some genuine old scalps will be used.

A quickly gotten up sham battle was given by the Indians yesterday afternoon, with a big crowd present and much enthusiasm. The plan of battle of Saturday last was followed.

In the center of the battlefield is being built a log house, a model of that occupied by Sitting Bull at the time of his death, and a picturesque feature of the next battle will be the last fight and death of Sitting Bull. Red Tomahawk, the Sioux policeman who killed him, will be here soon to be stage manager in that act.

The next battle will be given Thursday afternoon at 4:30.

CHILDREN'S JUBILEE.

Song Festival Being Prepared—Chorus of Small Voices.

Musical Director Kelly is working up enthusiasm for the Children's jubilee Saturday, October 16, which will resolve itself into a children's song festival in the afternoon. For that day the exposition management has made the reduced race of 15 cents for all children of 15 years or under. All who will participate in the afternoon chorus are requested to report at the Auditorium at 9:30 a. m., the jubilee chorus taking place at 2:30 p. m. on the plaza. To all children volunteering to participate handsome badges will be given in the morning, and it is being arranged by Mr. Kelly with the leading concessionaires that children wearing those badges will be admitted at reduced rates.

It is anticipated that on the occasion there will be from 5,000 to 10,000 children on the grounds, and from them it is hoped to select the chorus of 1,000 voices, 500 from Omaha and an equal number from visiting schools out in the state. The parents of children of such musical ability as developed in the public schools and whose children would like to join the chorus are requested to write in advance to Mr. Kelly, giving names and ages.

WOMAN'S BOARD DISBANDS.

Farewell Occasion Yesterday at Conclusion of Efficient Work.

For the last time the woman's board of the exposition met yesterday, and with lingering regrets the members bade good-bye to the work they inaugurated and now nearing a successful end. The board has met quarterly, and yesterday it was decided that the executive committee should do the work that is left, so a social day was enjoyed.

There was a greeting by Major Clarkson and an address by the president, Mrs. Sawyer. This was at the boys' parlor in the Boys and Girls' building at 10 a. m., and then luncheon was had in the library. The sentiments and ladies responding were: "Bureau of Education," Mrs. Kerr; "Woman's Sphere," Mrs. Hollenbeck; "The Genus Homo," Miss McHugh; "Finances," Mrs. McDowell; "The Scapegoat," Mrs. Ford; "Women as a Classified Exhibit," Mrs. Field; "Olive Branches," Mrs. Dutton; "The Executive Committee," Mrs. Towne. In the afternoon the courtesies of the Midway were enjoyed.

Those present from out of the city were: Mrs. A. J. Sawyer and Mrs. A. H. Field, Lincoln; Mrs. McDowell, Fairbury; Mrs. Hollenbeck, Fremont; Mrs. Giffert, West Point; Mrs. Kerr, Ansley; Mrs. Hunter, Broken Bow; Mrs. Dutton, Hastings, and Mrs. Key, Council Bluffs.

The work of the twenty-seven members of the woman's board has been the charge of all the educational exhibits, children's excursions, educational exhibits, children's excursions, educational conventions and the Boys' and Girls' building. All were much gratified at the successes attained, and left for their homes feeling that their work had been well done.

ITS FINANCIAL SHOWING.

Forty-Five Per Cent Dividend is Now in Prospect.

With $84,107.34 in the treasury in excess of all of the floating indebtedness, the exposition began the month of October, conceded to be the best, as well as the last, of the exposition. And as for more money that is to come, it may be observed by the following report that the exposition began the month with a $235,000 pace for receipts, and, after allowing $100,000 for the entertainments of peace jubilee week and the resplendent events that mark the whole month as the peer of all the others, there will be an additional surplus of $135,000 if September's pace be kept up, but with what is to come, there are sanguine exposition authorities that believe it will be doubled. Without allowing for the easily anticipated increase for October, there will [?]

This is the report of October 1:

Floating debt June 1$250,000 00
July 1 225,000 00
August 1 127,984 22
September 1 80,695 93
October 1 51,583 62

RECEIPTS.

Admissions—
Prior to June 1 and commutation tickets$ 19,248 77
June 80,001 85
July 81,178 95
August 139,174 00
September 182,768 75
Total$502,372 32
Concessions—
Pro-exposition period$ 81,054 92
June 25,471 04
July 35,524 66
August 45,803 59
September 52,705 83
Total$240,560 04
Total expenditures to June 1$ 751,002 58
Total expenditures June 1 to October 1 547,638 40
Total$1,298,640 98
Estimated operating expenses for October$ 75,000 00
Peace jubile​ and other incidentals 25,000 00
Total$100,000 00
Total stock subscribed$484,405 19
Total donations subscribed 163,070 20
Total$647,475 39
Total number subscribers, 6,641.
Cash in treasurer's custody October 1$124,411 25
Cash in secretary's custody October 1 11,279 71
Total$135,690 96

Mexican Bulls Not Coming.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Kansas City, Mo., Oct. 4.—Colonel A. H. Dean, chief of the stock yards bureau of animal industry, has received orders from the head of the department at Washington to have the Mexican bulls confiscated a few days ago, and quarantined on their way to Omaha, either returned to Mexico or sold for immediate slaughter.

There were only four of the ugly beasts in the car, and so far they have cost $110. If they are sold on the open market they would probably bring less than $10 per head. The animals were imported from Old Mexico by E. Mattox and billed to Omaha, but after having passed the officials on the border it was learned that they were to be used in an exhibition of bull fighting at the Omaha exposition, and Colonel Dean confiscated the property and placed the bulls in quarantine as soon as they arrived in this city. Since that time the owner has had the animals disinfected and in every other way attempted to satisfy the officers at Washington, who finally put an end to his scheme by the order to sell or return them to Old Mexico.

To Confederate Veterans.

New Orleans, La., Oct. 4.—Adjutant General Morgan, by orders of General J. B. Gordon, commanding United Confederate Veterans, today issued an order, stating that a cordial fraternal letter has been received at these headquarters from General T. S. Clarkson, past commander of the Grand Army of Republic, now general manager of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition at Omaha, especially inviting all ex-confederates to attend that exposition during Peace Jubilee week, from October 10 to 15.

The general commanding desires this generous invitation made known to all United Confederate Veteran camps and to all ex-confederates, so that as many as desire can attend the interesting and patriotic ceremonies.

CHILDREN FROM THE HOME

Manager Lemen Takes Several Parties of Juveniles to the Exposition.

Little Ones Enjoy the Great Show and Furnish Entertainment in Cairo Street.

Half Price Charged Them on the Midway and Special Rate Granted by the Exposition Managers.

The Omaha Bridge and Terminal company some time since issued to Manager J. G. Lemen of the Christian Home of this city ten passes, each of which gave free passage over the lines of the company for ten children of the home, accompanied by Mr. Lemen and a teacher. The exposition management supplemented this by admitting each of these parties for $1. Mr. Lemen has already taken to the exposition six parties of children each from the home, and before the exposition closes will take over four more.

Most of these children are from 6 to 12 years old and never before in their little lives have they had such an experience. Inside the grounds these parties of home children have attracted much attention. They have been admitted free of charge to the Libbey glass works, where each of them has received a beautiful souvenir; to the Scenic Railway, Hagenback's and the Ostrich Farm, and at nearly all the other places on the Midway where they should be taken only half price has been charged.

These little groups of orphan children from the home have attracted attention wherever they have gone about the exposition grounds. At each visit Manager Lemen has made it a point to call at the general offices of the exposition, and each time Manager Wakefield has manifested the deepest interest in the children and has dropped his work to greet them personally and shake hands with each one. The children are quite well drilled in singing and a few days ago Mr. Lemen asked Manager Wakefield if he would like to hear a song from the group then present. The youngsters began "Jesus, Lover of My Soul," and sang two stanzas. The little song stopped the machinery of the whole office and ever clerk and other employe opened his wicket widow and listened until the conclusion.

Another interesting incident occurred on the Midway opposite the Streets of Cairo. Mr. Lemen, with his children, met two old friends of the home at this point, and after some conversation the latter expressed a desire to hear the children sing. There was all about the noise of a large crowd, and added to it the din of the drums and cries of the "spielers." Scarcely had the children sung two lines, however, before there was a hush. The men about the entrance to the Streets of Cairo hushed each other, and as the tuneful notes sounded clearer and clearer people came from every side and gathered in a great crowd about the little band. At the conclusion of the song one of the swarthy Egyptians pressed forward and asked Mr. Lemen who the children were, and when he was told they were orphans from the home across the river he appeared deeply affected.

The children manifest the liveliest interest in the various things they see at the exposition, and their visits furnish the chief topics of conversation at the home.

 
ALL MONIES RECEIVED FROM THE BUSINESS OF THE PAPER GO TO BENEFIT OF THE ORPHANAGE
THE CHRISTIAN HOME.
The Christian Home is a weekly religious and family paper, published in the interest of a charitable institution for the care and training of orphans and destitute children, known as the Orphans' Christian Home, which is supported wholly by free-will offerings of the lovers of Christ and humanity.

OFFICE OF
The Christian Home

J. G. LEMEN, Editor and Manager.

Sec. John A. Wakefield,
Dear Sir:

Probably you noticed, but if you did not, I take pleasure in calling your attention to the enclosed article, clipped from today's Omaha World-Herald.

Again returning thanks to you for your generous consideration of the little ones of the Home, I am

Yours Truly

J. G. Lenzen
 

NATIONAL FUNERAL DIRECTORS

Seventeenth Annual Session at the Dellone Hotel.

A lively boy of men of melancholy occupation assembled at Odd Fellows' hall yesterday morning. It was the National Funeral Directors' association, for its seventeenth annual session. There weer​ about 100 delegates. President John H. Sharer called the meeting to order. Mayor Moores welcomed the directors, and George L. Thomas, Milwaukee, responded.

The address of the president was exceptionally interesting, and replete with wise suggestions, containing many recommendations.

Secretary Naulty's report showed that 15,125 directors were represented, and that twenty-two states had delegates in attendance.

The afternoon with the association was devoted to routine matters chiefly. President Sharer named the various committees, standing committees made their reports, and under the head of new business a resolution was adopted to the effect that the president name a committee of three who shall be empowered to consult with the government authorities with reference to the removal of American soldiers who died in battle or in hospitals during the late Spanish war, and to represent the association in the matter. The government is considering the advisability of removing the dead from Cuban and Porto Rican soil to the United States. The resolution was discussed at great length, some feeling that it were better to prepare a good cemetery in those lands than to take the risk of removing the remains. The discussion assumed, to some extent, a somewhat scientific consideration of the yellow fever and the germ of the disease, and its probable effects in soils, climate and caskets.

The president announced the various committees, the chairmen of which are as follows: On president's address, George L. Thomas; secretary's report, F. B. Waters, California; finance, A. E. Sossay, Minnesota; place of next meeting, Fred Hulburg, New York; obituary, J. B. Smith, New York; resolutions, J. S. Pierce, Pennsylvania.

Executive Committee—W. P. Hohnshuh, Iowa City; J. S. Pearce, Ardmore, Pa.; Franklin Dickinson, Pennsylvania.

Legislation—Percy B. Dixon, Fred Hurlburg, W. P. Hohnshuh, S. B. Purigo and John C. Cohill.

Constitution and By-Laws—W. H. Newlan, A. E. Sossay and H. M. Kilpatrick.

On Organization—P. F. Bell, F. B. Waters, William Danspier, W. B. Raymond and H. D. Wells.

The convention adjourned at 4 o'clock until 9:30 this morning. The ladies of the party, some twenty in number, were taken to the Creighton theater yesterday afternoon by the local committee. Last night the delegates, nearly 100, were taken to the exposition, being guests of the undertakers of Omaha.

OHIO HAS ITS TURN

Buckeyes Lead the Procession at the Exposition Today.

MANY ENTHUSIASTIC VISITORS HERE

Delegations from the New Mother of Presidents Joined by Others.

GOVERNOR HOLCOMB'S WARM WELCOME

Nebraska's Executive Extends the Verbal Glad Hand to Ohio.

RESPONSE FROM GOVERNOR BUSHNELL

Kindly Sentiments of the West Appreciated by the Great Central Commonwealth—Toledo's Celebration Brought to the Front.

Total admissions yesterday29,473
Total to date1,790,293

The Ohio day exercises which were postponed from Wednesday, were held in the Auditorium this morning at 11 o'clock. The Toledo Marine band, before the opening of the exercises, pondered [?] hall was filled long before the speakers took the platform. The last to arrive were Governor Bushnell and his staff. As the crowd caught sight of the governor it was a signal for the tumult of applause that did not cease until he had taken his seat in the center of the platform and had risen to acknowledge his enthusiastic reception.

President Wattles of the exposition acted as chairman and after calling the gathering to order he introduced Governor Holcomb of Nebraska who made the address of welcome on the part of the state. He said:

I know that a great many Buckeyes have been transplanted and have grown up on our western prairies. There is a similarity in the history of the two states. Ohio was once a state in which our ancestors despaired of establishing a civilization such as they then enjoyed. It was a brave people that broke over the barriers of the mountain system and came down into the Ohio valley. Ohio, settled by that sturdy citizenship, is an imperial state. She has contributed as much as any other state to the development of the privileges which we all enjoy. It is an inspiration for us to study the great Buckeyes who have done so much for the union. She has almost robbed the Old Dominion of her title as mother of presidents.

A great territory has come together, not to celebrate any event, but to show to the world what they have been doing for the last quarter of a century. We ask you to consider what are the possibilities of the future. We hope that your stay with us will be pleasant, that you come again and come often.

Governor Bushnell's Response.

Asa S. Bushnell, governor of Ohio, was the next speaker. He said:

Ohio rejoices in this exploitation of the growth of the western states. No praise can be more sincere than ours. We are mindful of the claim you have to the approbation of those who admire advancement. The children of Ohio are found everywhere in the west. It is a pleasure to us who come from the land of their birth to note that they are taking a prominent part in the affairs of their adopted states.

When much of the history of our state was written this was known as the Indian territory. Now it is one of the garden spots of the world. This exposition typifies the virtues of your aims and efforts. The view we shall have will move us to a spirit of emulation. Ohio must do as well at a later date. When her time shall come she must send her greeting westward to bid the western people to come and worship at her shrine of industry and peace. Five years hence she holds her centennial in the beautiful city of Toledo. Come to us then as we have come to you today, with hearts swelling with pride and joy that such a spectacle and occasion as this can be, with generous thoughts and words of kindness, with willing eyes to see the triumphs you have achieved and with ready hands to help lead the way to still higher paths of honor for all our people.

Ohio has exulted in this opportunity to do even a small part toward making this undertaking the glowing success it has proven to be. It is our hope that the bond between the states shall grow stronger year by year by reason of this closer communion. Cordially we accept and treasure the assurances of amity that have been spoken. May your state in the years to come feel that there has been the same steady advance and the same virility and power which made possible the remarkable results which are crystalized​ in the exposition that lies before us today.

Other Speeches Made.

Following Governor Bushnell, Hon. John L. Webster spoke a few words of welcome in behalf of the exposition, pledging the support of the west in the undertaking which the Ohioans are planning for 1903 in the city of Toledo. Colonel James Kilbourne, president of the Ohio Centennial Exposition, was the next speaker. He briefly outlined the expectations of his state in regard to the enterprise of which he has been placed at the head, and said that a great deal is to be learned from the Transmississippi Exposition which will be treasured up to make a great success of Ohio's show.

This afternoon the crowd will be swelled by the Knights Templar, who pass through the city today on their way to the conclave at Pittsburg.

A feature of the program this afternoon will be another sham battle between the Indians on the North tract at 4:30 o'clock. After the battle there will be a representation of how an Indian is scalped. The first showing of the live stock show toow​ place this morning in the amphitheater west of the Dairy building. This afternoon the animals will continue to be brought into the rings. The decisions of the judges will not be announced until the close of the exhibition, a week from Saturday.

Tomorrow is P. E. O. society, Knox college and New Jersey day. The P. E. O. society will make the Nebraska building their headquarters and hold a reception in that place tomorrow morning from 10 to 12 o'clock.

EMPIRE STATE'S BIG CELEBRATION

New York to Be Represented by a Party of Distinguished People.

New York day will be observed at the exposition Saturday by one of the most distinguished parties of visitors of the exposition season. There will be no small number of the Empire state's representative citizens in the party. Major Wheeler, who is the state's representative at the grounds, has been in telegraphic communication with the New York men and up to last night had received positive assurance of the attendance of enough to give the affair an air of unusual importance. The first delegation of the visitors will reach Omaha tomorrow morning. It will comprise twelve members of the New York Produce exchange. Most of these will be accompanied by their ladies. Another party will represent the Merchants' exchange of New York. This will include S. C. Mead and wife, Charles T. Roat and William R. Corwin, assistant secretary of the exchange.

Hon. C. M. Depew, who is to be the orator of the day, will reach Omaha Friday evening. The personnel of his party is not known. G. Creighton Webb, brother of W. Seward Webb, will also reach Omaha Friday evening, as will Hon. Jacob Amas of Syracuse and Henry B. Hebert of New York City.

From Buffalo another distinguished party is coming, headed by Mayor Diehl. In it are Captain Brinker, president of the Pan-American Exposition association; Treasurer Loutz and Secretary R. C. Hill of the same association; Herbert Bisell, brother of the former postmaster general, Wilson Bissell, and fully a dozen others of the representative men of the Bison City. These will be accompanied by their ladies. Aside from these there are a number of smaller parties coming, attracted by the celebration of New York day at the exposition and the great Peace jubilee celebration during the week that follows.

TOPEKANS HAVE REAL GOOD TIME.

Circulate About the Grounds and Enjoy Themselves Hugely.

The people who came up from Topeka, Kan., to visit the exposition made their presence felt yesterday at every turn of the road. There were only 700 of them, but they circulated around until some people had an idea that they numbered nearer 7,000,000. In the first place the Boyd cadets, forty-five young women, dressed in blue and carrying army rifles and canteens, marched out to the grounds, following their drum corps. They gave a drill on the Plaza and another over on the main court, after which they marched around the Midway and back to the Plaza, where they drilled again. After that they rested for a couple of hours, when they went at it again and from then until after dark they were marching or drilling, being applauded over and over again.

Just after the Boyd cadets reached the grounds, Miss Anna Rose, queen of the Karnival Knights of Topeka, and her suite, made up of courtiers and ladies of the court, reached the ground. They visited most of the main buildings, stopping for a brief period at the Hawaiian exhibit, where she met Commissioner Shingle, and then went to Markel's, where she and her party lunched. During the afternoon Miss Rose held a reception at the Kansas building, where she met a large number of the Omaha people and the Kansas pepole​ who are in the city.

Nebraska Commission's Finances.

The following statement shows the condition of the state appropriation made for exposition purposes. This report is for the month of September, with the balance on hand on October 1:

Vouchers drawn for officersDrawn during SeptemberPreviously expendedTotal expended
Salaries and employes wages$ 512.50$ 6,686.98$ 7,199.48
Furniture and fixtures 12.50 290.45 302.95
Current expenses 520.70 1,952.33 2,473.03
Construction 200.41 25,169.32 25,369.73
Agriculture dep't 348.41 7,189.64 7,538.05
Horticult'al dep't 2,080.70 5,207.71 7,288.41
Apiary dep't 197.39 1,832.14 2,029.53
Live stock dep't 85.35 5,437.84 5,523.19
Dairy dep't 837.80 1,328.25 2,166.05
Poultry dep't 173.41 1,910.78 2,084.19
Flor'cul'al dep't 197.60 1,642.73 1,840.33
Educational dep't 364.57 9,330.17 9,694.74
Miscellan'us space account 3,560.25 3,560.25
Postage account 210.00 210.00
Building employes 965.00 3,366.17 4,331.17
Sod house acc't 500.00 500.00
Decorations of the State building 77.19 1,662.04 1,739.23
Nebraska Cereal Cooking dep't 100.00 400.00 500.00
Nebraska Ceramic club 300.00 300.00
Attractions acc't 759.75 759.75
Repairs and improvements 260.97 260.97
Totals$6,673.53$78,997.52$85,671.05
[?]expended balance, $14,328.85.
 

Missourians Are Surely Coming.

President Sterrett of the Missouri state commission returned yesterday from St. Louis, where he went some days ago for the purpose of working up the details for Missouri day at the exposition, which will be observed on October 10. He says that the people of the state are becoming very much interested and that he will not be surprised if from 5,000 to 10,000 Missourians are in attendance.

President Sterrett has addressed letters to all of the editors of the state, urging them to call the attention of their readers to the Missouri date and the race that the railroads have made from all Missouri points—1 cent per mile. The tickets for the trip to Omaha will go on sale October 8, and will be limited, so that the parties coming may return on October 12, thus giving them from three to four days at the exposition.

As yet the program for the Missouri day exercises has not been completed, but it is in course of preparation by President Sterrett and will be out in a day or two.

THE AWARD JURIES.

Now that the exposition is gradually nearing a close the delicate task of making the awards of medals and diplomas must be taken up. Under the rules of the exposition the award juries are appointed on the basis of one juror chosen by competing exhibitors in any class, one juror named by the exposition and a third selected by the two. This rule, if honestly carried into effect, should be fair to all concerned.

There is, however, always some danger of chicanery and underhanded scheming whereby the finding of a jury is fore-ordained and inferior exhibits given preference to which they are not entitled. As a matter of precaution against abuse and to prevent just complaints of discrimination and favoritism the utmost vigilance should be exercised by exhibitors who have a voice in the selection of juries and the representatives of the exposition, whose only interest should be to reach impartial verdicts in each contest.

The greatest scandals in former expositions have arisen from the juggling and corrupt manipulation of awards through incompetent or dishonest judges and combines between preferred exhibitors and exposition officials or their subordinates. Such scandals should if possible be avoided by the Transmississippi Exposition, which in the main has been so far conducted satisfactorily to all classes of its patrons. The exposition management owes it to the public and to its own reputation that no exhibitor shall be in position to display a prize which he has not obtained by merit.

While it is not possible for any jury or set of juries to make awards that will not rouse some complaint in the part of those whose expectations have been disappointed, flagrant partiality and notorious favoritism to any exhibitors or class of exhibitors would seriously impair the value of all awards and reflect discreditably upon the management responsible for it. This responsibility cannot be shifted upon subordinates who may use their positions for private gain, nor is it to be borne by the Department of Exhibits alone because it has had control of installation of exhibits and selection of the juries. When the history of the exposition is summed up the responsibility for any serious blunder will be charged up to the whole executive board, which is presumed to exercise reasonable precaution against abuses in all departments.

PLANS FOR PRESIDENT'S TRIP

Schedule, if Carried Out, Will Land Mr. McKinley in Omaha Tuesday Night.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 5.—(Special Telegram.)—The tireless work of the committee sent by the Transmississippi Exposition to arrange the details not only for President McKinley's train to the exposition but for a train to carry many renowned people distinguished in arms, in education and diplomacy, is making itself felt in Washington. As finally arranged the president's train will leave Chicago via the Northwestern Tuesday morning, stopping a short time at Clinton, Cedar Rapids, Marshalltown, Boone and slowing up at a number of other points [?]o'clock. Wednesday will be president's day and according to the program the chief executive will be given a great ovation, spending the whole day in and about the exposition grounds.

He will leave Thursday morning via Burlington line and will run through Iowa during daylight, stopping at Creston, Ottumwa, Burlington, Monmouth and Galesburg en route to St. Louis, making his headquarters at the Southern hotel and leaving via Terre Haute and Logansport for Chicago, which will be reached Saturday afternoon.

The Gate City of the West train carrying representatives of the army, navy, government officials and numbers of the diplomatic corps will leave Washington over the Baltimore & Ohio Monday morning at 8 o'clock and will run to Chicago with stops only that engines may be changed. From Chicago the train will precede the president over the Northwestern and, if thought advisable, will make two or three stops en route. This is not, however, regarded as likely, as it is the desire of Mr. Babcock of the transportation department of the Exposition to arrive in Omaha about fifteen minutes before the president's train, members of both trains joining the procession to their several apartments.

Senator Thurston has not allowed grass to grow under his feet since he has been in Washington, having by dint of hard work secured for Nebraska one of ten additional revenue agents provided for under recent act of congress. The appointment of the agent will be made shortly. Colonel Chase, present surveyor of customs, will be appointed custodian of both old and new government buildings at Omaha.

Assistant Secretary Meiklejohn, in view of the agitation going on in Nebraska over the colonelcy of the First Nebraska, now at Manila, stated today that the colonelcy of the First Nebraska can only be filled by the governor's appointment. The reply of Governor Holcomb to a letter from the War department in relation to mustering out of one of the two Nebraska regiments now in the field has been received, but as far as can be learned Holcomb has failed to elect which regiment shall be discharged. He talks a good deal about sick soldiers, but evidently fails to remember that the boys who want to go home on account of illness can readily do so on application through the proper military channels.

P. E. O. CONGRESS NOW OPEN

Day's Program is Devoted Entirely to the E Sisterhood.

Part of the Afternoon is Given Over to a Reception of Out-of-Town Members and the Meeting Makes an Auspicious Start.

The first session of the P. E. O. Congress was held this morning at the First Congregational church at Nineteenth and Davenport streets.

Preceding the morning meeting of the sisterhood there was an informal reception for out-of-town members. Members from far and near renewed their old friendships and formed new ones. Fully 100 women were present, though the state convention in South Omaha, which is still in session, detained many. Before afternoon, however, this will have adjourned and its members will attend in a body.

The meeting was called to order by the supreme president, Mrs. Flora C. Herring, who introduced the executive committee, Mesdames Herring, West, Campbell, Barnes and Bryant. Mrs. Herring spoke of the honor accorded the sisterhood in opening the women's congress and expressed the sisterhood's appreciation.

At the request of the audience, rose and sang the Sisterhood's ode. Then Mrs. Berta C. Fox of Nelson, Nebraska, offered prayer invoking peace and comfort on the Sisterhood and womankind. Inconclusion​ she read the estimate of woman in the bible.

By special request, Mrs. Belle Haecker of Hampton, Ia., sang the "Holy City," after which Mrs. F. B. Bryant delivered the address of welcome, saying:

"It is an old saying that a woman cannot keep a secret. Now who started this report, which has come to be a proverb? It must have been a man. But in this twentieth century woman can look with scorn on this imputation. If you don't believe it ask some of our members what P. E. O. means.

"Omaha is proud to greet you and offers you the freedom of the city. But please observe Mayor Moores' modest request that you leave the new station, for its the only one we have. Though if you come next year you will find another.

"Few people realize the vast resources of our state and of the west, but I am sure [?]

Mrs. Kittie Loughbridge Dutton of Hastings delivered the greeting from the Bureau of Education of the Transmississippi Exposition. She traced woman's work from the birth of Christ. "In the life of the mother of our Savior we see unceasing love and mercy for the poor and unfortunate. Woman has taken Christ's saying, 'The poor you have always with ye,' to heart. To whom do people go for sympathy and consolation in time of trouble? To women. Look at the gloriour​ work of Florence Nightingale during the Crimean war, which opened the way for the work of our American women on the Potomac and in the south, and of which the Red Cross is the capstone.

"You hear more concerning the hero than the heroine in times of war, but unjustly I think. What mother, sister or sweetheart hesitated when her dear ones were summoned in our last war? Did any of them flinch? No! They said 'Go! and God bless you!' All honor to the heroes—and to these who bore the heroes.

"Steadily has woman marched upward. More gates are open to her and we feel a just pride at the sight. Women, realizing that they should occupy the crowning place in country, church and home, evolved a plan and success will be theirs in the end. The P. E. O. is doing grand work toward this end and we extend greeting to all."

Mrs. Herring Responds.

In responding to the welcome and greeting, President Herring said: "We should be proud and pleased at Omaha's greetings. We organized in 1869 at Mt. Pleasant, Ia. Since then reunions have cemented old friendships and been the cause of new and undying vows. Throughout our existence 7 has been our magic motto. Seven wowmen​ formed the sisterhood; seven members are required to start a chapter, and the members must be admitted in multiples of seven. Seven chapters form a state chapter, and seven presidents of state chapters form the supreme council. Our object is to live on a broad plain. For we shall be judged not by what we have done, but what we might have done. In the name of the sisterhood, I thank the chapter and citizens of Nebraska for their hospitality."

The president of the Chicago chapter, Mrs. E. M. Pratt, was then introduced. She spoke on the objects and aims of P. E. O. "As the Star of the East 190 years ago shone on him who brought peace on earth, good will to men, so our star has the same sweet thoughts. Love bears to spiritual life the same relation that electricity does to physicial​. Love is the epitome of life and makes it one long, sweet song. We appeal not only for an intellectual but for a sweet, pure home life. For life is an education, not a holiday. It is the smiles and sympathy that women know so well how to bestow that count. Truth should be our highest aim. We should try to be a help to others. Self-sacrifice is woman's noblest privilege. It is not to the intellectual woman that men go for love and help, but to the warm-hearted and loving. The world is at our feet. Woman as an aid and counsellor of man, fighting side by side with him, can purify the world.

"God's idea of woman was as a helpmate to man. But we have fallen far short. Look at the family of the new woman. Oftentimes the husband must be nurse and comforter of his children.

"The glory of a home is the mother. I believe in the Trinity of the Father, Mother and child. That will create trust and truth at home. Let our aim be for the future what it has been in the past, 'Love and being loved.'"

Mrs. Herring then introduced Mrs. Walter Campbell, president of the grand chapter of Iowa, who read the pathetic story of "Tom Connell, an Irishman." It was a dialect story and Mrs. Campbell read it in a delightful Irish brogue.

The morning exercises closed with a clever monologue, "The Obstruction Hat," which Miss E. M. Crawford, the principal of the Nebraska School of Oratory, recited. Miss Crawford has a charming voice. So delighted was her audience that it insisted on an encore, to which she responded with "So Was I," the story of a timid schoolboy.

This afternoon's papers will be by Mrs. Alice Babb, wife of Judge Babb of Iowa; Miss Clara Duval, Miss Corbett of Montana, Miss Dysart of Missouri and Mrs. Munro of South Omaha, interspersed with music and recitations.

 

SMITH THE GUEST OF HONOR

Postmaster General Tendered a Complimentary Reception at The Bee Building.

MANY CITIZENS PAY THEIR RESPECTS

Beautiful Court Presents an Entrancing Scene While the Visitors Are Presented to Distinguished Editor, Diplomat and Statesman.

Hon. Charles Emory Smith of Philadelphia, postmaster general of the United States, editor of the Philadelphia Press and former minister to Russia, was the guest of honor at a public reception tendered him last evening by Edward Rosewater, editor of The Omaha Bee, in the court of The Bee building.

It was one of the most notable affairs that has even taken place in The Bee building, where so many distinguished public men have met the citizens of Nebraska, and was attended by a large concourse of people. Each visitor was personally presented to the representative of President McKinley's cabinet, and many of them enjoyed quite a little intercourse with him. The reception committee consisted of Edward Rosewater, General Charles F. Manderson, who presented the visitors to Postmaster General Smith, who in turn introduced them to Assistant Postmaster Woodard, and the latter to United States Judge Munger and Colonel J. J. Dickey.

The receiving committee occupied a post at the north end of the handsome court. A dais slightly raised above the level of the court and spread with oriental rugs formed the station of the host, the guests of honor and the members of the reception committee. In front of them hung two large American flags, gracefully crossed and suspended from the balcony of an upper floor. Back of them appeared a transplanted conservatory rich with rare plants.

Decorations Most Effective.

The grand court of The Bee building never looked prettier than it did last evening. Brilliant with hundreds of multi-colored incandescent lights the effect was softened with several choice collections of stately palms admirably arranged on the staircase and throughout the court. The most notable display of flowers was that which completely filled the fine marble fountain in the middle of the court. Instead of the usual jets of water in the tessellated basin appeared a lavish display of palms and ferns rising to a height of a dozen feet above the marble top of the fountain, one beautiful palm forming an artistic apex for the floral pyramid. About the base of the court, on all sides, were distributed more palms, while the broad stairs leading to the first main floor were lined with the same flowers and the effect of the whole was not unlike the charming appearance of the richly decorated placita of some rare Mexican mansion.

The spotless white walls of the court shone brilliantly in the reflected light of the variegated electric lights and this resplendent scene was happily broken by the moving beaux and belles about the corridors of the upper floors. The pretty gowns of the visitors looked all the more attractive in these points of vantage and the picture in the balconies of the second and third floors combined pleasingly with the animated sight in the court proper. The balustrades of the upper corridors were appropriately trimmed with red, white and blue bunting, draped in graceful festoons about the four sides of the court. Throughout the evening the Sutorius Mandolin orchestra, assisted by the Misses Lowe, rendered delightful music from the second balcony.

The guests began to arrive shortly after 8 o'clock and continued to pay their respects to the well known journalist and diplomat until after 10. After the guests had met Mr. Smith they passed out through the other side of the court and took elevators to the seventh floor of The Bee building. Here refreshments, with coffee and punch, were served to all who called, in the large assembly room. Several hundred of the visitors took the opportunity to inspect the composing rooms, stereotyping department and press rooms of The Bee after being served with refreshments.

Some Who Attended.

Among those noticed among the out-of-town visitors were: E. E. Wonder, postmaster, Holmesville, Neb.; W. S. Raker, Gretna, Neb.; F. G. Simmons, Seward, Neb.; Ross Hammond, Fremont, Neb.; Postmaster Williamson, Riverton, Neb.; Postmaster Thomas A. Healey, Milford, Neb., and many others from Nebraska and Iowa points. Prominent among the callers were eighty letter carriers and clerks of the Omaha postoffice, uniformed, who marched to The Bee building early in the evening to greet their chief from Wash-[?] fire and police commissioners called to pay their respects after the adjournment of their meeting at the city hall.

The visitors refused to disperse until after Postmaster General Smith consented to address them. Mr. Smith, when introduced by Mr. Rosewater, paid a high compliment to The Bee and its magnificent establishment as typical of the west. He said this was the first time he had visited in the transmississippi country and standing here almost in the middle of the American continent he realized as never before the greatness and grandeur of the republic. He felt sure that the visit had done him good and that when he returned to the editorial chair, as he surely would, he would be a better editor because of what he had learned on this trip. He emphasized the importance of the Postoffice department as the one branch of the government service that came nearest home to the people and represented more than any other the intelligence of the country; this was shown by the fact that out of 17,000,000,000 letters written in the world each year one-third of them are written in the United States. He concluded by calling on those present connected with the postal service to do what they could to improve its usefulness and maintain its high efficiency.

Mr. Rosewater also responded with a few words expressing appreciation of the compliment paid Omaha and Nebraska by the visit of the postmaster general.

THREE QUIET EVENTS

Celebrations at the Exposition Today Are of Minor Importance.

NONE OF THEM HAVE SET PROGRAMS

Visitors to Whom the Day is Dedicated Spend Time Inspecting.

MORNING SEES A GOOD ATTENDANCE

Steady Stream of People Pours Into the Grounds All Forenoon.

NEW YORK'S CELEBRATION ON THE TAPIS

Empire State Comes Tomorrow and Promises to Make the Showing Its Importance in the Nation Demands.

Admissions yesterday27,423
Admissions to date1,817,716

With no important features to attract the people there is a fairly good crowd of visitors on the ground today and these included a large number who have come to participate in the final festivities of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben and then remain to assist in welcoming President McKinley next Wednesday. During the early morning the slight drizzle of rain had a minimizing effect on the arrivals, but later, when the clouds broke away and the sun shone out in full resplendence of a perfect October day, the crowd started with a rush and the street cars were jammed with all the people they could carry.

There are three celebrations of minor importance scheduled for the day, but none of them are attended by any formalities. The New Jersey day program was declared off, as it was found difficult to secure any representative attendance from that far-away state, in view of the superior attractions of Jubilee week. There are quite a number of New Jersey visitors on the grounds, but they preferred to spend their time in enjoying the exposition that they had come half way across the continent to see and voted speechmaking an altogether unnecessary adjunct of their holiday.

The pretty parlors on the second floor of the Nebraska building were given over to the women of the P. E. O, who occupied them with an informal reception given by the local chapter to the visiting members. The guests were received from 10 to 12 o'clock and regaled with light refreshments. After lunch the women broke up into small parties and spent the remainder of the day in sightseeing.

The excursion from Bureau county, Illinois, did not appear this morning, but Colonel Hambleton received advices that quite a representative party from that part of his state would be in during the day. The visitors will be informally received at the Illinois building and then left to their own devices.

The celebration of New York day tomorrow promises to be one of the most notable state occasions of the exposition. The presence of Hon. Chauncey M. Depew, who is to deliver the address of the day, is expected to bring out a large local attendance to add to the New York crowd and the Auditorium program will be of exceptional. interest. The other speakers have not been announced, but it is not likely that any elaborate addresses will be scheduled except that of Mr. Depew.

President A. E. Orr of the Chamber of Commerce of New York has transmitted to the exposition management a handsomely engrossed certificate bearing the seal of the organization, by which Hon. Chauncey M. Depew, Hon. Warner Miller, Charles A. Cohieren, Francis B. Thurber, Richard Young, Henry A. Spaulding and D. L. Ramsey are designated as the official representatives to the exposition.

PROGRAM FOR PRESIDENT'S DAY.

Outline of the Entertainment Prepared for Major McKinley.

The program for the entertainment of President McKinley and party has been announced and no changes will be made except as the convenience of the visitors may require. The party will be met at the depot Tuesday night by the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben, who will act as a mounted escort. The troops of United States cavalry that had been expected cannot be secured on account of several changes that are being made by the War department and lack of horses consequent of the recent service in the field. With the knights as a substitute for Uncle Sam's troopers the visiting party will be conducted to the city hall, where the spectacular parade of King Ak-Sar-Ben IV will be reviewed and thence to the Omaha club.

Wednesday morning the visitors will leave the club at 10 o'clock with the same escort and be conducted to the Grand Plaza, where the exercises of the day will occur. These will consist of music by Innes' band, a short introductory address by President Wattles and addresses by President McKinley and Postmaster General Charles Emory Smith.

After the speaking the official party will be lunched by the reception committee at Markel's cafe and the women of the party will be returned in carriages to the Omaha club, where a luncheon will be tendered to Mrs. McKinley. The president and his party will go to the Government building at 3 o'clock, where a handshaking reception will occupy half an hour, and then it will be rejoined by the women and the entire party will be taken in carriages to see the sham battle at 4 o'clock and the balloon ascension at 5. There will be a dinner at Markel's cafe at 6 o'clock, and at 7:30, unless the atmosphere should be too chilly for comfort, the entire fleet on the lagoon will be placed at the disposal of the visitors and they will admire the illuminations from the water while quartet and band furnishes vocal and instrumental music. At 8:30 the carriages will again be called into requisition and the party will witness the fireworks on the north tract. Later those who wish to spend an hour or two on the Midway will be given an opportunity and the others will be returned to their quarters.

GREAT EXPOSITIONS AS EDUCATORS.

Mayor Jones of Toledo Discourses at Ohio Day Celebration.

At the close of the formal exercises for Ohio day at the exposition Mayor Jones of Toledo delivered an address. He devoted a large portion of his time to the discussion of industrial problems. He spoke in part as follows:

When Lamenais said, "I love my family more than myself, my village more than my family, my country more than my village, and mankind more than my country," he showed himself the true lover in the broadest and best sense. The Omaha Exposition is Omaha's only in name. Its glory and greatness is only best understood when we speak of its as ours, and in so speaking we do not detract from, but rather add to, the glory of the people of this progressive city.

Not one of Ohio's sons or daughters who participates in these ceremonies today but feels a just sense of pride and a quickening of the pulse beat as he looks upon the marvelous beauty that has risen up out of the earth as the result of the labor of your hands. Our hearts swell with exultant pride at these manifestations of the power of creative effort, and yet I think this feeling of triumph and satisfaction is not due alone to the contemplation of the mere material things that we look upon, but rather to the spiritual thought that was behind all, that was the inspiration of all, and without which no part of this manifestation of genius could have arisen out of the ground. It is this feature of the work of the Omaha Exposition   that to my mind is more valuable as an object lesson than even these beautiful buildings that rear their graceful proportions toward heaven, more precious than the vaulted treasures that are here displayed, more priceless than the works of art that delight us with their beauty. It is the demonstration of the power of associated effort of men that leads us to exclaim with wonder, "What hath God wrought!"

Men, my brothers, men the workers,
Ever weaving something new,
That which they have done the earnest
Of the things that they will do

So it is that I say we of Ohio feel that we have a part in this Omaha Exposition, because we belong to the same world, the same nation, the same country, the same race. It is yours, it is ours. It is the practical demonstration of what love can bring forth. Men never created by hating each other, never builded an Omaha Exposition because they hated each other, but because they loved each other. The spirit of love inspires them to erect such altars as these to say to the world, "Come and see what we have done."

We of Ohio will leave Omaha with pleasant recollections of the beautiful pictures we have here seen, with the memory of your labors indelibly written upon our heart and in the work that we are about to enter upon of fitly commemorating the birth of the great state of Ohio with a centennial at our own beloved Toledo, we shall strive, not in any spirit of rivalry, but in the spirit of brotherly love, to emulate and excell​ the work that love has wrought at Omaha.

These expositions bring a more valuable lesson in spreading the idea of democracy than in any other way, as it seems to me, and this thought of democracy or brotherhood commands the attention of the thinking people of the civilized world today. We are learning the lesson that has been taught for ages, but which we have been seemingly slow to learn, that we are all children of one common Father and all entitled to share alike in His bounty and care. We are losing the degrading sense of class consciousness that has kept us apart, one from another, that has divided us into sects, classes and factions, and we are learning through such noble efforts as have been put forth at Omaha, that we are truly one people, that we have one Father, even God, and all we are His children. In no other place is our oneness demonstrated more fully and perfectly than in our public schools, and yet as late as fifty years ago the great state of Ohio had no free schools: but today all over this broad land, the sun of the public school actually does "shine upon the just and the unjust," and we would think it a most dreadful thing to find a child in this country who is denied the right to learn to read. So it seems to me we are coming to think about and to solve other questions of responsibility, and if the Ohio Centennial Exposition in 1903 may, along with commemorating the birth of a great state, mark the era of the emancipation of a race, great masses of whom are today wearing the chains of slavery no less truly than were the negroes bearing their chains forty years ago; if, I saw, we shall be able then throughout this broad land to proclaim such a degree of industrial freedom that every man who is willing to work may have the right to live in a self-respecting manner, it will be a greater triumph than was the emancipation proclamation of the immortal Lincoln.

And why not? Why should we not issue such a proclamation of liberty? Why is it not as important that my brother shall have the right to work as that he shall have the right to learn to read or the right to vote? My friends, let us demonstrate our greatness by our love for our fellow men. Let us frankly face these problems and say these things ought not to be, and I am sure that a people who have accomplished the great triumphs that characterize our history will not falter when it comes to the solution of the problem that simply means fair play, that shall mean equality not of wealth, or station or position, but equality of opportunity.

These are the questions that confront us in Ohio; these are the questions that confront us all over this broad land; greater in their importance than the questions of foreign policy, great as they may be, are the questions of social reconstruction that are now forcing themselves upon our consideration and will no longer be set aside. Towards the settlement of these social questions the work of the Omaha exposition has contributed mightily and in the recognition organized labor, the eight-hour day and the right of our fellow men to labor, and to labor under decent conditions, you have done much to establish and plant imperishably within our breasts the truth of universal brotherhood.

I trust that we of Ohio may profit by the example that you have here shown us, and I trust that four and a half years hence, when you shall come to Toledo to look upon the work that we have done to commemorate the centennial of Ohio we shall be able to point you to a great exposition and to a truly great city, as we have already the great state. I trust that we shall be able to point you to an improved condition of civilization that should distinguish and mark every step of our progress from this time forward, a condition in which we will finally and forever pass the stage of making periodical appeals for starving miners, a condition of civilization in which the interest of all of the people shall be the music that sings us to our work. I trust that we may point you to a centennial exposition that has [?] glory of all of the people of a great state, as the manifestation of the love of that state for its people untainted with the thought of private profit from its foundation stone to the highest pinnacle from which waves the emblem of our liberties.

Handshaking Carnival.

Commissioners Peterson and Cahn of Texas have returned from their homes, where they went some time ago to work up enthusiasm in the Peace Jubilee and North and South Handshaking carnival. Both of them say that there will be large crowds here from Texas next week, as the people down there are all anxious to come to the exposition and are also anxious to meet President McKinley.

Commissioner Peterson brought along a quantity of pears, raised by himself, J. W. Tinkley and Major Robert Ford. The fruit grew near Rock Island, Colorado county, and is the finest yet seen at the exposition. The pears are the big yellow fellows and weigh from one and one-half to two pounds each. Most of those that were brought were distributed among the exposition officials and MR. Peterson's friends.

LIVE STOCK SHOW IN FULL BLAST.

First Exhibition and Judging in the Ring Held Yesterday.

The first ring showing of the live stock exhibit took place yesterday afternoon in the amphitheater west of the Dairy building. Three rings of Jersey females were brought before the judges. It has been decided that no announcements of awards shall be made until the close of the exhibit a week from Saturday. At that time, besides the $35,000 prizes offered by the management of the exposition, there will be about $3,000 distributed in special premiums.

The gathering of live stock that is now on the exposition grounds exceeds that at any similar exhibit ever held in this country with the exception of the live stock show at the World's fair in Chicago. Although there were a greater number of animals brought together at that time, they fell far short of equaling in quality those of the present exhibit. There are still a few more entries that are on the way. But the entries are now practically all in the barns. There are about 200 head of horses, 700 of cattle, 800 of swine and 600 of sheep. Among the horses the Clydesdales, Percherons and Hackneys predominate. There are twelve varieties of cattle, but about one-fourth of the entire number on exhibition are Herefords. There are also a large number of Holsteins, Jerseys and Short-Horns shown. Among the swine there are eight distinct breeds. Fine specimens are shown of the Poland China, Chester White and Yorkshire varieties. The sheep show ten breeds, the Lincolnshire, Cotswold and Leichester predominating.

Almost all of the exhibitors are owners of large stock farms and the entries they have made are the pick of their pets. Rarely has any one breeder brought more than one variety. The Holstein cattle shown by W. B. Barney, I. W. Chappell and Stephens & Son are attracting a great deal of attention, as are also the Red Polled variety shown by S. A. Converse, J. W. Martin and McElvey & Son. There are a few exhibits from Canada in sheep and swine that are somewhat different from the varieties that are so common with exhibitors from this country. They include a pen of Yorkshire hogs and a couple of flocks of Lincoln and Cotswold sheep.

The program calls for the showing of the Short-Horns, Galloways and Holstein cattle today. Besides these, several of the horses will be brought into the ring.

An erroneous impression has got abroad that an extra admission is charged for the show. This is wrong. The live stock exhibit is free to all visitors to the exposition.

Today at the Indian Congress.

This afternoon at 4:30 the Cheyennes, Arapahoes, Sioux and other allied tribes of the plains will give a rendition of the famous Indian ghost dance which attracted so much attention throughout the country a few years ago in connection with the Sioux outbreak and the massacre of Wounded Knee. It will be given under the supervision of Prof. James Mooney, the government ethnological expert, who was detailed at the time of the outbreak to investigate the new Indian religion and in that capacity visited nearly every tribe west of the Missouri and interviewed the original Messiah in the Sierra Nevadas. Among the participants this afternoon will be some of the identical Indians whose frantic performances under the leadership of Sitting Bull led to military intervention.

In the ghost dance men and women together clasp hands and move around in a circle to a peculiar step, singing songs of lamentation for the old life which has gone by, while the medicine men in the center of the ring gradually work them into a frenzy under which the more sensitive subjects finally lose consciousness and go into [?] prophetic visions of the spirit world to which their departed friends have gone. To attain this trance condition is the great object of the dance and every means is used by the medicine men to accomplish this result, making the performance one of intense excitement.

Tomorrow Mr. Mooney will begin the setting up of his Kiowa Camp circle, a part of which formed the government ethnologic exhibit at the Nashville exposition. It consists of 100 miniature tepees with heraldic decorations as they existed in the Kiowa tribe at the period of the Medicine Lodge treaty in 1867.

Cheese and Butter.

The Dairy building is rapidly filling up with cheese, being entered for the contest which will be about October 28, at which time the final butter scoring will occur. Cheese is coming in from all of the states of the transmississippi region in quantities to insure the success of the exhibit.

The next scoring of butter will take place about October 10, at which time Expert Collyer will be here. The exhibits promise to be more numerous than at the September scoring, and at the same time there promises to be a larger quantity of good butter. The last scoring during the exposition will take place during the last days of the month, probably October 28. For this scoring the dairymen write that they will make their big showing of the season.

Depew on the Way.

BUFFALO, Oct. 6.—(Special Telegram.)—Hon. Chauncey M. Depew, orator of the day, with President Calloway of the New York Central lines, passed through here at 4:34 p. m. on a special train, and the Pan-American officials and excursionists fill a train leaving at midnight for Omaha. President Brinker, Treasurer Lautz, Architect Curtis, Manager of Concessions Higbee, Secretary Hill and the directors of the exposition are all aboard the train.

NEW YORK, Oct. 6.—The committee to represent the New York Produce exchange at the Omaha exposition on New York day left for Omaha this afternoon over the Erie railroad. The committee included: John Valiant, Samuel Graff, John Glenhill, E. H. Dougherty, D. T. Wade, F. W. Comiskey, John W. Axley, E. A. Allen, Frank Brainard, T. H. Andrews and W. E. Truesdell.

Road Congress Plans.

A meeting of the Good Roads congress will be held in the Nebraska building on the exposition grounds Saturday morning, convening at 10 o'clock. The meeting will be called to order by Martin Dodge of Washington, D. C., who will deliver a short address, after which E. Rosewater will be introduced as vice president to preside over the deliberations of the meeting, in the absence of President Roy Stone, who is now at Porto Rico. During the day the meeting will be addressed by Charles F. Manderson of Omaha; the subject will be "Contour Roads for the West." Other speakers and their subjects will be: Richard Daniels, Guston, Va., "Simple Methods of Road Building;" John M. Staht, Chicago, "Good Roads for Farmers;" Otto Donner, Milwaukee, "Wheelmen's Relations to the Good Roads Movement;" E. J. Harrison, New Jersey, "Road Construction and Maintenance;" A. B. Dunning, Scranton, Pa., "The Supervisor System." The governor of Iowa has appointed Mesdames Beatty of Fruillart and Ewing of Des Moines, both of whom will be here and take part in the discussion of the topics that will come before the meeting.

WHEN THE PRESIDENT COMES

Special Trains Will Reach Omaha Early Tuesday Evening.

AK-SAR-BEN PARADES TO BE REPEATED

Board of Governors Arranges for Presentation of Consolidated Pageants Before Mr. McKinley and His Distinguished Companions.

The latest advices at the local office of the Chicago & Northwestern railway concerning the special trains for the presidential party are to the effect that both President McKinley's and General Miles' trains will arrive at the Omaha union depot at 8.20 o'clock on Tuesday evening.

The first train will carry General Miles and party, who will await the arrival of President McKinley and party at the union depot, both parties then proceeding to the reviewing stand to witness the grand Ak-Sar-Ben parade. The train of President McKinley is scheduled to leave Clinton, Ia., at 11:20 a. m., and a run of nine hours will be made from Clinton on to Omaha, the   daylight trip from Chicago to Omaha giving President McKinley and his party an opportunity to see the states of Illinois and Iowa and to make brief stops at towns along the line of the Northwestern where crowds may be assembled to greet the nation's chief.

President McKinley is not to be deprived of the privilege of viewing the Ak-Sar-Ben parades because he was not in the city this week. The beautiful pageants will be repeated next week while the president is a guest of the city, and the grandeur of the scenes will be enhanced by the union of the two parades into one. This will be done on Tuesday night, the time set for the arrival of the president in the city. This much has been decided upon by the board of governors.

The line of march will not be so extended as on the two evenings of this week, as the purpose of the parade is to show the beauty of the floats to the president, and they will simply be passed in review before him. The floats will be assembled along Douglas street, with the head of the line resting on Tenth and Farnam streets, and no lights will be turned on until the hour arrives for starting from that point.

The board of governors will repair to the depot to receive the presidential party, along with the escort provided for the occasion, and the reception committee of the exposition. When the visitors turn up Farnam street the parade will be started and fall in behind. When the first of the floats reaches Fifteenth street the line will be halted until the presidential party becomes seated in a position to review the parade. It is expected that the visitors will be given places on the stand in front of the city hall, as it is thought the crowd will be too great to permit the carriages to take positions in the street.

After these arrangements have been perfected the parade will move again in grand review, going west as far as Nineteenth street, then south to Harney, east to Fifteenth, and then north to the den. It may be necessary to go east on Harney to Fourteenth if it is found that the parade is too long to permit the head of the line to cross at Fifteenth street. There will be between thirty and thirty-five floats in line. All of the electric floats will be used, and most of the Samson floats. Two or three of the latter were spoiled by the rain this morning, as they had not been put under cover.

It has not yet been decided what arrangement shall be adopted for the placing of the floats. It is possible the electric and legendary floats will be alternated, and if this be not done the electric display will come first in the line. No definite time for the starting of the parade can be given until it is known just what hour the presidential train will reach the city.

MORE SCHOOL CHILDREN COME

Seward, Aurora and York Send a Fine Delegation of Youngsters to Attend the Exposition.

There are three Nebraska towns in which no school is held today—Seward, Aurora and York. The doors of their houses of learning are closed and the pupils are enjoying a day's recreation at the exposition. At 11 o'clock a special train of ten coaches drew into the Burlington station. Each car was gaily decorated with flags and bunting, while the fluttering handkerchiefs at every window and the laughter and shouting of small boys and girls as the train came to a stop clearly indicated as an excursion of school children.

The youngsters numbered 700 all told. There were 300 from Seward, in charge of Superintendent W. W. Stoner and Principal L. H. Wilson, and 200 each from Aurora and York, in charge of Superintendents F. A. Hyde and W. D. Bower, respectively. They scrambled down from the cars and up onto the viaduct and it required all the vigilance their teachers were capable of to keep them together and prevent accidents. A dozen or more trolley cars were waiting for the party and on these the children were placed and conveyed to the exposition grounds. They will return this evening.

GREETING TO THE BUCKEYES

Governor Bushnell and Seven Hundred Ohioans Welcomed at the Exposition.

Exchange of Compliments at the Auditorium---General Attendance About Like Wednesday---The

Ohio lost nothing and apparently gained considerably by the postponement of the state day exercises from yesterday to today.

The weather was as fair and only a trifle cooler and the general attendance, it was though at noon, was larger. And besides it was possible to marshal on the grounds and even in the Auditorium all the excursionists—several hundred—that left the Buckeye state on a pilgrimage to the exposition.

The distinguished guests from Ohio, escorted in carriages from the Paxton hotel by the officials of the exposition and Secretary Hiram Greene of the Ohio state commission, were led to the Auditorium by the Toledo Marine band, resplendent in royal blue trimmed with white.

While the band played a number of patriotic melodies and popular selections the excursionists and the resident natives and friends of Ohio filled the greater part of the lower floor.

The exercises began soon after 11 o'clock.

WATTLES PRESIDES.

President Wattles of the exposition introduced Governor Holcomb of Nebraska, who delivered an address of welcome on behalf of the state. He made considerable pleasant reference to the fact of the large number of people in Nebraska originally from Ohio, with much compliment to the residents of both the older and the newer commonwealths, and he seemed for the moment to be just a little inclined to regret that he was not born a Buckeye instead of a Hoosier.

HOLCOMB'S GREETING.

Governor Holcomb made mention of the important part taken by Ohio in the great affairs of the country, and in naming some of the illustrious sons of the state repeated the name of William McKinley, which called forth much applause.

"I do not know," said the governor, "but that I ought to utter a word of caution here. We are beginning to raise presidential timber in Nebraska." At which there was more cheering. "But," continued the governor, "when we elect a president from Nebraska he will be compelled, in going back and forth between here and Washington, to pass through your beautiful state.

"I want to give you that consolation." (Laughter and cheers.) Governor Holcomb concluded with remarks regarding the west, as shown by the exposition, and with a reiteration of the words of welcome with which he began.

BUSHNELL RESPONDS.

Governor Bushnell of Ohio was warmly received as he arose to respond, just as he had been on taking his place on the platform. The hospitality of the Nebraskans and of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben, he said, had been so generous and their attention so constant and kind that he could not trust himself to make fitting acknowledgement extemporaneously, and so had taken a little time to make his response more proper. He was very gracious in returning the thanks ordinarily thought requisite on such an occasion. He praised the character of the citizenship of his state, and declared that in any state adopted by Ohioans their coming was welcomed and their long stay desired. He expressed his appreciation of the rapid development, the enterprise and the attainment of the great west and of the admirable general character of its inhabitants. His citations from old reports of opinions that the west beyond the Missouri river was a region where it was impossible to found agricultural, commercial or even pastoral communities, were heard with much interest, and their absurdity in the light of present facts caused much laughter.

Praising the exposition, Governor Bushnell said that in short, it was the result of American character and that therefrom all Americans could share in the just pride. Making reference, well understood, to the coming Ohio Centennial, the governor said that Ohio could and must do as well as Nebraska. The sentiment was applauded. And then, he said, the people here would [?]

WEBSTER'S ASSERTION.

John L. Webster extended a greeting on behalf of the exposition association. The sentence which attracted the most attention and caused the most astonishment was that in which Mr. Webster seriously gave assurance to the people of Ohio that all the people in Nebraska, including the governor himself, were now willing to get down on their knees and worship William Mcinley​.

Concluding addresses were made by President Kilbourne of the Ohio centennial commission and by Mayor Jones of Toledo.

NOTED LIVE STOCK COMING.

Many Champion Prize Winners Just Arriving.

Among the new arrivals of stock at the exposition are the following herds and flocks: H. C. Young of Lincoln has three head of Jersey calves, two heifers and one bull. These are very fine specimens. "Grace Manorfield" is an especially fine heifer, her native home is Tennessee. She is a descendant from some of the most noted ancestry to be found in this popular breed of cattle.

"Exile of Manorfield," a bull calf, was bred by the Manorfield Stock Farm company of Pennsylvania. He is a descendant of great butter families. "Exiles Beauty," dam of this noted calf, has a butter test of sixteen pounds and four ounces. His grand sire, "Exile of St. Lamber," has sixty-five tested daughters, making from fourteen to thirty-two pounds and six ounces in seven days.

Phillip H. Zweievel of Papillion, Neb., has a big steer at the show which will be a sight at the fat stock farm department. He weighs 3,100 pounds and is a grade shorthorn.

Charles Escher & Son of Boston, Ia., have seven head of Aberdeen Angus cattle, in ages from calves to aged cow and bull. One bull, 7 years old, weighs 2,100 pounds. One cow, 1,700 pounds.

T. F. B. Sothan, Chilicothe, Mo., has ten head Herefords. "Sir Bredwell," 3 years old, weighs 2,300 pounds. "Thick-set," a 2-year-old bull, weighs 2,200 pounds. "Benita," a 4-year-old cow, weight, 2,000 pounds. "Grandee," a yearling bull, weight 1,500 pounds. A 2-year-old heifer that weighs 1,500 pounds, a yearling heifer, 1,200 pounds, and two heifer calves, 800 pounds each. All of these are sired by the great stock bull, "Corrector." This herd numbers at home 150 animals. There is a 2-year-old steer in this show, 1,500 pounds, that was champion in the fat stock at Illinois state fair.

THE POLLED KANSAN CATTLE.

These cattle are shown as a new breed of polls. There are eight head on exhibition, representing a herd of forty head at home.

The main claim for this breed is that they are polled and resemble the Herefords. They are red and white faced, is about the only claim they can have of a resemblance to the pure bred Hereford. That they are a polled type of mixture of Hereford and a polled breed no one seems to doubt. General W. W. Guthrie of Kansas claims to be the originator of this breed.

BERKSHIRES.

Seven Oaks Stock farm, New Sharon, Ia., has twelve head large English Berkshires.

A 2-year-old boar, 700 pounds. All ages are represented from pigs to aged sow and boar.

John B. Thompson of Plattsburg, Mo., has twenty head; one boar that weighs 750 pounds.

Harris & McMahan, Lamine, Mo., has fourteen head of hogs. A 2-year-old sow weighing 800 pounds, and a yearling sow 715 pounds. Their home herd is 200 head; all recorded.

Reuben Gentry of Danvile, Ky., has fifteen head of his noted herd of Berkshires on exhibition. The reputation of this herd as a prize-taker in hog shows has few if any equals.

The famous sow, "Dutchess 158," bred by N. H. Gentry of Missouri, which was sold one year ago for $650, is in this display. There are two boars that weigh 800 pounds each, and sow whose present weight is 750 pounds. A 4-months-old sow pig that weighs 200 pounds.

This herd has been to the New York, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin and Kentucky state fairs this season and took a large share of all first and sweepstakes prizes offered for Berkshires.

HERE TO STUDY IT.

Officials of Two Coming Expositions Here to Inspect This.

The success and the general reputation of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition have not failed to impress the officials of coming expositions.

 

The members of the Ohio Centennial commission are here, coming with the Ohio excursions, for the express purpose of carefully inspecting the big show and acquainting themselves with the methods of its management for their guidance. These commissioners are W. H. Stewart, M. A. McGuire, William Binkley, G. K. Otis, J. W. Davis, Henry Flesch, Dr. W. A. Belt, L. J. Fenton, M. H. Donahue, G. B. Christian, C. E. McBride, B. J. McVinney, T. J. Donaldson, J. P. Forbes, J. C. Smith, J. M. Stull and J. W. Conger. The names of the officers have been published.

General Manager Clarkson has received word that Saturday morning President Brinker, Treasurer Loutz, Secretary R. C. Hill and Architect Esemwein of the Pan-American exposition to be held at Buffalo next year, will be here. They will spend several days studying important factors contributing to the success of the show. They write that they have heard from all sources that this exposition is the most complete of its kind ever held. They will make headquarters at the Paxton.

New York Day Speeches.

The exercises on New York day, a most elaborate program, including an address by Chauncey M. Depew, will be held at 11 a. m. Saturday at the Auditorium. The gathering promises to be large.

INDIANS ENJOY ATHLETICS

Will Run, Wrestle, Jump and Disport Themselves for the Public.

Foot Race Yesterday Ends in Charges of Sioux Favoring Sioux, Flimflamming Apache.

Tipped His Friend Before Firing Revolver--Pueblo Bachelors Move Into Their Adobe Mansion.

Friday's Admissions23,613
Total Admissions1,841,445

Athletic sports have been added to the repertoire of the Indian congress, the first event of the kind being pulled off last evening in a big foot race. It is the intention to follow immediately with foot racing, football, wrestling, high jumping, and all of the characteristic Indian games of the various tribes. These programs are to fill in the days between the sham battles.

Yesterday's races consisted of three trial heats, first by bunches by ten men each, the winner in each qualifying for the final heat. Brawny bucks made ready by stripping off all superfluous garments, showing their lithe and muscular physiques to perfection, as they sprinted the 100-yard dash like the wind.

The winners of the three trial events were Sam Houzous, a Chiracauha Apache; Playing Bird, a Crow, and George Good Load, a Rosebud Sioux. They were matched for the final heat, the pistol was fired, and Playing Bird and Good Load started as if they were going somewhere the Big Crow winning out by the length of his nose. But the Apache got left in the start, and declared that it wasn't a fair deal, because Good Load's best Sioux friend held the gun and gave the tip to start a couple of seconds before firing, whereupon Playing Bird took the cue and followed closely.

When the honest Apache saw smoke he avers that his rivals were kicking dust half way down the line, and, concluding it wasn't worth while wasting his breath to catch sight of them, just waited and protested. The Crow and Sioux sprinters denied the charges made by the Apache, said they started right, and Houzous had no kick coming. They would not run again, and there the matter was left for future adjudication.

After the races came a ghost dance led by the survivors of Wounded Knee, in which several susceptible dancers had trances and saw visions wherein they conversed with dead friends gone to the happy hunting grounds, all of which will be related in songs at the [?]

Yesterday was moving day for the Pueblos. Since coming here they have camped out like common Indians, but against this their aristocratic natures revolted, so they built a Mexican adobe house with brush roof, mud fire place and chimney, and real holes in the walls for windows. The mud was dry yesterday, so the nineteen men, constituting the contingent, moved in and established bachelors' quarters. During the early evening a reception to their lady friends of the Arapahoe, Kiowa and other southern tribes was given.

Louis Batiste, best known as Little Bat, has arrived with his family and has been formally installed into his seat in the congress. Although of French-Canadian birth, and with French blood flowing in his veins, he is to all intents and purposes an Indian, having served the government as a 'scout through all of the Indian wars of the past twenty years or more. He is reputed to be a man of great influence among the Sioux.

ASCENSION EVERY DAY.

War Balloon Will Take a Sail if Weather Permits.

War balloon times have come back, and each reasonably fair day from this time hence will witness an ascension. After the trial trip of two weeks ago, successful in itself, but demonstrating the weaknesses of the balloons furnished, hard work has been done in reinforcing them to withstand the Nebraska winds. The French balloon sent to Sergeant Baldwin at Santiago was the one selected for the work, as it was of the strongest and newest material, not getting so much gas whipped out in the wind. The generators began working early in the morning, and by 4 o'clock it was as full of gas as a pickaninny is of watermelon in August.

Captain Yancey and Sergeant Briede made the trip, over 2,500 feet of cable being paid out before they telephoned down from the aerial height that they were willing to come home to dinner. So the big fellow with his two passengers was slowly reeled back to mother earth.

For the first time for exhibition a little signal balloon was sent up, a yellow one, with only 250 feet of gas, not over five or six feet in diameter. From its cable fluttered two signal flags. In time of war these little balloons are sent up a sufficient distance so that the people with whom it is wished to communicate can see it. From the cable sometimes floats a dozen flags of different designs, meaning whole messages in the signal code. If responses be made in a similar manner lengthy conversations can be carried on by alternately lowering and raising the balloons and changing the flags.

On all reasonable fair days after this ascensions and signal work will be shown at 4 p. m.

RESULTS IN BROKEN JAW.

Quarrel Over a Phonograph Results in a Bad Fracture.

Trouble and bloodshed attracted more attention than the spielers yesterday afternoon at the east end of West Midway. It was all caused by C. N. Fairly, who is now in jail, and E. P. Noland, who is now in the emergency hospital with a lower jaw crushed into so many small pieces that Drs. Lee and Campbell say can never be knit together again, if the man escapes the good chances of dying.

Fairly lives in a tent near Sixteenth and Locust streets, and is minus one eye, while Noland lives at 712 North Seventeenth street and is minus one led. Both are married.

Yesterday they were working as partners in operating a phonograph, and Fairly says that Noland wanted to sequester the funds of their employers and divide them. He refused, and in the ensuing quarrel he picked up materials and started for the home office. He says that Noland followed and began beating him with a heavy black cane, and that in warding off the blows he threw up his right hand, striking Noland. In the hand was a heavy copper phonograph cylinder roll, two inches or more in diameter and six long, on a steel shaft nearly a foot long.

Guard Sergeant Wilber, the arresting officer, says that witnesses accuse Fairly of throwing the cylinder at the slender cripple, who was but a weak physical antagonist. At all events, the jaw is crushed to fragments.

THOSE WHO COME TUESDAY

Complete List of Army, Navy, Government Officials and Diplomats Given.

Generals Miles, Shafter and Wheeler Among Those Who Are to Visit the Exposition.

Members of the Diplomatic Corps in the Party That Will Be on Board Special Which Precedes President.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Washington, D. C., Oct. 7.—Following is the complete list of members of the army and navy and the government officials who will leave Washington next Monday by special train for the Omaha exposition, preceding the departure of the president and his party:

Army and Navy and Government Officials—Major General Miles, Colonel Francis Micheler, Colonel William M. Black, Colonel Samuel Reber, Captain H. H .Whitney, secretary; Mrs. Miles, Major General W. R. Shafter, two aides and valet, Major General Joseph Wheeler, the Misses Wheeler, Brigadier General A. W. Greely, chief signal officer; Mrs. Greely, Brigadier General C. F. Humphrey, Mrs. Humphrey, Miss Humphrey, Mrs. Mary Howland, Commodore J. W. Philip, U. S. N.; Captain Arthur Paget, naval attache, British embassy; Dr. R. W. Baker, U. S. A.; Mrs. Baker, Mrs. J. V. Creighton, Hon. J. M. Thurston, United States senator; Hon. J. D. Yeomans, interstate commerce commission; Prof. W. L. Moore, chief weather bureau; Mrs. Moore, Dr. W. T. Harris, commissioner of education; Mrs. Harris, General James A. Sexton, commander-in-chief Grand Army of the Republic; G. R. Butlin, secretary; A. J. Leonard, secretary; George Scott, messenger.

Diplomatic Corps—Mr. Wu Ting Fang, Chinese minister; Mrs. Wu Ting Fang, maid; Master Wu Cho Chu, Mr. Chow Tsz Chi, Mr. Hwang Chung Huli, Mr. Li Kwang Hang, secretaries; the minister's steward; Mr. Chin Pom Ye, Corean minister plenipotentiary; Mrs. Chin Pom Ye, Master We Chong Ye, Mr. Tam E. Ye, secretary; Mr. Henry Guillaume, Gonzolo De Quesada, charge d'affaires Cuban junta; Mrs. Quesada, Brazilian and Argentina ministers.

Representatives of the Press—W. E. Annin, Philadelphia Ledger; George Grantham Bain, Harper's Weekly; Frederick Benzinger, Chicago Times-Herald; W. E. Curtis, Chicago Record; Louis Garthe, Baltimore American; C. A. Hamilton, Sioux City Journal; James Henry, Philadelphia Press; Raymond Patterson, Chicago Tribune; Frank Richardson, Baltimore Sun; George W. Rouser, New York Herald; John S. Shriver, New York Mail and Express; E. C. Snyder, Omaha Bee; Howard N. Thompson, Associated Press; Charles S. Albert, New York World.

The train will leave Washington on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad Monday at 8 o'clock, preceding the presidential train one hour. Both together will carry the most brilliant party of public men that ever left the national capital on a pleasant jaunt.

There wil lbe​ no change of cars, the Chicago & Northwestern sending its special cars all the way to Washington to receive the guests of the exposition at the Baltimore & Ohio depot here, the latter line surrendering them to the Chicago & Northwestern at Chicago. The train is scheduled to arrive at Chicago at 6 o'clock Tuesday morning. Leave Chicago at 8; arrive at Clinton, Ia., 10:45; Cedar Rapids, 12:30; Marshalltown, 2 p. m.; Boone, 3:30; Council Bluffs, 7:10, and Omaha, 7:30.

The president will leave Omaha at 9:30 Thursday, October 13, for St. Louis, but the special army and navy and diplomatic train will not leave until midnight Friday, October 14, arriving at Chicago at noon Saturday and reaching Washington at 1 p. m. Sunday, October 16.

 

WILL NOT CHANGE PRESIDENT'S PLANS.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Washington D. C., Oct. 7.—It was announced from the white house at 11:30 that the death of Saxton would not change the president's intention to visit the Omaha exposition. This was a public engagement which it was not customary for the president to forego. The president and Mrs. McKinley will leave here tomorrow night for Canton. The president will start for Omaha probably on Monday afternoon. The information as to the funeral arrangements have not been received at the white house up to midnight. it was stated that although news of the death of Mr. Saxton was received at the white house early in the evening, the reception was practically over before the president was advised of the fact.

OMAHA'S GREAT OPPORTUNITY.

Omaha Club, Oct. 7.—The stalwart young metropolis that has for months excited the admiration of the nation and the envy of other municipalities is about to face a problem which has staggered many an older and wealthier community. Omaha has, by her courage in inaugurating and carrying out, on broad and comprehensive lines, a great exposition of the products and industries, arts and crafts of the mid-continental states, gained the sanction and esteem of all America and has occupied a high place in the pyramid of progressive cities.

The modern Venice, with its domes and parapets, colonades and plazas, lagoons and arches, kiosks and pagodas, an archetype of design, built almost with oriental splendor and at lavish cost, has dazzled and perplexed every visitors. Such sublime and stately preparation for an exposition could not have been expected even by the most audacious frontier town extant. The magnificence of the scheme would reflect credit upon the greatest of our cities. It approximates in grandeur, though not in extent, Chicago's memorable event.

The exhibits, gathered from the farms, mines and forests of the great west, have bewildered every one who has seen them, and have astonished even those who have in a measure kept pace with the phenomenal advancement of this vast Trans-Mississippi region. The lessons these exhibits have taught are many, and they will influence further developments in multifold directions. They have proven that for another century at least here will be the granary of the world; that western wheat and corn, fruits and vegetables, will continue to supply millions beyond our own shores; that western beef and mutton will be as much the daily sustenance of all Europe as of our own countrymen; that western and southern wool and cotton will, in large measure, clothe the people of many nations; that this country will be for an incalculable cycle of time the world's mainstay and safeguard for food and raiment and for most of the essential elements of living. This exposition has proven, too, that it is not to agriculture alone, bountiful as it is, that these states owe their exceptional prosperity and the great future which no man can define. The mineral displays have outstripped the claims of the most wildly sanguine mine promoter. One would think that mining was only in its inception and that the whole face of the earth west of Kansas and Nebraska was a mass of precious substances, the list of which was constantly increasing. These displays indicate that our western mining states are not only holding their own, but that they are, year by year, giving forth more and better ores, and that valuable minerals are being discovered not heretofore utilized.

In science and invention, in the substantial progress of industry, in education and art, the exhibits have made a deep impression and have laid the foundation for vastly greater and better results. Many economic lessons have been taught, the utilization of many waste products has been assured and the construction of mills, works and shops, almost without number, will, under proper direction and encouragement, follow upon the heels of Omaha's brave achievement.

So much for the exposition!

Now, will the closing of the gates forebode good or ill to Omaha?

To this city the results will be worth incalculable millions, if only the same intrepid spirit, the same indomitable energy, the same pride, intelligence and keen foresight which molded this event are maintained and strengthened. Otherwise, the exposition, splendid as it was in conception, far-reaching as it has been in effect, pregnant as it is of rich possibilities, will prove a calamity from which will take Omaha years to recover. The inevitable reaction must be seriously considered. No American city that has undertaken one of the more impoprtant​ expositions has escaped a reactionary period of business derangement, real estate stagnation and financial depression, with the single exception of Atlanta (1881), and there a grave crisis was only averted by harmonious and vigilant exertion on the part of business men, when the exposition was over, to hold every advantage that had been gained and to secure additional benefits by constantly pressing Atlanta's facilities and the resources of Georgia upon the attention of the whole country through every available medium. It was hard and expensive work, but it paid. The people organized to fight against a reaction; they raised a large fund for the purpose and carried out a campaign of instruction through the press. In the eighteen years since Atlanta has jumped from 25,000 to nearly 200,000 population and has become the leading commercial center of the South Atlantic states.

So with Omaha! Locally considered, her work begins with the CLOSE of the exposition. Its prospective benefits are apparent, but it will require constant aggression to gather all the fruits that are within reach. Stop now and there will remain after next month only the Omaha of yesterday. Continue to work unitedly, unselfishly, liberally, and the greater Omaha of tomorrow will illustrate a rapid expansion in manufactures, in population and wealth not yet equaled in this section of the nation.

The present is Omaha's opportunity! Will she rise to it and grasp it in its fullness?

The world applauds the readiness, the valor, with which Omaha assumed a great responsibility. She is now looked upon throughout this country and beyond the seas as having all the elements of extensive growth and expansion. Omaha will seriously disappoint the producing and industrial classes if she fails through inertia or the tired feeling that is usually prevalent at the close of a large exposition, to reap all the rewards her courage has entitled her to. Omaha has never shown a weak side yet. Will she now?


JOHN W. RYCKMAN,
The Chicago Chronicle.

PROVIDE FOR ITS HISTORY

Directors Will Have a Writeup of the Exposition and Make Appropriation.

Ten Thousand Dollars for the Purpose and a Committee to Be Appointed for the Work.

Mr. Rosewater's Desire to Be an Author Nipped in the Bud--He Will Be Allowed to Contribute.

Mr. Rosewater collided with the board of directors of the exposition yesterday afternoon, but the directors desisted just in time to keep their eminent associate from going into hysterics. In the vernacular of the sporting fraternity, the directors "handed him a hot mit," and Mr. Rosewater speedily demonstrated that he didn't know what to do with it, and that he didn't like it a little bit.

The allopathic dose of grief that was administered to Mr. Rosewater was put up in the following literary capsule, compounded by Mr. Manderson:

In view of the historical value of every incident connected with the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition and the importance of preserving in a safe public depository all material connected with its inception, its progress, its development and its triumphant success, it is

Resolved, The president and secretary of the exposition are hereby directed to obtain by purchase or otherwise one at least of every medal, souvenir, program, photograph, illustration, magazine or newspaper article and all other matters and things connected with its history that can be procured.

Resolved, That all such materials when gathered shall be placed in suitable cases or receptacles in the building of the Omaha city library, provided said library shall agree to furnish suitable places therefor and give due care to the preservation of the same. It is further

Resolved, That the president shall appoint from the directors of the exposition a committee of three to constitute and be called "the historical committee." Such commitee​ shall be authorized and empowered to employ a suitable person or historian, who shall at once proceed with the gathering of the material and information for a complete history of the exposition and prepare the manuscript and select the illustrations and plates therefor. Such manuscript and material to be ready for the printers by June 1, 1899. It is further

Resolved, That the sum of $10,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be appropriated for such purpose, the sum needed to be expended under the direction of the historical committee upon voucher approved by a majority of them and countersigned by the president of the exposition.

The said committee shall serve without compensation or emolument, but are authorized to employ a stenographer at not exceeding $75 per month.

The material prepared for publication shall be approved before printing by the said committee, who shall also direct the form of the book to be published and provide for its binding. One copy of said book shall be furnished to the Omaha city library, to the university of Nebraska, to the Omaha high school library, to Creighton college, to the state libraries of each of the Trans-Mississippi states, and to each one of the directors of the exposition. All other of said publications shall be sold at not exceeding the cost of printing and binding and 10 per cent addition, the sum resulting from such sales to be paid to the treasurer of the exposition.

RIGHTS OF ROSEWATER.

Mr. Hitchcock moved the adoption of the resolution, and it received half a dozen seconds.

Mr. Rosewater was so anxious to begin talking that he didn't wait to get his feet on the floor. It was rather a ticklish subject for him to handle, as modesty would hardly allow him to say that he wanted to attend to that matter himself, yet he manifestly could not   take the matter of writing the official history of the exposition out of his hands and place it with individuals who might overlook the fact that he originated and built the exposition and had been "it" all the way through.

Of course other members of the executive committee have fondly imagined at times that they were in some measure entitled to credit for what had been accomplished, but Mr. Rosewater knew better, and he proposed to see to it that when the history of the exposition was written a volume would be handed down to posterity that would do coming generations some good, and incidentally afford him a pleasing object of contemplation during his closing years.

He said that he was in accord with the general proposition, but he could not quite indorse the resolutions. He wanted it understood that the bureau of publicity had made it a point to collect a lot of material for this purpose, and would have all that was necessary for a history of the exposition on hand when the gates closed.

"So much the better," said Mr. Manderson. "That can be turned over to the committee, and will save just that much expense in time and labor."

STRUGGLES FOR OZONE.

Mr. Rosewater gasped thrice in rapid succession, but bravely continued, after putting a monkey wrench on his nerve and screwing it up to a pressure of 180 pounds. He said that all other expositions that he knew anything about had left this work in the hands of the bureau of publicity, and in support of that assertion stated that he had seen some of the matter that was written by Major Moses P. Handy about the World's fair, but that it had never been published. He declared that he was opposed to a big, bulky work that nobody would read, and said that the official history of the rebellion filled sixty volumes, which he had, but that no one would ever think of reading them.

This exhausted the supply of argument that Mr. Rosewater had on hand, and he sat down to let his think-loom weave a few more thoughts.

Mr. Manderson at once called his attention to the fact that Major Handy had not written the official history of the World's fair, and named the writers who had prepared it, and stated that the matter is now in the hands of the printing committee at Washington. "So far as the official history of the war of the rebellion is concerned," he continued, "it is a most interesting and valuable history. It has exploded more lies and blasted more bogus reputations than any other publication bearing on the war, and if it had attained no other end it has done sufficient in that direction to more than warrant its publication."

This more than confirmed Mr. Rosewater's worst fears, and he fidgeted around like the abdomen of a houchee-couchee artist. He had been busy for months trying to "got and get a reputation" in exposition matters, either bogus or otherwise, and this cold-blooded intimation that his carefully reared cob house was liable to be torpedoed at an early day was painfully disturbing.

ACCURATE HISTORY NEEDED.

Mr. Manderson said it was due the men who had carried the great work through to a tremendous and even stupefying success that the history be written, and that it be carefully and accurately done. These men had given their time and effort without compensation, and this would be a fitting monument. It would also preserve for the future all that could be preserved of the exposition when the gates were finally closed and the present fairyland had vanished like a dream, and the site again reverted to the uses of streets and alleys and city lots. It was in every way due that a faithful history be written, that it might be preserved in public libraries and schools and private homes in order that youth in coming years might receive accurate information of what the Trans-Mississippi exposition had been.

Mr. Rosewater died hard, and he executed one more spasm. He said he thought $10,000 was altogether too much to be used for the purpose, and he moved as an amendment that the amount be reduced to $2,500.

Mr. Manderson stated that he did not believe that the full amount would be used by any committee of the director unless it were actually needed, and the amendment was defeated by a decisive vote.

The original motion was then passed and the resolution adopted, Mr. Rosewater voting a solitary "No" in a very conspicuous and heartfelt manner.

The buildings and grounds department asked for instructions as to what was to be done with the property after the close of the exposition, and stated that a complete schedule of assets in that line was being prepared.

Mr. Bidwell moved that the executive committee be instructed to advertise for bids for the buildings and their removal in accordance with the terms of the ground leases.

Mr. Lindsey said this brought up the question of whether the exposition was to be continued another year, and he was in favor of selling the entire expo-[?]

Mr. Manderson was opposed to making the exposition a "warmed-over pudding," preferring that the city and state and entire western country should enjoy the present prestige rather than speculate on the dubious chances of success attending an attempt to carry the show on for another season.

Mr. Rosewater said he didn't quite know just what he would think about the matter, and wanted action deferred until after the peace jubilee.

Mr. Hitchcock was opposed to immediate action, and moved that further consideration of the matter be postponed until a special meeting of the entire board could be assembled under call of the president. The motion prevailed.

Chairman Kilpatrick of the committee of audit, revision and investigation reported that the pass situation was in excellent shape. There had been no marked abuses, and the whole board could hardly suggest any improvement if it had all details before it.

The cashier was instructed to comply with a request formerly made for a daily balancing of the cash, to avoid a repetition of a few minor seeming discrepancies. Mr. Kilpatrick stated that there was nothing to indicate any dishonesty, and read from reports made by the expert accountant, but recommended minor changes in the system.

After adjournment Mr. Rosewater looked over the directors to find a few sympathetic countenances, and proceeded to relate his troubles, as there was no policeman present for the purpose. He denounced the action relating to the history of the exposition, and employed several adjectives in making himself clearly understood, but the directors said they wouldn't get off the ticket.

CHAUNCEY DEPEW IN TOWN

Distinguished New Yorker and President Calloway Arrive for Today's Celebration.

Doctor Says His Dancing Days Are Over and Avoids Social Swim at Ak-Sar-Ben.

Major Clarkson Greets Him--President Wattles Calls and Exposition Is Seen in Its Plaza of White Light.

Smiling, affable Chauncey M. Depew, accompanied by President Calloway of the New York Central railway, came in over the Northwestern in the president's special car last evening, arriving in Omaha at 5 o'clock. Dr. Depew comes to help celebrate New York day, in honor of which occasion he will this forenoon at 11 o'clock deliver one of his characteristic addresses at the Auditorium at the exposition grounds. The New Yorkers were a little worse for wear after their long trip and glad to arrive in Omaha for a peep at the white city.

Mr. Depew was met at the depot by a reception committee consisting of Hon. Jacob Ames, ex-mayor of Syracuse, N. Y.; H. B. Hobert and A. M. Wheeler, members of the New York board of exposition commissioners, together with Major T. S. Clarkson, general manager of the Trans-Mississippi exposition, and others.

After greetings Major Clarkson, on behalf of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben, extended an invitation to the distinguished guest to attend the ball in

CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW.
the evening. Mr. Depew smiled as graciously as was possible for a man to do after making a flying trip from the Atlantic coast to Omaha, and replied:

"I trust, major, that your committee days are over and as I have heard so much about the beautiful effects of the electric lights with their varied colors playing on the waters of the lagoon at your exposition, I much prefer to spend my evening there."

The doctor was then informed that during the evening President Wattles and officials of the exposition would pay their respects. This was agreeable and the program was carried out later. The evening was spent at the exposition, the Midway being visited thoroughly and enjoyed by the party.

"The thing that interests me most just now," declared Mr. Depew energetically, "is to get located and attend to the wants of the inner man at such time and place as may have been decided upon."

As the doctor was being piloted from the depot he turned to the World-Herald reporter, and in reply to a question said: "Mr. Calloway, while he accompanies me to Omaha, does so as an Omaha man; he claiming Omaha as his home."

Mr. Depew, as of yore, years​ his beard blocked out on the cheeks, a smooth chin and no mustache. He was dressed in a black cheviot suit, cut a la sack, turn down collar and dark fedora hat.

President Calloway, who accompanied Mr. Depew, at one time resided in Omaha, being the general manager of the Union Pacific.

Mr. Depew will leave Omaha this evening for the east. He stops over at Chicago, where he addresses the Hamilton Republican club at the Auditorium in the afternoon and is banqueted by the same club in the evening.

Among the visitors to arrive this morning to attend the New York day exercises will be representatives from the produce exchange, board of trade and Merchants' association of New York city.

SPECIAL FROM NEW YORK CITY.

Excursion Party Leaves Chicago for the Exposition City.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

Chicago, Ill., Oct. 7.—An excursion party of leading citizens of New York city and state east of Buffalo, and a special car containing President Brinker, Treasurer Lautz, Secretary Hill and Messrs. Curtis, Essenweine, Higbee, Van Aken and Metcalf and others of Buffalo, reached Chicago as the first section of the Boston special on the Lake Shore road this afternoon, and left as the first section of the Northwestern and Union Pacific Overland for Omaha at 6:30 tonight, having added here a fine new dining car and observation car, which were attached to the train of the northwestern officials.

The train was under the personal supervision of Assistant General Passenger Agent Charles Carns from Chicago to Omaha. The party will participate in the ceremonies incident to the observation of New York day at the exposition tomorrow, Hon. Chauncey M. Depew being the orator for the day for the New York state commission.

Judge Metcalf of Buffalo and Hon. William R. Payne of Chicago will make addresses on behalf of the Pan-American exposition. The party expects to leave Omaha on Monday, via Northwestern, to Chicago, and going east via the Michigan Central and Niagara Falls. Ex-Senator Warner Miller is with the party, and a special car filled with leading people of Boston and New England also came upon the train, and goes west tonight.

Hoosier Editors to Be Here.

Two special Pullmans, loaded with Southern Indiana newspaper men, will leave St. Louis over the Missouri Pacific this evening for Omaha. They will arrive at 6 a. m. Sunday. The visitors come to participate in the peace jubilee, and take in the exposition. In the party will be some of the most prominent newspaper men in the Hoosier state.

Peace Jubilee week will open with a grand sacred and patriotic concert Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock. The Innes band and the Exposition chorus will combine.

 

AN UNWARRANTED EXTRAVAGANCE.

The action of the board of exposition directors in voting $10,000 for a history of the exposition will not be endorsed by the mass of exposition stockholders. A $10,000 history of the exposition means simply the squandering of that much money belonging to the stockholders in order to furnish lucrative employment for some favorite. There is no call whatever for such an expenditure. The publication of an exposition history in book form is no legitimate part of the exposition business that was entrusted to the directors.

So far as the history of the exposition is concerned, there is no danger that it will be lost or blotted out. All the record, souvenirs and memorials relating to the great fair are in the possession of the exposition and can be readily prepared for preservation in some public place at a small expense. If the directors want to see a many-volumed book printed to commemorate their work they need not draw upon the exposition funds for this purpose, but by joining in a subscription enterprise they can have the work published by any one of a dozen reputable bookmakers, who will undertake it upon a purely business basis.

The attempt of the directors to take the money of the 6,000 stockholders, many of them wageworkers, clerks and people of small means, and vote it away in this manner is not only unwarranted and without authority, but should be frustrated if need be by appeal to the courts. Let any laboring man who came forward with his hard earned savings for the support of the exposition when its success was in the balance and took his chances on getting back part of his money enter protest in the courts and no judge will refuse to grant an injunction to prevent this lawless dissipation of his money. With the favorable conditions enjoyed there should be a good surplus in the exposition funds at the closing of the gates. The stockholders will certainly not sit idly by while it is used up on all sorts of wild and useless projects designed simply to furnish a soft berth to somebody.

A $10,000 history of the exposition is too much of a luxury for 6,000 stock subscribers, whose money is to be thus squandered.

The popocratic candidate for congress is over-anxious to throw away $10,000 of the exposition stockholders' money on a history of the exposition. But then he has always been throwing away money which other people have earned.

SCHOOL CHILDREN COME IN

Burlington Brings a Train Load to Spend the Saturday Holiday at the Exposition.

Fifteen hundred small boys and girls who attend school in the different towns along the Burlington railroad took advantage of the Saturday holiday to enjoy a day's outing at the exposition. They were accompanied by teachers and principals, and traveled in a special train of twelve coaches, arriving in the city at 11:30 o'clock this morning.

Before alighting from the cars the youngsters from the various towns had remained together, each school in charge of its principal, and each class under the supervision of its teacher, and they had been instructed to remain together, but when the train came to a stop at the station some of the small boys unable to restrain their pent-up enthusiasm, made a rush for the viaduct, starting a stampede that resulted in the utter confusion of the entire party. All crowded about the dozen trolley cars waiting to convey them to the exposition, and an attempt at reorganization was made, but it resutled​ in failure, and they were placed aboard the cars regardless of division and order, after waiting fifteen minutes to make sure that none were missing.

The representation from the larger towns was as follows: Pawnee, 150, in charge of Superintendent Fulmer; Beatrice, 300, with Superintendent Dinsmore; Wymore, 300, with Principal Lauterback; Crete, 150, with Principal Reed. DeWitt, Liberty, Lincoln and Blue Springs were represented.

NEW YORK HAS A DAY

Empire State Celebrates Its Part in the Transmississippi Exposition.

SPLENDID REPRESENATION IS PRESENT

Strong Delegation of Distinguished Citizens Attend the Ceremonies.

PEOPLE FLOCK TO HEAR DR. DEPEW

Auditorium Filled by an Attentive and Enthusiastic Audience.

SENATOR WARNER MILLER PRESIDES

Congratulates the Transmississippi People and Presents What He Calls the Best Exhibit New York Could Possibly Make, a Man.

Total admissions yesterday23,613
Total to date1,841,445

The versatility of the Nebraska climate was again demonstrated today, when the visiting Knickerbockers were greeted by a day reminiscent of all the beauties of the Empire state when the chestnut ridges are aglow with red and gold and crimson and the smoky October haze mantles its massive hills and hovers sleepily over its smiling valleys. The air was crisp and invigorating and tempered by the radiance of a red October sun, that shone resplendently from a sky as clear as that which reflects the incomparable beauty of New York lakes and mountains. It was the sort of a morning that inspires humanity to its highest susceptibility of enjoyment and it left nothing lacking to make the pleasure of the visitors complete.

The ideal beauty of the day, combined with the attraction afforded by the presence of so distinguished a party, combined to induce an exceptionally generous attendance for the last day of the week, and all through the morning the turnstiles clicked continuously. While thousands of visitors were scattered over the grounds to improve the opportunity to see the show under such delightful conlitions​, the Auditorium was the center of attraction. In addition to the regular visitors, hundreds of Omaha people came out solely to hear the distinguished orator of the day, and the presence of Mr. Depew was largely responsible for the immense audience that filled the building to the limit of its capacity. Long before 1 o'clock nearly every seat in the Auditorium was occupied, and by the time the exercises began scarcely an inch of standing room remained unappropriated.

At exactly 11 o'clock a burst of long-sustained applause indicated the arrival of the distinguished guests. Mr. Depew was escorted to the stage by President Wattles and followed by the New York delegation, which filled the remainder of the stage and several rows of seats in the pit, which had been reserved for them. A medley of popular selections by Innes' band was enthusiastically received and then Jacob Amos, jr., of Syracuse, secretary of the New York commission, introduced Hon. Warner Miller as the presiding officer of the day.

Warner Miller's Address.

In accepting the chair Mr. Miller said that while the New York delegation was not large, it brought the sympathy and best wishes of the Empire state. The people of New York, he declared, have an abiding interest in the west, which is the home of so many of their children. The great drama of the last few months has made us a more homogeneous people than we have ever been before.

Mr. Miller then introduced President Wattles of the exposition, who cordially welcomed the New Yorkers to the great Transmississippi enterprise. He congratulated them on the fact that New York is the only eastern state that has a building on the grounds, and assured them that the cordial good will thus manifested was fully appreciated. He added that one great object of the exposition was to bring the people of the east and those of the west closer together. During the heat of recent political campaigns it had been repeatedly declared that the interests of the west were at enmity with those of the east, and more especially with those of New York. But when the Rough Riders of the west went to victory under the leadership of the gallant son of the Empire state it showed that the same blood flowed in every American citizen, whether he come from the prairies of the west or the millionaire homes of New York.

President Wattles briefly sketched the development of the west during the last fifty years, which this exposition is designed to illustrate, and added that the events of the last few months have indicated the necessity for a broader commercial existence, and the west looked to the east for leadership in these undertakings.

Dr. Depew Presented.

In presenting the orator of the day, Hon. Chauncey M. Depew, Chairman Miller said that he had had no opportunity to look over the grounds to see what sort of an exhibit New York had made, but he now had the pleasure of presenting the best exhibit it was capable of making, and one that he was confident would take the gold medal, the exhibit of a man.

When Mr. Depew rose to deliver his address he received the most dramatic and inspiring greeting that has yet been tendered to any exposition orator. An ovation of hand-clapping began spontaneously in every part of the house, then the band joined in with the melody of "Auld Lang Syne." This lent new inspiration to the applause and the entire audience rose to its feet and cheered tumultuously for several minutes. After gracefully expressing his appreciation of this royal reception Mr. Depew proceeded to deliver one of his characteristically eloquent orations, which was punctuated by frequent and generous applause. He said:

Ladies and Gentlemen: Some years ago, Chicago, the metropolis of the west, itself the most marvelous of the creations of the latter half of this wonderful century, reared upon the borders of Lake Michigan an industrial city. The spirits, whose deeds in classic and eastern tale charmed our childhood, became commonplace mortals. American genius and modern science surpassed in suggestion and execution the works of demigods and genii. The stately palaces, broad avenues, lakes and canals of this home of industry and the arts drew all the world within its walls. In its conception and administration the World's fair at Chicago was a worthy celebration of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Columbus, and a fitting tribute to the great explorer.

Our industrial progress has been during the four years since the Chicago exhibition greater than during any decade in our history. Our resources have been developed, our markets enlarged, and new avenues of employment opened. We have, in greater measure than ever before, realized our dream of producing in our country everything required for our necessities or luxuries. From practical independence of other countries for the products of their fields or factories, we have suddenly become their competitors with out surplus, both within and without their borders.

The great benefits which the World's fair at Chicago conferred upon the United States in acquisition from foreign countries and information to foreign governments, this Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha is to vastly enhance in bringing nearer together in better understanding of each other the different sections of our own country. I heard Li Hung Chang say when here that there were many provinces of China and millions of Chinamen who had not heard of the war with Japan. The light of the nineteenth century had not penetrated China's ironclad isolation. A conflict could be carried on and ended in which her territory was invaded, her fleet destroyed, her cities captured, tens of thousands of her people killed, and lands and islands she had held for centuries wrested from her, while a large part of the people of China were peacefully pursuing their vocations, ignorant of these disasters to their country. This exhibition has increased in industrial interest during every hour of our war with Spain, and yet every pulsation of its activities and every throb of the hearts of its visitors have been moved with patriotic prayers for the success of our arms and intelligent understanding of the justice of our cause. We have carried on a war with a foreign country, raised and equipped an army of 250,000 men and a formidable navy, have won great victories by sea and land, and yet though our interests and industries are so intimately connected that a blow in any section of the country is felt everywhere, this exhibition has as serenely continued its course as it has enthusiastically celebrated the deeds of Dewey, Sampson, Schley and Hobson, and Miles, Shafter and Merritt. There could be no happier illustration of the boundless resources of the United States and its powers for peace or war. It demonstrates the versatility of the Yankee character and its adaptability to circumstances. One thing at a time has had its day, and no longer forms a headline for the copy book of the American boy. Spain is thoroughly thrashed with one hand, while the other attends with energy and efficiency to the business of the nation.

Mistakes of New York.

New York has been too content with being the Empire state, and with having its chief city the metropolis of the continent, the west too eager for empire independent of the east, the south living too much upon its traditions and in its past, and the Pa-[?]   boundless possibilities and great expectations. The war with Spain has superbly restored the sentiment of nationality and eliminated sectional jealousies. But this exposition is a healthy educator for commercial union. The mission of peace is to develop the practical side of patriotism. It is to teach and demonstrate what will promote the development of the whole country and the prosperity and happiness of the whole people.

The concentrated capital of the east is the fruit of 300 years of settlement and trade. It is needed in the west for railroads, irrigation, mines, water power, furnaces and mills. It furnishes the transportation facilities which transform the prairie from the glazing plains of the buffalo and the hunting haunts of the wolf to the farm, the homestead, and productive power in herds of cattle and vast fields of wheat and corn. Its hopeful enterprise often finds for it an untimely grave in booming towns, unnecessary railroads and worthless mines. But capital is both selfish and intelligent. It never deserts a territory because the investment has failed through bad judgment. It seeks other sources for profitable employment, and finds its remuneration in other and needed work for the development of the country. Its freemasonry of fear is confined by no boundaries of land or sea. In times and in places of panic and distrust its disappears and increases the distress. With the return of confidence it moves the machinery of society and makes possible varied industries and prosperity. The state which so legislates as to take away all earning power from the money it has invited or borrowed soon learns that it has gained a temporary advantage and lost its credit, which is the most fruitful source of profit and prosperity. Differences between the east and the west have been due to distance, misunderstanding and demagogues. For a time the sections were daily becoming more widely separated. The west was encouraged to believe that it was plundered by usurers and extortionists in the east, and the east learned to distrust the integrity and intentions of the west. Far-sighted citizens of the prairie and mountain states knew that the resources of this wide territory had scarcely been touched. Drouth can be defeated by the ditch. Millions of acres from which the homesteader has fled in despair and millions more known as the Great American desert are to become, through storage reservoirs and irrigation, fruitful farms, thriving settlements and happy homes.

MEETING OF THE DIRECTORS.

Unbusinesslike Ways of Keeping the Accounts Are Reported Upon.

A large portion of the regular meeting of the Board of Directors yesterday afternoon was occupied by the consideration of a number of voluminous reports from the committee on audit and revision relative to carelessness and lack of business system in the management of the financial affairs of the exposition. These related chiefly to the failure of the cashier to strike daily balances as was directed by the board some weeks ago and to the failure of the same official to retain anything to show that a large number of vouchers and warrants had been paid.

On the latter score Chairman Kilpatrick reported that the expert examination of vouchers to August 15 had showed that there were a large number of cases in which no record had been made of the fact that money had been paid except the endorsement on the back of the voucher that had been retained by the treasurer for his own protection. A number of instances were cited, one of which referred to a voucher for $8,673.15 drawn in favor of Goldie & Son and cashed at the Union National bank in November, 1897. In this case, as in the others cited, there was absolutely no record on the books of the exposition to show that the amounts had ever been paid.

Numerous cases were also cited in which pay checks had been cashed without exacting a receipt or making any entry on the books to indicate that the employe had received his money. The same unbusinesslike policy prevailed in the matter of checks which were drawn and issued while no receipt was taken or record made beyond the endorsement of the recipient on the back of the check when he presented it for payment at the bank.

Three Cases that Are Suspicious.

Several directors suggested that these facts were very important and that the situation called for vigorous action. This led President Wattles to ask Mr. Kilpatrick if the committee had discovered anything that seemed to indicate that any funds had been misappropriated or embezzled. Mr. Kilpatrick stated in explanation that nothing of that kind was suggested except in three casse​ in which amounts of $15.69, $3.50 and $175, respectively, had been returned to the exposition and had not been credited to any of the funds. This left one of two conclusions. Either the employe who received these sums had put them into his pocket or the cash for the days on which they were received should be over to that extent. It was impossible to tell whether the latter was the case because no daily balances had been kept.

In reference to the daily cash balance Chairman Kilpatrick included a report from the special examiner, who declared that the records of cash as kept by the cashier showed that the cash was nearly $500 over when he begun​ his investigation and was still about $130 over. He added that the cashier kept an incomplete record of the cash for various days on slips of paper which were subsequently entered in the books. No proper cash balance had ever been made.

Continuing, the committee report referred again to the three amounts previously cited, in which the failure to maintain a daily cash balance made it impossible to tell whether or not a fraud had been committed. The committee recommended that the cashier should be compelled at once to make the daily cash balances and after a motion to this effect had been adopted the reports were referred to the executive committee.

Reports from the same committee showed that the bills receivable on September 16 amounted to $6,115.16. The amount unpaid by exhibitors was $13,525.05 and the amount overpaid exhibitors was $3,394.65. A number of errors had been discovered and the committee recommended that the accounts should be carefully checked up by the exhibits department at once. This matter was also referred to the executive committee, that the collection of these unpaid claims should be vigorously pushed.

Provides for a History.

The following resolution by General Manderson provoked quite a sharp debate, which ended in its adoption:

In view of the historical value of every incident connected with the Transmississippi and International Exposition and the importance of preserving in a safe public depository all material connected with its inception, its progress, its development and its triumphant success, it is

Resolved, That the president and secretary of the exposition are hereby directed to obtain by purchase or otherwise one at least of every medal, souvenir, program, photograph, illustration, magazine or newspaper article and all other matters and things connected with its history that can be procured.

Resolved, That all such materials when gathered shall be placed in suitable cases or receptacles in the building of the Omaha City library, provided that said library shall agree to furnish suitable places therefor and give due care to the preservation of the same. It is further

Resolved, That the president shall appoint from the directors of the exposition a committee of three to constitute and be called the Historical committee. Such committee shall be authorized and empowered to employ a suitable person as historian, who shall at once proceed with the gathering of the material and information for a complete history of the exposition and prepare the manuscript and select the illustrations and plates therefor. Such manuscript and material to be ready for the printers by June 1, 1899. It is further

Resolved, That the sum of $10,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be appropriated for such purpose. The sum needed to be expended under the direction of the historical committee upon voucher approved by a majority of them and countersigned by the president of the exposition. The said committee shall serve without compensation or emolument, but is authorized to employ a stenographer at not exceeding $75 per month. The material prepared for publication shall be approved before printing by the said committee, which shall also direct the form of the book to be published and provide for its binding. One copy of said book shall be furnished to the Omaha City library, to the University of Nebraska, to the Omaha High School library, to Creighton college and to each one of the directors of the exposition. All other of said publications shall be sold at not exceeding the cost of printing and binding and 10 per cent additional. The sum resulting from such sales to be paid to the treasurer of the exposition.

Unnecessary and Extravagant.

Manager Rosewater opposed the resolution on the ground that it contemplated as unnecessary and unjustifiable expenditure. He said that the bulk of the material referred to in this resolution had already been collected by the Department of Publicity and other souvenirs and records were in the hands of the secretary. He contended that to appropriate so large a sum for the purpose mentioned would be to let down the bars for all sorts of extravagance in the preparation of the "history" contemplated and that it was at the least poor policy to tie up so large a sum. He moved that the appropriation be reduced to $2,500, but this was lost and the original motion prevailed.

Auditor's Balance Sheet.

Secretary Wakefield furnishes the following auditor's account of receipts and disbursements to October 1:

Total receipts reported September 1, 1898$1,250,332.74
Received during September:
Stock subscriptions$ 1,867.50
Concessions 52,247.02
Exhibits 2,588.21
Bureau of Music 5.00
Publicity and Promotion 3.63
Buildings and Grounds 8,038.20
Gates 178,868.25
Photo passes 3,905.25
Commutation books 144.50
Souvenir medals 1,761.82— 249,429.38
Total$1,499,762.12

Disbursements from December 1, 1896, to date:

BY DEPARTMENTS.

Ways and Means$ 101,175.75
Publicity and Promotion 79,702.30
Buildings and Grounds 995,051.34
Exhibits department 45,586.77
Concessions and Privileges 24,029.29
Transportation 4,225.80
Store, storeroom 284.79
Keeper, postage and revenue 673.47
Interest and discount 3,044.01
Commission to agents 5,721.25
General expense 21,045.68
Girls' and Boys' building 8,747.41
Refunds 1,569.53
United States government Indian congress 4,507.15
H. T. McGarvie 150.00
United States war balloon 3,126.46
Total$1,298,640.98

BY REQUISITION.

Salaries and wages$ 289,147.02
Freight and express 15,812.97
Advertising 10,660.33
Printing and stationery 31,378.92
Photographing 3,227.75
Commissions 7,167.00
Souvenir medals 2,393.38
Furniture 3,010.66
Telegraph and telephone 3,217.09
Interest and discount 3,047.31
Special attractions 45,827.20
Insurance 15,249.67
Travelers, messengers and livery 23,730.93
Pictures and painting 16,701.15
Postage and revenue 10,779.23
Taxes, rentals and loans 11,662.48
Miscellaneous 19,530.87
Steam and electric plants 63,461.82
Utensils 10,123.47
Grounds 105,181.66
Buildings 567,734.73
Sewer 3,682.99
Water 35,882.36
Awards 30.00
Total$1,298,640.98

Innes' Band Concert.

The Wagner program give by Innes and his band in the Auditorium last night opened with a brilliant rendition of the "Rienzi" overture. In response to the encore which followed the band gave Mendelssohn's dainty "Spring Song." Then came "Isolde's Love Death" from "Tristan," which was substituted for the programed "Nachtgesang." Following this came the highly dramatic "Love Feast of the Apostles" and then the gem of the evening, the "Lohengrin Vorspiel," which was given with a delicacy, finish and dramatic fervor which the vast audience rewarded by such a demonstration of enthusiasm as has seldom been heard in an Omaha concert room. Tonight's concert will conclude with the sensational composition, "The Forge in the Forest." This is a wonderful musical contrivance of the most startling and thrilling character, requiring the highest order of interpretation of which any band is capable. In order to properly present it arrangements have been made to have electrical illustrations in its rendition. For instance, in signifying the forge in the forest, the lights in the building will be subdued and the finest electrical contrivances yet invented will be brought into play to illustrate in forms of fire and many-colored brilliancy the scene which the music undertakes to portray.

The third of Innes' Sunday afternoon concerts, which will be given in the Auditorium at 3:30 tomorrow afternoon, will introduce a program of especial merit, the notable features being two numbers by the Exposition chorus and Batiste's beautiful, "Communion in G," which will be given by Mr. T. J. Kelly on the grand organ accompanied by the band.

WIGWAGGING ALONG THE COURT.

Signal Service Men Send Messages to Show the Public.

The first exhibition of flag, heliograph and flashlight signalling, as carried on by the War department, was given yesterday afternoon and evening by the members of the United States signal corps. It started with the flag or wigwag system, men being stationed upon different buildings along the grand court. Armed with small flags, they carried on a system of telegraphing that was understood by each operator. Questions were asked by a wave of a flag and an answer was given by another wave of the little square. Next the heliograph was brought into action and the light, aided by mirrors, was flashed through the air like sunbeams. According to the code each flash meant a word or series of words, and a man with a heliograph threw his signals from the lagoon off into space, where they were read by the officers for whom they were intended.

The work of signalling at night was even more interesting than during the day. A small light working upon substantially the same plan as a searchlight was brought into action and a series of signals flashed up against the sky. In carrying on this work a code system is in use, each flash representing words, figures and sentences.

 

War Balloon Goes Up Once.

Captain Yancey and the members of the signal corps got the war balloon up in the air yesterday afternoon, reaching a point 1,600 feet above the earth. The trip was unannounced, but notwithstanding this there was a crowd around the ropes long before the big airship reached a height of 100 feet. The car was occupied by Captain Yancey and Sergeant Briede and when they signalled for a cut away, the ballast was cast off and the ballon​ started up like a big bird, going higher and higher until it had reached the elevation desired. From that point telephone messages were sent to the ground informing the operator there that up in the air the weather was very cold.

In sending up the balloon yesterday a pilot balloon was used as a feeler to find out the conditions of the upper currents of air. This balloon was sent ahead and as its flight indicated that there were no strong currents of air the big bag was allowed to follow. From now until the close of the exposition balloon ascensions will be daily features, providing the weather conditions are favorable.

New Mexico Day.

Captain Leeson, commissioner from New Mexico, has completed all of the arrangements for observing New Mexico day at the exposition. It has been decided not to have any exercises, but instead to have the visitors spend the day in an informal way.

New Mexico day has been set for next Monday, when Governor Prince and the members of his staff, together with enough from the territory to fill a special train, will be present. In the party there will be Captain Llewellyn and twelve of the Rough Riders who participated in the war with Spain. The members of the party will remain several days in order that they may be here during Peace Jubilee week. A button for New Mexico day has been designed and will be given out from the territory's space in the Mines building. The button will bear the words "New Mexico" on one side and on the reverse will be a picture of a burro, loaded with a miner's outfit.

Spieler's Jaws Broken.

A Midway spieler named Nolan became involved in a fracas yesterday afternoon with a visitor who resented his somewhat personal remarks. The stranger picked up an iron bar that happened to be in reach and hit Nolan a blow that fractured his jaw in two places. The injured man was taken to the hospital, where he was made as comfortable as possible, but he is still in a serious condition.

Massachusetts Will Show Butter.

Massachusetts has sent on an exhibit and will come into the next butter contest, which will occur the first of next week in the Dairy building.

A large number of entries of cheese are being made at the Dairy building. The contest at which the scorings will be made has been set for October 12.

Notes of the Exposition.

Mrs. W. V. Cox, wife of Secretary Cox at the Government building, has arrived from Washington, accompanied by her sister, Miss Emory. They will remain in the city several days visiting the exposition.

J. M. Biddle of the Department of State gave a dinner at the Omaha club Thursday evening in honor of the visit of Mr. and Miss Murphy of San Francisco. Mr. and Mrs. W. V. Cox and Miss Emory were also present.

The members of the Southern Indiana Editorial association will arrive in the city Sunday morning at 6 o'clock. It is understood that there will be 100 in the party and that they will stay during the greater portion of next week.

During the stay of the Ohio people at the exposition, a great many of them are making their headquarters at the Government building, where they have numerous friends who are in the employ of the government and assigned to work in the several departments.

Prof. Armstrong Smith of Hawaii, who is here, studying the public school system, is much pleased with the kindergarten work shown in the gallery of the Manufactures building. He is seeking to make arrangements to take home with him a portion of the exhibit as an object lesson for the children of the islands. Prof. Smith is in charge of the Hawaiian schools.

Superintendent Sumner I. Kimball of the life saving service was at the exposition yesterday and during the afternoon he was an interested spectator at the drill given by the members of the live saving crew. He has been with the service since its establishment and was one of the men who brought it into existence. Superintendent Kimball will be in Omaha next week for the purpose of attending the Peace Jubilee exercises.

OHIO PEOPLE VOICE PRAISE

Toledo Excursionists Start for Home Full of Transmississippi and Omaha Enthusiasm.

In two long trains the Ohio excursionists started homeward at 7 o'clock last night. The second section contained the Ohio commissioners, Mayor Jones, Editor Curtis and several architects with their wives from Toledo. Seated in the smoking compartment of the fourth car were President Kilbourne, Vice Presidents Kumler and Belt, Secretary Harris of the commission, Architect Tallis and James Smith, the stockman, discussing the exposition.

To the harmless question of how they enjoyed the exposition the replies "great," "fine," "splendid," "excellent," snapped like fire crackers. And then everybody started to praise it at once. "That stock show is a heap sight better than the one at the Columbian exposition," said Mr. Smith. "I never saw anything like it," and then they chose Vice President Kumler to speak for them.

"The entire commission," said he, "and the private citizens who accompanied us are delighted with the trip and the curiosities they have been shown. The exposition exceeded our expectations. The mining and electrical exhibits are far superior to those of the Columbian exposition. I never heard praise so uniformly expressed as on this trip. It was great—great.

"The gentlemen behind this enterprise are entitled to the greatest credit. When they conceived the idea of the Transmississippi Exposition they builded better than they knew. We were delighted to visit Omaha and hope that you will return the greeting at our exposition in 1903, in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of Ohio's admission to the United States. You are a great agricultural state. So come with sheaves of wheat and shocks of corn. And come ten hundred million strong. That beats Lincoln's request. We'll welcome you in our hearts and to our homes.

"Your exposition is conceded to be the best of its kind in the nineteenth century and has received and merited the plaudits of seventy million people."

Editor Curtis said it was his business to get Ohio people to talk, not talk himself, but he could not contain his surprise and delight in the exposition. "We were prepared to be very critical, you know," said he, "for we are to have an exposition ourselves, but we found nothing to criticise. Instead, we did nothing but admire and praise the buildings and exhibits."

Architect Tallis and several others came on to study the architecture and plans of the buildings and they had naught but praise for their beauty and dignity.

"I could talk for an hour about our good time," said Mayor Jones. "We have all enjoyed it immensely and are deeply gratified at the attention and hospitality we have received. You cannot express our pleasure too strongly."

And then the train pulled out with its passengers still wondering at and praising the exposition.

The Bee was yesterday afternoon favored with a serenade by the Toledo Marine band which accompanied the Toledo delegation to the exposition and took part in the Ohio day exercises Thursday. The band is composed of forty-two pieces, but only had twenty-five on this trip. The leader is W. E. Van Dorn and N. W. Hartman is the drum major. The band assembled in the court of The Bee building and played a march, after which it is rendered a concert selection, in which Mr. Hartman was given an opportunity to show his capabilities as a cornetist. The hastily gathered audience showed its appreciation of this selection so enthusiastically that an encore was given. The band left last evening with the excursionists for Chicago, where it will play today and will then go on to Pittsburg to attend the Knights Templar conclave.

GOOD ROADS PARLIAMENT

Session of the Delegates Opens at the Exposition Grounds During the Morning.

The Good Roads parliament opened in the Nebraska building this morning at 10 o'clock. Martin Dodge, who is connected with the road department at Washington and acting president of the parliament, called the convention to order and explained briefly the objects of the meeting. He said:

With all the rapid and wonderful advancement made in reference to both transportation and communication between distant places, there has been comparatively little progress in bettering the common roads of the country, and the means of communication in the rural districts but short distances from one another. It still costs an average of 25 cents a mile per ton to move the products of the country by animal power upon the common roads, and this can undoubtedly be reduced to an average of 5 cents by introducing the best known means of improvement. It is the desire of the government to do everything possible to solve the road problem, and especially to ascertain and publish all facts pertaining to legislation and construction of roads and the best methods of combining materials most suitable to the end in view.

Edward Rosewater, vice president of the National Goods Roads association, was then introduced as chairman of the meeting. He spoke of the need of better roads throughout the United States, and especially in Nebraska, mentioning a recent attempt on the part of the citizens of this county to improve their highways, for which the county appropriated several thousands of dollars.

It was the sense of the meeting that the subject of good roads is so vital a one that a permanent organization should be formed before proceeding to the reading of the papers dealing with the subject. On motion two committees were appointed by the chair, one to draw up resolutions and the other to submit a constitution at the afternoon session. The following were named on these committees: Resolutions—Delegates Patterson of Nebraska, Moore of Missouri, Kennedy of Pennsylvania and Rankin of Ohio; permanent organization—Delegates Helsley of Nebraska, Schackleford of Missouri and Donner of Wisconsin.

After electing A. B. Dunning of Pennsylvania temporary secretary the convention adjourned to hear the New York day exercises at the Auditorium and allow the committees time to prepare their reports. The afternoon session was called to order at 1:30 o'clock.

ISSUES ANOTHER INJUNCTION

Judge Scott Takes Another Turn at the Streets of All Nations Case.

A temporary injunction has again been ordered by Judge Scott to issue against the "Streets of All Nations" in the suit of the "'Streets of Cairo." He threatens to make trouble if the clerk of the district court does not honor his order. The injunction of the other judges on the clerk, the sheriff and the coroner was up to term time. Judge Scott says it does not apply to any order he might make now, as term time commenced October 3. All the other judges, however, adjourned court until November.

When asked about what he, as attorney for the "Streets of All Nations" and general counsel of the exposition, would do if any effort is made to harass his clients, Carroll S. Montgomery said no notice had been received by him yet from the other side and he would not take any action until he was formally notified. "Anyway," said Mr. Montgomery, "the case has been removed from the district court to the federal court by our petition, which we filed before October 3, according to the bond we gave. We consider the case removed from district court jurisdiction absolutely and there is now nothing that Judge Scott can do."

The attorney for the "Streets of Cairo" had not fled any order with the clerk of the district court at a late hour yesterday afternoon.

 

DEPEW ARRIVES IN OMAHA

New York's Popular Orator Will Make an Address at the Exposition.

SAYS HIS SUBJECT WILL BE OMAHA

His Train Arrives an Hour Ahead of Time and Heads Off Any Possible Demonstration by Omaha Admirers.

Chauncey M. Depew, accompanied by President S. R. Calloway of the New York Central, arrived in Omaha at 5 p. m. yesterday after a quick run from New York. Dr. Depew will participate in the exercises of New York day today and will start on the return trip tonight.

The party left New York at 8:30 a. m. Thursday and arrived in Chicago at 6:15 a. m. yesterday, completing the run to the Mississippi river in twenty-five hours. The routes taken were the New York Central, the Lake Shore and the Northwestern. The special train was made up of the finest equipment and the trip was made so smoothly that Dr. Depew was not in the least fatigued by his long journey.

The time of the party's arrival was not generally known and had been announced for one hour later. The prominent republicans of this locality, therefore, were unable to pay their respects in person to their chief and will take that opportunity at the hotel or during the exercises at the grounds.

General Manager Clarkson was waiting when the train drew up and tendered Dr. Depew the welcome of the exposition management. He said that President Wattles and other officials wished to meet the distinguished guest after he had become refreshed from his journey, and to conduct him to the exposition grounds and later to the Ak-Sar-Ben ball. Dr. Depew accepted the first invitation cordially, remarking that he had heard the praises of the exposition at night sung in no measured terms. Others who were present to extend an official welcome to the party were: Hon. Jacob Amos, ex-mayor of Syracuse, N. Y.; H. B. Hebert of the Produce Exchange, New York, and Major A. M. Wheeler, all members of the New York state commission.

Not a Stranger in Omaha.

Dr. Depew remarked on his way to a carriage that he was by no means a stranger in the city, having made brief stops here on a number of occasions. "Mr. Calloway, who is with me," he added, "quite considers himself an Omaha citizen, as he was resident here for a number of years at the time he was president of the Union Pacific."

He was asked regarding the subject of his speech today and replied with one of his contagious laughs, "Omaha, nothing but Omaha, the center of the world."

Although the special made a direct trip from New York there will be less haste on the return and Monday will be spent in Chicago. Dr. Depew will make an address in the afternoon at the Auditorium under the auspices of the Hamilton club and in the evening he will be tendered a banquet by the same organization, which will be followed by one of the guest's famous after dinner speeches.

The main body of the New Yorkers came in this morning. There is a party of twelve from the Produce exchange and a number from the Merchants' association and the Board of Trade. Dr. Depew's party is quartered at the Paxton and the New York headquarters will be divided between that house and the Millard, where reservations have been made for the Merchants' association.

PLANS FOR PRESIDENT'S TRIP

Itinerary for the Journey from Washington to Omaha is Practically Completed.

WASHINGTON, Oct. 7.—(Special Telegram.)—The work of the committee sent to Washington to arrange for the president's train to Omaha is about completed. The copy for the itinerary has been given to the printer and the only minor details intrusted to division superintendents affecting the running of trains remain to bring to a glorious culmination the efforts of Nebraska and the west to make the week of the Peace Jubilee notable in these closing century days. There have been few changes in the itinerary of the president's train to Omaha, the design being to run the train carrying the army and navy people, representatives of the diplomatic corps and government officials ahead of the president's train in order that the party may be in carriages on the arrival of the chief executive.

As for the second special which goes over the Baltimore & Ohio Monday morning, it will carry more notables than have ever left Washington at any one time in the history of the century. The list as made up now is as follows:

Diplomatic corps—Mr. Wu Ting Fang, Chinese minister plenipotentiary; Mrs. Wu Ting Fang and maid, Master Wu Cho Chu, Mr. Chow Tsz-Chi, Mr. Hwang Chung-Huli, Mr. Li Kwang-Hang, secretaries; the minister's steward; Mr. Chin Pom Ye, Korean minister plenipotentiary; Mrs. Chin Pom Ye, Master Wo Chong Ye; Mrs. Tam E. Ye, secretary; Mr. Henry Guillaume, Gonzalo DeQuesada, charge d'affaires of the Cuban junta; Mrs. Quesada, Miss Quesada.

Army and navy and government officials: Major General Miles, Colonel Francis Michler, Colonel William M. Black, Colonel Samuel Reber, Captain H. H. Whitney, staff officers, and Mrs. Miles; Major General W. R. Shafter, two aides and valet, Major General Joseph Wheeler, the Misses Wheeler, Brigadier General A. W. Greeley, chief signal officer; Mrs. Greeley, Brigadier General C. F. Humphrey, Mrs. Mary Howland, Commodore W. J. Philip, U. S. N.; Captain Arther Paget, naval attache, British embassy; Dr. R. W. Baker, U. S. A.; Mrs. Baker, Mrs. J. V. Creighton, Hon. J. M. Thurston, Hon. J. D. Yoemans, interstate commerce commission; Prof. W. L. Moore, chief weather bureau; Mrs. Moore, Dr. W. T. Harris, commissioner of education; Mrs. Harris, General James A. Sexton, commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic. Representatives of the press: Charles S. Albert, New York World; W. E. Annin, Philadelphia Ledger; George Grantham Bain, Harper's Weekly; Frederic Benzinger, Chicago Times-Herald; W. E. Curtis, Chicago Record; Louis Garthe, Baltimore American; C. A. Hamilton, Sioux City Journal; James S. Henry, Philadelphia Press; Raymond Patterson, Chicago Tribune; Frank Richardson, Baltimore Sun; George W. Rouzer, New York Herald; John S. Shriver, New York Mail and Express; E. C. Snyder, Omaha Bee; Howard N. Thompson, Associated Press.

FOOT RACE AND GHOST DANCE

Novel Intermission in the Round of Sham Battles by Indians.

PECULIAR RELIGIOUS CEREMONY ENACTED

Members of Several Tribes Join in the Strangely Wierd​ Dance that Led up to the Pine Ridge War.

A foot race, participated in by twenty-four of the swiftest runners of the Indian congress, and a ghost dance in which fifty men and women from the Apache, Cheyenne, Wichita and Sioux tribes joined, were the attractions at the Indian village yesterday afternoon. Neither of these features has been presented before and they made a pleasing variation to the sham battles which have been enjoyed by so many during the last three weeks. They represented two new and distinct phases of the Indians' life. The one showed him in his natural and native sport, the other in his religious ceremonial. The arrangements for both of these exhibitions of the Indian at peace were in charge of Prof. James Mooney, the government ethnological expert, who has spent the last twelve years among the Indians and especially among the Arapahoes.

Owing to the small space in the enclosure the track for the foot race was limited to 100 yards. This distance was determined upon as an experiment and was not expected to develop the quality for which the Indian is most famed—endurance. The Pueblos, Apaches, Navajoes and other tribes of the extreme southwest are long distance runners and can follow a trail for hour after hour without diminishing their speed. The Wichitas have a religious festival every year in which foot races for a distance of one or two miles form a part and the members of this tribe are trained especially for this distance. The tribes of the plains are horsemen and, although they have a few runners, are not swift on their feet.

To bring these various competitors down to a short distance was the difficulty experienced. But when the Sioux chief, His Horse Looking, called the competitors to the start twenty-four well-muscled, trim-limbed braves answered the blast of the bugle. They were divided into three groups of eight competitors each, each group to run one heat and the three winners to appear in the final. The three heats were well contested, the first going to Sam, a Chiricahua Apache, the second to a Crow and third to a Sioux. After a short rest the three winners toed the mark for the championship of the congress. Each was bare-headed, bare-footed and bare-legged. The Apache wore a white, the Crow a red and the Sioux a black shirt. The shot was fired, away spend the Crow and the Sioux, leaving Sam, the Apache, standing at the post. The red-shirted Crow won by a foot. Sam wanted the race run over, claiming that the start was not fair. But they refused to go into another heat. So the question of championship was left to be debated around the fires in the tepees.

Ghost Dance Comes On.

Just as the shadows were beginning to lengthen across the clearing in the center of the village the men and women of the congress trooped out from their wigwams to give a rendition of the famous Indian religious ceremonial—the ghost dance. This differs from all other Indian dances. It is the basis of a religion originated twelve years ago by a prophet of the Piutes of western Nevada called by his people Wovoka and known to the whites as Jack Wilson. He declared that he had had a vision in which he was carried to heaven and saw the great god of the Indians, by whom he was informed that by going into a trance the people of the earth might gain a sight of heaven and meet their departed friends. When in this state he said that the new earth would open before their eyes and a new life be unfolded to them. The ghost dance began to develop immediately among the Piutes and belief in the teachings of Wovoka spread like a prairie fire across the plain until the new religion and its attendant ceremonial became the life of the western tribes. Its culmination came with the outbreak of the Sioux at the Pine Ridge agency and the massacre at Wounded Knee, where the government intervened, believing that the ceremonial tended to inflame the redskins to rebellion.

The ghost dance yesterday was of too short duration to show the effects. However, it was not an imitation to amuse the spectators, but a real ghost dance participated in with all the characteristic vigor and frenzy. Fifty redskins from the Arapahoes, Sioux, Cheyennes and Wichitas—men, women and papooses—joined hands in a ring. With no musical instruments but the sonorous tones of their voices singing in unison they began to move in a circle. Low and droning, like the voices of monks muffled by the walls of a distant convent, they repeated the strains of the Indian messiah's message to his people, while their feet, stepping in perfect time, marked the rhythm of the Arapaho song. Then the Cheyennes joined in, humming the tune but not the words. The volume of sound increased and the sidelong steps beat the ground more firmly. They stopped and the Wichitas and Sioux began the weird strains again with other words in which the whole circle joined. Their bodies began to sway in time to their voices, lifting a prayer to the great father, while cries of lamentation broke in on the monotonous strain.

Then three medicine men of the tribes broke from the chain and with bodies bent almost to the ground began to wheel around the inner circle, waving their white handkerchiefs in the faces of the dancers. Round and round they went as the music changed from lamentation to a frenzied song that indicated the mesmeric spell induced by the rhythm of their own motion and the incantations of the medicine men. Finally, two of the women dropped their hands to their sides and trembling to the finger tips danced in the center of the ring, their eyes following the medicine men as they spun around in search of subjects. The outer circle continued the awful strain of the song while those within, oblivious to rhythm, threw up their arms in weird fantastic gesticulations, beat their breasts and tore at the roots of their hair, half conscious of what they did and heeding only the mendications of the mesmerists. Then the Sioux began the song sung at the Pine Ridge agency, who words translated are "Our father, the crow has told us to dance around five times and stop." It began with the frenzy of the song of lamentation, but with each successive repetition became softer and softer, until with the last turn of that circle it died away and the famous ghost dance was over.

Had it not been that the dance was begun so late in the afternoon it might have been possible for the medicine men to have broken up the dance and sent the whole ring into a state of semi-consciousness, as often happens when the ceremonial continues late into the night.

 

NEW YORK'S FAIR DAY

Empire State Draws a Prize in the Weather Man's Lottery.

SPLENDID REPRESENTATION WAS PRESENT

Strong Delegation of Distinguished Citizens Attend the Ceremonies.

PEOPLE FLOCK TO HEAR DR. DEPEW

Auditorium Filled by an Attentive and Enthusiastic Audience.

SENATOR WARNER MILLER PRESIDES

Congratulates the Transmississippi People and Presents What He Calls the Best Exhibit New York Could Possibly Make, a Man.

Total Admissions Yesterday26,162
Total for the Week148,025
Total to Date1,867,656

With the great attractions of Jubilee week only a day ahead it was not to be supposed that the exposition would receive more than a limited patronage yesterday. But the show provide big enough to command attention even if thousands of people were waiting for the great spectacles that will begin tomorrow, and it was one of the biggest and most enjoyable Saturdays since the exposition opened.

The versatility of the Nebraska climate was again demonstrated when the visiting Knickerbockers were greeted by a day reminiscent of all the beauties of the Empire state when the chestnut ridges are aglow with red and gold and crimson and the smoky October haze mantles its massive hills and hovers sleepily over its smiling valleys. The air was crisp and invigorating and tempered by the radiance of a red October sun, that shone resplendently from a sky as clear as that which reflects the incomparable beauty of New York lakes and mountains. It was the sort of weather that inspires humanity to its highest susceptibility of enjoyment and it left nothing lacking to make the pleasure of the visitors complete.

The ideal beauty of the day, combined with the attraction afforded by the presence of so distinguished a party, combined to induce an exceptionally generous attendance for the last day of the week, and all through the morning the turnstiles clicked continuously. While thousands of visitors were scattered over the grounds to improve the opportunity to see the show under such delightful conditions, the Auditorium was the center of attractions. In addition to the regular visitors, hundred of Omaha people came out solely to hear the distinguished orator of the day, and the presence of Mr. Depew was largely responsible for the immense audience that filled the building to the limit of its capacity. After the exercises had been thoroughly enjoyed the crowd mingled with the other thousands that were seeking enjoyment in every part of the grounds, and the Empire state visitors improved their first really adequate opportunity to acquire a full appreciation of the wonderful enterprise. Many of them were attracted by the various attractions of the afternoon, but the majority preferred to spend their time in inspecting the big buildings and their varied contents. They regarded the exhibits with unstinted admiration and did not hesitate to declare that in many respects the Transmississippi show was a distinct improvement on the World's fair.

Today the celebration of Jubilee week, the crowning feature of the exposition, will be opened with a grand sacred concert in the Auditorium. This will be one of the most enjoyable musical events of the summer and with the 25-cent admission the Sunday attendance record should be broken with a few thousand to spare. The usual Plaza concert will occupy this evening, and there will probably be a religious dance at the Indian encampment.

PEOPLE FLOCK TO HEAR DEPEW.

Auditorium Filled by an Attentive and Enthusiastic Audience.

The presence of the large delegation of distinguished citizens of the Empire state was celebrated by formal exercises in the Auditorium yesterday forenoon. The great building was jammed with people and resonant with enthusiasm. Long before 1 o'clock nearly every seat was occupied, and by the time the exercises began scarcely an inch of standing room remained unappropriated.

At exactly 11 o'clock a burst of long-sustained applause indicated the arrival of the distinguished guests. Mr. Depew was escorted to the stage by President Wattles and followed by the New York delegation, which filled the remainder of the stage and several rows of seats in the pit, which had been reserved for them. A medley of popular selections by Innes' band was enthusiastically received and then Jacob Amos, jr., of Syracuse, secretary of the New York commission, introduced Hon. Warner Miller as the presiding officer of the day.

Warner Miller's Address.

In accepting the chair Mr. Miller said that while the New York delegation was not large, it brought the sympathy and best wishes of the Empire state. The people of New York, he declared, have an abiding interest in the west, which is the home of so many of their children. The great drama of the last few months has made us a more homogeneous people than we have ever been before.

Mr. Miller then introduced President Wattles of the exposition, who cordially welcomed the New Yorkers to the great Transmississippi enterprise. He congratulated them on the fact that New York is the only eastern state that has a building on the grounds, and assured them that the cordial good will thus manifested was fully appreciated. He added that one great object of the exposition was to bring the people of the east and those of the west closer together. During the heat of recent political campaigns it had been repeatedly declared that the interests of the west were at enmity with those of the east, and more especially with those of New York. But when the Rough Riders of the west went to victory under the leadership of the gallant son of the Empire state it showed that the same blood flowed in every American citizen, whether he come from the prairies of the west or the millionaire homes of New York.

President Wattles briefly sketched the development of the west during the last fifty years, which this exposition is designed to illustrate, and added that the events of the last few months have indicated the necessity for a broader commercial existence, and the west looked to the east for leadership in these undertakings.

Dr. Depew Presented.

In presenting the orator of the day, Hon. Chauncey M. Depew, Chairman Miller said that he had had no opportunity to look over the grounds to see what sort of an exhibit New York had made, but he now had the pleasure of presenting the best exhibit it was capable of making, and one that he was confident would take the gold medal, the exhibit of a man.

When Mr. Depew rose to deliver his address he received the most dramatic and inspiring greeting that has yet been tendered to any exposition orator. An ovation of hand-clapping began spontaneously in every part of the house, then the band joined in with the melody of "Auld Lang Syne." This lent new inspiration to the applause and the entire audience rose to its feet and cheered tumultuously for several minutes. After gracefully expressing his appreciation of this royal reception Mr. Depew proceeded to deliver one of his characteristically eloquent orations, which was punctuated by frequent and generous applause. He said:

Ladies and Gentlemen: Some years ago, Chicago, the metropolis if the west, itself the most marvelous of the creations of the latter half of this wonderful century, reared upon the borders of Lake Michigan an industrial city. The spirits, whose deeds in classic and eastern tale charmed our childhood, became commonplace mortals. American genius and modern science surpassed in suggestion and execution the works of demigods and genii. The stately palaces, broad avenues, lakes and canals of this home of industry and the arts drew in all the world within its walls. In its conception and administration the World's fair at Chicago was a worthy celebration of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Columbus, and a fitting tribute to the great explorer.

Our industrial progress has been during the four years since the Chicago exhibition greater than during any decade in our history. Our resources have been developed, our markets enlarged, and new avenues of employment opened. We have, in greater measure than ever before, realized our dream of producing in our country everything required for our necessities or luxuries. From practical independence of other countries for the products of their fields or factories, we have suddenly become their competitors with our surplus, both within and without their borders.

The great benefits which the World's fair at Chicago conferred upon the United States in acquisition from foreign countries and information to foreign governments, this Transmississippi Exposition at Omaha is to vastly enhance in bringing nearer together in better understanding of each other the different sections of our own country. I heard Li Hung Chang say when here that there were many provinces of China and millions of Chinamen who had not heard of the war with Japan. The light of the nineteenth century had not penetrated China's ironclad isolation. A conflict could be carried on and ended in which her territory was invaded, her fleet destroyed, her cities captured, tens of thousands of her people killed, and lands and islands she had held for centuries wrested from her, while a large part of the people of China were peacefully pursuing their vocations, ignorant of these disasters to their country. This exhibition has increased in industrial interest during every hour of our war with Spain, and yet every pulsation of its activities and every throb of the hearts of its visitors have been moved with patriotic prayers for the success of our arms and intelligent understanding of the justice of our cause. We have carried on a war with a foreign country, raised and equipped an army of 250,000 men and a formidable navy, have won great victories by sea and land, and yet though our interests and industries are so intimately connected that a blow in any section of the country is felt everywhere, this exhibition has as serenely continued its course as it has enthusiastically celebrated the deeds of Dewey, Sampson, Schley and Hobson, and Miles, Shafter and Merritt. There could be no happier illustration of the boundless resources of the United States and its powers for peace or war. It demonstrates the versatility of the Yankee character and its adaptability to circumstances. One thing at a time has had its day, and no longer forms a headline for the copy book of the American boy. Spain is thoroughly thrashed with one hand, while the other attends with energy and efficiency to the business of the nation.

Mistakes of New York.

New York has been too content with being the Empire state, and with having its chief city the metropolis of the continent, the west too eager for empire independent of the east, the south living too much upon its traditions and in its past, and the Pacific slope resting too serenely upon its boundless possibilities and great expectations. The war with Spain has superbly restored the sentiment of nationality and eliminated sectional jealousies. But this exposition is a healthy educator for commercial union. The mission of peace is to develop the practical side of patriotism. It is to teach and demonstrate what will promote the development of the whole country and the prosperity and happiness of the whole people.

The concentrated capital of the east is the fruit of 300 years of settlement and trade. It is needed in the west for railroads, irrigation, mines, water power, furnaces and mills. It furnishes the transportation facilities which transform the prairie from the grazing plains of the buffalo and the hunting haunts of the wolf to the farm, the homestead, and productive power in herds of cattle and vast fields of wheat and corn. Its hopeful enterprise often finds for it an untimely grave in booming towns, unnecessary railroads and worthless mines. But capital is both selfish and intelligent. It never deserts a territory because the investment has failed through bad judgment. It seeks other sources for profitable employment, and finds its remuneration in other and needed work for the development of the country. Its freemasonry of fear is confined by no boundaries of land or sea. In times and in places of panic and distrust it disappears and increases the distress. With the return of confidence it moves the machinery of society and makes possible varied industries and prosperity. The state which so legislates as to take away all earning power from the money it has invited or borrowed soon learns that it has gained a temporary advantage and lost its credit, which is the most fruitful source of profit and prosperity. Differences between the east and the west have been due to distance, misunderstanding and demagogues. For a time the sections were daily becoming more widely separated. The west was encouraged to believe that it was plundered by usurers and extortionists in the east, and the east learned to distrust the integrity and intentions of the west. Far-sighted citizens of the prairie and mountain states knew that the resources of this wide territory had scarcely been touched. Drouth can be defeated by the ditch. Millions of acres from which the homesteader has fled in despair and millions more known as the Great American desert are to become, through storage reservoirs and irrigation, fruitful farms, thriving settlements and happy homes.

 

Education the Remedy.

Education is the remedy for our troubles. The school is the preparatory department of the college, and the college fits boys for the greater university of the world. The school and the college teach, they cannot educate. The collegian can become as narrow as his village playmate who graduated at the common school if both remain for their life-work in the isolated environment of these local conditions, prejudices and misconceptions. Both of them come to this exposition. The encircling horizon which made coincident their physical and intellectual vision expands with their minds and embraces states and cities, arts and industries. They see the vastness and interdependence of our internal commerce. They learn that the more intelligently selfish any business may be, the more patriotically it encourages every other industry and contributes to the general weal. The solution of the century-vexing problem of capital and labor grows simpler. They see that even a railroad president may be a public-spirited citizen without betraying the interests or lessening the business of his company; that the money power is the concentration of the capital of the many at convenient centers of financial operations and contact with the world, where it lies idle and useless in times of distrust, but is easily drawn to the beneficent purposes and productive energies of the community which can give it profitable employment. Those from large cities learn that New York and Boston, Philadelphia and Chicago are marts of trade, not places of power. The country needs and recruits them. They reflect and do not originate the conditions and opinions of the republic. The untraveled city man is the most provincial of mortals. His local pride paralyzes his powers of observation, and the rest of the universe exists only for his benefit and by his permission. The west is an unknown land of grazing plains, mining camps and big game. But he finds here the broadest culture of the schools and colleges, a vigorous and healthy public sentiment, the courage to try and the ability to utilize every invention which will increase the productive power and decrease the cost of operating the farm, the forest, the manufactory and the mine. Thus the broader education brings into contact and activity all the elements of our strength and growth. Self-centered satisfaction is an insurmountable barrier to mental, moral or material growth.

Big Enough for Our Destiny.

Foreign cities say Americans boast of the bigness of their country. There is no use denying the fact; we are big. We are not too large for a destiny never so manifest as today. Cuba is under our protection and certain to come under our flag by the vote of her people; Porto Rico is ours; our foothold in the Philippines will never be surrendered, and the markets of the far east are inviting us to compete with the nations of Europe for their trade. Big as we are, the future is bigger with duties, responsibilities and opportunities for our citizens. The sentimentalist declares that such a review as has occupied our hour today is the grossest materialism. After years of experiment and observation I have found that sentiment has less alloy, is purer and attains loftier ideals under a well thatched roof than on the sod, under storms as well as sunshine, and with drenching clouds as well as stars above. "What makes a hero in battle?" I inquired of a veteran, the victor on many a bloody field. His answer was: "Plenty of good beef or mutton and hot coffee."

When Nebraska shall have reached the age of New York there will be a population of over 200,000,000 in the United States, Our domain will be sufficient for their support and our institutions elastic enough for their orderly government and their liberty. Intelligence will be keen and high and the state will be very close to the daily life and industrial activities of the people. Co-operation will be working to an extent now thought chimerical. There will always be differences of conditions, as God has endowed his children with degrees of gifts, but the much abused doctrine that the world owes every many a living will be in general vogue and practical. The lazy, the shiftless and the improvident will grumble and suffer then as now, but there will be a place for all according to the talents bestowed upon them, and wisely perfected plans for the care and comfort of the aged and the helpless.

The war with Spain has unified our country. The sons of the south and the north fighting side by side and under the old flag has effaced the last vestige of the passions of the civil war. The young men of the farthest west and its primitive conditions lying with their comrades from the circles of the clubs and fashion in the east in the trenches of El Caney and charging up the hill and over the defenses of San Juan have made the men of the west and the east one by the baptism of blood. Whether from the plains of Arizona or the palaces of New York, and whether dressed in broadcloth or in buckskin, the Rough Rider is the same American.

Venerable New York sends hail and cordial congratulations to young Nebraska. Our settlement is 240 and our sovereignty ninety years older than yours. Three centuries of development under original conditions and free institutions greet this half century of the west from the painted savage to the industrious citizen with a past and present full of cheer and hope. First among the states of the republic in population, prosperity, educational institutions, churches, productive power and wealth, and commanding the resources of the continent through her metropolis, the second city of the world, and opportunity. It is her pride and pleasure to attract and welcome the citizens of all the sister states. The people of the south, the west and the Pacific have found hospitable homes in the Empire state in numbers greater than the population of many cities in those sections. These fraternal ties intertwining with the bonds of patriotism and common interest bind our states together in one indissoluble union, and makes us all one people, of one country and under one flag.

The inspiring peroration which closed Mr. Depew's address was followed by another popular demonstration, and then the crowd pressed forward to the stage, where a short informal reception occurred.

Upon the conclusion of the exercises at the Auditorium the members of the New York party and the exposition officials proceeded to one of the viaduct cafes, where dinner was served, the members of the New York exposition commission being the hosts. The dinner was an informal affair and was without oratory. One remarkable feature was the fact that at the table there was more capital represented in a business way than at any gathering every before seen in the city. It is estimated that the men who were around the board represented not less than $200,000,000, nearly all of which is employed in trade or in the operation of railroads and railroad equipment.

After their lunch the distinguished New Yorkers separated into groups and visited the buildings that interested them most. At 3 o'clock they all met at the New York State building and under the guidance of Major Clarkson proceeded to the Indian congress, where they watched the sham battle from seats that had been reserved for them. To most of the party this was something new, as many of them had never before seen Indians, except the wooden articles in front of cigar stores. The charging of the forces and the retreat, together with the treatment of the captives, interested them very much and many of them expressed the opinion that if the exposition was without other features, seeing the battle would be well worth the time and expense of a journey from New York.

TELEPHONE DOWN FROM CLOUDS.

War Balloon Makes Its First Successful Ascension.

Yeesterday​ afternoon the atmospheric conditions were perfect for ballooning, and as a result the war balloon made the only successful ascension since its arrival several weeks ago. The day before the big bag got away and shot up into the air, but the upper currents of air were strong and it drifted with the wind. Yesterday afternoon, however, there was scarcely a breeze when the balloon was cut loose, and the same conditions prevailed up in the strata where it soared.

Just after 2 o'clock Sergeant Briede took Sergeants Barton and Lockart into the confidence and informed them that he proposed to give the people an exhibition of fine ballooning. The three men jumped into the basket, Briede standing on the edges and hanging to the guy ropes over his head, with his companions beneath him, signalled the men having charge of the lifting apparatus to cut loose. The bags of ballast were cast off and the balloon commenced to rise. It went up in an almost perpendicular direction until it reached a height of 800 feet, when it stopped. Barton and Lockart threw out some ballast and higher and higher the bag shot until it reached an elevation of 1,000 feet and not 100 feet either side of the starting point.

From their high perch the men in the basket placed themselves in telephonic connection with the operator on the ground, informing him that they had a beautiful view of the surrounding country, and that up where they were doing business the weather was even more perfect than down on the earth.

From its elevation the balloon was drawn down by the windlass to which the cable is attached, and anchored with the bags of ballast until 5 o'clock, when another ascension was made, which was equally as successful as the one of the early afternoon.

The balloon used yesterday was not one that was in service during the recent war with Spain. It was made for the purpose and sent south, but before it reached Cuban soil the war was over and the bag was sent back to the balloon station at Washington and from there sent direct to Omaha. It carries 25,000 cubic feet of gas and is made of the strongest canvas, varnished both inside and out.

Speaking of the trips made yesterday Sergeant Briede said: "It was one of the most delightful ones in my nine years' experience in ballooning. All of the conditions were perfect. Up in the air the wind, what little there was, was as fresh and balmy as spring. The atmosphere was as clear as a bell and cities and towns thirty and forty miles away could be seen. Off to the southeast we could see the town of Glenwood, over in Iowa. The winding course of the Missouri river could be followed [?] To the south we could see Plattsbouth​ and way off to the west the town of Ashland was visible. The fringe of timber along the Platte could be distinguished, while Fremont was plainly in view. Off toward the north we could see Blair, nestling in the hills along the bluffs of the Missouri river. The country to the west and north resembled a great chess board, dotted with the farms upon which the houses and other buildings might be taken for chess men.

"People who have never been up in balloons have no idea of the beauties that are spread out below them. There is something about the business that is fascinating. People who climb to the top of a high mountain and look over the landscape think that is a beautiful sight, but it is nothing to what may be seen from a balloon that is 1,000 or more feet in the air."

Sergeant Briede, while not one of the oldest navigators of the air, is one of the successful ones. He was not at Santiago, but he was in active service at Washington during the recent war and there had charge of all of the balloons that were sent south. He is a young man, 23 years of age, and has been ballooning since he was a boy of 15. Prior to enlisting he was a balloonist who gave exhibitions of balloon work in mid air. He used the hot air balloons frequently and made parachute leaps from the dizzy heights. He has met with numerous accidents and carries a crippled ankle and any number of scars as mementos of his trips through the air.

TWIN CITY DAY IS NOT A SUCCESS.

Thousands of Visitors Promised Fail to Show Up.

While yesterday was designated as Twin City day it lacked most of the essential features required of a day in order to make it a success. It has been stated, and the information had been given out, that thousands of the residents of Minneapolis and St. Paul would be here for the purpose of seeing the exposition and joining the thousands from other cities and towns in the United States. But instead of the great crowds coming down from the two big towns of Minnesota, only a couple of hundred of visitors arrived. Those who did come, however, had a good time and felt amply repaid for the trip. They visited the Minnesota building, where they checked their parcels, after which they started out to do the exposition. They did not get half way around when the gates closed for the night, finding it a much bigger show than they had anticipated.

The Minnesotians will remain over today and Monday, and some of them will be back again, coming to participate in the exercises of Jubilee week. The advices from Minnesota are to the effect that during Jubilee week several excursion trains will run from St. Paul and Minneapolis, and that thousands of the residents of the state will be here upon that occasion.

Last night the visitors from St. Paul and Minneapolis had something of a reunion at the Minnesota building. They spent the early part of the evening along the Midway and at the fireworks. Soon after 10 o'clock the entire party, together with a number of invited guests gathered at the Minnesota building, where an informal reception was held, Secretary Danforth and Commissioner Field doing the honors for the occasion. There was music during the evening. Upstairs light refreshments and cigars were served to all who called. By those who were in attendance it was voted one of the most delightful "at homes" held on the grounds since the opening of the exposition.

NEW YORKERS VISIT THE INDIANS.

Sham Battle Proves an Interesting Attraction for Them.

All the New Yorkers viewed the sham battle fought by the Indians yesterday and after it was over they pronounced it one of the sights of a life time. Few of the distinguished visitors from the Empire state had ever seen western Indians and their methods employed in peace and war proved most interesting.

The battle was fought along the same old lines, Goes-to-War looking after the interests of the Sioux, while Big Brave was the guiding star of the Blackfeet. There was the same brilliant charge made by the Sioux, routing their enemies, and in turn there was the return charge of the Blackfeet, who had been reinfroced​ by a lot of Indians who had been loafing down among the trees on the west side of the camp. The same old program was carried out and in the final charge the Sioux were outnumbered and routed, leaving their pretended dead upon the field.

After the battle Chauncey M. Depew and the members of his party, under the guidance of Captain Mercer and the exposition officials, visited the camp and looked in upon the Indians, shaking hands with some of the big men of the tribes and admiring the little fellows.

 

"Step right this way if you want to ride on the smallest railroad on earth," sang out the Midway barker in front of the Union Pacific's miniature railway.

Two distinguished looking gentlemen approached and surveyed the curious little railroad with evident interest. "We might take a ride on it, Mr. Depew," remarked President Callaway of the New York Central, for the two strangers were the two great railroaders of the Empire state.

"We'll just do that very thing," replied Chauncey. "I've ridden on the greatest railroad on earth a good many times, so I guess I'll have to ride on the smallest to make my record good."

So the protectors of the Vanderbilt railways in New York state bought two tickets at 10 cents each. As they were not known they received no free transportation and they wouldn't think of asking for half rates. Both the visitors found the seats of the little cars none too large. At first they were dubious about the capacity of the cars, but they were assured that the train had often carried bigger men, from the consideration of avoirdupois.

The whistle gave a shriek as long as the train and much bigger, and the chief executive officers of the four-tracked railway across the Empire state were soon being whirled past Julesburg, Cheyenne, Rawlins, Ogden and into Salt Lake City at a rate of speed that made their heads swim. As they were jarred up and down in their seats President Callaway leaned over to his predecessor in the next car to remark: "I've ridden on smoother roads in my lifetime."

"Yes, the track isn't like ours and I guess they forgot springs in building the coaches, but then think how cheap the trip is—all the way to Salt Lake and back for 10 cents."

When the trip was completed they got out of the little train adorned with Union Pacific shields and were cordially greeted by the manager of the miniature railway, who during their ride had been informed of the identity of his two heavyweight passengers. He said he would send them passes good for rides on the "Miniature Limited," on which free transportation is not ordinarily accepted, and Dr. Depew smilingly remarked that he should be glad to reciprocate the favor.

The fireworks display was also exceptionally brilliant. It included twenty-two distinct features, a large portion of which consisted of elaborate set pieces. Of these the most notable were the spiral Phoenix, a portrait of Chauncey M. Depew and the "Sunrise on the Alps."

Attendance for the Week.

Ak-Sar-Ben week did not break the record of exposition attendance, but it easily reached second place. The total for the seven days was 148,025, which was only exceeded by the big week which ended September 22, when the grand total was over 189,000. The record for the week is:

Week Ending October 1.Week Ending October 8.
Sunday 16,035 15,925
Monday 15,759 15,266
Tuesday 16,396 19,998
Wednesday 19,474 29,539
Thursday 20,395 27,473
Friday 19,540 23,662
Saturday 21,251 26,162
Totals128,850148,025
Average 18,407 21,003

DO EXPOSITIONS PAY?

In the early stages of the Transmississippi Exposition many men in this community and not a few influential newspapers throughout the country expressed doubt that exposition could be fairly adjudged beneficial to cities projecting them. These cities at home and abroad were not slow to assert a belief that the financial success of the Omaha Exposition was highly problematical. Their opinions were based upon the experience of Chicago, Atlanta and Nashville. Nobody could gainsay the extraordinary success of the Columbian fair in an artistic sense but the financial distress which followed in its wake was cited as an example of the ill-effects of expositions upon cities standing as sponsors for such undertakings. Atlanta was cited as a partial failure, while the success of the Nashville fair was open to some question.

The projectors of the Transmississippi Exposition discounted all these predictions of disaster and forged ahead. They knew that the stressful conditions following the Columbian fair were in no sense attributable to that exposition, but rather to foolhardy speculators who operated in real estate and in the building of topheavy structures in the city to an extent out of all proportion to possible demands and in spite of the dictates of sound business principles. They argued further that business conditions in Chicago would have been much more direful but for the benefits directly traceable to the World's Fair. The opinion prevailed here that success or failure at Atlanta or Nashville could have no bearing on the destiny of the Transmississippi Exposition.

Time has justified the sanguine expectations of the men who bore the burdens of financiering and promoting the exposition and its phenomenal success in the face of an international war and other serious obstacles has not only caused a radical revision of opinion among local croakers, but it has compelled recognition at the hands of the press all over the United States, which now frankly concedes the Transmississippi Exposition to be, just what its projectors contended, an enterprise second only to the World's Fair. The effect upon the country at large is simply amazing. The promoters of the Panamerican exposition at Buffalo, it is said, will revise that project in view of the success scored by the Omaha affair, while St. Louis is now earnestly discussing a celebration of the centenary of the Louisiana purchase for the year 1903.

There is no longer room for question as to the benefits Omaha and the Transmississippi country are enjoying by reason of the exposition. The city has been by it lifted to a higher plane in the estimation of the world, for a city which can prove itself equal to a task of such magnitude is entitled to and will receive encomiums of merit that must continue to be of inestimable value to it for years to come.

NEW YORKERS AT EXPOSITION

Prominent Commercial Men from Metropolis Represent the Empire State.

New York's delegation to the exposition as the official representatives of the Empire state in the special exercises at the exposition arrived in Omaha yesterday morning over the Northwestern. The train ran as a special to Chicago and from there to Omaha it was scheduled as the second section of the Overland Limited. The members of the delegation are not so prominent in the political world, but are leading business men of the metropolis and are substantial representatives of the big state. Among the delegates are the following:

Representing the New York Produce exchange: Frank Brainard, F. H. Andrews, John Valient, Frank Commisky, J. W. Ahles, John Gledhill, E. A. Allen, W. E. Truesdale, E. H. Dougherty, Daniel T. Wade, S. T. Graff.

Representing New York Chamber of Commerce: Warner Miller, Charles A. Schieren, Francis B. Thurber, Richard Young, Henry A. Spaulding, D. S. Ramser.

From Buffalo: Captain J. M. Brinker, F. C. M. Lantz, R. C. Hill, A. C. Essenwein, Major G. Creighton Webb, F. D. Higbee, E. W. Curtis, jr., and D. Van Aken.

In addition to these there are Chauncey M. Depew, S. R. Callaway, Dr. Seward Webb, Marvin Hughitt, W. H. Newman and W. E. Eby, who came in on their special train Friday afternoon.

Yesterday morning the delegation was met at the Paxton hotel by General Manager Clarkson and at 10:30 the members entered carriages provided by the exposition and were driven straight to the grounds, where the exercises took place.

The delegates from Buffalo embrace the officers of the Panamerican Exposition company, who are planning an exposition to be held in their city in 1901. They are: J. M. Brinker, president; F. C. Lantz, treasurer; R. C. Hill, secretary; A. C. Essenwein and E. W. Curtis, jr., architects, and F. D. Higbee, superintendent of concessions. They will study the exposition in all its phases and consult with the officers as to details of building and management to prepare themselves for the work before them.

Boston Bankers at Exposition.

A party of Boston bankers have stopped in Omaha for a day to visit the exposition while on a western tour. They will leave Sunday evening, continuing their trip. The following are in the party: Thomas S. Carpenter, Charles E. Redfern, Denman Blanchard, James R. Simpson, Eugene French, Phineas W. Sprague, George O. Knowles, Frederick H. Mills, David Thayer, Albert D. Thayer, E. Henry Barnes, H. Fisher Eldridge, Willard B. Ferguson, Frederick A. Gilbert, Arthur L. Robinson, James S. Sanborn and James F. Shaw. While in the city the visitors stopped at the Millard.

MOTHERS' CONGRESS MEETS

Women Gather Together to Discuss the Welfare of Children.

COLORED TEACHER GIVEN AN OVATION

First Session is Given Over Largely to Welcoming Visiting Delegates and an Informal Reception.

The opening session of the Mothers' congress at the Omaha Woman's club rooms yesterday afternoon was devoted to welcoming the guests. After the formal meeting an informal reception was tendered the visiting club women and the officers of the National Mothers' congress. Conspicuous among the many world-famed women were the president, Mrs. Theodore W. Birney, of Washington; recording secretary, Mrs. Sallie S. Cotton, of Falkland, N. C.; corresponding secretary, Mrs. Vesta H. Cassidy, of National Park seminary, Glen Forest, Md.; treasurer, Mrs. Hardin W. Masters, of Lewiston, Ill.; Mrs. Mary H. Weeks of Kansas City; Miss Amelie Hofer and Miss France Newton of Chicago, Dr. Mary Wood Allen of Ann Arbor, Mrs. Hollenberger of Virginia and Miss Moten of Washington, D. C.

Mrs. Ford called the congress to order and after a few words of hearty pleasure at seeing so many people present, introduced Mrs. Harriette Heller, who formally welcomed the mothers.

 

After a most cordial greeting and a mention of the youth of the congress, Mrs. Heller said: "Though we are a Mothers' congress we are in our infancy. But youth bears no discredit. The mightiest oak was once a feeble shoot. And that great and good man whom we are soon to welcome here in Omaha was once a little child, young and helpless. As he has grown great, so we must and shall grow.

Mother Needs to Study.

"People think nothing of live stock shows, doctors' conventions and the like, but they are inclined to scoff at a Mothers' congress. Yet there are different ways of caring for children. And the mother who occasionally leaves her child, yet not without pangs, to discuss the best methods of child culture, returns more able and competent. As music stimulates man and makes him stronger, so a rest stimulates the mother in her care for her child. Recently I visited the electrical plant that supplies the myriads of electric lights that make our exposition so beautiful by night. I found a lot of machinery and belts, with lubricating devices and copper heads which caused a multitude of sparks. These were the instruments which cast the light. And it occurred to me that our congress was like that power house, the machinery, belts and lubricating device by which light is cast in every home."

Mrs. Birney, the national president, responded to the welcome. "It gives me great pleasure to hear these words of welcome and to attend the exposition. When Mrs. Hellen extended the invitation to us we wondered if we could accept, for October is a busy month for mothers. But we wanted to get in closer touch with the women of the west and we came.

"Nothing appeals to us more than the helplessness of children and to aid that helplessness our Mothers' congress was formed. It is but two years old and it depends on women whether it grows as it deserves or falls by the wayside.

"In my moments of distress, which come to us all, I seem to see visions of thousands of little hands stretched out appealingly to me. Some are from palatial homes, where nothing is lacking, others from the less fortunate. No work or sacrifice can be too great to bring happiness to these children."

Mrs. Cotton, Miss Cassidy, Mrs. Muller, Miss Hofer and Miss Newton were then presented in turn to the audience and expressed their pleasure and delight in being here.

Colored Teacher Talks.

Mrs. Heller next introduced Miss Moten of Washington, the colored kindergarten teacher who has done so much for her fellowmen. Miss Moten said: "I thank you many times for my cordial reception. I bear to you messages of love and sympathy from all our mothers; for the colored mothers are fully alive to all questions and especially to that of their children. In our young of today their interest chiefly centers. Though the position of our present and future generations is vastly above that of former times it is not what we hope to see it.

"Since certain conditions exist we must not close our eyes to them. The solution depends upon the mothers of the land. They shape the destinies of nations; for the hand that rocks the cradle rules the world.

"We wish to make the most of our opportunities. We can show you a generation of young men and women of which you can be proud. But we need your aid and support. Do for us what all other nations have done for their oppressed; for we can never aspire unless you inspire.

"There is a large class of colored men and women who have never known the horrors of antebellum days. Break down the barrier and we will help you. We feel that the child is the bridge on which we shall meet. But you must not make us feel inferior."

In a burst of applause Miss Moten sat down.

A telegram of greeting and best wishes from the Salt Lake City and a letter from the South Dakota branches were then read. Mrs. Heller announced that a mass meeting would be held at the First Congregational church this afternoon at 3 o'clock. The following program will occupy the congress today and Monday:

Sunday afternoon: Mass meeting; devotional exercises; brief addresses by Mrs. Theodore Birney of Washington, Miss Amalie Hofer, Miss Frances Newton and Mrs. Elia W. Peattie of Chicago, and Mrs. W. P. Harford and Mrs. H. H. Heller of Omaha.

Monday morning: Open conference; informal discussion of matters connected with home and school; organization of mothers' clubs; questions and answers.

Monday afternoon: Paper, "Result of the Training School in Washington for Colored Kindergartens," Dr. Lucy Moten; address, "Mother and Teacher," Mrs. Vesta H. Cassidy, Washington, D. C., corresponding secretary National Congress of Mothers; discussion.

Monday evening: Address, "A National Training School for Women," Mrs. Sallie S. Cotton, Falkland, N. C., recording secretary National Congress of Mothers; address, "Methods of Organization," Mrs. Mary H. Weeks, Kansas City, auditor National Congress of Mothers; discussion, led by Mrs. A. C. Ricketts of Lincoln, Mrs. McMullen of Evanston, Ill., Mrs. Mary S. Lockwood, Washington, D. C., Mrs. Sudborough, Mrs. Ford of Omaha and others.

TO TALK OF HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS.

National Association of Women Will Meet Here This Week.

On Thursday and Friday, in this series of women's meetings, will be held the sixth annual meeting of the National Household Economic association. Like a majority of the rest of the gatherings of the week, this body claims as its confines the bounds of the country, and delegates will be prominent women from all sections. They will arrive during the early days of the week and during their stay in the city will be entertained by the women of the Omaha Woman's club at their homes. The entertainment and the meeting will be under the direction of the directors of the Household department of the local club, Mrs. C. H. Townsend and Mrs. M. M. Pugh.

The meetings of the association will take place at the First Congregational church. The attendance will be by no means limited to the membership of the association, or of the Omaha Woman's club, but every person who is interested in the home is cordially invited to be present. A program full of interest has been prepared for the meeting and will be of a highly educational value. It is as follows:

Thursday morning: Prayer, Rev. Mary Gerard Andrews; music; address of welcome, Mrs. Mary Moody Pugh, Omaha; response, Mrs. Emma F. Van Vechten, Cedar Rapids, Ia.; reports of state vice presidents.

Thursday afternoon: Music; "The Problems which the Present Century Presents to the Housekeeper," Mrs. M. V. Shailer, New York; "Household Economics in the Schools," Miss Ellen F. Marshall and Miss Isabella D. Bullard, Chicago; "Household Economics in the Rural Districts," Prof. Marie B. Senn, Fargo, N. D.; "How May Women be the Most Useful and Successful?" Mrs. W. K. James, St. Joseph, Mo.

Thursday evening: "How to Finish the Home," Mrs. Kate H. Watson, Chicago; president's address, Mary E. Green, M. D., Charlotte, Mich.; reception.

Friday morning: Demonstration lecture; "What May be Done with Fifty Cents a Day in Preparing Food for a Family of Four," Mrs. Harriet S. MacMurphy, Omaha; "How May Every Woman Become a Sanitarian?"

Friday afternoon: Music; "The relation of Women to the Labor Problem," Mrs. Maude H. Lacy, St. Louis, Mo.; "Economy of Time, Money and Labor," Mrs. James D. Whitmire, Denver, Colo.; "The Necessity of Instructing Children Concerning Their Prospective Conjugal and Parental Duties," Susa Young Gates, Provo City, Utah; discussion, led by Mrs. Emma F. Van Vetchen, Cedar Rapids, Ia.

NEBRASKA CLUB WOMEN TO MEET.

Officers of the General Federation Will Be Present.

Tuesday, October 11, immediately following the Mothers' congress, which concludes its three days' session tomorrow, the Nebraska Federation of Women's Clubs meets in annual session at the First Congregational church. The officers of the federation are as follows: President, Mrs. B. M. Stoutenborough, Plattsmouth; vice president, Mrs. E. M. Cobb, York; secretary, Mrs. Draper Smith, Omaha; treasurer, Mrs. M. V. Nichols, Beatrice; auditor, Mrs. E. S. Larsh, Nebraska City; state chairman of the general federation, Mrs. Ricketts, Lincoln; librarian, Mrs. G. M. Lambertson, Lincoln.

The opening meeting, which convenes Tuesday at 9 a. m., will be devoted largely to business, reports from the various clubs, committees, etc. Mrs. A. N. Ferguson, first vice president of the Omaha Woman's club, will give the address of welcome and Mrs. Brindley, president of the Columbus club, will respond. The musical numbers will be contributed by Mesdames J. H. McIntosh and J. H. Metcalf.

The afternoon session will commence promptly at 2:30. Mrs. Snyder of Plattsmouth, Mrs. Harrison of York, Mrs. Apperson of Tecumseh, Mrs. Richardson and Mrs. Wilson, both of Lincoln, are the speakers. Following the address the annual election of officers will take place.

The opening address Tuesday evening will be given by Mrs. Rebecca D. Lowe, after which the officers of the general federation will be introduced. Mrs. Lowe of Georgia is president, Mrs. Platt of Colorado is vice president, Mrs. Fox of Michigan is re-[?]sylvania is corresponding secretary, Mrs. Moore of Missouri is treasurer and Mrs. Barnes of Kentucky is auditor. The musical portion of the program will be rendered by Mr. Dan H. Wheeler, jr., and Miss Louise Kellogg. The annual address, by Mrs. Stoutenborough, state federation president, will close the meeting.

Wednesday will usher in the larger club gathering, the Transmississippi Congress of Women's clubs, which continue for two days. The program committee comprises the presidents of the Transmississippi Federated clubs, namely; Mrs. Scammon of Missouri, Mrs. Thatcher of Colorado, Mrs. Van Vechten of Iowa, Mrs. Tuller of North Dakota, Mrs. Peters of Kansas, Miss Evans of Minnesota and Mrs. Stoutenborough of Nebraska. Mrs. Philip N. Moore will preside at the opening session, which convenes at 9:30. Two addresses, "Traveling Libraries," by Mrs. Bachwalter of Ohio, and "Rest Rooms in Market Towns," by Mrs. Giddings of Minnesota (both to be followed by discussion), together with two musical numbers, constitute the program.

President McKinley will address the afternoon meeting, which will be held in the Auditorium at the exposition grounds, commencing at 3:30. The program, which will be presided over by Mrs. Lowe, is as follows: Organ solo, Mr. Thomas J. Kelly; vocal solo, Mrs. Cotton; address, "The Unlimited Club," Mrs. Platt of Denver; piano solo, Mr. Joseph Gahm; greetings from President McKinley.

Thursday's meetings, both morning and afternoon, will be held at the Congregational church, the former beginning at 9 o'clock and the latter at 2:30. The morning program opens with music by Mrs. H. P. Whitmore. Addresses will be delivered by Miss Cole of Denver, on "The Bible as Literature;" by Miss Lathrop of Hull House on "Philanthropy and Charities," and by Miss Rockwell of Kansas on "Evolution in the American Home." Miss Oakley of Lincoln will sing.

The afternoon program includes addresses on "Club Life in California" and "Pioneer Club Life in Oklahoma," by Mesdames Moore and Douglas respectively; a vocal solo by Miss Terry and a piano duet by Miss Connor and Mrs. McIntosh.

There will be no formal program Thursday evening. Instead, in the club parlors, a reception will be given visiting club women by the Omaha Women's club.

As if all this, in addition to "Club Day" in June, were not sufficient compensation for Omaha not entertaining the "biennial," the board of directors of the general federation meets in our city at this time. The personnel of the board is as follows: Mrs. Bachwalter, Ohio; Mrs. Morris, Wisconsin; Mrs. Eastman, California; Mrs. Ford, Nebraska; Mrs. Kinney, Utah; Mrs. Helmuth, New York, Mrs. Pyle, Connecticut; Mrs. Windsor, Iowa, and Mrs. Lockwood, Washington, D. C. Then, too, the annual meeting of the National Household Economic association, October 13 and 14, will bring many representative women. The president of the association, Dr. Mary E. Green of Michigan, is chairman of the program committee. The list of speakers includes women not only from the western states but many from the Atlantic coast as well, who will give interesting addresses on helpful and practical subjects.

 

CLOSE OF A BIG WEEK

Second Best in the History of the Exposition and Larger One Coming.

Gives the Total Admissions a Long Push Toward the 2,000,000 Mark.

One Hundred and Fifty-Eight Thousand Clicks of the Turnstile During Seven Days.

Splendid Average Attendance With No Particularly Strong Attraction at the Grounds.

Comparison During the Past Fortnight--Signalling by the Corps--Sham Battle of the Reds.

Saturday's Admissions,26,162
Total for Week158,021
Total Admissions1,867,556

These are the days of big attendance at the exposition, as compared with all previous records, for the week ending last night is the second best to date, the first being the week ending September 24. So accustomed to the big events of the last week have people become, that they fail to realize that the pace is rapidly increasing, but it is, and will take a sprint this week that will pass the best of the records.

The three big weeks to date are:

Ending September 24189,615
Ending last night158,021
Ending September 3135,213

The figures putting the last week at second place were hardly excepted, but none the less gratifying. There were no particularly big days that served as markers, but a steady enthusiasm that counted well at the gates, which registered the 158,921, as against 128,855 of the week before.

WITH THE WEEK BEFORE.

The comparison in days with the week before shows this:

Week before.Last week.
Sunday 16,684 15,238
Monday 15,857 15,264
Tuesday 16,396 19,999
Wednesday 19,464 29,473
Thursday 20,388 27,423
Friday 19,530 23,613
Saturday 21,255 26,162
Total128,855158,021

Honors are shared equally in showing this effective result between the live stock show, yet good till October 20, and the Ak-Sar-Ben festivities. Special days contributing largely were Pennsylvania and Ohio days Tuesday, and New York, Twin City and Good Roads day yesterday.

SIGNAL CORPS AT WORK.

Signalling by balloons, flags and heliographs, was given practical demonstrations along all lines yesterday afternoon by the signal corps attached to the war department exhibit, even to carrying a wounded officer from the field.

In the afternoon three ascensions were made by the big captive balloon, and signalling with flags was carried on from one end of the lagoon to the other. At night, signalling by acetyline​ lamps, much after the style of the heliographs by day, was tried with good success till an acetyline​ reservoir exploded, and blew pieces of metal into Captain Yancey's arm. The concussion caused it to become swollen to several times its normal size in a very short time. No results of a serious nature are anticipated.

BLOOD-CURDLING BATTLE.

With their usual avidity, the warlike Indians of the congress on the exposition grounds dashed into a frisky sham battle yesterday afternoon for the benefit of several thousand spectators. It was another blood curdling chapter in the long standing war between the Sioux and their friends, and the Blackfeet with another crowd of allies, truces always being declared when the ammunition gives out and the warriors get hungry. Sham battles are slated for Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of this week. The camp will be given a thorough scrubbing up and dressing down tomorrow.

Half of the Crow Creek Indian band arrived Friday night, and ten more musicians are expected today. Fourteen Winnebagos arrived yesterday to join their friends here. A delegation of big chiefs is expected from the Sioux reservations tomorrow.

DAIRYMEN TO GATHER.

Dairymen will not only jubilate on account of peace the coming Tuesday, but will discuss the ins and outs of butter and cheese making at a congress in the Dairy building, at 2 p. m. Many prominent dairymen from over the entire country west of Ohio are expected.

Addresses will be delivered by President Wattles of the exposition, Governor Hoard of Wisconsin, Hon. W. A. Poynter of Nebraska, Prof. Hoecker of Minnesota, and Prof. Curtiss of the Iowa state agricultural college. The guests of the day will be L. S. Gates, P. G. Henderson, J. C. Daly and W. K. Boardman of Iowa; Hon. John Mathieson of Minnesota; C. F. Armstrong of Kansas, and the officers of the National Buttermakers' association.

Exposition Notes.

E. F. Self, a marine of the detachment of eight of the heroes of Guantanamo who arrived Friday to assist in the navy exhibit, was taken sick yesterday with malarial fever and is now in the hospital. The malaria in his system was a souvenir of the campaign in Cuba. There are seven able-bodied men left to take the next relief in answering the incessant fire of questions which have simply driven the men on duty to the point where they are almost speechless.

E. P. Noland, the phonograph spieler who received a blow that crushed his jaw in a quarrel with a larger man Friday, will be sent to his old home in Des Moines this morning. In addition to the broken jaw, Noland was already minus one leg and suffering from a rupture. The Midway spielers passed around the hat yesterday and raised a purse of over $50 for the poor fellow.

George Cook was arrested last night on the exposition grounds by Police Sergeant Bebout on the charge of being implicated with D. R. McGuire in picking the pockets of J. M. Bradford of Deadwood.

Dr. Minor C. Baldwin, a musical artist of widespread reputation, is in the city, and has kindly consented to give the usual organ recital tomorrow afternoon at 4 o'clock at the Auditorium.

The opening musical event of Peace Jubilee week, the grand sacred concert, will be given at the Auditorium by Innes' band this afternoon at 3 o'clock.

A. C. Esenwein is the architect of the Pan-American exposition and will spend much of his time in studying the buildings and general architecture of the grounds. He has visited all the great expositions, and will pass several days in Omaha. He has a large force of men at work on the great buildings to be erected at Buffalo. He said he had heard much of the Omaha architecture, and had no criticism to make. He had see the pictures, and the work was that of a masterhand.

Minnesotans at the Exposition.

An even dozen Minnesotians arrived in the city yesterday, traveling in a special sleeper on the St. Paul & Omaha road. The delegation came to see the exposition, and most of them will remain in the city until after the coming of President McKinley. G. H. MacRae, assistant general passenger agent of the St. Paul & Omaha, was in charge of the excursion. The party is composed of W. D. McNaughton of the passenger department of the Erie line, W. L. Wyland of the Michigan Central, W. G. Calving and G. H. MacRae, all of St. Paul; A. W. Warnock and C. J. Tuller of the Journal, Minneapolis; H. J. Smith, C. P. McClure, C. C. Joslyn and A. W. Harrison, judge of the supreme court of Minnesota, all of Minneapolis, and E. W. Kuehn of Wabasha, Minn. They are at the Dellone hotel.

Twin City day at the exposition is creditably well patronized. The St. Paul & Omaha this morning brought in a fine train, there being twelve coaches, well filled. The Twin City people filled two coaches, numbering something over 100. Many of these got off at the exposition, and some forty or fifty came on to the city. The Minnesotans will return home Sunday evening.

Children from the North.

Two carloads of little people came in this morning on the St. Paul & Omaha, from Emerson and intervening points. They were let out at the exposition, and immediately started on a run for a good time. They will return to their homes tonight.

Sidelights on Exposition.

Despite his declination of the invitation to take in the Ak-Sar-Ben ball, Dr. Depew, with President Calloway and others of the New York party were induced to drop in at the ball. They stayed an hour or so and were presented at court.

D. R. McGuire, who lays claim to residence in South Omaha, was arrested by Guard Murphy at the Manderson gate late Friday night on the charge of picking the pockets of J. M. Bradford, an exposition visitor from Deadwood, stopping at the Arcade. It is charged that by some coincidence Bradford's purse and $5 was found in McGuire's pocket, all of which McGuire says that he will explain later.

STORY OF THE EXPOSITION.

General Manderson's resolution providing for the compilation of a history of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition is timely, and the plan suggested in the resolution will meet with the unqualified approval of all people who desire to have the history of this great enterprise fairly and comprehensively written. The preparation of a history of the exposition will involve an immense amount of labor, and the hardest task for those who do the work will be to keep out matter rather than finding matter.

The history of the exposition will be in many respects the history of the great west. The development of the Trans-Mississippi country has taken place within the memory of many men and women who have not yet reached the meridian of life, and thousands who saw the sod broken where prosperous cities now stand and who saw the mighty herds of buffalo roaming the free prairies have been privileged to see the exposition the material evidences of a progress and development that have been the admiration and the wonder of the world. From the sod house of a new west to the majestic palaces of the exposition is but a short distance measured in actual time, but in development the distance is greater than ever before covered in a century of time. The Trans-Mississippi exposition's history will be a literary monument to the indomitable energy that has made, west of the Mississippi river within a generation, an industrial empire that heretofore centuries have not equalled.

The men selected to write the history of the great exposition will have an arduous duty to perform. It will be their duty to give credit to all the forces that contributed to the success of the exposition—credit alike to the capitalist who gave of his abundance and to the laborer who gave his mite. It will not be their duty to single out any one man or any particular coterie of men and say that to him or to them is the credit due. The credit is due to all the forces that have combined to made it possible for the great west to erect and carry to a successful conclusion the greatest exposition save one in the history of civilization. It must be the history of an enterprise, of a country, of a people. Such a history will be an inspiration to greater exertion in the development of the boundless resources of the fairest country that man has been privileged to own and utilize.

 

NEW YORKERS AT THE CLUB

Dr. Chauncey Depew and Other Distinguished Guests Given a Banquet.

Sparkling Wit of Visitors and Local After Dinner Speakers Entertain the Company.

The Doctor Tells of His Experience on the Midway and They All Compare Notes--The Toasts.

The Omaha club house was filled with lights, flowers, music and with some six score guests last night. It was for the banquet given by former sons of New York and sons of other states to Chauncey Depew, members of the New York Trans-Mississippi commission, the mayor of Buffalo and officers of the Pan-American exposition.

Dr. Depew sat at the right of E. M. Bartlett, toastmaster; General Cowin at the right of Dr. Depew, ex-Senator Warner Miller next, John L. Webster and Captain Brinker next, with Judge Wakeley and W. H. Roberson to the left of Dr. Depew, and beyond them Major Creighton Webb, President Wattles, F. B. Thurber and W. E. Corwine. Other prominent New Yorkers were: Frank Brainard, S. C. Mead, ex-Mayor Schierren of Brooklyn and Jacob Amos, H. B. Hebert and Major Wheeler of the New York Trans-Mississippi commission, of which commission Major Webb is also a member, and Secretary Loutz and Secretary Hill of the Pan-American exposition, of which Captain Brinker is president.

The menu cards were printed on Indian tepees, and with each was a copy of the dainty volume of Mrs. Giffen and Bright Eyes—Oo-Mah-Ha Ta-Wa-Tha.

THOSE ROUND THE TABLE.

Among the resident guests were:

E. Dickinson, Henry W. Yates, C. F. Weller, G. F. Bidwell, E. M. Bartlett, W. H. Roberson, M. T. Barlow, F. P. Kirkendall, Luther Drake, J. H. Evans, Judge E. Wakeley, H. T. Clarke, W. I. Kierstead, C. W. Lyman, Michael Cudahy, W. Farnam Smith, George E. Pritchett, J. H. Millard, G. W. Wattles, I. W. Carpenter, W. M. Burgess, C. K. Coutant, R. S. Hall, J. J. Dickey, J. H. McCulloch, Thomas Kilpatrick, E. W. Dixon, A. U. Wyman, W. F. Wyman, J. J. Brown, T. H. O'Neill, E. L. Bierbower, W. S. Balduff, E. J. Cornish, B. B. Wood, R. C. Peters, W. F. Allen, Judge Baker, Edgar Allen, F. W. Nash, General J. C. Cowin, Captain Palmer, E. W. Simeral, W. J. Fischer, M. C. Peters, C. F. Hayward, T. W. Taliaferro, Charles J. Greene, F. H. Gaines, D. F. Hurd, G. W. Rainey, H. L. Cummings, J. W. Thomas, Dr. Crummer, P. C. Moriarty, O. S. Hoffman, H. H. Baldrige, W. S. Heller, W. S. Wright, Robert Dempster, Judge Baxter, B. G. Burbank, J. W. Hamilton, H. K. Burket, Guy C. Barton, Frank Murphy, G. M. Lambertson, John L. Webster, E. L. Lomax, P. E. Iler, Edward Rosewater, Congressman Mercer, H. F. Roberson, General Dundy, S. O. Barkalow, Rev. Dr. Butler, Joseph Polcar and S. F. Woodbrige.

Dr. Depew was currenly​ reported to have ordered his iron horse for 10:30, but the steed was champing his bit long after that hour and the great New Yorker evidently was enjoying the gathering and much at his ease. Nobody noted the flight of time, even when Rev. Dr. Butler remarked by way of benediction that Sunday was drawing near and that all hoped for a banquet hereafter which would not be broken up.

Mr. Bartlett presided gracefully with brief and pointed presentations of the speakers.

Rev. Dr. Butler, as substitute for General Manderson, who was not able to be present, delivered a witty speech that took with the guests immensely, his toast being "Our Guests."

John L. Webster, responding to "What Are We Here For?" spoke eloquently of the exposition as illustrating the building of fifteen sovereign states and four organized territories out of what was Indian land fifty years ago.

DEPEW'S FACETIOUS TALK.

Dr. Depew's speech was characteristic. He replied to Dr. Butler's joke that he had been told if he would only shave his head and remove his hairwhiskers he would resemble Dr. Depew—and the New Yorker threatened that unless Dr. Butler shaved he himself would grow hair. He had been through the Midway, he said, with Senator Miller under guidance of Major Clarkson, and when the major had asked "Where on the Midway would you go?" he had answered, "Whatever the puritanical managers of this exposition have licensed, that I want to see." The Midway fakirs had recognized him and one had hailed him with "Chauncey, come in here, we don't dance with our feet." And Brother Miller, who is a deacon of a Methodist church in the Mohawk valley, had asked how they could get out of a place that they were told was a "gymnasium." He himself had noticed one of the most muscular of the dancers wore on her sack a New York produce exchange badge—but these gentlemen were a long way from home.

Touching on politics Dr. Depew said that in the campaign of '88, when some friends had proposed him for candidate for presidency of the United States, the Nebraska delegation had come to him and told him that if he stuck on long enough he would be doubtless nominated and elected—and the Nebraskans had warned him that if such a monopolist as he were elected then Nebraska, which was republican, would go populist or democratic. He had told them that the present conditions did not count for much, but if Nebraska could be kept republican for 100 years if he withdrew—as they promised it would—he would withdraw. And he had withdrawn. And Nebraska had voted all ways since. (Laughter.)

NEBRASKA RESURRECTED.

Speaking of his trip through Nebraska two years ago in company with Cornelius Vanderbilt, Dr. Depew said the people then said that they could not market their stock or grain or pay their mortgages because the railways oppressed them. Since that time Nebraska has been resurrected. And the railways are no better to the people than they were then. What has brought about the change? The people have set about solving their problems for themselves instead of believing the fictitious things that somebody had been telling them. Then the speaker enlarged upon education and declared that the university was to be the redemption of Nebraska. Then the places for cattle ranges will be cattle ranges and the places for corn and what and Nebraska will be the same every year.

In closing Dr. Depew complimented the social life of this part of the west as he saw it at the Ak-Sar-Ben ball. He closed with an eloquent picture of the passing of the Indian as shown at the exposition, and its lesson.

SOME OTHER TOASTS.

General Cowin responded to "Westward the Course of Empire Takes Its Way;" Senator Warner to "The Nicaraguan Canal;" Secretary Corwine of the New York Merchants' exchange to "Relations Between the West and the East;" J. H. Metcalfe of Buffalo to "The Pan-American Exposition;" President Wattles to the "Trans-Mississippi Exposition;" Editor Rosewater to "The Press," and F. K. Thurber to "Foreign Commercial Relations."

Treasurer Loutz of the Pan-American sang "The Sar​ Spangled Banner," the guests rising and joining.

Judge Wakeley closed the banquet with the toast of Rip Van Winkle applied to the guests from the Empire state; "Here's to your health and that of your families; may you live long and prosper."

It was midnight when the banquet broke up. The menu and service had been admirable, the gathering was congenial and New York day had ended happily, was the sentiment.

MATRONS OF THE NATION

Congress of Mothers Held Yesterday Marked by Many Worthy Addresses.

Mrs. Theodore Binney, National President of Organization, Discourses Eloquently.

Ladies From Chicago Kindergarten in Attendance and Deliver Talks on Topics of Interest to All Mankind.

The second session of the congress of mothers, held at the Congregational church yesterday afternoon was attended by a large number of the women of Omaha, the auditorium being almost entirely filled by women of all ages who had gathered to listen to the discussion of the many topics of interest coming within the scope of the congress.

The meeting was opened by Rev. Herring, who read the eighteenth chapter of the gospel according to Matthew. Mrs. A. P. Ely sang a solo appropriate to the [?]

Mrs. Theodore Birney, president of the nation congress of mothers, was the first speaker. She read a paper on the plan and scope of the mother's congress, laying down the broad proposition that the field of the congress is all mankind and womankind, regardless of color or creed. Regarding the importance of the organization she called attention to the fact that during the last year there has been a very marked increase in the number of articles on childlife in the leading magazines and many other indications showing the influence of the work.

The speaker then talked most entertainingly regarding the methods of work of the mothers' clubs, telling of the establishment of day nurseries in districts where hardworking mothers are unable to give their children the care they require, the establishment of kindergartens, bands of mercy, encouraging philanthropy, etc.

The results attained in some of the large cities were spoken of in detail, making a most interesting recital, and in closing the speaker referred eloquently to the sacredness of the work, appealing to the better feelings of her auditors.

MISS HOFER'S ADDRESS.

Miss Amalie Hofer of Chicago, editor of the Kindergarten Magazine and a director in the Chicago kindergarten institute, related a number of incidents in her own experience showing the importance of properly training children during their early years. She suggested that "Child Nurture" be aided to the curriculum of every high school and college in order that the little understood subject may be brought home to the mind of every student. She also advocated the training of every woman in the proper care of children. She gave her auditors much food for thought, outlining problem after problem, which she left them to work out. Her address was earnest and thoughtful and made a most favorable impression.

Miss Frances Newton, a director in the Chicago kindergarten institute, made a strong plea for the kindergartens. She said the question was often asked her, "What do you young women have to do in a mothers' congress?" She answered this question by telling of how closely the work of the kindergartener is associated with the care of the mother for her child, and assured her hearers that every kindergartner has the same experience in the rearing of young children as the mothers who bear the little ones. She urged that these workers be given the moral support of the mothers.

Mrs. W. P. Harford, president of the bureau of education of the exposition, extended a hearty greeting to the visitors on behalf of the bureau, and expressed the gratitude of the women of this section that a session of the mothers' congress should be held in the west and should be attended by so many of the national officers. The great importance of the work of the congress was referred to most eloquently by Mrs. Harford, and she expressed great satisfaction that the fathers, as well as the mothers, are included in the scope of its work. She predicted that the bureau of education will reap a rich harvest from the results of this gathering after the material portion of the exposition shall have passed away.

MRS. HELLER SPEAKS.

Mrs. Harriet Hickox Heller, chairman of the local committee and the delegate who was mainly instrumental in securing the meeting of the congress in Omaha, was the last speaker. She analyzed the work of the session, and emphasized the fact that the main work is with each individual—that each mother should look to it that she applies to herself and to her own child the great truths which had been expressed, and not rest content with applying the theory, in thought, to the children of her neighbor.

Mrs. Heller also laid stress upon the point that much of the difficulties which beset the paths of mothers might be avoided by careful attention to the spiritual development of the child between the age of 2½ years and the age when it is sent to school. She asserted that at this period the habit of obedience should be well instilled, and much later difficulty thereby avoided.

A session of the congress will be held this morning. The proceedings will be an open conference, with a discussion of matters connected with the home and the school, the organization of mothers' clubs, questions and answers, etc.

This afternoon at 3:30 Miss Moten will read a paper on "The Result of the Training School in Washington for Colored Kindergartners." Mrs. Vera Casseday of Washington, corresponding secretary of the national congress, will deliver an address on "Mother and Teacher," and a general discussion will close the session.

The meeting of the congress will come to a close this evening with a session at 8 o'clock.

Mrs. Sallie S. Cotten of Falkland, N. C., recording secretary of the national congress, will deliver an address on "A National Training School for Women;" Mrs. Mary H. Weeks of Kansas City, auditor of the national congress, will deliver an address on "Methods of Organization," and a general discussion of pertinent topics will be held, led by Mrs. C. A. Ricketts of Lincoln and others.

 

PEACE JUBILEE IS NOW ON

Celebration of Close of War With Spain Promises to Be of Magnificent Proportions.

Great Preparations for Reception of President McKinley and Party Are Now Complete.

Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben Will Escort, Reproducing Both Their Parades--Innes Band Opens Jubilee.

Sunday's Admissions,19,517
Total Admissions1,887,273

Peace Jubilee has begun, and the exposition yesterday rang with the first echoes of its gladness. It began with a sacred-patriotic concert by the renowned Innes New York band at 3 p. m. at the Auditorium, assisted by the Omaha exposition chorus, and was a most fitting prelude to the brilliant events that are to come. Bewitched with the grandeur of Mendelssohn, Mozart, Wagner, Gounod and Handel, as presented by artists, and by the grand old doxology that began the concert, the audience that filled the big auditorium till thousands were turned away in disappointment was more than enthusiastic in its avowals that peace jubilee had a magnificent introduction.

Nothing could be more fitting as a preparation for the welcome to the mayors of the metroplitan​ cities of America, the governors of the states, the president of the United States, the great generals of victorious armies and the civic representatives of the mighty government of the United States, as they follow in succession by days, with the celebration of five successive triumphs in songs of joy by 1,000 children the last day of the week.

AK-SAR-BENS WILL LEAD.

A meeting of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben has been called by Samson for this evening at 8 o'clock, all knights being commanded to appear at the den at that hour. Arrangements will be completed for the grand parade, which will be given Tuesday evening in honor of the coming of President McKinley to the seat of government of the kingdom of Quivera. It is the intention to make the parade a pageant which has never been equalled in the history of America, and many details remain to be arranged.

The South Omaha Equestrian club will join the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben in welcoming the president and in escorting him to the city hall. The board of governors of the knights and the Equestrian club will proceed to the depot and meet the presidential party, escorting them up Tenth street. At Tenth and Farnam streets the floats will be in waiting and the line will be formed at this point. The board of governors will lead the way west on Farnam street, followed by the distinguished visitors in carriages, along either side of which will ride the members of the Equestrian club. The long line of gorgeous floats, forty-two in number, will follow the carriages.

At the city hall the president will be escorted to the big reviewing stand and the magnificent parade will pass before him, proceeding west on Farnam street to Nineteenth street, where it will disband.

After the parade shall have passed the president will be escorted to the Omaha club by the board of governors and the Equestrian club.

PRESIDENTIAL PARTY.

Advices from Transportation Manager Babcock in Washington are to the effect that the two trains constituting the presidential and diplomatic parties will contain these persons, as judged by the knowledge of a day or two ago:

First train—President and Mrs. McKinley, Mrs. McKinley's maid and husband, White house steward, Mr. Sinclair; Captain and Mrs. Lafayette McWilliams, Secretary of the Interior Bliss, Secretary of Agriculture Wilson and daughter, J. Addison Porter, private secretary to the president; Secretary of the Treasury Gage and Mrs. Gage; George Cortelyou, assistant secretary to the president; Postmaster General Smith and wife, George D. Meiklejohn, assistant secretary of war.

The president suggests that three or four more guests will be added later.

Second train—Major General Miles and wife, with secretary and staff of six officers; General and Mrs. A. W. Greely, General Joe Wheeler and four daughters, Brigadier General Humphrey, wife, four daughters and Mrs. Henry Howland; Prof. and Mrs. W. L. Moore of the weather bureau, Dr. and Mrs. W. T. Harris, bureau of education; Hon. W. Y. Yeomans of the interstate commerce commission, Dr. and Mrs. Baker, guests of Senator Thurston; Minister Wu of China, wife, son, maid, three secretaries and steward; Minister Chin Paw Ye of Corea, wife, son and secretary; Minister Gonzalo de Quaseda of Cuba, wife and daughter; Minister Garcia Meron of Argentine, Minister from Brazil and Mr. Lina, first secretary of legation; Major H. O. Heistand, wife and niece, Miss Morton, James A. Saxton, Alfred Paget, naval attache of the British embassy; fifteen newspaper men representing leading papers of the country.

Among the other prominent guests will be: Perry S. Heath, first assistant postmaster general; Senator Mark A. Hanna, Hon. Alva Adams, governor of Colorado; General James H. Wilson, H. C. Taylor, captain of United States steamsip​ Indiana; Hon. A. M. Clough, governor of Minnesota; Chancellor McLean, Lincoln; Hon. Silas A. Holcomb, governor of Nebraska; minister from Turkey.

As at present arranged the trains will proceed over the Baltimore & Ohio to Chicago, thence over the Northwestern to Omaha, arriving in this city at 7 o'clock tomorrow evening.

PECULIAR MUSICAL TREAT.

Bandmaster Innes Will Perform "A Day at the Exposition."

Bandmaster Innes is engaged in making a nightly pilgrimage through the Midway. He is collecting material for a new musical work, which he will put on next week. It promises to be a remarkable piece of descriptive writing, according to those who have had an advance hearing of the work. Its title is to be "A Day at the Omaha Exposition," and it will be described in music, not only the sights and sounds of the exposition proper, but all the queer music and the queerer scenes of the Midway, which will be depicted and heightened by mechanical stage effects. The music of the Chinese theater will be faithfully reproduced, as will that of the peculiar aggregation of the Streets of Cairo. Shooting the Chutes will have a representation, as well several other of the more characteristic shows which lend themselves readily to musical reproduction. Due announcement will be made as to the first production of the work.

Verdi's famous "Anvil Chorus" will have its first production at the concert set for tomorrow night. The great military spectacle, "War and Peace," will be given on Thursday night. It is understood that in this piece a detachment of some 300 soldiers from Fort Crook will take part. A mimic battle scene will form an interesting episode of this much-heralded work, while a battery of artillery will help lend realism to the event.

On Friday night the third of Innes' symphony concerts will be given, and in this, as in the other festival concerts of the week, the Exposition chorus will form a prominent feature.

The children's carnival will take place on Saturday, when, it is expected, a juvenile chorus of 1,000 of the little folk will be heard. Each child taking part in the singing of the jubilee number is to be presented with a delightful souvenir of the occasion. In connection with this event, arrangements are being made which will admit every child on the ground to any single concession for a uniform charge of 5 cents. The parents of all children desiring to take part in this festival should at once make application by postal card to Superintendent Kelly of the bureau of music in order that places may be reserved and souvenirs provided for all the children.

TEN THOUSAND MISSOURIANS.

Advance Guard of Over a Thousand Arrived Yesterday.

Ten thousand visiting Missourians is the estimate given by President Sterrett of the Missouri commission as to the attendance today—Missouri day. Fully 1,000 arrived in the city yesterday, it is estimated, one delegation of 300 coming from Pike county, 105 from Schuyler county, with smaller delegations from other counties where commissioners have rustled up much enthusiasm. Owing to the fact that St. Louis is now celebrating her autumnal festivities, including a special peace jubilee day, Tuesday, the most energetic men of that metropolis are concentrating their energies on the local event, and but a small delegation will come to Omaha. In general, the bulk of the Missouri contingent will be from counties away from the large metropolitan centers.

Owing to the fact that the day is being taken up by peace jubilee exercises and that Governor Stephens is prevented by illness from representing his state, the state day exercises will consist of a reception at the Missouri headquarters in the Agricultural building at 2 p. m. Lieutenant Governor Bolte will then give a brief address.

Children's Day Saturday.

The exposition management has decided to make a rate of 15 cents for children on October 15, being the closing day of peace jubilee week. Superintendent Kelly of the bureau of music has arranged with Mr. Innes for the production of two magnificent concerts on that occasion. All children who can sing will be put into a large chorus for the afternoon concert, which will take place at 4 o'clock, and every child singing in the choirs will receive a beautiful souvenir as a memento of the occasion of children's day.

A handsome souvenir is now being made especially for the children, and the ladies of the bureau of entertainment will pin them on the children's clothing as they enter the band stand for the afternoon concert. As there will be a great many thousands children here on that day and only 1,000 can be accepted for the children's chorus Mr. Kelly suggests that all those who are anxious to get into this 1,000 notify him at once, and there will be a rehearsal of the entire chorus at 9:30 on the morning of October 15 for the afternoon performance.

The chorus will have to be limited by necessity and souvenirs will be given only to those children participating.

St. Louisans Come in Crowds.

Special Dispatch to the World-Herald.

St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 9.—There will be a large contingent of St. Louisans in ttendance​ at the Trans-Mississippi exposition tomorrow, desirous of joining in the celebration of Missouri day. The railroads report tremendous sales and if the interest manifested here in the event is a criterion Missourians in general are thoroughly alive to its importance. Following the departure of Lieutenant Governor A. H. Bolte and Governor Stephens' staff, with prominent St. Louisans, last night in the special car provided by the Burlington with outgoing trains today were crowded with those taking advantage of the special rate.

Mayor Ziegenheim's inability to go with the party that left last night was due to the fact that the republican city convention is to be held this week, and he is busy with the preliminaries and taking precautions against his arch-enemy, Chauncey I. Filley, capturing the convention.

This Is Mayors' Day.

The mayors participating in the exercises incident to mayors' day at 11 a. m. today at the exposition will meet at the Paxton at 10 a. m., and will be escorted by President Wattles and General Manager Clarkson to the exposition grounds in carriages. Among the mayors will be Hon. George T. Baker, mayor of Davenport, Ia.; Hon. John MacVicar, mayor of Des Moines, Ia.; Hon. A. J. Magruder, mayor of Kankakee, Ill.; Hon. Victor Jennings, mayor of Council Bluffs, and Hon. M. M. Stephens, mayor of East St. Louis.

Rough Riders Injured.

Floyd Bowers, a rough rider in the Wild West show, was yesterday afternoon thrown from his horse, receiving internal injuries. He was taken to the emergency hospital.

Mrs. McKinley May Yet Come.

Mrs. McKinley, wife of the president, will accompany the presidential party as far as Chicago, and will then decide as to coming to the exposition. This is the gist of a telegram received yesterday by President Wattles of the exposition from W. N. Babcock, manager of transportation, now in Washington arranging for the transportation of the presidential party. Since Mrs. McKinley has never failed to accompany the president wherever he has gone since becoming president it is not doubted by the exposition management but that she will accompany him to this city.

 

FIRST JUBILEE DAY

Great Peace Festival Opens Under the Most Favorable Auspices.

WEATHER DELIGHTFUL AND CROWDS LARGE

Monday Morning Sees More People on the Grounds Than Ever.

MISSOURIANS MAKE A GREAT SHOWING

Thousands from the Transmississippi Empire State Flock to Omaha.

MAYORS CELEBRATE AT THE AUDITORIUM

Representatives of Transmississippi Cities Give Modest Accounts of the Municipal Greatness of the Municipal Greatness of the Region They Represent.

Total Admissions Yesterday19,517
Total to Date1,887,273

The great Peace Jubilee has begun. No event ever had a more auspicious initiation. There was every element that predicates success from the most beautiful October weather to a crowd of enthusiastic people that promises to make this the most successful Monday since the exposition opened. The elements spent their force in the heavy downpour of the preceding night and left nothing but beauty and sunshine and smiling landscapes to greet the great celebration.

The natural attractions of the day brought the people out early and the grounds filled up this morning with exceptional rapidity. The Missouri day visitors were conspicuous among the early arrivals and as their celebration was scheduled for the afternoon a large number of them assembled to help make up the Mayor's day crowd in the Auditorium and listen to the excellent program that was rendered by Innes' band preliminary to the formal ceremonies of the day.

The exercises were introduced by a selection by the band and an impressive invocation by Rev. T. J. Mackay, who prayed the Omnipotent's blessing on the great peace celebration, of which these exercises were the beginning. After briefly outlining the general plan of the celebrations of the week President Wattles presented Mayor Frank E. Moores of Omaha as the first speaker. Mayor Moores emphasized the importance of good municipal government as an essential to the happiness and prosperity of the people. Well governed cities exert an influence on all the territory surrounding them on commercial as well as moral lines. He declared that the wonderful development of the transmississippi region is largely due to the excellence of its state and city governments. He asked the visiting executives to make themselves at home and assured them that all departments of the city government were at their service to give them any information and assistance that they might require.

Other Mayors Respond

In response Mayor George T. Baker of Davenport paid a high tribute to the exposition, which, he declared, is a wonderful educator. We have always believed in the Missouri valley and this is the enterprise that will remain a credit to the transmississippi country through all the future.

Mayor John Macvickar of Des Moines said this celebration glorifies the best part of war, the end of it. He spoke of the vast scope of the enterprise and from this selected for his subject "The Man Who Wants to Come Home." He declared that if there is one thing more than another that glorifies American citizenship it is the readiness of the people to serve their country in its hour of peril and their determination not to live on a soldier's pay when their services were no longer needed. The war has gone outside of its original object, which was to rescue the starving reconcentrados of Cuba, and he contended that the government should be able to meet the responsibilities that remain without keeping men on garrison duty. He urged that the man who wants to come home should have his own way as soon as he can be spared, and that his work should not be undone by attempting to set up a bogus imperialism.

President Wattles was expected to close the program with an address, but he said that what he had to say referred mainly to the beauties of the grounds and buildings and their artistic embellishments. He suggested that these would speak more eloquently to the visitors than any words that he could offer, and consequently dismissed the crowd to enjoy the attractions of the show.

At 1 o'clock the visiting mayors, with their wives, were entertained at lunch at Markel's cafe by the officers of the exposition and the Bureau of Entertainment.

SACRED CONCERT MUCH ENJOYED.

Mr. Innes and Mr. Kelly Score Fresh Musical Triumphs.

The sacred concert which was given by Innes and his band and the Exposition chorus in the Auditorium yesterday afternoon was even more successful than that of the preceding Sunday. Not only the seating capacity, but every inch of possible standing room in the big structure was occupied. People crowded into the doors and stood compressed against the walls for two hours and although the program was materially extended by numerous encores, they stood patiently and seemed well rewarded for their enthusiasm.

The program of the afternoon offered more than ordinary attraction. It began with the magnificent overture "1812," by Tchaikowsky, and included two movements from Mendelssohn's Scotch symphony, the Vorspiel from "Lohengrin" and the even acceptable trombone solo by Mr. Innes. The encores added such beautiful compositions as the serenata by Mozkowsky, Mendelssohn's "Spring Song" and Mr. Innes' own stirring two-step, "Love is King." With such material for enjoyment the audience would have been delighted even if no further variety had been offered. But to these was added the chorus numbers and the rendition of Batiste's beautiful Communion in G by the band, with an organ obligato by Mr. Kelly. The organist scored a distinct success and Mr. Innes laid down his baton to join in the enthusiastic encore that rewarded him. Mr. Kelly then played the intermezzo from "Cavalleria Rusticana" with the band accompanyment​, and this was, if possible, more acceptable than his previous effort.

The chorus performed its part in the mixed numbers with fair success. Its renditions were well-balanced and enjoyable, but its volume was scarcely equal to the competition of the band. This was especially noticeable in the "Hallelujah" chorus, in which the conductor was compelled to suppress his brasses in order to permit the chorus to be heard. The most enjoyable chorus number was the "Vesper Hymn," which was rendered with no other accompaniment than the cathedral chimes, which assisted to create a very effective feature.

Bandmaster Innes is nowadays fairly haunting the Midway after the conclusion of his night concerts. Visitors cannot help noticing the big, good-natured looking musician as he goes from concession to concession. He is everywhere. The dancing girls, the Streets of Cairo, Hagenback's animal show, the Chinese theater, the Chutes, the Old Plantation, any and everything in the Exposition's most lively quarter, are receiving the patronage of the energetic bandmaster. The cause of all this is the fact that Innes is memorizing sights and sounds for a new piece of music which he is to give next week and which will be entitled "A Day at the Omaha Exposition." The band will show its art of imitation in reproducing everything that strikes the eye and ear from the time that the visitor boards the trolley car for the exposition grounds until he reaches the exit gate late at night after a day of sightseeing and gaiety. Even the fireworks will have its literal reproduction in this strange aggregation of musical pictures. Innes has picked up some of the peculiar instruments on sale at the Chinese Village and his musicians have already become expert performers on tom-toms and the other weird instruments of the almond-eyed players from the flowery kingdom.

The much heralded "Anvil Chorus" will have its first presentation Tuesday night. On Thursday night the great military spectacle "War and Peace," will be given. In this piece a large number of soldiers from Fort Cook will take part so as to give a realistic idea of the pomp and pageant of actual war. Innes' third symphonic concert will be given on Friday night, and the Children's carnival, in which the grand chorus of a thousand juvenile voices will be heard in the national airs, is announced for Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock.

To properly commemorate this event, the management has decided to give each child taking part in the singing of this jubilee number a charming little souvenir of the occasion, and it is probable that in addition to the reduced rate of admission which has been made to the grounds for this one day, that all the concessions will be thrown open to the children for the day at a uniform rate of 5 cents for each concession visited. In order that places and souvenirs may be provided for all children, it should be well for parents to make early application for places in the grand chorus by postal card to Mr. T. J. Kelly, superintendent of music.

Among the Fruit Exhibits.

There was not any great amount of rest in the Horticulture building yesterday, as all of the exhibitors were putting their fruit in order and getting ready to present a neat and attractive appearance during the Jubilee week. As usual Nebraska is piling its tables to overflowing with all of the varieties grown in this locality. Today it is showing eighty varieties of apples, thirty of which were raised last year. The bulk of the old apples, however, are Jonathans, Willow Twigs and Ben Davis, yet there are large numbers in the other varieties shown. In addition to the apples the state is showing dozens of varieties of peaches, twelve varieties of plums, scores of grapes and goodly quantities of pears and crabapples. On Apple day Nebraska will give away 100 barrels of new and thirty barrels of old apples.

Missouri is getting in a lot of apples and today it will give away ten barrels of the fruit to those who visit the exhibit. Most of them will be the big red apples which have made Missouri famous.

Superintendent Courtney of the Oregon exhibit is looking for a carload of exhibits, the greater portion of which will be fruit. With this he hopes to keep his exhibit in the best possible shape until the close of the exposition. During the Jubilee week he will make something of a spread and will fill all of his tables and all of the available space that he can secure.

Light on the Bluff Tract.

The electric illuminations on the Bluff tract put up for the Jubilee week promise to be the most attractive that have been seen upon the grounds. The test of the lamps will be made tonight. In addition to the arc lights in place, thousands of incandescent lamps have been hung. Poles have been set along all of the avenues of the tract, including those that lead to the state buildings from the main boulevard. Along all of these, poles have been placed at a distance of twenty feet apart. When the lights are all turned on the Bluff tract will be almost as brilliant as noonday.

No Change in Program.

It is announced that there will be no change made in the plans for the reception of the distinguished women who will accompany the presidential party to Omaha on account of the possible absence of Mrs. McKinley. As the arrangements for the entertainment of the distinguished guests have been completed and announced they will be carried out whether Mrs. McKinley accompanies the president here, or on account of her brother's death remans​ in Canton. There will be a number of the wives and daughters of the army and navy officers and cabinet members in the party and for these the full program of entertainment will be followed.

What Tuesday Holds.

Tuesday will be Governors' day, Dairy day and Peoria, Ill., day. The main ceremony of the day will be the Governors' day exercises in the Auditorium at 11 o'clock. These will consist of music by Innes' band, an invocation by Rev. S. Wright Butler and addresses by Governor Silas A. Holcomb of Nebraska, Governor Alva Adams of Colorado, Governor D. M. Clough of Minnesota and Governor C. M. Barnes of Oklahoma.

The observance of Dairy day will consist in the convention of the National Dairymen's association, which will begin at the Dairy building at 2 o'clock.

Exposition Notes.

The building and grounds department has begun the erection of a large addition in front of the band stand for Jubilee week. The new portion will seat about 225 people and is constructed especially for the accommodation of the presidential party Wednesday.

The owner of the sod house on the bluff tract has asked President Wattles to call the attention of President McKinley to the structure as an object lesson in what the west has accomplished in the last fifty years. The suggestion was favorably received and a visit to the sod house will be a part of the program of entertainment Wednesday.

Thirty members of the Southern Indiana Press association came in last night for a three day's stay at the exposition. They are in a special car which has been switched to the grounds. In this they will be at home during their visit here. Many of the members are accompanied by their wives. The president of the association is E. W. Cockrum of Oakland City and the secretary is Major Simpson of Paroti.

 

MAYORS SLOW GETTING HERE

Only a Few of the Executive Heads of Transmississippi Towns on Hand at the Hour.

Mayor's day today does not give promise of being an elaborate affair. There may be an army of municipal executives in the city, but they had not reported to General Manager Clarkson at 10:30 this morning, the time set for the party to go to the grounds. Only four were on hand at that hour, and but two of these were accompanied by their wives. These were John MacVicar and wife of Des Moines, O. M. Pettit of Kenosha, Wis., Victor Jennings of Council Bluffs, and John Gratt and wife of North Platte, Neb. To meet this party there was a reception committee of exposition stockholders headed by President Wattles, and a committee of ten women as follows: Mrs. G. M. Hitchcock, Mrs. George A. Joslyn, Mrs. Charles Offutt, Mrs. W. S. Poppleton, Mrs. George F. Bidwell, Mrs. W. J. Connell, Mrs. C. N. Dietz, Mrs. Charles E. Squires, Mrs. Thomas Kilpatrick and Mrs. W. C. Carter. The members of the committee wore the new badges, which consist of a bar on which are the words, "Peace Jubilee," to which is attached a small silk flag, with a pendant representing the seal of Nebraska. These badges were also given to each of the guests.

The visitors were taken in carriages at 10:30, at the Paxton hotel, and escorted to the exposition grounds, where they will spend the day and participate in special exercises provided for them, marking the first day of Peace Jubilee week.

BUFFALO MEN GETTING IDEAS

Officers of the Panamerican Exposition Are Studying the Transmississippi.

VALUABLE LESSONS RECEIVED HERE

Omaha's Experience Will Be of Great Service in Building the Exposition on Cayuga Island for 1901.

President J. M. Brinker, Treasurer F. C. M. Lautz and the other officials of the Panamerican exposition to be held on the Niagara frontier in 1901, spent yesterday in securing information regarding the operation of the Transmississippi Exposition likely to prove beneficial in the conduct of their enterprise. They express themselves as being highly gratified at the many courtesies extended to them in Omaha. Captain Brinker said: "I am very pleased with my visit and am very agreeably disappointed at the size, importance and completeness of the exhibition here. As editorially suggested in The Bee, we have received great encouragement and have become inspired with new zeal for the Panamerican exposition by what we have seen and learned. Omaha has certainly done wonders."

Mr. Lautz, treasurer of the Panamerican exposition, who is one of the largest manufacturers in western New York and an important representative of the thriving city of Buffalo, said he was highly pleased with his experiences in Omaha. "We have learned some most valuable lessons and trust we shall profit by them in 1901."

Secretary R. C. Hill, who is a newspaper man of long experience and who has for many years made a careful study of expositions, was a visitor to The Bee office last evening. He said: "I will not attempt to express all the complimentary ideas I have in mind in regard to the Omaha exposition. When the history of all the great expositions of this country is written the chapter devoted to Omaha in 1898 must be an interesting and important one."

Object of the Congress.

Speaking of the Panamerican exposition project he explained, "It has been alluded to as the Panamerican congress, but that is an erroneous title. The leading idea of the exposition will be to illustrate the marvelous progress of the present century in the western hemisphere. This idea was emphatically stated in the enabling act passed by both houses in congress and approved by President McKinley, and the act stated that the purpose of the Panamerican exposition, to be held on Cayuga island, between the cities of Buffalo and Niagara Falls, in the state of New York, in the year 1901, needs the encouragement and approval of congress and of the people of the United States. The exposition is intended to fittingly illustrate the marvelous development of the Western hemisphere during the Nineteenth century by the demonstration of the reciprocal relations existing between the American republics and colonies.

"This idea of an exposition reviewing the achievements of the New World during the Nineteenth century is certainly in harmony with that patriotic spirit long vigorously existent on this hemisphere, but made infinitely more expansive and emphatic by the remarkable events of the last few months in Cuba, Porto Rico, Hawaii and the Philippines. The New World has fairly outrivaled the Old World during the Nineteenth century in many important fields of human competition. A purely New World's exposition will be an essential departures for the international character of previous great expositions.

Value of the Location.

"I believe that geographically, historically, commercially and scientifically it would be difficult to find a more desirable location than that which has been selected for the Panamerican exposition. This location is not at the city of Buffalo, as has been stated, but within a short distance of the great cataract of the Niaraga​ river. The opportunities for a great electrical display are remarkable. The power generated by the current of the Niagara river is now being delivered along the frontier to Buffalo, twenty miles away, and the supply of electrical power for the exposition purposes will be practically unlimited. The Niagara Frontier teems with historic interest. It was the 'Dark and Bloody Ground' of the revolutionary war, and along its river bank were fought many of the famous battles of the war of 1812. It was also there that more than three centuries ago the intrepid missionaries from France planted the divinely illuminated cross which shed upon the untutored red men of the picturesque region the first gleam of Christian faith. It was at Cayuga island, which is close to the American mainland that Sieur de La Salle built and launched in 1697 the 'Griffon,' the first vessel which sailed the inland seas and pioneered the watery pathway to the Mississippi and the great northwest.

"The Niagara frontier is the center of the largest mass of population on the western hemisphere. Within a day's ride, encircling a radius of less than 500 miles are 50,000,000 people, a fact of great significance in weighing the importance of the Panamerican enterprise. With the experiences of Chicago, Atlanta, Nashville and Omaha it would seem that such an exposition as that proposed for 1901 can be made highly successful."

The Panamerican Exposition party will visit the exposition again today and it is probable that the​ will leave for the east by special car over the Chicago & Northwestern railway this evening.

JUBILEE CROWDS START EARLY

Railroads Surprised at the Rush for Omaha Monday Morning.

EVERY LINE HAS ALL IT CAN HAUL

Nebraska and Missouri People Furnish the Bulk of the First Day's Business, but Kansas and Iowa Are Represented.

The first week day of the Peace Jubilee of the Transmississippi Exposition saw an immense crowd of vistors​ enter the city through its two passenger stations and one shed. The influx was more numerous than was anticipated, previous railroad advces​ being to the effect that the movement toward the first big Jubilee celebration would not set in before Tuesday.

All of the morning trains from Chicago were heavily filled. There was not one of the four Chicago-Omaha lines that had the least kick coming on the amount of travel it hauled in, but the big crowds were observed to come in from the west. If the attendance at the grand occasion may be prejudged by the advance guard the transmissouri states are the ones that are going to be the most numerously represented. The Union Pacific's morning train from the west arrived in two long sections, and the noon train from Beatrice and Stromsburg brought in a good crowd. The Burlington brought in its McCook express at 9:35 in two well filled sections, and the Hastings train, twenty minutes before noon delivered 600 more Nebraskans to Omaha to be well taken care of until the last sky rocket should be sent up to tell the inhabitants of Mars and other planets about the glorious successes of the army and navy of the United States. In addition to the special trains the afternoon express of the Burlington from the west is running in three sections, and so far the road has brought in during the last twenty-four hours ninety-five car loads of Missourians. A special train from the St. Francis branch, Kansas, will arrive here at 5 p. m. today with over 1,000 excursionists.

Demand for Equipment.

As the reduced rates to Omaha on account of the Peace Jubilee were not available until one minute after midnight on Monday morning the passenger men were surprised to see such a large crowd come in on the morning trains. Many of the arrivals must have left home before the reduced rates went into effect or else the ticket agents in their home towns pushed the clock hands ahead a few hours.

There is not a railroad superintendent in Omaha that is feeling easy today. All of them are worried about the supply of passenger equipment for the crowds this week. One of them remarked to a Bee reporter: "The crowd has started with a rush and I don't know what it will do to us before the week is over." Superintendent of Transportation Buckingham of the Union Pacific has distributed a goodly supply of passenger coaches at Grand Island, Columbus, Kearney and other central points and the "Overland Route" is probably better fixed for handling the crowds than any other Omaha road, and it is not feeling that it will have an easy time of it. Superintendent Bignell of the B. & M. has everything in the way of passenger equipment that is on wheels ready for use, but he is fearful that he is going to run short. Thirty odd tourist cars of the Burlington have been pressed into service and as the seats are wide they are being made to accommodate three persons each. The Burlington has also hauled out a lot of new coal cars, cleaned them up and in case of emergency will run temporary seats in them and use them for short hauls into Omaha to help handle the crowds.

An indication of the popularity of the peace jubilee throughout Nebraska is gleaned through the fact that at all of the railroad headquarters in the city telegrams were received throughout the morning from station agents in Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, Wyoming and South Dakota, asking for additional special tickets to Omaha "on account of the way our citizens are lining up to attend the Peace Jubilee at your exposition." The requests for more tickets were sent by telegraph and called for bunches of thirty, fifty, 100 and even 200, for be sent immediately.

The Missouri Pacific brought in just 2,434 people during the morning. Most of the crowd came from Missouri to attend the state celebration at the exposition grounds. The train reports showed the following number of passengers on the five trains: Six hundred and twenty-five from Kansas City, 352 from Kansas City, 410 from Kansas City, 547 from St. Louis and 500 from Auburn.

GERONIMO ON INDIAN WARS

Famous Apache Chief Speaks from His Own Costly Experience.

CALLS PILLAGER INDIANS RED FOOLS

Trouble at Leech Lake Gives the Old Man a Chance to Talk About the Folly of Fighting Against the White Man.

While in a talkative mood yesterday Geronimo, the old Apache chief, who is one of the attractions of the Indian congress, unbosomed himself and talked quite freely of the Indian uprising in and around the vicinity of Leech Lake, Minn. The old man has spent more years in war than in following the pursuits of peace and as all of his warfare has been waged against the whites by all of the older Indians he is looked upon as a great man and what he says consequently carries a good deal of weight.

Speaking of the Minnesota troubles Geronimo through an interpreter said: "I have heard something of the fight up in the north and some of my friends have told me some things, so that I have quite an idea of the situation. I don't know where Leech Lake is, but I suppose it is way out in the woods or someways out from the big towns. I have not traveled up that way, so I don't know much about the country, only from what I have been told. I want to say that the Indians are a lot of red fools for going into this fight against the white men. They will get the worst of it in the end and then they will be sorry.

"Years ago," continued the old chief, "I thought that I could whip the whole United States, but since I have been around the country I have changed my mind. There is no country that can whip the United States and what is the use of a few hundred Indians starting in to undertake the job. Since coming to Omaha I have learned that the white men are more numerous than the leaves on the trees or the blades of grass on the prairies. Coming up from my home in the south I saw more white men than there are Indians in existence and I am told that there are only a few down there as compared   with the number up in Minnesota, where a few fools are making war. Right here at the exposition there are enough people coming every day to put an end to every Indian in the world if they saw fit to do so. Then, besides this, the white men have all of the guns, powder and bullets. They have all of the big guns and they are the ones that count. Down at the government building the other day I saw a gun that shoots more bullets in a minute than all of the Minnesota Indians could shoot in a year. The United States has hundreds and thousands of these guns and I am told that the country has big houses filled with powder and bullets and can make as many more every day in the year, so, as I said before, what is the use of a few hundred Indians going out on the war path trying to clean out the government?

"When I was a young man and a fool, I lived down along the south border of the United States where there were only a few white people. Some of my old friends told me that those people were the only whites in the country and I believed what they said. I want to war and suffered. My men were killed and I was made a prisoner. Of course that made me mad, but it was the best thing that ever happened to me, for it taught me a lesson and convinced me that I was not the only person in the world. Now I am satisfied to settle down and be a good citizen. My days of fighting are over, except to fight for the stars and stripes, which I would be glad to do it I had a chance. Of course if I should be called to go out to fight Indians, I would do so, but I am through shooting at white men. When the president comes here this week, I want to meet him and tell him I am a friend of the white man. Some of the white men have wronged me, but they were bad men and I don't blame all because a few are bad.

"I am an old man now and I want to see my people learn the ways of the whites. I want to see them raise corn and cattle and live in houses and I believe that the president and the big men at Washington will help my people if they will try to help themselves."

WEATHER MAKERS ARE COMING

Convention of the Men Under Prof. Moore Will Meet in Omaha This Week for Consultation.

If Omaha does not enjoy good weather this week it will be due directly to the presence in the city of a host of Uncle Sam's weather men. Prof. Willis L. Moore, chief of the weather bureau, has called a meeting of all of his assistants to be held here and the chief himself will be present to open the meeting. The sessions will be held in the Commercial club rooms and those present will represent every state and territory in the union. The object of the meeting will be to devise ways and means for improving the work of the bureau and to exchange experiences in dealing with weather problems. Covering so wide a range of territory the weather officials meet new propositions in the different sections and their experience with these is the basis upon which the bureau establishes new lines of work. These meetings are called at intervals by the chief of the bureau. The present one will be the fifth, the last one being held at Indianapolis in 1895. Prof. Moore will arrive in Omaha with the presidential party tomorrow night and will open the meeting Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock, adjournment being billed for Thursday afternoon. The sessions will be open to the public.

A committee meeting was held this morning to complete the details for the general meeting and make such arrangements as were necessary to insure a profitable session. The committee was composed of the following members: Prof. Cleveland Abbey, member of the scientific staff of the chief and who has been connectend​ with the bureau since it was established; F. H. Brandenburg of Denver, Major H. C. Bate of Nashville, Dr. I. M. Cline of Denver, J. Warren Smith of Columbus, O., James Berry of Washington, D. C., and T. F. Townsend of Philadelphia.

James Berry, who will be secretary of the meeting, says that when he left Washington responses has been received from the following weather officials, who signified their intention of being present and who were making arrangements for the trip, and it is believed that every one mentioned will be here, unless sickness or accident interposes:

F. P. Chaffee, Montgomery, Ala.; E. B. Richards, Little Rock, Ark.; Wayland Bailey, Fort Smith, Ark.; F. H. Brandenburg, Denver; J. P. Slaughter, Pueblo, Colo.; Prof. Willis L. Moore, Prof. C. Abbey, Prof. H. A. Hazen, James Berry, E. B. Calvert, Washington, D. C.; A. J. Mitchell, Jacksonville, Fla.; A. B. Crane, Pensacola, Fla.; J. B. Marbury, Atlanta, Ga.; H. A. Cox and C. E. Linney, Chicago; John Craig, Springfield, Ill.; P. H. Smyth, Cairo, Ill.; C. F. R. Wappenhans, Indianapolis, Ind.; J. R. Sage and G. M. Chappel, Des Moines; E. H. Bowie, Dubuque, Ia.; U. G. Purssell, Sioux City, Ia.; J. M. Sherier, Davenport, Ia.; T. B. Jennings, Topeka, Kan.; G. T. Todd, Dodge City, Kan.; G. E. Hunt, Louisville, Ky.; A. G. McAdie, New Orleans; Charles Davis, Shreveport, La.; F. J. Walz, Baltimore; C. F. Schneider, Lansing, Mich.; N. B. Conger, Detroit; T. S. Outram, Minneapolis; H. W. Richardson, Duluth; P. F. Lyons, St. Paul; W. T. Blythe, Vicksburg, Miss.; A. E. Hackett, Columbia, Mo.; R. J. Hyatt, St. Louis; R. L. Anderson, Hannibal, Mo.; E. J. Glass, Helena, Mont.; L. A. Welch, Omaha; G. A. Loveland and J. H. Spencer, Lincoln; J. C. Piercy, North Platte, Neb.; G. B. Ackerman, Winnemuca, Nev.; E. W. McGann, New Brunswick, N. J.; R. M. Hardinge, Santa Fe, N. M.; R. G. Allen, Ithaca, N. Y.; David Cuthbertson, Buffalo, N. Y.; A. F. Sims, Albany, N. Y.; John W. Smith, Boston; B. H. Bronson, Bismarch, N. D.; J. Warren Smith, Columbus, O.; G. Hass-Hagen, Toledo, O.; E. C. Thompson, Sandusky, O.; E. A. Beals, Cleveland, O.; J. I. Widmeyer, Oklahoma; B. S. Pague, Portland, Ore.; T. F. Townsend, Philadelphia; J. W. Bauer, Columbia, S. C.; S. W. Glenn, Huron, S. D.; G. B. Wurtz, Pierre, S. D.; H. C. Bate, Nashville; L. M. Pindell, Chattanooga; S. C. Emery, Memphis; W. M. Fulton, Knoxville, Tenn.; T. M. Cline, Galveston; H. H. Curley, San Antonio; J. H. Smith, Salt Lake City; G. N. Wilson, Lynchburg, Va.; G. N. Salisbury, Seattle, Wash.; H. E. Wilkinson, Spokane, Wash.; W. M. Wilson, Milwaukee; W. S. Palmer, Cheyenne, Wyo.

PRESIDENT AND THE PARADE

Mr. McKinley Will Review the Pageant from City Hall Stand.

ALL ARRANGEMENTS NOW COMPLETE

More Seats Being Erected in Order that Ample Accommodations Will Be Provided for Distinguished Party and the City's Guests.

President McKinley and his official party will review the parade in his honor from the big stand in front of the city hall. The stand is being rearranged. An addition is being attached to the east end. This will extend to the entrance of The Bee building and a number of seats will thus be added to the capacity. Accommodations for very nearly 900 people will thus be secured. The members of the local city family will occupy the big majority of the seats, as the stand was erected at their expense, although the exposition management will be given a proper share of the stand. City Clerk Higby will have charge of the distribution of the seats to those who are entitled to them.

The president and his party will occupy the front rows of the platform along its entire length. The party will include the reception committee and officials of the exposition. The number of seats reserved for them will be 200. Immediately in the rear of this party will be seated the members of the various city boards and heads of departments, and behind will be ranged the other employes of the city hall and their friends.

One inexorable rule will be put into effect regarding admission to the stand. Those who are entitled to seats must be in their places before the arrival of the presidential train, which is scheduled to reach Omaha at 8:20 o'clock in the evening. As soon as the train gets into the city the city hall doors and all entrances to the stand will be closed and no one not in place can secure admission to the stand until the presidential party is seated. This rule will be strictly enforced.

GREETING TO WILLIAM M'KINLEY.

The people of Omaha, Nebraska and the entire transmississippi country extend cordial greeting to their chief executive, William McKinley, who has come to celebrate with them the restoration of peace after successful war. No man occupying the responsible position of president of the United States has conducted the affairs of the nation with greater prudence in most trying circumstances and none have established themselves in the confidence of the people more firmly.

It is eminently fitting that the commander-in-chief of the army and navy of the United States should by his presence lend inspiration to the popular demonstration at the first national peace jubilee following the close of the war with Spain. Nowhere in America could it be more appropriate for President McKinley to signalize the victories of peace than in the heart of the continent at the great exposition conceived and inaugurated to illustrate to the world the arts of peace through the development of the marvelous resources of the most prolific section of the United States.

It is scarcely necessary for the people of the transmississippi states and especially the citizens of Omaha to assure President McKinley how gratefully they appreciate the honor conferred by his participation in their peace jubilee festivities, and how deeply indebted to him and the members of his cabinet for the invaluable assistance rendered by them to the great enterprise whose culmination will mark an epoch in the history of the country. Their hope and prayer is that President McKinley's attendance will give new inspiration for patriotic devotion to America's free institutions and renewed confidence in the vitality of the republic.

MUST MEET THE EMERGENCY.

During the next three days the hospitality of the citizens of Omaha will be taxed to the utmost. The outpouring of vast multitudes to welcome President McKinley and the military and naval heroes of the war will not only exhaust the capacity of all the hotels and public resorts, but also fill every residence and dwelling that offers accommodations for pay. It therefore behooves our citizens to throw open their homes and to improvise for the time being quarters for the thousands of people who otherwise would be shelterless.

The Bee furthermore urges upon the owners of public halls and the municipal authorities to throw open to public use every available place that can be made to serve for sheltering strangers who may be unable to find lodgings. The Coliseum alone would accommodate from 2,000 to 3,000 people who might be glad to avail themselves of such an opportunity rather than be compelled to walk the streets in search of other quarters.

This is an emergency that must by met by public-spirited action. It is the paramount duty of the community to make every stranger within its gates comfortable as far as lies within its power. With prompt and concerted action, all demands can be supplied.

Incidentally it may be proper to point out the most effective course to be pursued by those who are in a position to accommodate some of the visitors. Notice should be given the police, who will be instructed by the chief to direct strangers to lodgings.

 

JUBILEE CROWD HERE

Western People Gather at Omaha to See Peace in Its Glory.

EXPOSITION THRONGED AS NEVER BEFORE

Morning Crowd Exceeds the Experience of Modern Woodmen Day.

GOVERNORS TELL OF THE GREAT WEST

Triumphs of the Transmississippi Empire Eloquently Portrayed.

HOLCOMB AND ADAMS THE SPEAKERS

Nebraska and Colorado Executives Vie with Each Other in Tossing Verbal Bouquets at the People of the United States.

Total Admissions Yesterday29,033
Total to Date1,916,401

The second day of the Jubilee week celebration promises to crowd the high water mark of attendance another point upward. The morning crowd was bigger than that at the corresponding hour of Modern Woodmen day when the top figure of 52,000 was reached and unless the effect of the counter attraction down town tonight should be too potent to be overcome, there is every prospect that that figure may be exceeded. At no time since the exposition opened has there been such a crush on the street railway trains. The Sherman avenue line handled its proportion of the crowd fairly well, but the cross-town and Dodge street lines were not able to carry the people. The Dodge street trains seldom hesitated after they left Sixteenth and Dodge streets and the people on North Twentieth street who wanted to ride to the grounds had to be contented with the excellent walking. There was a crowd waiting at nearly every block, but as train after train whirled by without enough room on the footboards to accomodate​ a fly, the people started for the grounds on foot. After 9 o'clock there was a continuous stream of pedestrians towards the main entrance and densly-laden​ motors discharged their loads at the rate of one a minute. This was the situation from the time the gates opened until noon and even then there was only a slight falling off in the arrivals. There was a bigger crowd on the grounds at 10 o'clock than there was at any time Monday, and at noon the big enclosure was crowded from the Horticulture building to the Indian encampment.

The ceremonies of the day were in the hands of the governors of the transmississippi states and at 11 o'clock there was a good sized audience in the Auditorium to listen to the oratorical felicitations of the gubernatorial guests. They were not kept waiting for the official party appeared with commendable promptitude, although it lacked the personality of some of the speakers whose participation had been anticipated. An invocation by Rev. S. Wright Butler of St. Mary's Avenue Congregational church was followed by the opening address by Governor Holcomb. In his remarks the governor brought out a comparison between the progress of this country during the past hundred years and that which had been achieved during the same period by any other nation. It is no wonder that we can build an exposition that is the admiration of the world, for here the representation of what has been done in the last half century is a revelation to every visitor and a source of pride and pleasure to every citizen of the transmississippi country. From no source had more willing co-operation been experienced than from the chief executives of the various transmississippi states. They had been quick to perceive the advantages that would result from the exposition and zealous in their efforts to assist in making it a success.

Celebrates Great Victories.

In discussing the sentiment of the day the speaker spoke of the victories that had been won on the field and on the seas since the exposition opened and declared that it was entirely fitting that the American people should gather here in the midst of the greatest victory of peace to congratulate each other on the triumphant issue of the most brilliant campaign that has ever signalized our arms.

After a selection by the band, President Wattles introduced Governor Alva Adams of Colorado, whose excellent address was punctuated with hearty applause. He congratulated his audience on the fact that there were not more governors present. No words of theirs, he declared, could compensate them for the artistic melody of all that was outside the building. This is the best exposition ever known, and if it does not inspire better aspirations in the hearts of the people, its mission is in vain. It is the child of the west, but while we give fealty to the west, we are not disloyal to the east. But we have a special interest in the place where our homes are built, where our children were born and which holds all that we love and cherish.

Governor Adams spoke in eloquent terms of the effect of this exposition on the people of the east. Many of them have still considered the west as an uncivilized and foreign land. But the audacity of this enterprise has opened their eyes, given a new trend to their thoughts and taught them that the Mississippi river is not the western boundary of the republic. It is in the west that real manhood is most frequently found. Here the man is not bound by tradition or prejudice. He may not have a full idea of the civilizing effect of a dress suit, but when it comes to fulfilling the ideal of the republic he would lose nothing by comparison with any man on earth. This led to a discussion of the gallant achievements of American soldiers and sailors during the last few months, and he declare that through all ages to come these would stand as types of heroic sacrifice and patriotic endeavor. They are worth more to the American people than all their mines of gold and waving harvests. It would be unpatriotic to declare that the flag that has been planted on foreign shores at the cost of such heroic sacrifice shall not stand there forever.

The exercises were concluded by a very brief address by President Wattles and then the audience was dismissed, while the gubernatorial party was entertained at lunch by the exposition management.

NEW MEXICANS HOLD EXERCISES.

Brief Formalities at the Mines and Mining Building.

The New Mexico day exercises were held in the territory's space in the Mines building at 11 o'clock this morning, and while the attendance of residents from New Mexico was not large, those who were there were sufficiently enthusiastic to make up for what they lacked in numbers. There were a number of prominent people present from the territory, including Captain Leeson, who is one of the exposition commissioners, Commissioner Prince, the orator of the occasion, Colonel Albright, the veteran newspaper man of the territory, and a number of others.

Commissioner Prince read a letter from Governor Otero, who expressed his regrets in not being able to attend, having been detained at home by some important public business. He congratulated Captain Lesson upon having made such a successful exhibit, with the bare exception of one consignment of ore, is the private property of the captain, who brought it here at his own expense from his museum. It was all gathered by the captain during his thirty five years' residence in the territory, and is exhibited without reward or hope of reward, aside from what may come to him as a man who has the interest of the territory at heart and is willing to spend his own time and money in advancing the interests of the section of country that is his adopted home.

Commissioner Prince referred to the fact that in 1893, at the World's fair, New Mexico took the highest prize on wheat and oats, has unlimited quantities of gold and silver, lumber, marble, granite and building stone and the most healthful climate in the world.

The exercises of the day closed with a piano selection, which was well received and loudly applauded.

CONDITION OF THE WEATHER

Hour.Deg.
5 a. m.48
6 a. m.47
7 a. m.46
8 a. m.48
9 a. m.52
Hour.Deg.
10 a. m.55
11 a. m.58
12 m.60
1 p. m.61
2 p. m64
3 p. m.66

AT THE GOVERNMENT BUILDING.

Formalities to Be Carried Out When the President is There.

Secretary W. V. Cox of the government board has completed the arrangements for the reception of President McKinley when he visits the building on the afternoon of President's day. These are announced as follows:

The Government building will be closed to the public at 1:30 p. m. to allow preparations for the reception. During his presence the president's flag will float from the flagstaff at the center of the east front of the building.

The president, with his guests, accompanied by the president of the exposition and the chairman of the Government Board of Management, will enter the Government building at the north entrance, opposite the north colonnade, and will visit successively of the various department exhibits, in each of which the department representative will act as host.

At 3 o'clock the president will witness the life-saving drill from the eastern entrance of the building. At the close of the drill he will re-enter the building to the rotunda to meet those who desire to pay their respects to him. The president will leave the Government building through the eastern entrance, opposite the south colonnade.

Invited guests will be admitted at the east entrance, opposite the north colonnade.

The president will receive with such persons as he may designate in the main aisle adjacent to the light house lens in the rotunda.

Seats for the presidential party will be reserved in the space of the Department of State and in the rotunda. Other guests will be seated, as far as possible, in the spaces adjoining the main aisle.

The presentation will be made by the representatives of the War and Navy departments, the president of the exposition and the chairman of the government board, occupying positions to the right and back of the president.

Members of the government board and their associates will assist in entertaining the invited guests of the president.

Order will be maintained in the Government building by the government guard, regular and volunteer soldiers and marines detailed for that purpose, exposition guards being stationed on the outside at the various entrances.

A string orchestra will furnish appropriate music for the occasion and will be seated in the section allotted to the Smithsonian institution.

COMING HERE TO SHAKE HANDS.

Southern People Eager for the Grip of Their Northern Neighbors.

One thousand people from Texas and other southern points arrived yesterday, chaperoned by Assistant General Passenger Agent Lupton of the Santonio & Aransas Pass Railway company. Another trainload is expected this morning and it is expected that the number of southern visitors will be swelled to 5,000 before Wednesday noon. While the bulk of the people come from Texas and intermediate points along the route traveled, many come from other southern states, brought here through the labors of Mr. Lupton who had much to do with working up the North and South Handshaking carnival, a feature of Jubilee week.

When Mr. Lupton was here some weeks ago he suggested the matter to the exposition officials and with them it met with great favor. After he went home he pushed the scheme and secured a rate of less than 1 cent per mile over all of the southern roads, together with the same rate over the connecting lines, thus allowing the people to reach Omaha at a less rate than has ever before been granted to any excursionists since the opening of the exposition.

The handshaking feature of the Jubilee week is scheduled for this afternoon along the banks of the Lagoon, and if the program is carried out in its details, the northern people will meet at the east end, while those from the south will congregate in front of the Government building. Bands will be stationed along the brink of the pool, playing "Yankee Doodle" and "Dixie." At a given signal the two forces will move together and when they collide, the handshaking will begin and continue until a general introduction has been completed.

 

Hours for Innes.

The elaborate celebrations of Jubilee week have interfered somewhat with the regular concerts of the Innes band. Today the band will play in the Auditorium at 3 o'clock and on the Plaza at 7 as usual. Tomorrow it will give a short concert on the Plaza at 10:30 o'clock and another in the Auditorium at 2. The evening concert will begin at 6:30. The hours of the concerts during the remainder of the weeek​ are still undetermined.

McKinley in Electricity.

Superintendent Henry Rustin of the Electrical department is preparing to exhibit a large portrait of Persident​ McKinley in incandescent lights from the top of the band stand tomorrow night. If the attempt is successful it will be another feature which has never been successfully introduced by any previous exposition.

Notes of the Exposition.

Robert R. Johnson of Bloomington, Ill., is in the city visiting his brother, John A. Johnson of the exposition directory. He wlll​ remain during Peace Jubilee week.

Cudahys are putting out a very pretty jubilee souvenir in thes hape of a tablet bearing President McKinley's vignette on one side and a neat design on the other.

Mrs. Lord, wife of Governor Lord of Oregon, is in the city, the guest of Mrs. Oberg, the flax expert, who is in charge of the textile department of the Minnesota exhibit. Mrs. Lord will remain in the city several days attending the exposition.

State Senator Stubblefield of Bloomington, Ill., is in the city, the guest of John A. Johnson of the exposition directory. Yesterday he visited the exposition and after looking over the grounds said: "It is certainly the greatest show since the World's fair."

Dairymen's day will be observed at the exposition by a lunch at noon and speaking at 2 o'clock this afternoon. The dinner will be served at one of the viaduct restaurants and the exercises will be held in the Dairy building on the north tract. It is anticipated that there will be a large attendance of those who are interested in dairy work and dairy products.

While this is designated as Peoria day, it is not expected that there wiill​ be any set program. Four hundred of the people from Peoria arrived yesterday and spent their time upon the grounds, visiting the state buildings and those upon the Main Court. They are making their headquarters at the Illinois building. At that place they will meet today, not for the purpose of holding public exercisies​, but to meet old friends who formerly resided in Illinois. They will remain n​ the city several days, or at least until after the Jubilee week exercises.

At least one of the Missouri visitors took to water yesterday afternoon. The party referred to was William Pettker, a young man from St. Louis, who hired a boat and went out for a ride on the lagoon. Down in the vicinity of the bridge south of the Administration arch the craft capsized and Pettker went sprawling in the water. He floundered around for a while until his antice were observed by the members of the United States lifie​ saving crew, who went to the rescue. The young man was pulled out of the water and taken ashore, where he explained that the boat in which he was riding is not like those to which he is accustomed and that the thing became unmanageable.

OF INTEREST TO STOCKMEN

Executive Committee of the National Live Stock Association to Meet Here on Wednesday.

The executive committee of the National Live Stock association will meet at the exchange building, South Omaha, tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock. Among other matters which will be brought before the commitee for consideration will be the program for the national convention, which meets in Denver during the last week of January.

The committee has been asked by the stockmen of the west to take up the proposition to secure feed-in-transit rates west of the Missouri river, and it is probable that the board will take measures to induce the western states to pass a uniform bounty law in regard to the killing of coyotes and wolves. It has been estimated that in Colorado alone $750,000 worth of sheep and calves are killed annually by these animals, and in Utah $800,000 worth of sheep alone are destroyed during the same period. A number of the western states have placed a bounty on the heads of coyotes and wolves. But in others there is no such provision. The result is that they are killed in one state and sold in another. The stockmen believe that by the passing of a uniform bounty law a great deal of the present loss of stock will be obviated and they intend to bend all their efforts toward such an end.

Those of the commitee who are already in the city are: John W. Springer, president of the association, who owns a large ranch at Esteline, Tex.; Peter Jansen of Jansen, Neb.; F. M. Stewart of South Dakota, R. C. Judson of Portland, Ore.; T. W. Melville of Topeka.

FRATERNAL CONGRESS MEETS

Delegates Representing the Various Reserve Fund Organizations in Session Now.

The American Fraternal congress was organized this morning, the plan being to have a body including in its membership all fraternities in the United States having a reserve or emergency fund. J. C. Root was chosen temporary president, and W. E. Sharp, temporary secretary.

The following fraternities were represented at the opening session: Fraternal Union of America, Ancient Order of Pyramids, Woodmen of the World, Royal Highlanders, Business and Fraternal association, American Benevolent association. Addresses were made by all the members present. A committee on constitution and by-laws was appointed, J. C. Root, F. F. Roose and L. A. Merriam serving, and a report was drafted which will be acted upon at the afternoon session.

"Hail to the Chief
Omaha Extends the glad hand to President McKinley."

King Ak-Sar-Ben IV to Personally Greet the Distinguished Visitor.

MAGNIFICENT PARADE IN HIS HONOR

Gaily Caparisoned Knights and Two Score Beautiful Flaots.

IMPOSING PAGEANT IN THE CITY STREETS

Columbia's Popular Ruler Will Review the Spectacle from the Stand in Front of the City Hall.

At a meeting of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben at the castle last evening it was unanimously decided that President McKinley should be accorded the most splendid reception ever accorded any visitor to the kingdom of Quivera. King Ak-Sar-Ben IV made his first appearance before the knights since his coronation and his most gracious queen sent her greetings. Both bade the knights to exert themselves mightily to do honor to the beloved ruler of the nation.

On his arrival at the union depot President McKinley and his party will be met by King Ak-Sar-Ben IV in person and escorted to the city hall by two handsomely mounted troops—the board of governors of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben and the Equestrian club of South Omaha. Preceded by this cavalcade the presidential party will drive north on Tenth street to Farnam and west on the latter highway to the city hall.

One inexorable rule will be put into effect regarding admission to the stand. Those who are entitled to seats must be in their places before the arrival of the presidential train, which is scheduled to reach Omaha at 8:20 o'clock in the evening. As soon as the train gets into the city the city hall doors and all entrances to the stand will be closed and no one not in place can secure admission to the stand until the presidential party is seated. This rule will be strictly enforced.

Promptly at 6 o'clock the several hundred knights who will man the floats of the pageant to pass before the presidential party will assemble at the Castle. A royal edict to this effect has been issued and obedience to it is enjoined on all. Though President McKinley may not arrive here before 10 o'clock the parade will be prepared at an earlier hour, ready to start as soon as he takes his place on the reviewing stand. The parade will include the forty floats used in both the Ak-Sar-Ben and the grand electrical parades of last week, and should prove to be the most brilliant pageant ever seen in the west.

On Wednesday morning the president will be escorted from the Omaha club to the Transmississippi Exposition by the Board of Governors, mounted. On the exposition grounds 150 soldiers of the Twenty-second infantry, U. S. A., from Fort Crook and under the command of Major Van Horn, and 500 soldiers of the Second Nebraska infantry, U. S. V., under Colonel Bills, will act as the military escort to the president.

The Omaha club, which will be the home of the presidential party during its stay, has been thoroughly renovated and beautifully decorated in honor of the most distinguished guest. The suite of rooms assigned the president is on the first floor, and the rooms of the other representatives of the government army and navy will be on the upper floors. In the president's room a desk telephone set was yesterday arranged by the Nebraska Telephone company and communication with Washington satisfactorily tested over the wires of the American Telegraph and Telephone company.

Plans for the Reception.

The full plans and arrangements for the reception tonight of President McKinley and the distinguished visitors who accompany him have been completed. According to the program laid out the visitors will have only to place themselves in the hands of the members of the reception committee to have anything in Omaha that Omaha has to give and to see everything that is to be seen; if they want anything that they do not see they have simply to make a request for it and it will be forthcoming.

The reception committee is to meet at the Omaha club rooms at 8 o'clock tonight, where they will take carriages and drive to the depot to meet the visitors. Each member of the committee and his wife has some particular guest to look after. The member must locate this guest and escort him or her to his carriage. The procession will be formed as soon as all are seated in the carriages and will move under escort north on Tenth to Farnam and west on Farnam to Eighteenth street. The party will alight at the west entrance of the city hall and take seats on the platform to review the Ak-Sar-Ben parade. At the conclusion of the parade the visitors will be escorted againt to their carriages, will be taken to the hotels to which they are assigned and given rooms which have been engaged for them.

At 9:30 o'clock tomorrow morning the members of the reception committee will call at the hotels, each for his own particular guest. The carriages will be gathered at the Omaha club, where a parade again under a military escort, will be formed and will proceed to the exposition grounds. The line will start at 10 o'clock. The parade will conclude at the band stand on the Grand Plaza and after the guests are seated the exercises of the day will commence.

Lunch for the Women.

At the conclusion of the exercises the women of the reception committee will take the carriages to the band stand and return the women of the visiting party to the Omaha club, where lunch will be served. The male members of the party will be taken to the North cafe, west of the band stand, where they will be served with luncheon. After luncheon at 2:30 they will be escorted through the exhibit buildings on the north side of the grand court to the Government building. Under the escort of the officers of the building the party will go to the west entrance and there view the exhibition of the Life Saving Sservice​ corps. At its conclusion the party will take a position in the building, where the president will hold a short hand-shaking reception. When that is finished the visitors will be escorted through the buildings on the south side of the grand court to the women's reception room in the Mines and Mining building.

In the meantime the women will be expected to have finished their luncheon at the Omaha club and will be returned to the exposition grounds and will be escorted to the reception room in the Mines and Mining building. It is expected that they will be joined by their masculine companions at 3:30 o'clock. The entire party will then proceed over the Sherman avenue viaduct to the Grand Plaza, where carriages will again be taken and will proceed to the grounds of the Indian congress. Seats will be reserved for them there and they will witness the sham battle. After the battle the party will be returned to the north cafe, stopping a few minutes at the cattle exhibit. The committee and guests will dine at the cafe at 6 o'clock. After dinner they will be given a ride around the lagoon and will afterward take carriages on the Grand Plaza for the fireworks. After the fireworks the guests will be entertained according to their wishes and later returned to their hotels.

The entertainment will not conclude with Wednesday. If any of the visitors remain longer in the city they will be provided accommodations and means to enjoy themselves as they wish.

 
Bee

WELCOME TO WOMEN'S CLUBS

Fifth Annual Convention of Nebraska Federation in Session.

SETTLES DOWN TO WORK PROMPTLY

Reports of Officers Received and the Program of Exercises for the Day Taken Up—Early Evening Session.

A large and appreciative audience attended the opening session of the General Federation of Women's club at the First Congregational church this morning. The meeting is under the auspices of the Nebraska Federation of Women's clubs, of which Mrs. Stoutenborough of Plattsmouth is president. Mrs. Lowe of Georgia, the president and the other officers, Mrs. Platt of Colorado, vice president; Mrs. Moore of Missouri, treasurer; Mrs. Barnes of Kentucky, auditor, and Mrs. Fox of Michigan and Mrs. Kendrick, the secretaries of the general federation, are present at this the Fifth annual convention of the Nebraska Federation.

Mrs. Stoutenborough presided. The session was formally opened with prayer by Rev. Mary G. Andrews of this city. Rev. Mrs. Andrews invoked divine blessing on all women and their clubs and open woman's progress over all the world.

Mrs. A. N. Ferguson, vice president of the Omaha Woman's club gave greeting and a cordial welcome to the visiting club women. In welcoming them Mrs. Ferguson said that any gathering of clubmen or women was always attended by some good. So these sessions of today could not but be of value.

Mrs. Brindley, president of the Columbus Woman's club, in response thanked the Omaha women for their kindness and hospitality. Twenty-eight years ago Mrs. Brindley crossed from Council Bluffs to Omaha in a ferryboat. In striking terms she depicted the growth of the city. In glowing terms the exposition was praised, for Mrs. Brindley said that it was not only a source of pride and satisfaction to the people of Omaha, but to the people of Nebraska, and thus to all the people of the transmississippi section.

The fact that men gave so little of their time to intellectual culture while women gave so much Mrs. Brindley lamented and urged that the women endeavor to make it possible for men to secure more leisure from their business. With a repetition of thanks and appreciation for the courtesies extended to the visiting club women Mrs. Brindley closed her address.

Commence Business Session.

Business routine was then taken up. Mrs. Draper Smith, the secretary, then read the minutes of the fourth annual session of the Nebraska Federation of Women's Clubs, held at Beatrice last year, which were approved and accepted by the delegates. Following this came the report of the committee on credentials and the roll call of delegates. The roll call disclosed that delegates were present from thirty-nine clubs.

The report of the secretary showed that there were seventy-five clubs in the State Federation. The reports of the treasurer, Mrs. Nichols, and the auditor, Mrs. Larsh, were then read and accepted.

The routine work was interrupted for a few moments to listen to two delightful songs by Mrs. J. H. Metcalf. After this refreshing respite, two minute reports of the condition and work of the different clubs were given, all of which offered great satisfaction to the assembled club women.

This afternoon the program will be:

2:30 p. m.—Recommended work; "Town and Village Improvement," Mrs. Nellie Richardson, Lincoln, Neb.; "Art," Mrs. Ida L. Snyder, Plattsmouth, Neb.; "Rest Rooms," Mrs. Helen Harrison, York, Neb.; music, "Angelus," Chaminade, Mrs. D. A. Campbell and Miss Maude Oakley; short addresses; "University Extension," Mrs. H. H. Wilson, Lincoln, Neb.; "District Federation," Mrs. Apperson, Tecumseh, Neb.; unfinished business; music, "An Rendi Me," 1686, Rasse, Mrs. D. A. Campbell; reports of committees; election of officers; new business.

To give the club members an opportunity to see the parade in honor of President McKinley, tonight, the evening session will begin promptly at 7:30 o'clock, ending at 9 o'clock. All the delegates are urgently requested to be in their seats punctually. The following papers and music will end the fifth annual convention of the Nebraska Federation of Women's Clubs:

8 p. m.—Music, (a) "In Woodland Path" (in Mss), Roy L. Smith; (b) "Mine Own Little Sweetheart" (in Mss), Mr. Dan H. Wheeler, jr.; address, Mrs. Rebecca D. Lowe, Atlanta, Ga., president General Federation [?] the General Federation of Women's Clubs, music, aria, "My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice," from Samson and Delilah, Saint Saens, Miss Lillian Deland Terry; annual address, Mrs. Belle Stoutenborough, Plattsmouth, Neb., president Nebraska Federation Women's Clubs.

FREE LODGINGS FOR VISITORS

County Commissioners and Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben Do What They Can to Relieve Pressure for Shelter.

The county commissioner have decided to throw open the court house for the accommodation free of charge of those who will be unable to secure places to sleep tonight, and will do the best they can to make their visitors comfortable. The court rooms will be opened and those who wish may occupy the benches. In addition to this the county has about 100 cots and mattresses which the jurors use when court is in session, and these will be turned over to the public. An extra force of janitors has been appointed for the time to look after the wants of those who have been unable to secure lodgings in the city. There will be no charge for any of this service.

The board of governors of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben have also decided to open the castle free of charge for the accommodation of those who are unable to find lodgings. There will be no beds or bunks, there, but the people who desire to take shelter there will be welcome. Policemen have been instructed to guide strangers to the castle, which is the old Coliseum building on North Twentieth street.

COMES SLOWLY ACROSS IOWA

President's Train Proceeds at His Will Through the Hawkeye State.

WILL REACH OMAHA AFTER NINE O'CLOCK

Northwestern People Give the Distinguished Travelers Right-of-Way and Handle the Trains Just as the President Likes.

The special train of the Chicago & Northwestern bearing President McKinley left Chicago at 7:45 o'clock this morning, passed Clinton, Ia., 138 miles from Chicago, at 11:20 o'clock, and is due to arrive at the Omaha union depot at 9 o'clock tonight.

On President McKinley's train is the general superintendent of the Northwestern, and on the other train the assistant general superintendent is riding. All stops are made at the will of the president, who gives instructions when, and how long the stops shall be made. The run up to date has been very pleasant, and great crowds have been out at every station to greet the head of the nation.

The train is making a fair run. No effort at record-breaking is being made. Great precautions are being taken for the safety of the train, all the switches being spiked with other trains off the main line an hour within the president's train. Track-walkers have carefully inspected the entire line and fifty feet from every switch is stationed a switchman to signal the engineer.

President McKinley's train is coming across Iowa in advance of General Miles' train, the preliminary arrangement having been reversed. This manner of handling the trains will be continued through to Omaha, so the president will reach here in advance of the military party. The train will stop at Council Bluffs at the Broadway depot to allow the Omaha committee to get on board.

Good Time with Second Special.

CLINTON, Ia., Oct. 11.—(Special Telegram.)—The army and navy special has been making exceptional speed to overtake the president's train which left Chicago on schedule time. Owing to a wreck on the Cambridge division of the Baltimore & Ohio, a change had to be made to the Camden & Marietta road, compelling the train to make a long detour to Newark, getting into Chicago two hours late. The run from Chicago, however, has been on schedule time and will be in Omaha at 9:30.

" Bee

PLAN FOR POLICE PROTECTION

Arrangements Made by Chief White for the Care of the Presidential Party During Its Visit.

Every member of the police department and all the exposition guards available will be used in handling the big crowds expected during the parade tonight. Orders have been issued by Chief of Police White for the assembly at headquarters of the entire department at 7 o'clock.

The exposition guards detailed for duty with the police will meet at the same place and time. At that hour a detail of mounted officers under command of Sergeant Iler will be assigned to duty at the entrance of the Tenth street depot. Sergeant Whalen and ten men will be assigned to duty on the depot platform and will clear the crowds in advance of the presidential party and escort it to its carriages. Iler's and Whalen's commands will unite on the viaduct and act as escort to the presidential carriage on its way to the reviewing stand in front of the city hall. The rest of the force will be distributed about the down town streets. At each of the most prominent crossings four officers will be stationed. The exposition guards will be distributed in the same manner. A guard of twelve officers will be placed about the building of the Omaha club and this guard will be maintained during the stay of the president in the city. About the reviewing stand a strong cordon of police and detectives will be drawn.

Wherever the presidential party goes it will be guarded by officers in plain clothing.

RAILROADS TO CLOSE ONE DAY

Everything but Ticket Officers Will Be Shut Down During the President's Visit Here.

"You may say that the railroads hope to see an attendance of 100,000 at the exposition to greet President McKinley on Wednesday, and will help swell the crowd by giving their employes a holiday," remarked an executive officer of one of the Omaha lines to a Bee reporter this morning.

The movement to set apart President's day for a railroad holiday was inaugurated by General Manager Holdrege of the B. & M., Dickinson of the Union Pacific and Bidwell of the Elkhorn early this morning. The officers of the other lines were consulted at once, and all of the railway officials in charge quickly fell in with the idea. Before noon a general agreement had been reached for a whole day's vacation, and as the bulletins were posted in the different headquarters they were received with enthusiasm by the hundreds of clerks there. It will be the first occasion during the exposition that the railroad employes have enjoyed an entire day off. On Railroad day they were given only a half day.

The closing order applies to the general headquarters here, the general offices and the local freight houses. The city ticket offices and the depot ticket offices will necessarily be kept open on account of the enormous number of passengers to be looked after.

The officials of the operating departments of the Omaha terminal lines are glad that the local freight houses are going to be closed all day tomorrow as it will save a lot of switching of freight cars and give more room in the railroad yards for the handling of passenger trains. Said one of them: "There is going to be a big lot of extra and special trains in all of the yards tomorrow. We can handle them with greater safety and in quicker time now that we know there will be but little switching of freight cars. As the local freight houses will be closed there will not need to be much switching and we'll have most of the room in the yards for our passenger trains."

 

COMING TO PEACE JUBILEE

People by the Thousands Flock Into the Exposition City.

EVERY RAILROAD RUNS SPECIAL TRAINS

Union Depot is Packed with Visitors Who Arrive Faster Than They Can Be Distributed by the Street Cars.

The vanguard of the army of Peace Jubilee week visitors put in appearance this morning. It came from all localities of the Transmississippi region, but mainly from Iowa and Nebraska, and the indications are that before the arrival of the last train tomorrow night all existing records for travel over the railroads will be smashed to smithereens.

Without a single exception a greater number of people were brought into the city by each of the railroads than were ever carried before during a morning and the same assertion holds good with regard to afternoon, for special trains are scheduled to arrive over all the roads in numbers that are unprecedented. All of the regular trains are carrying extra cars, increasing their size to fourteen or fifteen coaches, being drawn by a pair of locomotives instead of one. The specials vary in length from nine to thirteen cars.

At the Webster street station, in addition to the usual number of regular morning trains, there were four specials—two from Missouri, one from Minnesota, and one from Iowa. The station was crowded all morning, but the visitors experienced little or no difficulty in securing transportation to the parts of the city they wished to reach.

At the big station by the viaduct it was different. Trains followed one another into the depots at such short intervails​, unloading one lot of passengers on to the platforms before the preceeding​ crowds had gotten away, that it became impossible for those in charge to handle the throngs and every avenue of exit became congested, remaining that way most of the morning. To add to the confusion, the street car service was wholly inadequate to accommodate the visitors, and all morning the viaduct was packed with people who were unable to find places on the street cars and get away. Several hundred preferred to walk and carry luggage than to remain home for hours waiting a chance to ride on cars, and as a consequence streets leading to hotel and boarding house districts were crowded by travelers for many hours.

The regular trains into the Union and Burlington stations arrived in sections numbering from two to four, instead of one as is usually the case. In addition to these, there were two specials from Marion, over the Milwaukee; two from Cedar Rapids, over the Northwestern; two from Des Moines, over the Northwestern and Rock Island; three from Missouri, and several more from the west. Two big excursion trains from Holdrege and Beatrice are scheduled to arrive this afternoon at 3 o'clock.

Missourians Still Coming.

The Missourians did not cease coming to the exposition on the conclusions of their state celebration here. Over 5,000 more visitors wearing the up-to-date motto "Show Me" arrived here this morning, and as many more are said to be on the way to Omaha to greet President McKinley.

During the morning the Missouri Pacific delivered 2,685 Missourians to the exposition authorities. They came on six trains, whereas the company's time card provides for only half that number of trains. Train No. 1 came in three sections, the first arriving with 650 passengers at 9.25 a. m., over three hours late on account of the heavy travel. Train No. 9 drew in with two sections bearing 300 and 350 persons respectively. The Auburn local train had all of its seats taken and its aisles and platforms crowded when it reached Avoca, so the engineer was instructed to pull it through to Omaha without a stop. This he did, though he had many mean things said about him by the crowds left standing at country stations.

The Rock Island, like all other roads, had a busy morning. Its specialty was in handling Kansans. Its trains from the east and from Colorado and Nebraska points were well filled, but the denizens of the Sunflower state had a great big majority. This was because the Rock Island broke away from the other roads and carried round trip rates of $2, $2.50 and $3 into territory from which the regular one-way fare to Omaha ranges from $6 to $7. A special train from Phillipsburg, Kan., will arrive at 4 p. m., and will be followed by four heavy sections of the regular afternoon train from the west, arriving between 4 and 5 o'clock. The trains are running ten minutes apart on the block system.

Modoc Club Coming.

About 2,600 Kansans are aboard of these trains under the guidance of Hon. Thomas Anderson of Topeka, ex-postmaster of that city and a Grand Army leader. He has with him the famous Modoc club of the Kansas capital, composed of twenty-five well-trained singers. His chief clerk, George W. Bainter, is with him.

All of the large supply of passenger coaches sent west last week by the Union Pacific are returning to Omaha with their seats crowded and their aisles jammed. They will be sent out to points in Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado again tonight, no matter whether anyone rides in them or not, so that they will be ready to bring more visitors to the Peace Jubilee on Wednesday and Thursday.

Here's how some of the cars came in on the "Overland Route" today: Train No. 4 in two sections, the first of sixteen cars and the second of twelve cars; train No. 8 with eleven cars; train No. 42 with thirteen cars. That complets​ the morning grist of arrivals on President Burt's road, while the afternoon express is already reported to be in three sections, with thirty-five cars, and as traffic this way increases more cars are put in service and additional selections made up.

ALL OMAHA IS READY

And Visiting Thousands Wait the Coming of President McKinley Tonight.

Exposition Officials Lay Aside All Other Business to Prepare for the Event.

Plans Made to Take Care of the Big Crowds Along Line of March and at Congested Points.

Trip to the City Hall, Domicile at the Omaha Club and the Program Wednesday.

Will Arrive "About 8 O'Clock"---Sees the Exposition Next Day and Attends the Special Attractions.

Preparations for the reception of the president of the United States and the other distinguished guests who will constitute his party temporarily sidetracked other business in exposition official circles yesterday. President Wattles was well-nigh buried in the abstraction of a thousand and one details.

It has been accepted as a predestined fact that tonight will see the biggest crowd that ever assembled on the streets of Omaha, and much thought has been given to its proper handling as well as to the details more closely applying to the reception of the presidential party. Plans have been formulated to relieve about 100 of the exposition guards for duty down town, to assist the police in keeping the streets clear and preventing any annoying interruption of the parade.

Much speculation has been indulged in as to how the crowd will be managed, as the line of march is so short that the people will be massed more densely than at any of the previous parades, and there will be twice as many of them. The presidential party and escort will pass up Tenth street from the depot to Farnam, thence to the city hall reviewing stand, but the parade proper, consisting of the combined lines of last Tuesday and Thursday nights, will only pass up Farnam from Tenth to Eighteenth streets.

The most definite information that can be secured at railroad headquarters as to the time of arrival of the presidential train is that it will be "about 8 o'clock." It is expected that the party will reach the reviewing stand shortly before 9 o'clock.

Immediately following the parade the president will be escorted to the Omaha club, where he will remain until 10 o'clock tomorrow morning, when he will be escorted to the exposition grounds. The addresses of the day will be delivered at the band stand on the grand plaza, providing the weather is suitable, otherwise they will occur at the Auditorium. Following the exercises the party will lunch at the Markel cafe at 1 o'clock, and then proceed through the buildings on the north side of the grand court to the Government building.

Returning through the buildings on the south side of the court, the ladies of the party will be met at the rooms of the entertainment bureau in the Mines and Mining building after lunch down town at the club, and all will take carriages and visit the Indian encampment to witness the sham battle, returning through the Midway.

The party will be banqueted at the Markel cafe at 6 o'clock, and, after listening to the Innes band concert, will drive to the north tract to see the fireworks. Immediately following the fireworks the party will leave the grounds and be driven to their quarters at the club, where they will remain until the following morning, when the special train leaves for Washington via St. Louis and Chicago.

While the exposition officials will nominally have charge of the club house during the president's stay, the building will be in direct charge of Major W. C. Ward, president of the government board, who will see that the proper regulations are observed there to maintain such privacy as President McKinley may desire.

Arrangements announced at the city hall reviewing stand for the parade tonight are that 200 most desirably located seats in the front tier will be set aside for the presidential party. In the rear will be located the city officials and employes. All persons holding tickets for these seats must be in their seats before 8:20, or they will then be shut out entirely till after the presidential party is all seated, and may happen to get left altogether in the jam.

M'KINLEY LEAVES CANTON.

Boards Special Train for Omaha and Will Arrive on Time.

Canton, O., Oct. 10.—President McKinley boarded the Omaha special at 9:30 tonight and will reach Chicago at 7 o'clock tomorrow morning, leaving an hour later on the Northwestern road. Mrs. McKinley remained in Canton, but will join the president at Chicago in time for the peace jubilee.

The members of the party on the Pennsylvania special are the president, Secretary Bliss, Secretary Wilson, Assistant Secretary of War Meiklejohn, Secretary John Addison Porter and Assistant Secretary John B. Cortelyou. Postmaster General Smith and Secretary Gage are expected to join the party at Omaha. Governor Shaw of Iowa and his staff will take the train at Clinton, Ia., in order to be present at the exposition on Wednesday, President's day.

His Reception at St. Louis.

St. Louis,Mo., Oct. 10.—Arrangements for the reception of President McKinley in St. Louis have nearly been completed. It has been decided to abandon the proposed visit to Jefferson barracks and provide a drive about the city instead. The Twelfth regiment, Capron's battery, and battery A, will escort the president from union station to the Southern hotel, where a general reception will be held from 11 o'clock till noon. Then a reception will be held at the merchants' exchange until 12:30 o'clock. After luncheon the afternoon will be spent in driving about the city and at night a reception will be held at the exposition, where Governor Stephens and others will speak.

TO RECEIVE THE PARTY.

Committees to Greet the President at the Station.

The train of President McKinley will arrive at the union depot about 8 o'clock tonight.

Pulling in before it will be the train bearing General Miles and the whole party, comprising:

Army and Navy and Government Officials—Major General Miles, Colonel Francis Micheler, Colonel William M. Black, Colonel Samuel Reber, Captain H. H. Whitney, secretary; Mrs. Miles, Major General W. R. Shafter, two aides and valet, Major General Joseph Wheeler, the Misses Wheeler, Brigadier General A. W. Greely, chief signal officer; Mrs. Greely, Brigadier General C. F. Humphrey, Mrs. Humphrey, Miss Humphrey, Mrs. Mary Howard, Commodore J. W. Philip, U. S. N.; Captain Arthur Paget, naval attache, British embassy; Dr. R. W. Baker, U. S. A.; Mrs. Baker, Mrs. J. V. Creighton, Hon. J. M. Thurston, United States senator; Hon. J. D. Yeomans, interstate commerce commission; Prof. W. L. Moore, chief weather bureau; Mrs. Moore, Dr. W. T. Harris, commissioner of education; Mrs. Harris, General James A. Sexton, commander-in-chief Grand Army of the Republic; G. R. Butlin, secretary; A. J. Leonard, secretary; George Scott, messenger.

Diplomatic Corps—Mr. Wu Ting Fang, Chinese minister; Mrs. Wu Ting Fang, maid; Master Wu Cho Chu, Mr. Chow Tsz Chi, Mr. Hwang Chung Hull, Mr. Li Kwang Hang, secretaries; the minister's steward; Mr. Chin Pom Ye, Corean minister plenipotentiary; Mrs. Chin Pom Ye, Master We Chong Ye, Mr. Tam E. Ye, secretary; Mr. Henry Guillaume, Gonzolo de Quesada, charge d'affaires Cuban junta; Mrs. Quesada, Brazilian and Argentina ministers.

Representatives of the Press—George Grantham Bain, Harper's Weekly; Frederick Benzinger, Chicago Times-Herald; W. E. Curtis, Chicago Record; Louis Garthe, Baltimore American; C. A. Hamilton, Sioux City Journal; James Henry, Philadelphia Press; Raymond Patterson, Chicago Tribune; Frank Richardson, Baltimore Sun; George W. Rouser, New York Herald; John S. Shriver, New York Mail and Express; E. C. Snyder, Omaha Bee; Howard N. Thompson, Associated Press; Charles S. Albert, New York World.

For this party carriages will be in waiting at the depot, and the carriages will wait until the arrival of the presidential train, a few minutes later.

The committee that will receive the president at the station comprises:

For the Exposition—President Wattles and Mrs. Wattles, Vice President and Mrs. Saunders, Treasurer Herman Kountze, Secretary and Mrs. Wakefield, General Counsel Montgomery and Mrs. Montgomery and General Manager Clarkson and Mrs. Clarkson.

 

For the Executive Committee—Z. T. and Mrs. Lindsey, E. Rosewater and Mrs. Rosewater, F. P. Kirkendall and Mrs. Kirkendall, E. E. Bruce and Mrs. Bruce, A. L. Reed and Mrs. Reed, W. N. Babcock and Mrs. Babcock.

For the Government at the Exposition—Major H. C. Ward and Mrs. Ward, J. R. Dunn and Mrs. Dunn.

For the Invitation Committee—Senator Thurston, Senator Allen and Mrs. Allen, Congressman Mercer and Mrs. Mercer, John L. Webster and Mrs. Webster, General Cowin and Mrs. Cowin, General Mandeson and Mrs. Manderson, John C. Wharton and Mrs. Wharton.

For the Bureau of Ententainment​—Mesdames Clement Chase, H. T. Clarke, W. A. Redick, G. M. Hitchcock, J. E. Summers, jr., Joslyn and Lyman.

In the president's party, besides the president of the United States of America, will be Secretaries Gage, Smith, Wilson, Bliss and their wives, Secretaries Gage and Smith coming back to the city to join the president.

At Tenth and Farnam streets the carriage procession will be met by the board of governors of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben, and the guests will be escorted up Farnam street in the lead of the main floats of the parade of Tuesday and Thursday nights. From the platform in front of the city hall the president will review the parade.

The president and party will afterward be escorted to the Omaha club rooms, and General Miles and party to the Paxton hotel and to the Millard hotel.

PREPARATIONS AT THE CLUB.

Elegant Apartments Provided for President and Cabinet Officers.

All day yesterday the Omaha club was the scene of unusual animation and activity. Preparing for the reception of the presidential party this evening occupied the efforts of everybody from the officers of the club down to the porters. But they have done their work thoroughly and artistically, and this morning the beautiful house is in readiness for the entrance and occupancy of the distinguished guests.

As a matter of greater convenience the ladies' department on the ground floor has been elaborately fitted up for the president and Mrs. McKinley, if she comes. This suite includes the cafe, reception and toilet room, and they have been attractively appointed with brass beds, mahogany dressers, chiffoniers and dressing tables. Heavy cheval glasses adorn the walls. The big doors are hung with rich tapestry, while magnificent lace curtains drape the east windows. Choice plants, vines and flowers are banked everyhere​, and the apartments are really exquisite in their artistic finish.

FOR THE CABINET MEMBERS.

On the second floor four private dining rooms have been metamorphosed into sumptuous sleeping apartments, with their handsome new furniture and other appointments. Huge palms and spreading ferns are to be seen in profusion here also. These rooms are for the cabinet officers. Ten additional rooms on the third floor have also been elegantly fitted up for the accommodation of other notable visitors.

The club house presents a most attractive appearance throughout interiorally with its labyrinths of tropical verdure, and on the outside huge silk flags alone serve as adornment. A canopied walk reaches from the broad main entrance on Douglas street to the curbing.

CAN CALL UP WHITE HOUSE.

The Nebraska Telephone company has installed a handsome telephone cabinet and special set of instruments in the anteroom to the room in the Omaha club to be occupied by President McKinley. An attendant will be placed in charge of these instruments, and the president will be afforded every facility for talking over the lines of the Nebraska company and the lines of the American Telegraph and Telephone company, thus covering every point in the country. By this means the president will be enabled to hold conferences with his office in the White house or with any other point.

The Northwestern city ticket office will today display in its window bulletins announcing the progress of the train bearing the president and his party and of the train bearing General Miles and his party. The latter train will arrive first, so that the occupants may be in their carriages when the presidential party arrives. This is to avoid delay.

Assistant General Superintendent W. A. Gardner will be on the president's train, and General Passenger Agent W. B. Kniskern on General Miles' train.

TONIGHT'S PROGRAM.

There is a general anxiety on the part of the public to know something about the line of march of tonight when the president arrives. It will be very simple, beginning at Tenth and Farnam, and up Farnam to Eighteenth street.

The board of governors of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben and the South Omaha Riding club will meet the presidential party at the Union Pacific depot this evening and escort them up Tenth to Farnam, thence up Farnam to the reviewing platform in front of the city hall.

While the distinguished guests are being seated there the escort will return to Tenth and Farnam and lead the parade up the main thoroughfare to Eighteenth street.

After the parade the president and party will be escorted to the Omaha club by the board of governors.

Wednesday morning the party will be conducted to the exposition grounds, where it will be met at the grand stand on the plaza by the exposition board of directors.

General Green Will Be Here.

Among the distinguished men to be in the city this evening, accompanying the presidential part, is General F. V. Green. General Green, it will be remembered, passed through the city a few weeks ago, en route to Washington from the Philippines, having been summoned there to carry the reports and important documents from Manila to the war department. At Manila he was in command of one wing in the battle, full particulars of which were printed in the World-Herald at the time he passed through the city. The Nebraska troops were in General Green's command. This being true, he is especially interested in Omaha and Nebraska. Of the many notables to form the presidential party none will receive a warmer welcome than will General Green. He is president of the Barber Asphalt company and will retire from the army soon to resume his duties at the head of that company. While in the city he will be at the Millard.

EXPOSITION PROGRAM.

Tuesday, October 11.

PEACE JUBILEE WEEK.
GOVERNORS' DAY.
NEW MEXICO DAY.
DAIRY DAY.
PEORIA, ILL., DAY.
LIVE STOCK SHOW IN PROGRESS.
INDIAN CONGRESS IN PROGRESS.

9 a. m.—Live stock display in live stock pavilion.

10 a. m.—Omaha Concert band at Auditorium.

11 a. m.—Governors' day exercises at Auditorium:

Music
InvocationRev. S. Wright Butler
WelcomeG. W. WattlesPresident of Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.
AddressHon. Silas A. HolcombGovernor of State of Nebraska.
AddressHon. Alva AdamsGovernor of State of Colorado.
Music
AddressHon. D. M. CloughGovernor of State of Minnesota.
AddressHon. C. M. BarnesGovernor of Oklahoma.
Music

11:30 a. m.—Model of battleship Illinois dry docked at Government building.

12 m.—Fire horses hitched by electricity.

2 p. m.—New Mexico day exercises at Mines and Mining building.

2 p. m.—Omaha Concert band in promenade concert on Main Court.

3 p. m.—Innes band at Auditorium:

Overture—"Le Domino Noir"Auber
Euphonium Solo—"Golden Rod" (Concert polka)EarlPerfetto.
Three Dances From "Henry VIII."—(a) Morris Dance; (b) Shepherd's Idyll; (c) Torch DanceGerman
Scenes from "The Bohemian Girl"Balfe
"At a Georgia Camp Meeting," (Descriptive fantasia)Mills
Overture—"Stradella"Flotow
(a) "Cupid's Story," (Intermezzo)Innes
(b) "Maypole Dance"Tobani
"The Campbells Are Coming," (Scotch fantasia No. 2)Mackey
Trombone Solo—"Esmeralda"LeveyInnes.
"Les Voltigeurs" (Pas Redoubles)Gabriel Pares

3 p. m.—United States life saving service exhibition at west end of lagoon.

4 p. m.—Organ recital at Auditorium by T. J. Kelley:

March—"Lohengrin"Wagner
TraumereiSchumann
Gavotte—"Mignon"Thomas
Fanfare—"Militaire"Lemmeas
RequestFranz
Finale—"Star Spangled Banner"

4 p. m.—Sham battle on Indian congress grounds.

5 p. m.—Santiago war balloon ascension (if not too windy.)

5 p. m.—Omaha Concert band at Government building:

March—"Stars and Stripes Forever"Sousa
Overture—"Hungarian"Keler Bela
Song—"Spring"Mendelssohn
Waltz—"Wine, Wife and Song"Strauss
Fantasia—"Rienzi"Wagner
Patrol—"American"
Selection—"Pleasant Evening"Beyer
Finale—"Return of the Troops"Eilenberg

7 p. m.—Innes' band in third grand jubilee concert on Ggand​ Plaza:

Overture—"Fest"Lassen
(a) "An die Musik" (Romanza)Schubert
(b) "Love is King" (Two step march)Innes
"Invitation to the Dance"Weber"Transcription by Weingarten. New.)
"The Anvil Chorus" and other scenes from "Il Trovatore"VerdiIntroducing the Exposition chorus, the flaming anvils, solos by Messrs. Levi (clarionet), Zimmerman (trombone); Perfetto, (euphonium;) Kenney, (cornet,) and the costumed corps of musical blacksmiths.
Overture—"Masaniello"Auber
"Vesper Hymn" (Unaccompanied chorus)Exposition chorus, under direction of Mr. Thomas J. Kelly.
"England to America" (International fantasia)BaetensConcluding with an original transcription of the interwoven representatives melodies, "America," "St. Patrick's Day," "Tullochgorum" and "Rule Britania," and introducing Innes' battery of electric artillery.
"The Star Spangled Banner"Introducing the Exposition chorus and Innes' battery of electric cannons, the accompanying fireworks spectacle being by the Due Fireworks company.

9 p. m.—Special jubilee fireworks on the north tract.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12.

President's Day—11 a. m.—Exercises from band stand on grand plaza. Addresses by His Excellency William McKinley, president of the U. S. Chorus and band music. Lunch to distinguished guests. Lunch to Mrs. McKinley at Omaha club. Reception at Government building. Military and spectacular parade. Sham battle by Indian tribes and spectacular fireworks in afternoon and evening.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13.

Army and Navy Day—Exercises in Auditorium at 11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Addresses by Major General Nelson A. Miles, John D. Long, secretary of the navy; General Russell A. Alger, secretary of war; General Joseph Wheeler and other distinguished officers of the army and navy, officers of the Grand Army of the Republic and officers of the Confederate Veterans' association. Lunch to prominent guests. Military parades. Ascension of war balloons. Sham battle of Indian tribes and spectacular fireworks in afternoon and evening.

 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14.

Civil Government Day—11 a. m.—Exercises in Auditorium. Addresses by members of the president's cabinet, representatives of the supreme court, senators and congressmen and other civil officers. Lunch to distinguished guests. War balloon ascension. Illustration of life saving service and spectacular fireworks in afternoon and evening.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15.

Children's Jubilee Day—11 a. m.—Grand patriotic chorus on grand plaza. Music by Innes band. Concert in Auditorium. Spectacular concert on plaza and spectacular fireworks in afternoon and evening.

RECORD BREAKING AT ALL POINTS.

Peace Week Opens With Great Influx of Visitors to Exposition.

Mayors' Day Exercisee​--Missouri Day at the Apartments in Agricultural Building--Features of Monday.

The most prominent visitors on the grounds Monday were several thousand badged excursionists from Missouri, the members of the Indiana Press association and the mayors of a number of Omaha's sister cities.

"There are 5,000 Missouri people on the grounds this minute," said President Sterrett of the Missouri commission, before 10 o'clock, "and I think that my guess that there would be 10,000 here today is not too sanguine."

Secretary M. V. Carroll of the commission came in yesterday from Jefferson City and he said there were 1,000 on his train. Commissioner Hedgpeth of Atchison county arrived yesterday and says that 1,000 were on his train. George E. Reynolds, one of the St. Louis commissioners, also got in early and reported that a big crowd was coming a few hours later from the Missouri metropolis. Perhaps 2,000 excursionists from Missouri reached the city yesterday.

MAYORS.

The mayors were here because it was also mayors' day.

Mayors' day exercises were at the Auditorium at 11 o'clock. For an hour before they began a large audience had enjoyed the regular morning concert by the Innes band, which, when the visiting mayors had been escorted to the platform by the exposition management and members of the directory, playing a patriotic meddly​, all standing.

President Wattles said that these exercises were to formally open the series of events celebrating Peace Jubilee week.

Prayer was offered by Rev. T. J. Mackay, rector of All Saints.

The first address was by Mayor Moores of Omaha, who proposed the fitness of a representation of the municipalities at this important time, because the good government of cities was essential to the welfare and the prosperity of the country. He discussed the desirability of purity and integrity in the conduct of city affairs. He bade a formal welcome to the visiting mayors and assured them that if they desired to study the methods of administration every facility would be offered.

He was followed by Mayor George T. Baker of Davenport, who begun by extolling the exposition as an educator not only of the American but of foreign peoples. He was gratified that the great and grand enterprise had been so signal a success in every way. He returned thanks for the opportunity then given to him and the chief executives of other cities to visit the exposition.

John MacVicar, the mayor of Des Moines, made appreciative reference to the recent achievements of the army and navy which had given a new luster to American citizenship and given a new exemplification of valor. His theme, he said, would be "The Man Who Wanted to Come Home." While he had the greatest admiration for the heroes who had by acts won distinction, but he had an admiration no less for the boys who having enlisted had no opportunity to do further service. He held that red tape should not prevent the coming home of those not longer needed. All honor to the man, who, with the danger and the need gone, wanted to come home and return to the ranks of peaceful industry. His desire to do this indicated no disposition to shirk responsibility or to desert the old flag in danger. Let the man who wants to come home have his own way. Throw open the city home and the farm house to him and have his assistance in establishing self-government for the new American possessions.

The conclusion of the address was marked by cheers.

It was the last address, and another patriotic medley by the Innes band brought out the last applause of the hour.

President Wattles, to conclude the exercises, invited the visitors to the inspection of all the attractions of the exposition and announced that at 1 o'clock the mayors and their ladies would be lunched by the management and by the bureau of entertainment at the Market cafe.

MISSOURI EXERCISES.

Missouri state exercises were held at the apartments of the Missouri exhibit in the Agricultural building yesterday afternoon.

The rooms and the aisles adjacent were crowded. President Sterrett of the state commission first introduced Lieutenant Governor Bolte. He thanked the officers of the exposition and the people of the city of Omaha and the state of Nebraska for the kindness shown them on all occasions. He commended the commisisoners​ for the excellent and altogether satisfactory manner in which they had performed their duty, and then gave a description of the resources of the state.

The governor could not be present on account of sickness.

The second and the concluding address was by State Senator E. W. Major of Pike county. It was the first time, he said, that the west had had an opportunity to witness in collected form western enterprise. He declared his admiration of western push and enterprise as shown in what Omaha, Nebraska and the general west had done. He had no words too extravagant to express his appreciation of what Missouri and its people had done at the big show.

He then dwelt on the resources, the condition and the prospects of the state of Missouri. He called attention to the fact that the state had a larger available school fund than any other state in the union. He did not let the occasion pass to compliment the women of the state, and he quoted the couplet:

Whatever spurs our sons have won,
Our women have placed their armor on.

He made much pleasant boast of the promptitude with which Missouri responded to the recent call to arms, and he concluded with a general praise of the people of the state.

Dignitaries From Utah.

Judge Shurtliff, president of the Utah commission, came to town yesterday to remain ten days or longer at the exposition. He says that not many from his state are coming for peace jubilee week, but that there will be a big crowd for Utah day, October 20. Governor Heber M. Wells and staff, and most of the state officials will be present. The presidency of the Mormon church, Lorenzo Snow, George Q. Cannon and Joseph F. Smith; Franklin D. Richards, the president of the twelve apostles, and several of the apostles will also be here.

Two Regiments to Escort.

General Sumner, commander of the department of the Missouri and Colorado, arrived from Denver yesterday, accompanied by his aid, Captain Palmer.

He spent the morning conferred with the exposition authorities regarding the arrangements for the Twenty-second infantry from Fort Crook and the Second Nebraska volunteers, both of which will be on duty at the exposition all Wednesday as an escort and guard for the president. Both regiments will reach the exposition grounds Wednesday morning about 8 o'clock and will remain until the president leaves.

General Sumner offered to detail a detachment of soldiers to act as a guard about the Omaha club during the president's stay here, but the civil authorities had already made provision for guarding the chief executive's safety, and the soldiers were not required.

Cleveland Will Not Be Here.

Through a mistake it was announced in the official program of the exposition published in the World-Herald that ex-President Cleveland would be here Thursday. He will not be here.

MOVES TOWARD A HIGH MARK

Monday Swells the Exposition Admissions Nearly Thirty Thousand.

Live Stock Show Proving to Be a Great Attraction to Thousands of the Visitors.

Amphitheater Crowded With People to See the Animals Receive Their Awards--Three Hundred Prizes Already Given.

Monday's Admissions,29,033
Total Admissions1,916,401

The attendance yesterday at the exposition hit close to the 30,000 mark. For Monday it was a "top notcher," and was merely a small indicator of the way peace jubilee week will swell the total admissions well beyond 2,000,000.

Today is to be divided up among the governors, New Mexico, dairymen, stockmen and the good citizens from Peoria, Ill.

Special attention is being given by the exposition public to the movements of the live stock show, over 500 visitors standing around for hours yesterday envying the 3,000 people who filled the amphitheater because of their opportunities to view the judging then going on as the prize horses, cattle, sheep and swine of all America were trotted about the ring for inspection. About 300 awards in the various classes have been made, with hard work by judges to come daily till October 20.

Yesterday they were judging the Hereford classes in cattle, Suffolk Punch class in horses, Southdown sheep and Poland-China swine. Visitors and experts of the stock shows without exception gave lavish praise of the fine quality of the stock and its excellent condition.

The judging begins each morning at 9 o'clock, lasts till noon, and again beginning at 1:30 p. m., continues till 5 p. m., during which the general public is invited to be present, liberty being given to pass through the fifty-one big barns at any time of the day.

Catalogues descriptive of the entire show, the most complete of their kind ever published, are out, being issued by the exposition.

MUSICAL ATTRACTIONS.

Special Program for This Afternoon and Tonight.

Innes and his band took part in the formal exercises which were held in the Auditorium at 10 o'clock yesterday morning. For this reason the afternoon concert had to be abandoned, much to the regret of those who have grown accustomed to going up to the exposition in the afternoon for the purpose of hearing the famous organization. The evening concert was given as announced, and was the scene of the usual enthusiasm, which seems to be a daily accompaniment to the performances of the popular organization.

A splendid program is announced for this afternoon at 3 o'clock in the Auditorium, while tonight's jubilee concert, to be given on the grand plaza at 7 o'clock, promises to be of unusual interest. The piece de resistance will be the first production in spectacular form of Verdi's famous "Anvil Chorus." This will introduce a corps of costumed blacksmiths, Innes' battery of rapid fire electric artillery and the exposition chorus of 200 voices.

The clever bandmaster has arranged a magnificent feast for tomorrow night, which is to be attended by President McKinley, who is a great admirer of the band. Much interest is being aroused in the military spectacle, "War and Peace," which is to be given at the jubilee concert on Thursday night. General Manager Clarkson has assumed the responsibility of securing the necessary military accompaniment to the piece. This will take the shape of some 350 marching troops, which will form a prominent feature in the battle scene contained in the piece as well as in the military review which brings it to a conclusion. Superintendent Kelly has arranged for the attendance of the required auxiliary bands, drum and fife corps and other necessary musical additions.

The children's carnival, which is to be given on Saturday at 4 o'clock on the grand plaza, will introduce a chorus of 1,000 children, to each of whom the management has decided to present a handsome and unique souvenir of the occasion. Applications are coming in daily by the hundred to the bureau of music for places in the big chorus, and as the admission to the grounds for that day has been placed at 15 cents for each child, and moreover the managers of the concessions have agreed to admit children to any single show on the grounds for 5 cents, it is expected that every available place will be pre-empted long before the coming of the great day.

GERMAN DAY AT OMAHA.

Parade and Speeches Arranged By the Committee.

There was another meeting of the arrangements committee for the German day celebration at Turner hall yesterday. Delegates from twenty-five societies and lodges were present. The preparations for the festival are nearly concluded.

It will consist of a parade, with floats and bands, throughout the streets of the city, the societies all taking party in the procession. The parade will go to the exposition, and in the Auditorium there the[?]. The program for the latter will consist of a vocal and instrumental concert and speeches in German and English. As German speaker, William Rapp, editor-in-chief of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung at Chicago, has been secured.

Theodore Sinhold has been elected treasurer of the committee, while Dr. Max Adler, who is already corresponding secretary, has also been made financial secretary. W. F. Stoecker was elected marshal of the parade. The Plattdeutscher verein at Lincoln, Turner verein at Plattsmouth, Germania society at Loup City and other outside societies will come to Omaha on German day in a body and participate in the parade. The Bennington landwehr verein will come to Omaha with a fine float, drawn by six horses. The parade will start from Turner hall, which has been made headquarters, at 11 o'clock[?]

Great enthusiasm prevails in this matter and German citizens say there is no doubt whatever that German day will prove a great event and will bring many thousand people to Omaha October 18.

   

North Dakota Day.

For North Dakota day, October 17, preparations for state day exercises are proceeding famously. It is assured that a large delegation of North Dakota, citizens will be present, headed by the First regiment band of Lisbon. Colonel Lounsberry, president of the North Dakota citizens will be present, headed by the First regiment band of Lisbon. Colonel Lounsberry, president of the North Dakota commission, will arrive October 12 to make necessary arrangements, and he, with Colonel J. B. Power of Power, will participate.

Miss Ford, superintendent of the North Dakota exhibit, has received from Richland and Traill counties an unusually fine collection of vegetables, including mammoth onions, squashes, beets, etc. Miss Ford has been advised of six shipments coming from the various fairs and harvest festivals throughout the state.

For Canadian Day.

Matthew A. Hall, British vice consul, returned last evening from Canada, where he had been to enlist interest in Canadian day, October 15, at the exposition. A special car, with Clifford Sifton, minister of the interior, and L. I. Parte, minister of public work, and a number of members of their staffs, will come to the city. A large number of Canadians have preceded them to this city, coming thus early owing to low fares to Chicago growing out of the rate war with the Canadian Pacific road. Addresses and music will be the program of Canadian day. They will begin at the Auditorium at 2:30 p. m. Saturday.

Idaho Branching Out.

Idaho has taken all the space she could get in the Agricultural building, 100 feet, the fakirs have taken everything else, and yesterday installed a magnificent cereal, vegetable and fruit exhibit. Properly speaking, it is a Bingham county exhibit, arranged by Mr. O. F. Smith of Blackfoot, and is intended to exploit the resources of the Upper Snake river valley, a fertile oasis twenty-five by 125 miles, including the counties of Bingham and Fremont. The products are all from irrigation, and are rare qualities of wheat, oats, corn, three and one-half pound potatoes, cabbages, celery, beets, turnips, prunes, plums, apples and pears.

Grand Lodge K. of P.

Knights of Pythias will meet in grand lodge at Creighton hall this morning, Grand Chancellor Harry Boydston presiding. After the day's session adjournment will probably be taken to Thursday morning to give members a change to take in presidential day at the exposition. After concluding business Thursday morning the members of the grand lodge, with the visiting divisions of the uniform rank, will proceed in a body to the exposition, and at 2 p. m., at the Nebraska building, will hold Knights of Pythias day exercises.

New Mexico Today.

New Mexico day was to have been celebrated yesterday, but owing to a misunderstanding the program was not arranged. Ex-Governor L. Bradford Prince and a party of distinguished New Mexicans arrived in time to participate, but finding things as they were, arranged with the exposition management for exercises this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the New Mexico exhibit at the Mines and Mining building.

Exposition Notes.

In the Apiary building has been received a novelty from Silver Creek, Neb., a swarm of bees which had alighted on a slender limb thirty feet above the ground and at once proceeded to make honey on the limb. Enough honey of a fine quality had been made to fill a hive, and the limb was bending under the weight. It was carefully cut off and with the bees and honey now forms an exhibit in a glass case.

Sumner I. Kimball, general superintendent of the United States life saving service, who has been at the exposition since Thursday last, left for home yesterday. He was well pleased with the exposition and the work being done by the life saving crew on the lagoon, and in return received many complimentary words regarding Captain Knowles and his men.

Mrs. Governor Lord of Oregon is in the city, the guest of Mrs. O. N. Olberg of the Minnesota exhibit, 2438 Manderson street. She has been invited to be present on the occasion of the reception to Secretary of Agriculture Wilson tomorrow by the National Flax, Fiber and Ramie association and Prof. Charles Richards Dodge, expert on flax raising for the fiber. Prof. Hayes of the Minnesota agricultural college experimental station has also arrived to participate in the reception and subsequent meeting.

Commissioner Bernard of Pipestone and Commissioner and Mrs. Nind of Minneapolis and H. F. Brown of Minneapolis were guests at the Minnesota building yesterday.

The Southern Indiana Press association was given a reception last evening at the Press building at the exposition. An address of welcome was made by Mr. E. Rosewater.

Abraham Elsham, a Turkish camel driver at the Streets of All Nations, was arrested a night or two ago for being drunk and at the police station had a prodigious wad of money. The Streets of All nations had lost $400 through theft a short time before, and eyes were being kept open for the thief. Putting two and two together, the arrest of Elsham for grand larceny followed.

In order to avoid the jam at the exposition grounds Wednesday it has been provided that those who wish can secure admission tickets to the exposition from an official seller agent at the corner of Fourteenth and Farnam streets. This will be the only place down town to secure the tickets.

GREETING TO NATION'S CHIEF

Omaha and the Great West Receive and Pay Tribute to President McKinley.

Highest Officer in the United States and Distinguished Party Given a Western Welcome.

Cheers From Hundreds of Thousands Ascend as the Pageant Passes By---Ak-Sar-Ben IV. Pays Homage.

As the guest of the mighty west, the chief executive of the nation tarries within the city of Omaha. Direct from the seat of government to honor the great Trans-Mississippi exposition with his presence and to participate in the demonstrations of the national peace jubilee, the president of the United States, his cabinet and members of the foreign diplomatic corps, the most prominent officers of the army and navy, and representatives of the metropolitan press of the country last night arrived on special trains at the heart of the continent.

Grand in itself as was the occasion, magnificent to the degree of sublimity was the gorgeous spectacles witnessing the welcome of these distinguished guests to the empire west of the Mississippi. In a blaze of light and color rivaling the brilliancy of noonday, and greeted by loyal cheers from 250,000 throats, the notable party, accompanied by the reception committee and escorted by the carmine-coated board of governors of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben on horseback, moved through seas upon seas of people to the reviewing stand, where passed before them a pageant of gleaming splendor the like of which was never seen before.

From the realms of mythology, astrology and ancient fable were brought the wonders of far-off time, while with them were combined the modern marvels of electrical scenic effect on a scale never before attempted in this direction. Both the great parades of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben were rolled into one and added to, and for the space of an hour the continuous effort of a year of preparation and the outlay of tens of thousands of dollars was presented in one of the most unique and awe-inspiring spectacles ever witnessed.

It was not a manifestation of personal friendship to a partisan, but the expression of the most devoted loyalty and broadest patriotism. Republican and democrat, populist and prohibitionist, goldbug and silverite, stood side by side and cheered the passing of the head of the nation, and their homage was neither increased by partisan zeal nor tempered by partisan prejudice. It was the spantaneous​ tribute of each individual sovereign to the official head of the grand republic that each was helping to build to a greater future, and hoped to see every maintained. It was a genuine western welcome, generous, cordial and sincere, that could not be less grateful to those who received than it was a pleasure to those who gave it.

CROWDS AT THE STATION.

Cheers for the President Upon His Arrival.

For hours a great crowd of people eager for the first glimpse of the chief executive of the nation jammed the platform at the station. It was the beginning of the entertainment of the president and the triumph of the exposition.

It was expected that the president and his party would arrive about 8 o'clock, but the train did not get in until 9. It was expected that the train bearing General Miles, General Shafter and others, the army and the navy heroes of the United States, would arrive a few minutes later. The president's train got in at 9, but the other train was nearly two hours behind time.

The president's train had scarcely whistled this side the Union Pacific bridge when a great scout went up from the thousands on the platform of the station, and, as the train pulled in, the police and the extra police had all they could do to keep the crowds back from the track.

GREETED WITH CHEERS.

The occupants of the carriages in waiting—the members of the reception committee—made their way to the track. Those of the first carriages there received the guests whom they were to escort. The chief was President McKinley. He came off the platform of the rear car with his hat in his hand, for the crowd was cheering and in every way extending its greeting to the chief magistrate of the nation, and the chief magistrate seemed solicitous to acknowledge the honor offered. President McKinley was arm in arm with President Wattles of the exposition. They made their way, with much courteous hat lifting by President McKinley, to the first carriage, and speedily drove away. The other carriages followed in quick order.

The train bearing the diplomatic representatives, the army and navy officers and the representatives of the great metropolitan newspapers arrived about an hour and a half behind the president's train. This train was one of the most noted trains which ever traveled across this country, having on board more distinguished people than had ever been hauled before by any railroad at the same time. Much finesse was required to handle the many dignitaries on this train, the niceties of official etiquette requiring very fine discrimination in order to avoid violating the ethics which obtain in official circles. These matters were looked after during the journey by Colonel E. C. Snyder, secretary of Senator Thurston, and the efficient manner in which the entire affair was managed resulted in many compliments for the affable and diplomatic gentleman.

It was the original intention to have this train arrive ahead of the president's train, but a wreck on the Baltimore & Ohio road in Ohio compelled the train to make a detour of about 300 miles, and threw it behind time for the entire distance.

 

The committees appointed to escort the distinguished guests to the hotels to which they had been assigned were at the depot, and the visitors were driven directly up town.

The committee receiving the guests on both trains at the union depot comprised:

For the Exposition—President Wattles and Mrs. Wattles, Vice President and Mrs. Saunders, Treasurer Herman Kountze, Secretary and Mrs. Wakefield, General Counsel Montgomery and Mrs. Montgomery and General Manager Clarkson and Mrs. Clarkson.

For the Executive Committee—Z. T. and Mrs. Lindsey, E. Rosewater and Mrs. Rosewater, F. P. Kirkendall and Mrs. Kirkendall, E. E. Bruce and Mrs. Bruce, A. L. Reed and Mrs. Reed, W. N. Babcock and Mrs. Babcock.

For the Government at the Exposition—Major H. C. Ward and Mrs. Ward, J. R. Dunn and Mrs. Dunn.

For the Invitation Committee—Senator Thurston, Senator Allen and Mrs. Allen, Congressman Mercer and Mrs. Mercer, John L. Webster and Mrs. Webster, General Cowin and Mrs. Cowin, General Manderson and Mrs. Manderson, John C. Wharton and Mrs. Wharton.

For the Bureau of Entertainment—Mesdames Clement Chase, H. T. Clarke, W. A. Redick, G. M. Hitchcock, J. E. Summers, jr., Joslyn and Lyman.

CARRIAGES IN LINE.

The committee met the trains, with carriages, as outlined below, but owing to the lateness of the hour of the arrival of General Miles' train some of the carriages contained only members of the committee, they returning later to escort the Miles party.

Carriage No. 1—Gurdon W. Wattles, president of the Trans-Mississippi and International exposition, and William McKinley, president of the United States of America.

No. 2—Vice President Alvin Saunders of the exposition and Mrs. Saunders and Dr. Garcia Meron.

No. 3—Mr. and Mrs. Z. T. Lindsey and Chinese Minister Wu Ting Fang and Mrs. Wu Ting Fang.

No. 4—Mr. and Mrs. E. Rosewater and Corean Minister Chin Pom Ye and Mrs. Chin Pom Ye.

No. 5—Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Kirkendall and Brazilian Minister Brasil and Gonzalo de Quesada, charge d'affaires of the Cuban junta.

No. 6—Treasurer Herman Kountze of the exposition and Secretary of the Treasury Lyman J. Gage.

No. 8—E. E. Bruce and Secretary of the Interior Bliss.

No. 9—Mrs. E. E. Bruce and Secretary of Agriculture Wilson and Miss Wilson.

No. 10—A. L. Reed and Governor Alva Adams of Colorado and Governor Holcomb of Nebraska.

No. 11—Mrs. A. L. Reed and Senator and Mrs. Allen.

No. 12—Senator Thurston and Mr. and Mrs. Dr. R. W. Baker and Mrs. J. V. Creighton.

No. 14—Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Babcock and Major General and Mrs. Miles.

No. 15—Congressman D. H. Mercer and Brigadier General Sumner.

No. 16—Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Montgomery and General A. W. Greely and Mrs. Greely.

No. 17—Secretary John A. Wakefield of the exposition and Mrs. Wakefield and General and Mrs. Charles F. Humphrey.

No. 18—Mr. and Mrs. John L. Webster and Major and Mrs. O. S. Heistand and Miss Martin.

No. 19—Major H. C. Ward, president of the government board of control; Assistant Secretary of War Meiklejohn and J. Addison Porter, private secretary to President McKinley.

No. 20—J. R. Dunn and Captain Arthur Paget.

No. 21—Mrs. J. R. Dunn, Colonel Francis Micheler and Colonel W. M. Black.

No. 22—Mrs. Major H. C. Ward, Colonel James Allen and Captain H. H. Whitney.

No. 23—President Bingham of the city council and Secretaries A. Delviso of the Argentine minister, Tam E Ye of the Corean minister and Leme of the Brazilian minister.

No. 24—Mrs. Congressman Mercer and Messrs. Chow Tsz Chi, Whang Chang Huli and Kwang Hany, secretaries to the Chinese minister.

No. 25—J. C. Wharton, Prof. W. L. Moore, chief of the United States weather service; Mrs. Moore.

No. 26—Mrs. John C. Wharton and United States Commissioner of Education W. T. Harris and Mrs. Harris.

No. 27—Mr. and Mrs. John C. Cowin and Captain McWilliams and Mrs. McWilliams.

No. 29—Mrs. W. A. Redick, Miss Greely daughter of General Greely, and General Miles' secretary.

No. 30—Mrs. G. M. Hitchcock, Mrs. Cortelyou.

No. 31—Mrs. J. E. Summers, jr., and Mrs. George A. Joslyn, Miss Humphrey and Mrs. Howland.

No. 32—Mrs. C. W. Lyman and George F. Bidwell and General and Mrs. John C. Black.

Nos. 33, 34, 35 and 36—G. M. Hitchcock and fifteen of the newspaper men accompanying the two trains.

WHERE THEY ARE QUARTERED.

The guests after the parade and the review were over were taken to their quarters, as follows:

Omaha Club—President McKinley, Mr. and Mrs. Secretary Gage, Secretary Bliss, Captain and Mrs. McWilliams, Postmaster General and Mrs. Smith, Assistant Secretary of War Meiklejohn and Secretary to the President Porter, Secretary Wilson and daughter.

Paxton Hotel—Dr. Garcia Meron, Wu Ting Fang and Mrs. Wu Ting Fang, Mr. and Mrs. Chin Pom Ye, Minister Brasil, Mr. Gonzalo de Quesada, Senator and Mrs. Allen, Secretaries Chow Tsz Chi, Whang Chang Huli and Kwang Hany, Captain Paget, Secretaries Delviso, Tam E Ye and Lima.

Millard Hotel—General and Mrs. Humphrey, General and Mrs. Greely, General and Mrs. Miles, Brigadier General Sumner, Mahor and Mrs. Heistand, Prof. and Mrs. Moore, Dr. and Mrs. W. T. Harris, Colonel James Allen, Captain H. H. Whitney, Colonel Francis Micheler, Colonel W. M. Black, Miss Greely and N. E. Dawson, General Miles' secretary, Miss Humphrey, Mrs. Howland, General and Mrs. John C. Black, L. E. Reed, Chicago Tribune; George W. Rouser, New York Herald; Howard N. Thompson, Associated Press; W. M. Osborne, Army and Navy Register; J. H. Maddy, press agent Baltimore & Ohio, Frank Richardson, Baltimore Sun; E. C. Snyder, Washington correspondent; James S. Henry, Philadelphia Press; John S. Shriver, New York Mail and Express; Raymond Patterson, Chicago Tribune; C. A. Hamilton, Sioux City Journal; W. E. Curtis, Chicago Record; Fred Benzinger, Chicago Times-Herald; Charles S. Albert, New York World.

AN INSPIRING PICTURE.

The scene that greeted the eye as the presidential party moved from the depot to the reviewing stand at Eighteenth and Farnam was an inspiring one. Notwithstanding the fact that those who assembled along Tenth street were off the line of the parade, that thoroughfare was lined on both sides with humanity, whose sole desire seemed to be to see the president and the other distinguished guests who make up his official family and fully represent the official circles at Washington. As the party passed they cheered repeatedly, there being audible evidence whenever was seen one of the faces that frequent newspaper illustration has made familiar to the great reading public.

It was when the line turned into Farnam street, however, that the extent of the crowd became apparent. At the lower end of the street the vast concourse was held back reasonably well, but as each block was traversed the opening become narrower, until from Fifteenth to Eighteenth streets the police were only able to keep open a narrow passage barely wide enough for the carriages to squeeze through. It was a congested gorge of humanity, solidly packed from the lot one to the street car rails, and any attempt to force the people back seemed like an impression on so much India rubber that immediately sprung back to its former position. The broad 100 foot thoroughfare might as well have been but half that width, so far as the parade space was concerned, for it afforded but inadequate facilities for either the moving line or the stationary spectators.

ALIVE WITH PEOPLE.

The great buildings along either side of the street seemed to be alive with people, who occupied every foot of available space from street level to roof line. Windows were crowded, improvised platforms were packed, and from every spot where a citizen of the republic struggled to maintain a point of vantage came a hearty, loyal cheer as the president of the United States passed by.

PLEASES THE PRESIDENT.

While it was perhaps but a repetition of the expressions of welcome that the people of the country have been accustomed to accord to the occupant of this high office since the nation was in its infancy, there was a heartiness and whole-souledness about it that seemed to please President McKinley, and he smiled pleasantly to right and left and repeatedly bowed and lifted his glossy tile over the entire route.

While there were several interruptions along the line, due to the size of the crowd, there was no serious disarrangement of the program until the last carriage containing the presidential and receiving party had reached the reviewing stand. At that juncture the crowd rushed forward and completely filled the street, and in spite of all that the police and a large detail of exposition guards could do Farnam street between Seventeenth and Eighteenth street became a tumultuous sea of human faces, with wildly surging waves that threatened disaster.

Over that short stretch of pavement 20,000 people madly struggled, first for position and then seemingly for existence, while the 1,500 people on the reviewing stand and the unnumbered thousands seated in compact tiers on the steep terraces of the court house grounds across the street looked on with mingled interest and apprehension. Women fainted and strong men, pitiably helpless in that resistless crush, labored with desperation to keep the inanimate forms from being trampled under the feet of thousands. Policemen seized babies from their mothers' arms and held them above their heads to prevent the crushing out of their young lives.

GOES TO MAYOR'S OFFICE.

For fifteen minutes no apparent headway could be made by the fifty policemen and guards who tried to fight back the oncoming thousands, and President McKinley was escorted by President Wattles from the stand to the mayor's office. The withdrawal of the president was not without effect, for the crowd looked blankly at the vacant space for a minute and then seemed to become tractable. More vigorous action was also indulged in by the police, and a living stream was slowly turned up Farnam street and the condition was relieved. Some objected to going, but the majority of those who had suffered in the squeeze were only too anxious to get out when the chance was offered, and in a few minutes an opening was secured. The approach of the mounted police at the head of the parade served to widen it, and from that time a passageway was maintained until the last float had gone by.

The president reappeared as the head of the line approached the stand and reviewed the moving spectacle standing by the side of President Wattles. He was cheered not only by the crowd but by the occupants of the floats, and he acknowledged the numerous salutations, a good-natured half smile pervading his features as the demonstrative occupants of ethereal space hurled muscular osculations in his direction.

Shortly before the last of the parade appeared the president and the immediate members of his party retired from the stand and were driven to his quarters at the Omaha club, as he as much fatigued by the continued efforts of the day. He had delivered sixteen short speeches, and desired to obtain as much rest as possible in view of the arduous program that had been arranged for today.

LENGTH OF THE PARADE.

The parade was an hour and a half passing the stand, and its features were regarded with much interest by the members of the presidential party and other distinguished guests. The electrical floats were very much of a novelty and were the subject of much comment. The grand effect of the general illumination received many words of approval, and there were many expressions of self-congratulation that the guests present had arrived on the first train and had an opportunity to witness the great demonstration.

The floats appeared as on Tuesday and Thursday evenings of last week, the regular Ak-Sar-Ben parade of twenty floats leading, and followed by those of the electrical parade. Inasmuch as the same attendants had done service in both parades it was necessary to halt the line midway in order that some of the unavoidable deficiencies in that particular might be remedied by a partial rearrangement. The delay, however, was not a long one.

The general effect of the street illumination was seen at its best from the reviewing stand, and the spectacle that filled the field of vision from the top of the hill looking down Farnam street as the electrical parade was approaching was one of which the visitors expressed the keenest appreciation.

After reaching his quarters at the club at 11 o'clock last night President McKinley said good night to the members of the local reception committee who had accompanied him, and after giving brief attention to one or two matters of official moment retired.

Mr. J. Addison Porter, secretary to the president, had telegraphed ahead for the engagement of a competent stenographer, and he was busily engaged in dictation during the late hours of the evening.

Sergeant Halter and a detail of twelve policemen are on duty at the club and officers were stationed at all the entrances to secure the president and the members of his party from interruption or annoyance.

President McKinley received a salvo of applause when he passed the World-Herald office and acknowledged it with a bow.

HANDLING THE CROWDS.

Police Kept Busy With Great Mass of People.

As there was never a larger multitude in the thoroughfares of the city, so there was never a more difficult task presented to the police for solution. Almost the entire force was stationed along the route which the president took from the depot to the reviewing stand in front of the city hall. The vastness of the affair only appealed to the civic authorities, and when the myriads began to collect there were nearly threescore and ten exposition guards placed at points on both Farnam street and Tenth street, where they could readily aid the police officers in their work of handling the turbulent throngs.

Captains Haze and Mostyn were in charge of the police, while Major Llewellyn looked after the less experienced guards. Steadily all through the early portion of the evening the crowds grew denser and denser, eddying to and fro like wind-swept autumn leaves. At first it seemed as though there would be excellent standing room for everybody, but as the time grew closer for the commencement of the parade it became more and more apparent that it would require the utmost energy and tact to clear the way for the presidential carriage. And such proved to be the case.

The twelve mounted police under the leadership of Sergeant Iler found the crowds so thickly massed, especially at the street corners, that the progress of the procession was necessarily slow, but there was an evident advantage in this, for it gave the people a much better chance than they had anticipated of seeing the president and the celebrities who followed him in impressive sequence. Back, back the crowds were pressed by the chafing steeds, only to sway forward again when the opportunity afforded. But the guards and patrolmen did heroic work in restraining the boisterous individuals who frequently became obstreperous.

It was at Fourteenth, Fifteenth and Sixteenth streets that the greatest difficulty was experienced. There were several sharp clashes between police guards and citizens. At Fourteenth street one policeman was struck so violently in the face that he was stunned for several seconds, but his assailant fared rather badly when two of the guards succeeded in laying their hands on him. At Nineteenth and Farnam streets a volunteer soldier, who found himself hustled about with what he considered undue celerity, attacked the policeman at his elbow, and was immediately surrounded and placed under arrest. There were several other arrests for various misdemeanors, but all in all a big crowd was rarely handled with more marked skill.

The president himself was well-guarded, even better than he himself imagined. At the city hall he was met by Detectives Dunn and Donahue, who quietly, and without attracting any attention, dropped into his wake, and remained constantly near him until he was escorted in safety to his quarters in the Omaha club.

 

TAKEN TO THE HOTELS.

Different Guests Find Rest After Their Journey.

The hotels of the city were taxed to their full capacity last night. The Millard and the Paxton each had 500 guests. At both places many cots were occupied. The Murray, Mercer, Dellone, Barker and Iler Grand were overflowing and dozens turned away for want of room.

Early in the evening the streets were thronged with people, the street crowd being estimated at from 125,000 to 150,000, and some placed the number as high as even 200,000 people on the central streets of the city.

After the parade the rush was made for the hotels and for nearly an hour the clerks were kept on the alert.

The Miles party arrived at the Millard at 10:40 and in fifteen minutes had been assigned apartments, and all save the fifteen representatives of the press had retired.

The newspaper men were taken in carriages to the rooms of the department of publicity by Press Agent Richardson, where they were provided with exposition tickets, badges and fitted out for today. They returned to the hotel a half hour later.

The diplomatic corps arrived at the Paxton at 10:45 and the work of registering and assigning apartments consumed a half hour. They each registered their names, and with interpreters were fixed out and sent happily to the partments​ reserved for them. While the diplomats were registering at the Paxton hundreds of people thronged the lobby, anxious to get a glance at the representatives of other lands. It was with some difficulty that the diplomats could get to the desk, and as fast as they placed their names on the register they disappeared. At midnight the streets seemed quite deserted.

SEARCHING FOR LODGING.

Court House Takes Care of Fifty Tired People.

For the first time in its history the accommodations of Omaha were taxed to their utmost, but the hospitality of its citizens made the lot of the stranger a light one. As it was, many visitors walked all night under the starry vault and thanked their particular constellations that they had sturdy constitutions. Fortunately, however, no instance of any woman or child unprovided with proper accommodations was observed.

It was a rather odd sight in the late hours of the afternoon and the early hours of the evening, before the parade began, to watch the delegations, great and small, which wandered through the residence districts looking for lodging. For the first time since Omaha became a city its citizens realized that the metropolis was overcrowded. But the response was quick and cheerful. In homes where the renting of a room had been as a thing unknown the visitor was provided with the best. The women and children fared particularly well. Not only all rooms were occupied, but cots were set up in the hallways and, wonderful to relate, the shelter of an inviting hay loft was not despised. The thrifty made much money and the charitable found that virtue is its own reward.

The World-Herald had the opportunity of securing accommodations for many who would otherwise have suffered great incovenience​. In both the court house and city hall corridors and offices were liberally thronged with men who asked nothing better than to extend themselves at length in a capacious arm chair or lie upon the carpets, and even the cold stones, with nothing but their coats to ease their weary heads. Over 200 addresses of homes where beds could be secured were sent to the police station, and in this way nearly 1,000 people who applied to the jailer were directed to boarding houses and private residences, where they enjoyed the best that could be had.

 

MEETING OF WOMAN'S CLUBS

Mrs. Langworthy of Seward Chosen President of Nebraska Federation.

Annual Election Follows the Discussion of Many Interesting Subjects.

Feature of Educational Work Strongly Advocated by Convention--Interesting Program Tuesday Evening.

The opening session of the woman's congress began at the First Congregational church yesterday morning with an attendance embracing nearly 200 local club women and delegates from abroad. It was the session of the Nebraska State Federation. Tomorrow will be occupied with the Trans-Mississippi congress of women's clubs, when the attendance will be swelled two-fold.

Mrs. A. N. Ferguson, vice president of the Omaha Woman's club, presided yesterday.

The morning's program opened with a feeling invocation by Rev. Mary G. Andrews of this city. Mrs. Ferguson succeeded her in a welcome address that was timely worded and fervid in its cordiality. The response by Mrs. Sarah Brindley, president of the Columbus Woman's club, was a neat bit of oratory, sparkling with good and pleasant things about Omaha, her women and her great exposition, and evoked the heartiest plaudits of gloved hands.

The solos, "Mignon" and "The Little Dustman," rendered by Mrs. J. M. Metcalf, were captivating, the lady acquitting herself with exceeding credit. She was accompanied on the piano in a charming way by Mrs. J. H. McIntosh.

The rest of the morning's work consisted of routine club business.

At the afternoon session "recommended work" came in for initial attention. This consisted of a trio of ably prepared and interesting papers, the first "Town and Village Improvements" by Mrs. Nellie Richardson of Lincoln, and the second "Art in the Schools" by Mrs. Ida L. Snyder of Plattsmouth, and the third "Town and County Clubs" by Mrs. Helen Harrison of York.

Following the readings came a musical program and discussion of the papers.

Mrs. H. H. Wilson delivered an address on "Woman's Department of the State University," which caused the passage of the following set of resolutions:

"Whereas, We believe the educational features of the women's clubs of our state would be greatly strengthened and benefited by the proposed university extension offered by the state university; therefor be it

"Resolved, That the Nebraska federation of women's clubs in fifth annual session assembled, does indorse and recommend to the clubs of the federation this feature of educational work."

The annual election of officers resulted as follows: President, Mrs. S. C. Langworthy of Seward; vice president, Mrs. Apperson, Tecumseh; secretary, Mrs. M. J. Sackett, Weeping Water; corresponding secretary, Mrs. D. C. McKillip, Seward; treasurer, Mrs. Fuller of Oakland, and librarian, Mrs. G. M. Lambertson, Lincoln.

In considering unfinished business the revision of the constitution and by-laws was completed.

At the evening session the following interesting program was rendered:

Music (a) "A Woodland Path;" (b) "Mine Own Little Sweetheart" by Mr. Dan H. Wheeler, jr.

Address, Mrs. Rebecca D. Lowe, Atlanta, Ga., president of the general federation of women's clubs.

Introduction of the officers of the general federation of women's clubs.

Music, "My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice," Miss Lillian Deland Terry.

Annual address, Mrs. Belle Stoutenborough, Plattsmouth, president of Nebraska federation of women's clubs.

There will be a session of the Trans-Mississippi congress of women's clubs at 9:30 this morning, and at 3:30 this afternoon the delegates will go to the exposition grounds to greet his excellency, President William McKinley. The convention will close Thursday evening.

ROOT IS CHOSEN PRESIDENT.

American Fraternal Congress Elect Officers and Transact Business.

The American Fraternal congress convened yesterday morning at 1320 Farnam street. There were ten or fifteen fraternal societies represented. The forenoon was spent in routine matters, the appointment of committees and hearing reports.

J. C. Root presided. W. E. Sharp presented a paper containing ten reasons why the reserve fund societies should organize in a federation. In the afternoon constitution and by-laws were adopted and permanent officers elected. J. C. Root of Omaha was chosen president; W. E. Sharp, Aurora, Neb., vice president; Roger Dickens, Omaha, secretary; F. F. Roose, Omaha, treasurer, and F. A. Falkenberg, actuary. These committees were appointed: Arrangements, the chairman being C. A. Sharp; finances, J. T. Yates; jurisprudence and legislation, W. B. Howard; statistics, F. A. Falkenberg; fraternal press, E. S. McClintock; medical matters, L. A. Merriam; reserve fund, J. C. Root. The society will meet again this morning.

IT IS SECOND DAY

Exposition Attendance Tuesday Almost Reaches Fifty Thousand Mark.

Today Over Two Million Visitors Will Have Visited the White City.

Mass of People Come Early and Remain but a Few Hours, Coming Down Town at Night.

Delegations for Special Exercises and Those Who Come to See the President Fill Grounds.

An Earnest of the Great Crowd Which Will Swarm at the Big Show Today--They Come From Everywhere.

Tuesday's Admissions,47,974
Total Admissions1,964,700

Another high spot was touched by the exposition yesterday in the line of attendance, the record for the day being that of second place, with 47,974. To Modern Woodmen of America day, Thursday, September 22, for a few fleeting hours yet belongs the honor of first place, with a record of 52,723, while July 4 is third with 44,452, and Iowa day, September 21, is fourth with 39,094.

Away past the 2,000,000 mark will today's admissions leave the exposition, for the attendance, estimated far in excess of 100,000 will work wonders to last night's total to date of 1,964,700 when added to it.

The component part of yesterday's crowd came from a multitude of sources, save Omaha and Council Bluffs, for the local people who customarily spend the evening only at the exposition or count on it as the best part of their day, went down town instead to see the president and the big double parade. Delegations were there for governors' day, New Mexico day, dairy day and Peoria day, yet greater than all was the vast aggregation of strangers in for the great stirring events of the peace jubilee, timing their days to include today—presidential day. It was verily "strangers' day."

They began clicking the turnstiles early, made the best of their time seeing everything possible in a short time, seeing and hearing and laughing, but yet it had the serious air of strangers among strangers and in a strange land. They all longed for the down town events of the evening, for by 7 o'clock but a light contingent was left, and it soon melted away. They all said they'd come back today and stay longer.

It is only once that the president of the United States visits the exposition, and therefore Mr. Due will surpass himself in the display of fireworks tonight. The program is as follows:

Display will be announced by the firing of three aerial cannon; grand prismatic illumination; welcome; simultaneous firing of extra heavy peacock plume rockets; flight of A. L. Due's bouquet rockets; set piece—emblem of peace; ascension of snakes; display of mammoth umbrellas; fire portrait—secretary of war; ascension of meteor shells; flight of 200 silver plume rockets; comic device—performing acrobat; flight of flying doves; ascension of cascade rockets; flight of parachute rockets; display of Due's famous silver shells; ascension of red, white and blue shells; fire portrait—secretary of navy; the lake on fire; ascension of mammoth sixty-inch bombs, designed for president's day; ascension of mammoth sixty-inch bombs, designed for president's day; ascension of phosphorescent rockets; mechanical device—bicycle rider; a grand display of jeweled fountains; mechanical watermelon; ascension of two dozen festoon or floating chain rockets; grand flight of magnesium shells; exhibition piece—spreading fan; fligt​ of 100 weeping willow rockets; mechanical device—locomotive thirty-five feet long; eruption of Vesuvius; mammoth portrait—the president of the United States; ascension of whistling bombs; Niagara falls on fire; flight of hissing snakes; grand aerial bouquet of thousands of rockets in red, white and blue; mechanical device—walking elephant; grand finale—terrific bombardment, consisting of flights of shells containing 15,000 stars, together with hundreds of rockets, candles, comets, humming birds and thunderous explosions, constituting an aerial display the likes of which has never been witnessed in this section of the country; good night.

POYNTER TO THE DAIRYMEN.

Humorous and Entertaining Welcome to the Visitors.

A meeting of the dairymen of the western states was held at the Dairy building on the exposition grounds yesterday afternoon under the auspices of the Nebraska Dairymen's association. Several hundred, mostly from the nearby states, were present, and though there was much to distract attention, the interest in the meeting was marked.

George Haskell of Lincoln, the president of the Nebraska association, presided. A welcoming speech was made by Hon. W. A. Poynter, who gave a humorous and a serious review of the dairy industry. Job, he said, was the first dairymen of importance to be mentioned in the history of the world, and he met with reverses on account of the machinations of a certain being, the devil, who had never ceased to stick his nose into the business of other people. In the dark ages the housewives used to put horseshoes into the churn to drive away the witches and to make the butter come. This was just the beginning of the introduction of science into butter making, for soon the horseshoe was heated, and this principle had been followed up. Mr. Poynter made reference to the romance of the pasture and the poems that had been written about the milk maid with dimpled hands, clean frock and beautiful face.

Mr. Poynter emphasized what science had done for the dairy industry, particularly in the case of the cream separator, which he said marked the longest stride in the progress of the industry.

But science had done too much. It had shown how butter could be made of hog fat and other fats. This was where the dairymen drew the line. They insisted that what was called butter should be made out of nothing save the milk of the cow.

The Lord, said Mr. Poynter, had promised his chosen people a land flowing with milk and honey. This meant nothing else than a great dairy country, and here Mr. Poynter said that the country lying just west of the Mississippi river was a country equal to the old Canaan, for on its broad prairies grew the most succulent of grasses, with blossoms for the finest honey. And of this country Nebraska was a gem. To Nebraska, he said, he took great pleasure in welcoming the visiting dairymen. Here were a half million of cows and 200 creameries.

Prof. Haecker of the Minnesota Agricultural college followed with a recital of the history of the dairy industry in his state. It was mainly the growth of the last six years. What the cows had done for Minnesota could hardly be told. There were now 600 creameries and the profits from cows ran from $20 to $36 per year for each.

The next address was by Henry Wallace, editor of the Wallace Farmer, Ia. His theme was how the dairymen could help the farmer in his work that the benefit might be for both.

L. S. Gates, state dairy commissioner for Iowa, was to follow with a general discussion of the profitableness to the farmer carrying on the dairy business when the session was brought to a sad ending by the shocking death of the speaker.

At noon sixty or seventy of the delegates, all adorned with broad yellow badges to indicate the color of their chief product, had attracted much attention as they marched from the Dairy building to the Markel cafe for lunch.

Battle for Peace Jubilee.

Clouds of smoke, groans of scalped and dying Indians, shrieks of the widows and orphans and all of the other turmoil and terror of battle were served out to an eager crowd of fully 15,000 visitors on the parade grounds of the Indian congress yesterday afternoon. It was one of the peace jubilee sham battles by the Indians, the first of a series of four, today, tomorrow and Friday at 4:30 p. m. The rare studies in the unique and ethnological, the brilliant kaleidoscopic effect of many colored costumes and a dash of real Indian warfare of the plains were given by the 600 specimens of characteristic Indian life.

American Horse, the hereditary chief of the Ogalalla Sioux, and a man of great political influence in the Sioux nation, and Red Tomahawk, the Sioux policeman who killed Sitting Bull, arrived yesterday.

Prof. True, the second officer of the Smithsonian institute, was at the congress grounds looking over the educational work being done.

 

EXPOSITION PROGRAM.

Wednesday, October 12.

PEACE JUBILEE WEEK.
PRESIDENT'S DAY—VISIT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.
LIVE STOCK SHOW IN PROGRESS.
INDIAN CONGRESS IN PROGRESS.

9 a. m.—Special live stock display at live stock pavilion.

100 a. m.—The Innes band on the plaza:

Overture—"Zanetta"Auber
(a) "The Rustic Mill" (descriptive idyl)Eilenberg
(b) "Rob Roy" (quickstep)DeKoven
Solo for contra tuba—"Air Varie"Cesky
Scene from "The Chimes of Normany"Planquette
"At a Georgia Camp Meeting" (descriptive fantasia)Mills
Vorspiel—"Haensel and Gretel"Humperdinck
(a) "Demons of the Mountain" (from "Peer Gynt"Grieg
(b) "Love Is King" (Two Step March)Innes
Cornet solo—"Concert Polka"LevyKenney.
"American National Fantasia"Bendix

11 a. m.—President McKinley and his party enter the grounds.

Exercises on the grand plaza:

MusicInnes Band
InvocationRev. John McQuoid, pastor of First Methodist church.
Introduction and welcomePresident G. W. Wattles of the exposition.
AddressWilliam McKinley, president of the United States of America.
Music
AddressHon. Charles Emory Smith, postmaster general.

2 p. m.—Innes' band at Auditorium.

3 p. m.—Omaha Concert band at Government building.

3 p. m.—United States life saving service exhibition at west end of lagoon.

3:30 p. m.—President McKinley received the public at the Government building.

3:30 p. m.—Woman's club at Auditorium.

4 p. m.—Omaha Concert band at Indian grounds:

March—"Commander in Chief"Horst
Overture—"Bohemian Girl"Balfe
Song—"Spring Awakening"Bach
Waltz—"The Pester"Launer
Selection—"Wang"Moses
Polka—"Light as a Feather"Ziehrer
Fantasia—"Soldier's Life"Keler Bela
Patrol—"British"Ash

4:30 p. m.—Great Indian sham battle at Indian grounds.

5 p. m.—Santiago war balloon ascension on north tract (if not too windy.)

7 p. m.—Innes' band on the plaza:

Overture—"Tannhauser"Wagner
Piccolo solo—"Turtle Dove" (concert polka)DemareHeidelberg.
"Gathering of the Clans" (Scotch fantasia No. 1)DooneIntroducing solos for all the principal players of the band and concluding with the old pledge of affectionate remembrance, "Auld Lang Syne."
"The Star Spangled Banner"Introducing Innes' battery of electric cannon, the accompanying fireworks spectacle being by the Due Fireworks company.
"The Forge in the Forest" (descriptive idyl)MichaelisThe dawn; "winged minstrels" announce the new day; by the brook; a summer shower; the cathedral chimes sound the hour of morning prayer; at the forge. (Introducing the costumed corps of musical blacksmiths, flaming anvils, double male quartet, etc.)
Two characteristic marches—
(a) "En Liesse" (French)Coutant
(b) "Love Is King" (American)Innes
Trombone solo—"Waiting"MillardInnes.
Overture—"Jubel"WeberConcluding with the national hymn, "My Country 'Tis of Thee," and accompanied by Innes' battery of electric artillery.

9 p. m.—Grand special fireworks in honor of President McKinley and his party.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13.

Army and Navy Day—Exercises in Auditorium at 11 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Addresses by Major General Nelson A. Miles, John D. Long, secretary of the navy; General Russell A. Alger, secretary of war; General Joseph Wheeler and other distinguished officers of the army and navy, officers of the Grand Army of the Republic and officers of the Confederate Veterans' association. Lunch to prominent guests. Military parades. Ascension of war balloons. Sham battle of Indian tribes and spectacular fireworks in afternoon and evening.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14.

Civil Government Day—11 a. m.—Exercises in Auditorium. Addresses by members of the president's cabinet, representatives of the supreme court, senators and congressmen and other civil officers. Lunch to distinguished guests. War balloon ascension. Illustration of life saving service and spectacular fireworks in afternoon and evening.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15.

Children's Jubilee Day—11 a. m.—Grand patriotic chorus on grand plaza. Music by Innes band. Concert in Auditorium. Spectacular concert on plaza and spectacular fireworks in afternoon and evening.

JUBILEE WEEK.

This is the greatest week in Omaha's history, and this is the greatest day in Omaha's greatest week. The city is filled to overflowing with visitors who have come to greet the president of the United States and celebrate with him and with us the advent of peace. Omaha is proud of the honor conferred upon her. She is proud to be the center of interest in this great republic for a time.

The doors of the city are open to the visitors. They are thrice welcome. The week belongs to Omaha's visitors. Everything that can be done to contribute to their comfort will be done. The magnificent parade provided by the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben, the wonderful illumination of the city, the lavish decorations—and even the bright sunshine and healthful atmosphere—have been provided for them, the former by men and the latter by providence. The managers of the great demonstration have a right to be proud of the success that has attended their efforts. The success is magnificent, the occasion is great.

A WORD OF CAUTION.

The greatest crowds in the history of Omaha are here today. The streets are crowded, the cars are crowded, the stores are crowded and the exposition is crowded. A few words of advice may not be amiss, and if they are heeded there will be a lessening of discomfort and an increase in comfort.

Keep to the right and don't shove.

Do not be afraid to ask for directions. Every Omahan will gladly be of service to the visitors.

All street cars that go to the exposition grounds are properly labeled on the front. Take them as they go north.

Check your grips down town and do not take them upon the street cars nor into the exposition grounds.

Try to have the exact change for the street car conductors and for all purchases inside the exposition grounds.

Let everybody be good natured and enthusiastic. This is the Peace Jubilee. Do not mar it by becoming annoyed at minor discomforts. Enjoy yourselves and get your money's worth.

P. S.—When in doubt consult a policeman.

Notes of the Exposition.

J. Sterling Morton has been elected president of the National Flax, Ramie and Hemp association, recently organized at the exposition by flax fiber experts of the country. The entertainment committee is arranging for a demonstration in honor of Secretary of Agriculture Wilson during his stay in Omaha this week.

The Los Angeles exhibit of Southern California products is extending the olive branch of peace to all of the friends of Los Angeles, a dainty sprig of olive tied with ribbon and card.

No war balloon ascensions occurred yesterday, but everything was gotten ready for keeping the balloon in motion all the time today. Signalling by flags and heliographs is being shown each afternoon at 2 o'clock by the signal corps.

TIDE OF PEACE WEEK RUNS TO WHITE CITY

Crowds Going Out Early in the Day—Day to Governors, New Mexico and Peoria.

Sentiments of Nebraska and Colorado--Governor Otero Sends a Message for His Territory.

Yesterday was the division of the week devoted to the participation of of states through their chief executives. It was Governors' day. The Omaha Concert band entertained the audience until the arrival of their excellencies about 11 o'clock.

The exercises opened with prayer by Rev. Dr. S. Wright Butler, pastor of the St. Mary's Avenue Congregational church.

The first address was by Governor Holcomb of Nebraska, who expressed much regret that circumstances were such as to prevent the attendance of all the other governors, save Governor Adams of Colorado. He compared the progress of the American people in the last hundred years with that of other peoples, and found the great and gratifying differences to be due to the genius of American institutions and the blessings of civil and religious liberty. The exposition illustrated the mightiness of the American people in peace and the achievement and promise of the west. He commended the enthusiasm with which the chief executives of all the western states have supported the exposition project and he took the present opportunity on behalf of the state and the exposition management to return thanks for this support.

PLEASANT WORDS FOR M'KINLEY.

Governor Holcomb said he felt like a John the Baptist, making the way straight for a greater to come after. The expression of his pleasure in the anticipated visit of President McKinley drew out hearty applause. The significance of the results of the year, the victories of war and the victories of peace were dwelt on and both conception of the dignity of American citizenship, the value of American opportunity and the seriousness of American duty.

The governor's praise of the self-sacrificing spirit and of the efficiency of the volunteer soldiers as compared with the drafted troops of the standing armies of the old world were much appreciated.

COLORADO'S GOVERNOR.

After a selection by the band the concluding address was delivered by Governor Alva Adams of Colorado. The governor caused a pleasant laugh when he remarked that if the audience had any regrets it was probably not that more governors were not there, but that two more were not delinquent. He was sure that nothing which he and Governor Holcomb could say could compensate the people for the time taken from sightseeing to hear them.

Governor Adams was roundly applaunded​ when he declared that the exposition was better than any that had ever been held. If it were not better, progress was a myth and it would, too, be a failure if it did not create new ambition, new zeal and stronger purpose. He loved the exposition because it was the child of the west, and he declared that in giving his fealty to the west he was not disloyal to the east, for he was loyal to the whole, and the western people were ready to defend every foot of the country, whether between the two oceans or now in the islands of the sea.

But the western people, he said, had a peculiar interest in the land of their homes. The governor was not sure but that the ideal American was to be developed on the prairies or mountain valleys of the west. The charm of romance, adventure and opportunity had attracted the bolder spirits from the east and Europe. They might lack in some of the graces of society, but in the elements of manhood they were not delinquent. The man of the west was broader and stronger than the man of the east. He might not have due appreciation of a dress suit, but in illustrating the best ideals of American manhood and citizenship he was without a peer. He did not go into the cemeteries and boast of his ancestry, but like Scott, and Hastings, and Cicero, he was anxious to found a family of his own.

Before the war with Spain the American had not appreciated his own country at its true worth. No longer would it be necessary to read chivalry or ancient story for examples of heroism. "Your own soldier boys," said the governor, "will hereafter be your types of self-sacrifice and valor. The assault at Manila was worth more to American patriotism and American spirit than all the products of field or mine." (Cheers.)

Governor Adams argued from the [?]   necessities of trade and new markets, that the flags that had been planted on the islands of the sea should stand there forever. He closed with tender words for those to whom the war had brought personal loss and invocation of a benediction on this proud honor of the nation's history.

NEW MEXICO DAY.

Territory Celebrates at its Mining Exhibit.

New Mexico Territory day exercises were held at the exhibit in the Mines and Mining building at 11 yesterday morning. There were a number of distinguished citizens of the territory and several hundred excursionists present. The railroads had made a rate of 1 cent per mile from all points in New Mexico to Omaha.

J. J. Leeson, the commissioner and general manager of the exhibit, presided. He had intended to have on hand a larger supply of fruit to give away to the public, but was disappointed in being advised at a late hour that the fruit was delayed in shipment and would not be here until next week.

The apartments were crowded. It was lamented that Governor Otero, on account of sickness, could not be present. He, however, sent an address which was read, and short talks were made by ex-Governor L. Bradford Prince, Colonel J. G. Albright of Albuquerque and Colonel Gise of Los Vegas. Colonel Albright is the pioneer editor of that southwestern country, having founded and for twenty years been the editor of the Albuquerque Democrat.

The governor's address and the speeches of the others were laudatory of the exposition and its managers, expressed gratification at the splendid showing made under very discouraging circumstances by New Mexico and full of praise for Commissioner Leeson, to whom all the credit for the exhibit was unanimously attributed. Of course there was considerable, but not extravagant exploitation of the advantages of New Mexico has a place to live and grow rich.

Twas Peoria Day.

Peoria, Ill., was one of the claimants of yesterday at the exposition. There were no exercises. A large representation, including many men of prominence, was present from the famous Illinois city, and excursionists were on the grounds from all parts of the state. A great many from Southern Illinois came with the excursionists from St. Louis. The visitors made their presence most felt at the Illinois building, which was a rallying point for them and where they registered.

Hour.Deg.
5 a. m.52
6 a. m.50
7 a. m.53
8 a. m.54
9 a. m.54
Hour.Deg.
10 a. m.55
11 a. m.63
12 m.66
1 p. m.65
2 p. m.67

For Nebraska—Showers this afternoon and tonight; cooler tonight; Thursday fair, with cooler in east portion.

For Iowa—Showers tonight, with cooler in west portion; warmer in east portion; Thursday fair and cooler.

For Kansas—Showers in north portion and fair weather tonight; Thursday rain in northwest portion; cooler.

JAM AT THE JUBILEE

Patriotic People Do Honor to the Great Nation's Executive.

MIGHTY MASS THRONGS THE GROUNDS

Greatest Gathering Ever Assembled in the West Sees the President.

EXPOSITION GATES NOT WIDE ENOUGH

Press for Admission Exeeds​ the Capacity of Turnstiles for Hours.

EXERCISES PROMPTLY CARRIED OUT

President McKinley Speaks from the Band Stand on the Plaza to More than Seventy-Five Thousand Cheering Citizens.

Total admissions yesterday47,974
Total to date1,964,702

If the Peace Jubilee had no other title to a place in history, the mighty celebration of today would make it memorable. The presence of President McKinley and the distinguished party that accompanied him was signalized by the most stupendous demonstration that ever occurred on western soil, and years must pass before the people who participated in its inspiring incidents can witness such a scene again. It was a fitting culmination of the mightiest enterprise the west has ever carried to success and it was witnessed by a crowd that packed the great White City with surging and struggling people until it seemed that a thousand more could not find foothold within its gates.

In the morning it seemed that the skies that had smiled so merrily had changed their temper. The clouds hung low and ominous of storm. A drizzling rain was driven in chilling mist by a strong south wind and thousands of people resigned themselves to the discomforts that seemed inevitable. But soon after 9 o'clock the prospect changed so suddenly that it seemed as though Nature had granted a special dispensation in favor of the great event. The clouds broke into a thousand fragments and these were swept swiftly out of sight. The menacing dome of slaty black was transformed into an arch of brightest blue set with slight whirling specks of gray which hurried before the wind as though anxious to get away and leave no obstacle between the azure above and the white beauty of the resplendent towers beneath. It became an ideal day for the comfort of the immense crowd that was rapidly expanding inside the exposition enlosure​ and the people hastened to dispose of their mackintoshes and umbrellas and get ready to enjoy the day to its full limit.

Couldn't Bluff the Crowd.

While nature was coquetting with the show the people were thronging to the grounds regardless of her smiles or frowns. They began to come almost as soon as it was light and before 7 o'clock there were hundreds massed in front of each of the entrances. In deference to the anticipated crush the gates were opened soon after 7 o'clock and by that time the capacity of the street car lines was reached. Soon after it was exceeded and from 8 o'clock to noon the transportation facilities were totally inadequate. The street railway company turned its barns inside out and ran its trains with exceptional regularity in view of the tremendous crowds that assailed them. But it was simply overwhelmed and a car was no sooner started to the grounds than it was loaded to the roof. No effort whatever was made to carry the people from points north of Dodge street and the trains whirled by them scarcely a block apart, but piled so thickly with people that it was impossible to secure a foothold. Crowds congregated at every block and finally most of them gave it up and started for the grounds on foot. Both sides of all the streets leading towards the exposition grounds were crowded with pedestrians and scores of carryalls and express wagons did a lucrative business picking up the stragglers.

Jam is Astounding.

When all these people merged into compact crushes at the entrances the jam was astounding. Before 9 o'clock there were fully 1,000 people marshaled at the Twenty-fourth street gate waiting for their chance at the ticket windows. On Sherman avenue the crush was less noticeable, as it was distributed between the bluff and main court entrances. It was manifestly impossible to handle such a crowd without some delay, but the inconvenience was the least that could possibly be expected. The Admissions department performed its difficult task with admirable efficiency and the people were hustled through the gates had been opened two hours there were fully 40,000 people inside the grounds, and the rush seemed to become more insistent every minute.

Before the forenoon was half over it was almost impossible to force a way through any of the large buildings. The aisles were packed solidly and every entrance was besieged by a clamoring and struggling multitude. Even in the main avenues the pedestrian had to be contented to elbow his way along with patience, and as the hour for the exercises of the day approached, the rush toward the Plaza was something terrific.

At the same time there was no cessation of the crowd at the gates. Every half minute a motor train dumped from 150 to 200 people, and nearly as many seemed to be coming on foot. What the crowd will be when the last visitor has been registered tonight is difficult to tell. Estimates vary from 90,000 to 125,000, and if it does not reach the latter figure it will be because the people cannot get to the grounds.

RECEPTION TO THE PRESIDENT.

Seventy-Five Thousand People Massed in Front of the Stand.

The scene on the Plaza as the hour for the arrival of the president's party approached almost exceeds description. From the band stand the perspective of tightly packed humanity stretched as far as the grounds were visible. It extended from the base of the pavilion over the viaduct and to the entrance to the main court. On sides the human sea was unbroken from the Horticultural building to the East Midway, and even the young trees and the roofs of the buildings were populated by ambitious spectators. Over all was a profusion of bunting that fluttered wildly in the strong breeze and blended in patriotic harmony with the cheers of the crowd and the inspiring strains of martial music. Two long festoons of streamers were strung over the Plaza from each end of the pavilion to the casinos and the arch over the grand stand was draped with two immense silk flags and huge masses of bunting. The same colors were flung from the flagstaffs of all the surrounding buildings and hundreds of smaller flags that were waved by enthusiastic spectators completed the patriotic effect and inspired the crowd to continual outbursts of cheers and handclapping.

While the crowd was waiting Innes' band played a short program and the people cheered wildly whenever a patriotic chord was touched. All this time additional thousands were pouring over the viaducts and through the gates. At length it seemed that the great expanse of bluff was so tightly packed that no more could enter. The crowd became so solidly wedged on the viaduct and in the open space that even the tremendous press behind could not budge it another inch and hundreds of people were unable to even get within sight of the president. It was estimated that when the exercises begun there were 75,000 people on the Plaza and there was not the slightest disposition to break away until after they were over.

Arrival of the President.

The presidential party entered the wagon gate from Sherman avenue at precisely 11 o'clock and the carriages were driven to the band stand through the narrow path which hand​ been kept open by the entire force of the Second Nebraska volunteers. As the carriage which contained President McKinley and President Wattles of the exposition approached the volunteers were drawn up in company front immediately in front of the pavilion and the detachment of the Twenty-second United States infantry stood in solid formation at their left. The passage of the presidential carriage through the crowd was accompanied by the most extravagant demonstrations. The crowd was wedged so closely that it was almost impossible to move, but the people managed to get their hands above their heads long enough to wave a greeting with hats and handkerchiefs and flags, while their voices united in a succession of tremendous cheers that made the Plaza ring. President McKinley bowed right and left to the people as he passed and as he mounted to the platform the demonstration was renewed. It was continued almost   without interruption while the other distinguished visitors were conducted to seats behind him and even the members of the diplomatic corps in their national costumes were greeted with enthusiastic cheers.

The enthusiasm continued while the band played a patriotic selection and was only silenced when President Wattles introduced Rev. John McQuoid of the First Methodist church to offer the invocation. This was an earnest and eloquent appeal for the Omnipotent's blessing on the celebration of the day and after its conclusion President Wattles spoke briefly in introducing President McKinley. He said in substance: "Our hearts are filled with gratitude and thanksgiving on account of the return of peace to the nation. We meet to celebrate the victory of our arms and to rejoice that the sunshine of peace again bathes our land. I voice the sentiment of all in our heartfelt gratitude to our beloved president, our honored guest today. If I could bring together all the love and adoration that we feel for him and present it like a fragrant flower I might express in some degree the sentiment that we feel. We honored every achievement of American arms. All honor to the soldiers and their commanders who have so gallantly planted the American flag where it will assure the blessings of liberty and of God. All hail to the chief who sent to a suffering people the humanity of a mighty nation. All hail our guest, our rule, our president."

Wild Burst Greets the President.

As President McKinley rose the multitude broke into another tumult of cheers that continued for several minutes. During the eloquent address that followed this was repeated at frequent intervals and when the president asked if the American people would endeavor to detract from the glory so gallantly won by their soldiers the response was a temptuous​ chorus of "Noes" that seemed to reflect the unanimous sentiment of the tremendous throng. President McKinley spoke as follows:

Gentlemen of the Transmississippi Exposition and Fellow Citizens: It is with genuine pleasure that I meet once more the people of Omaha, whose wealth of welcome is not altogether unfamiliar to me and whose warm hearts have before touched and moved me. For this renewed manifestation of your regard and for the cordial reception of today my heart responds with profound gratitude and a deep appreciation which I cannot conceal, and which the language of compliment is inadequate to convey. My greeting is not alone to your city and the state of Nebraska, but to the people of all the states of the transmississippi group participating here, and I cannot withhold congratulations on the evidences of their prosperity furnished by this great exposition. If testimony were needed to establish the fact that their pluck has not deserted them, and that prosperity is again with them it is found here. This picture dispels all doubt.

In an age of expositions they have added yet another magnificent example. The historical celebrations at Philadelphia and Chicago, and the splendid exhibits at New Orleans, Atlanta and Nashville, are now a part of the past, and yet in influence they still live, and their beneficent results are closely interwoven with our national development. Similar rewards will honor the authors and patrons of the Transmississippi and International Exposition. Their contribution will mark another epoch in the nation's material advancement.

One of the great laws of life is progress, and nowhere have the principles of this law been so strikingly illustrated as in the United States. A century and a decade of our national life have turned doubt into conviction; changed experiment into demonstration; revolutionized old methods and won new triumphs which have challenged the attention of the world. This is true not only of the accumulation of material wealth and advance in education, science, invention and manufactures, but above all in the opportunities to the people for their own elevation, which have been secured by wise free government.

Present Full of Responsibility.

Hitherto, in peace and in war, with additions to our territory and slight changes in our laws, we have steadily enforced the spirit of the constitution secured to us by the noble self-sacrifice and far-seeing sagacity of our ancestors. We have avoided the temptations of conquest in the spirit of gain. With an increasing love for our institutions and an abiding faith in their stability, we have made the triumphs of our system of government in the progress and the prosperity of our people an inspiration to the whole human race. Confronted at this moment by new and grave problems, we must recognize that their solution will affect not ourselves along but others of the family of nations.

In this age of frequent interchange and mutual dependency, we cannot shirk our international responsibilities if we would; they must be met with courage and wisdom and we must follow duty even if desire opposes. No deliberation can be too mature, or self-control too constant, in this solemn hour of our history. We must avoid the temptation of undue agression​, and aim to secure only such results as will promote our own and the general good.

It has been said by some one that the normal condition of nations is war. That is not true of the United States. We never enter upon war until every effort for peace without it has been exhausted. Ours has never been a military government. Peace, with whose blessings we have been so singularly favored, is the national desire, and the goal of every American aspiration.

On the 25th of April, for the first time for more than a generation, the United States sounded the call to arms. The banners of war were unfurled; the best and bravest from every section responded; a mighty army was enrolled; the north and the south vied with each other in patriotic devotion; science was invoked to furnish its most effective weapons; factories were rushed to supply equipment; the youth and the veteran joined in freely offering their services to their country; volunteers and regulars and all the people rallied to the support of the republic. There was no break in the line, no halt in the march, no fear in the heart. No resistance to the patriotic impulse at home, no successful resistant to the patriotic spirit of the troops fighting in distant waters or on a foreign shore!

Patriotism Flames Out.

What a wonderful experience it has been from the standpoint of patriotism and achievement! The storm broke so suddenly that it was here almost before we realized it. Our navy was too small, though forceful with its modern equipment and most fortunate in its trained officers and sailors. Our army had years ago been reduced to a peace footing. We had only 19,000 available troops when the war was declared, but the account which officers and men gave of themselves on the battlefields has never been surpassed. The manhood was there and everywhere. American patriotism was there and its resources were limitless. The courageous and invincible spirit of the people proved glorious, and those who a little more than a third of a century ago were divided and at war with each other were again united under the holy standard of liberty. Patriotism banished party feeling; $50,000,000 for the national defense was appropriated without debate or division, as a matter of course, and as only a mere indication of our mighty reserve power.

But if this is true of the beginning of the war, what shall we say of it now, with hostilities suspended, and peace near at hand, as we fervently hope? Matchless in its results! Unequaled in its completeness and the quick succession with which victory followed victory! Attained earlier than it was believed to be possible; so comprehensive in its sweep that every thoughtful man feels the weight of responsibility which has been so suddenly thrust upon us. And above all and beyond all, the valor of the American army and the bravery of the American navy and the majesty of the American names stand forth in unsullied glory, while the humanity of our purposes and the magnanimity of our conduct have given to war, always horrible, touches of noble generosity, Christian sympathy and charity, and examples of human grandeur which can never be lost to mankind. Passion and bitterness formed no part of our impelling motive, and it is gratifying to feel that humanity triumphed at every step of the war's progress.

The heroes of Manila and Santiago and Porto Rico have made immortal history. They are worthy successors and descendants of Washington and Greene; of Paul Jones, Decatur and Hull, and of Grant, Sherman, Sheridan and Logan; of Farragut, Porter and Cushing, and of Lee, Jackson and Longstreet.

Heroes of the Line.

New names stand out on the honor roll of the nation's great men and with them unnamed stand the heroes of the trenches and the forecastle, invincible in battle and uncomplaining in death. The intelligent, loyal, indomitable soldier and sailor and marine, regular and volunteer, are entitled to equal praise as having done their whole duty, whether at home or under the baptism of foreign fire.

Who will dim the splendor of their achievements! Who will withhold from them their well-earned distinction! Who will intrude detraction at this time to belittle the manly spirit of the American youth and impair the usefulness of the American army! Who will embarrass the government by sowing seeds of dissatisfaction among the brave men who stand ready to serve and die, if need be, for their country! Who will darken the counsels of the republic in this hour requiring the united wisdom of all!

Shall we deny to ourselves what the rest of the world so freely and so justly accords to us? The men who endured in the short but decisive struggle its hardships, its privations, whether in field or camp, on ship or in the siege, and planned and achieved its victories, will never tolerate impeachment, either direct or indirect, of those who won a peace whose great gain to civilization is yet unknown and unwritten.

The faith of a Christian nation recognizes the hand of Almighty God in the ordeal through which we have passed. Divine favor seemed manifest everywhere. In fighting for humanity's sake we have been signally blessed. We did not seek war. To avoid it if this could be done in justice and honor to the rights of our neighbors and ourselves was our constant prayer. The war was no more invited by us than were the questions which are laid at our door by its results. Now, as then, we will do our duty. The problems will not be solved in a day. Patience will be required; patience combined with sincerity of purpose and unshaken resolution to do right, seeking only the highest good of the nation and recognizing no other obligation, pursuing no other path but that of duty.

Right action follows right purpose. We may not at all times be able to divine the future, the way may not always seem clear; but if our aims are high and unselfish, somehow and in some way the right end will be reached. The genius of the nation, its freedom, its wisdom, its humanity, its courage, its justice, favored by Divine Providence, will make it equal to every task and the master of every emergency.

The inspiring conclusion of the president's address was followed by renewed acclamation and when Postmaster General Smith was introduced, he received an ovation that was almost equally flattering. He spoke briefly along lines similar to those followed by the president.

GOOD-NATURED JAM AT THE PLAZA.

Throng Gathered to Hear the President Hardly Able to See Him.

Thousands of the press who packed the Grand Plaza before the band stand when President McKinley arose to speak had been in their places for hours. Motor trains early in the morning unloaded thousands who had come long before the turnstiles were set agoing for the express purpose of getting a position on the plaza and retaining it until the exercises were over. It was a case of the early bird catches the worm and plenty of people seemed to be convinced of the soundness of this axiom.

Thus at 9 o'clock and shortly thereafter the forerunners of the immense crowd that was to come were rapidly filling the place. Gradually the crowd became a throng, the throng became a solidly packed mass. At 10 o'clock the people had filled the entire place up to the crest of the viaduct. The reserved seats had long been disposed of and the only place that one could secure to get a view of the platform was on the far outskirts of the crowd. Every point of any elevation about any of the buildings was seized with avidity. From some of the buildings and from the outskirts of the crowd it was impossible to hear anything from the platform and it was barely possible to see more than the outline of persons on the platform. Yet everybody seemed to be satisfied to look at the place where the president was even if they were not always able to distinguish him.

The crowd amused itself with the usual banter and comment that pervade such an assembly. That is, they talked while they were not engaged in trying to prevent themselves from being squeezed to death, and in stopping those who were pushing and hustling to secure their positions. A diversion occurred on the arrival of the soldiers. The Cuban veterans were given a hearty reception, being cheered loudly as they made their way through the crowd. The crowd then sank back again into comparative quietude until it was aroused to cheers by the arrival of the presidential party. The sudden push forward resulting from the wild enthusiasm and the wish to see almost obliterated the passageway along which the cavalcade was passing.

All the distinguished visitors were greeted with cheers, but the ovation of the event was vouchsafed to the president. Another outburst occurred when he arose to speak. Very few of the crowd heard President Wattles, but everybody waited until he apparently turned to introduce some one. When in response to the pantomime President McKinley arose and stepped forward, a thunder of cheers and a sea of waving hats and handkerchiefs greeted him. Those on the outskirts were as eagerly centering their gaze on the stand if they were able to secure but glimpses of the nation's ruler.

"Here, you can see him through here."

"I see the back of his head. See there!"

"That time I saw his face, fair and square. Now let's go."

"Oh, how I wish I could hear him speak only a minute."

Hundreds of such comments and remarks flew right and left through the crowd. And even though 'nary a word penetrated to a twentieth of the audience, the press remained until the last speaker had finished, until the last carriage had rolled away.

HAND SHAKING A GREAT SUCCESS.

North and South Exchange a Hearty and Brotherly Greeting.

The North and South Handshaking jubilee was one of the features of yesterday at the exposition. The exposition management turned its work in connection with the handshaking over to Superintendent Kelly of the musical department and he at once went into conference with General Passenger Agent Lupton of the San Antonio & Aransas Pass railway and Prof. Atwater of the Texas exhibit. The plan was outlined and was carried out in accordance with this outline. At 2 o'clock hundreds of the visitors from the south congregated at the west end of the lagoon and many hundreds of the northern people met at the east end of the little body of water. Each section was accompanied by a band. A few moments later Superintendent Kelly appeared upon the   viaduct spanning the lagoon and commenced to wigwag with a handkerchief, tied to the end of a long pole. This signal was for the bands to begin to play. Both struck up familiar airs and continued for ten minutes, when Superintendent Kelly again wigwagged, this time for the two processions to move.

The band heading the delegations from the south played "Dixie," while the musicians who preceded the northern forces rendered "Marching Through Georgia." The two great bodies, each containing several hundred men and women, marching along the north side of the lagoon until they reached the Plaza in front of the Administration arch, where the bands joined and played "The Star Spangled Banner." The selection having been completed, Prof. Atwater of Texas stepped into the open space and said that in behalf of the people of the south he wanted to congratulate the exposition management upon its success in building up and carrying on a great show, the like of which had never before been seen upon this or any other continent. He said that the people of the south and especially those of Texas have done all that lay in their power to make it a great achievement. The railroads of the south, he said, and that of Aransas Pass in particular have aided the south in making it possible for the country to be here with its exhibits and its people, doing this by contributing money and making the lowest possible passenger rates.

This ended the speechmaking and the handshaking commenced. At first it was in a weak way, but it seemed to be contagious and in less than five minutes hundred of men, women and children were all shaking hands and all shaking at the same time. Old battle-scarred veterans who fought against each other thirty-five years ago grasped hands and appeared to be as glad to see each other as though they were brothers separated for a long period of years. The whole thing was pronounced a success and will be long remembered as an epoch in the history of the exposition.

In the march to the meeting place the northern forces were preceded by Colonel Stanton of Illinois, Major Courtney of Oregon, Colonel Richardson of Nebraska and a score of others equally prominent. The southern forces were led by Colonel Johnson, vice president of the Texas commission; General Lupton, Commissioner Cole, Colonel Gilliam of Tennessee, Captain Moore of Georgia, Leopole Cahn, Captain Travis, Miss Ethel Jones of Texas and dozens of other prominent southerners.

TEST OF THE STEEL TRACK ROAD.

Successful Exhibition of the Advantage of the New Plan.

A test of the steel road, which is on exhibition north of the Dairy building, was made yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Three heavy wagons loaded with nearly 100 men were drawn over its smooth surface by a single horse. This represented the hauling power of the animal on this style of roadway to be nearly ten times its weight.

The steel road has been placed on exhibition under the direction of Martin Dodge of the United States bureau of road inquiry. It consists of two steel rails eight inches in width and one-half an inch thick, laid on a foundation of cement. Between these is a hard surface of crushed gravel. The rails are laid in lengths of thirty feet. It is estimated that this road can be put down in almost every kind of soil at an average expense of from $3,000 to $3,500 a mile.

On a common road a good load for a horse is his weight. On the paved streets in the city a horse can haul from two to four times his weight. The steel road has the advantage of being harder and more unyielding than one made from any other material. There is practically but one point of contact and friction is reduced to the minimum. It is believed by those interested in the construction of the new road that if it comes into general use the demand for inanimate motive power will be increased, as engines of small horse power would be cheaper than horses.

The new road will be put down with a single track and no turnouts. The hard bed between the rails and at the sides is thought to be adequate to allow the lighter team to give way to the heavier.

Praise from President Peterson.

Charles Peterson, president of the San Antonio & Aransas Pass Immigration company and also exposition commissioner from Texas, was unexpectedly called to his home at Rock Island, Tex., last night, thus preventing him from being here during the festivities and participating in the exercises of Peace Jubilee week. Before leaving for the south, Mr. Peterson said: "I feel confident that the Transmississippi and International Exposition will go down into history as the most successful enterprise of its kind ever held in any country on the face of the earth. In my judgment this is largely due to the advertising the exposition received. The Department of Publicity took the right course in pushing the advertising. Mr. Rosewater knew how to reach the people at the right time and just how to reach them in order to start them toward Omaha. Everybody must concede that the large attendance at the exposition has been due in a great measure to Mr. Rosewater and the efforts that he has put forth through his department and his paper, The Bee.

"I feel that Texas as​ done its share toward helping build the exposition. Our people have put in their money and have done so willingly. We feel that the investment has been a good one and that our state will be repaid fully tenfold. Thousands of people in the north, east and west had little idea of the resources and diversified wealth of Texas until they came here and looked over our exhibit. Since then they have changed their minds and many of them are willing to admit the Lone Star state stands well up toward the head of the procession in about every respect."

Sham Battle Yesterday.

The Indian battle yesterday afternoon drew its share of the crowd and proved to be an interesting feature. The grand stand and all of the vacant ground adjoining the battlefield was crowded with people, most of whom were strangers and those who have never seen the Indian as he appears upon his native heath. The fight was along the well worn lines and consisted of the Sioux and their allies battling with the Blackfeet and their allies. As has been the result frequently, the Sioux were licked out of their boots, that having been the program for the occasion.

For the entertainment of the president and the other distinguished members of the party, the Indians will engage in battle this afternoon. They will be supplied with double the usual amount of ammunition and will burn all of it before they quit fighting.

Horticulturists Decorate.

The exhibitors in the Horticultural building are filled with expectancy. They are looking forward to Wednesday, as upon that day they expect the President McKinley will pass through the building and inspect the fruit which is in their care. Anticipating this visit, all of the people connected with the exhibits are doing their utmost to place their fruit in the best possible condition in order that it may make an impression.

[?] the exhibitors have joined forces and [?] hung large numbers of flags, yards [?]g and scores of lithographs of the [?] Their work has given the inte-[?]building a finished appearance [?] much more attractive than [?]

TODAY AT THE EXPOSITION.

President's Day.

8 a. m. to 10 p. m.—Indian Congress.

9 a. m.—Live Stock Exhibit at Stock Pavilion.

10:30 a. m.—Innes Band on Plaza.

Part 1.

Overture—ZanettaAuber
(a) The Rustic Mill (descriptive idyl)Eilenberg
(b) Rob Roy (quickstep)DeKoven
Solo for Contra Tuba—Air VarieCeskyCesky.
Scenes from the Chimes of NormandyPlanquette
At a Georgia Camp Meeting (descriptive fantasia)Mills

Part 2.

Vorspiel—Haensel and GretelHumperdinck
(a) Demons of the Mountain (from Peer Gynt)Grieg
(b) Love Is King (two step march)Innes
Cornet Solo—Concert PolkaLevyKenney.
American National FantasiaBendix

11 a. m.—President McKinley Enters the Grounds and Will Speak at Music Pavilion.

MusicInnes Band
InvocationRev. John McQuoid
Introduction and WelcomeG. W. WattlesPresident Transmississippi and International Exposition.
AddressHon. William McKinleyPresident of the United States.
Music
AddressHon. Charles Emory SmithPostmaster General.

2 p. m.—Innes Band at Auditorium.

3 p. m.—Omaha Concert Band at Government Building.

3 p. m.—U. S. Life Saving Exhibition on Lagoon.

3:30 p. m.—Women's Club at Auditorium.

3:30 p. m.—President Receives the Public at Government Building.

4 p. m.—Omaha Concert Band at Indian Grounds.

March—Commander-in-ChiefHorst
Overture—Bohemian GirlBalfe
Song—Spring AwakeningBach
Waltz—The PestherLanner
Selection—WangMoses
Polka—Light as a FeatherZiehrer
Fantasia—Soldier's LifeKeler Bela
Patrol—BritishAsh

4:30 p. m.—Great Indian Sham Battle.

5 p. m.—Santiago War Balloon Ascension.

7 p. m.—Innes Band on Plaza.

Part 1.

Overture—TannhaeuserWagner
Piccolo Solo—Turtle Dove (concert polka)DemareHeidelberg.
Gathering of the Clans (Scotch fantasia No. 1)Doone(Introducing solos for all the principal players of the band and concluding with the old pledge of affectionate remembrance, "Auld Lang Syne.")
The Star Spangled Banner(Introducing Innes battery of electric cannon, with accompanying fireworks spectacle.)

Part 2.

The Force in the Forest (descriptive idyl)MichaelisThe dawn; "Winged Minstrels" announce the new day; by the brook; a summer shower; the cathedral chimes sound the hour of the morning prayer; at the forge (Introducing the costumed corps of the musical blacksmiths, flaming anvils, double male quartet, etc.)
Two Characteristic Marches—
(a) En Liesse (French)Coutant
(b) Love Is King (American)Innes
Trombone Solo—WaitingMillardInnes.
Overture—JubelWeber(Concluding with the national hymn, "My Country 'Tis of Thee, and accompanied by Innes' battery of electric artillery.)

9 p. m.—Grand Special Fireworks in Honor of the President and His Party.

 

FIRST IN WAR—FIRST IN PEACE.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.
CHAS-A-GRAY
 

Gems from President McKinley's Speech.

My greeting is not alone to Omaha and the state of Nebraska, but to the people of all the states of the Transmississippi group participating here, and I cannot withhold congratulations on the evidences of their prosperity furnished by this great exposition. If testimony were needed to establish the fact that their pluck has not deserted them, and that prosperity is again with them, it is found here. This picture dispels all doubt.

One of the great laws of life is progress, and nowhere have the principles of this law been so strikingly illustrated as in the United States.

No deliberation can be too mature or self-control too constant, in this solemn hour of our history. We must avoid the temptation of undue aggression, and aim to secure such results as will promote our own and the general good.

Ours has never been a military government. Peace, with whose blessings we have been so singularly favored, is the national desire and the goal of every American aspiration.

New names stand out on the honor roll of the nation's great men and with them unnamed stand the heroes of the trenches and the forecastle, invincible in battle and uncomplaining in death. The intelligent, loyal, indomitable soldier and sailor and marine, regular and volunteer, are entitled to equal praise as having done their whole duty, whether at home or under the baptism of foreign fire.

Who will dim the splendor of their achievements! Who will withhold from them their well-earned distinction! Who will intrude detraction at this time to belittle the manly spirit of the American youth and impair the usefulness of the American army! Who will embarrass the government by sowing seeds of dissatisfaction among the brave men who stand ready to serve and die, if need be, for their country! Who will darken the counsels of the republic in this hour requiring the united wisdom of all!

Shall we deny to ourselves what the rest of the world so freely and so justly accords to us? The men who endured in the short but decisive struggle its hardships, its privations, whether in field or camp, on ship or in the siege, and planned and achieved its victories, will never tolerate impeachment, either direct or indirect, of those who won a peace whose great gain to civilization is yet unknown or unwritten.

Right action follows right purpose. We may not at all times be able to divine the future, the way may not always seem clear; but if our aims are high and unselfish, somehow in some way the right end will be reached.

 

PRESIDENT IS HERE

Mr. McKinley is Given a Royal Western Welcome to Omaha.

THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE CHEER HIM ON

Mightiest Throng Ever Gathered in the City Vents Its Enthusiasm.

SHOUTS OF LOYAL GREETING FILL THE AIR

Popular Ovation Leaves no Doubt of the Feeling of the Public.

OVER A MILE OF STRUGGLING HUMANITY

Wide Streets Jammed from Curb to Curb with Citizens Eager to Honor the Nation's Chief Executive as He Passes.

The biggest and most enthusiastic crowd that ever assembled on the streets of Omaha gave hearty and tumultuous greeting last night to the president of the United States. The city was ablaze with light, gorgeous with color and resonant with cheers. It was a welcome worthy of the Exposition city, worthy of its distinguished guests and worthy of the president who, in the last few months, has achieved the diplomatic triumphs of a Richelieu and conducted the most brilliant campaign on land and sea the world has ever witnessed.

Twice before has William McKinley been the guest of Omaha, each time as the representative of a party struggling for supremacy. Last night he came as the executive of the nation and the whole people congregated to bid him welcome and vent their ardor in the greatest demonstration that Omaha has ever seen. Thousands of people from every part of the transmississippi country joined with Ak-Sar-Ben and his loyal subjects in the ringing cheers of greeting. The streets of the city were resplendent with electric radiance and patriotic colors swept in profusion over the upturned faces of the tremendous concourse that waited to catch a glimpse of its president and lend voice and inspiration to the patriotic tumult. The pavements were carpeted with a solid mass of pushing, crowding, surging humanity that packed itself so densely that it was almost impossible to force a passage. Long before 6 o'clock the people began to congregate at the most favorable vantage points and early in the evening the jam in the streets was unprecedented. At the same time the street cars were unable to carry half the people who were still coming. The streets far our into the residence districts were lined with pedestrians hurrying to the streets on which the presidential pageant was to move and these mingled finally in the impact throng that seemed already to fill every foot of standing room. The density of the crush was apparent when the president arrived and the police attempted to clear a passageway for the carriages.

Hardly Room To Pass.

From the foot of Farnam street to the city hall the people were crushed in a cohesive body that had scarcely elasticity enough to yield. The first file of police barely succeeded in opening a narrow footpath. The next jammed the people harder against the walls on either side and finally the mounted troop rode their horses in the faces of the crowd and it fell back with crushing force on those behind and left barely room for the carriages to pass. This was continued all along the line, but even the unbearable crush did not chill the enthusiasm of the people. When the carriage which contained President McKinley was perceived the crowd burst into a vociferous cheer that never seemed to cease. When one voice tired another took it up and the whole line of march was a single demonstration of swelling cheers and waving hats and flags. At frequent intervals the president bowed right and left and his recognition gave new impetus to the ovation. Under the red, green and yellow of the electric arches and the shimmering glory of myriads of incandescent bulbs the scene was one well calculated to inspire the patriotism of the multitude. And this broke forth in new ardor with the appearance of each of the officials and guests as they were recognized by the crowd. When the carriages which carried General Miles and the other heroes of the war came into view the enthusiasm culminated in a shout that fairly made the big buildings quiver and thousands of flags that had waved a greeting to the president were raised again in tribute to the blue and gold and the men who wore it.

It was impossible to move the parade of Ak-Sar-Ben at once and it required nearly an hour and the most vigorous exertions on the part of the police to sufficiently clear the streets to permit its passage. When this was accomplished the pageant moved rapidly over the line of march and the magnificent spectacle was cheered almost as enthusiastically as that which had gone before. Then with a final outburst the crowd broke and swept in every direction. It swamped the street cars and overflowed by thousands into the streets that led homeward. It had been jammed and crushed and elbowed almost beyond the limit of human endurance, but it had performed its duty and went home happy.

Immediately after reviewing the parade President McKinley and his party were driven to the Omaha club, where they will be quartered during their stay in Omaha. Shortly after a lunch was spread in the dining room for the distinguished guests, members of the reception committee and the directors of the club. In this President McKinley did not participate. He was somewhat fatigued after his long journey and the excitement of the evening and at once retired to his apartments on the first floor, which had been especially refitted for his occupancy. Meanwhile the remainder of the party spent a very pleasant hour over the luncheon, which was enjoyed in a thoroughly informal matter.

President on the Fair.

The special committee which met the presidential train at Council Bluffs consisted of Edward Rosewater, Z. T. Lindsey, F. P. Kirkendall, E. E. Bruce and A. L. Reed.

While the train was crossing the bridge the president expressed himself as highly gratified over the success of the exposition. He remarked that this of itself is a good testimony to its excellence. These great industrial fairs, he observed further by way of philosophical comment, are the very best promoters of peace in the world. As the president felt somewhat fatigued by his trip every effort was made by the committee to save him all unnecessary annoyance and only the ordinary interchange of ideas passed between them.

A question, however, was ventured as to whether Senator Hanna was coming, as Mr. Hanna was not on the train. The president's response was to the effect that it had been his particular desire all along that no political significance whatever should attach to his visit. In keeping with this Mr. Hanna had not accompanied the party. Mr. McKinley said he had come merely to participate in the Peace Jubilee after the happy termination of the war with Spain.

COMING OF PRESIDENTIAL TRAIN.

Patient Crowd of Patriots Await and Cheer Its Arrival.

For three hours a dense crowd of people thronged the Tenth street viaduct waiting for the arrival of the first section of the Northwestern special train bearing President McKinley and his party. The Burlington and union depots and the yards were thronged. It was with great difficulty that Superintendent Baxter of the Union Pacific and the yard force could keep the railway tracks clear at all for the regular trains. It might have been supposed that the presidential train would have necessitated a change of schedule for some of the regular trains, but only one train was actually delayed, No. 3 of the Union Pacific, which had to be held across the river until the presidential train came over the bridge.

President McKinley's train arrived almost a half hour before it was expected, having made up that much time. Consequently it looked for a while as though there would not be carriages on time to accommodate the party, but Mr. Baxter telephoned up word and the needed carriages appeared. The time at which it was first supposed the presidential train would arrive was 9:20 p. m., but it steamed into the yards as early as 9 o'clock. Wild shouts went up from the people and cheer after cheer welcomed its approach, the cheering commencing as soon as the headlight of the engine was first seen.

Of the reception committee waiting at the Union Pacific depot there were President Gurdon W. Wattles of the exposition and Mrs. Wattles, Mr. and Mrs. Carroll S. Montgomery, Congressman and Mrs. David H. Mercer, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Dunn, Major and Mrs. H. C. Ward, Mayor Frank E. Moores, President W. W. Bingham of the city council, ex-Senator and Mrs. Charles F. Manderson, Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Saunders, Mr. and Mrs. John L. Webster, Inspector General Beck, H. S. McGarvey, General and Mrs. John C. Cowin, General Manager Thad. S. Clarkson of the exposition, Herman Kountze, Mr. and Mrs. John A. Wakefield, Mr. and Mrs. John C. Wharton, G. M. Hitchcock, Mr. and Mrs. Z. T. Lindsey, Mesdames George A. Joslyn, Clement Chase, J. E. Summers, George F. Bidwell, W. A. Redick, E. Rosewater, C. W. Lyman, E. E. Bruce, A. L. Reed, F. P. Kirkendall and a number of other. Edward Rosewater, Z. T. Lindsey, F. P. Kirkendall, E. E. Bruce and A. L. Reed constituted a special committee to meet the train at Council Bluffs. Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Babcock were already on the train when it arrived at Council Bluffs.

Eager to See McKinley.

Hardly had the train arrived before the eager crowd began to press against the steps of the cars. The presidential party was in the last coach. Everybody wanted to catch a glimpse of Mr. McKinley's face. No sooner did they succeed in doing so than they began pressing toward the rear steps and a jam of humanity was threatened. A squad of police under Sergeant Whalen had managed to keep clear an aisle through the surging mass, but now it had to redouble its efforts to make it possible for the president to pass. The reception committee had to assist, too, in keeping back the people. General E. V. Sumner, commander of the Departments of Colorado and the Missouri, and his aide, Lieutenant John M. Palmer, had been waiting with the committee, more particularly for the military train which was to follow in about an hour, but they were among the first to board the coach and a hearty handshake was given the president by General Sumner. President Wattles was likewise speedily into the car and other members of the committee. A few words of welcome were extended to the president and then he appeared on the steps and was escorted through the crowd to his carriage by Mr. Wattles and Carroll S. Montgomery. The people pressed around him thickly and cheering at the top of their voices. Mr. McKinley smilingly took in the situation and his face beamed benignly upon his enthusiastic fellow Americans and their spontaneous expressions of admiration. There was no time to be lost though, so the party was escorted to the carriages immediately.

The presidential party consisted of Mr. McKinley and his secretary, John Addison Porter, and Assistant Secretary George B. Cortelyou, Secretary of the Interior Cornelius Bliss, Secretary of Agriculture James Wilson ,Assistant Secretary of War George D. Meiklejohn, James McKinley, a nephew of the president, William Drummond, a relative of Mrs. McKinley, and Captain Lafayette McWilliams of Chicago. Governor Leslie M. Shaw and staff of Iowa were also on the train, having got aboard at Clinton, and Congressman Cousins had boarded it at Cedar Rapids. Senator Allison had ridden with it as far as Boone. The press was represented by Robert S. McFarlane of the Associated Press and D. H. Carroll of the New York Sun.

Ride to the City Hall.

There was naturally some slight hitch in the arrangements, for it was necessary to get the party up town through great masses of people on time to see the parade. President McKinley, accompanied by President Wattles of the exposition, were soon seated in the first carriage and taken up the driveway. Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Bruce, General and Mrs. John C. Cowin, Major and Mrs. H. C. Ward and other members of the reception committee, with the exception of Major Clarkson and one or two others, took their carriages and went up town, also, expecting to be back easily in time for the train bearing the military party.

At every step of the horses as the party drove through the streets the throngs which lined the sidewalks cheered themselves hoarse and far ahead of the course taken, as soon as the word was passed along that the president was coming, the shouts arose. The cheers served as a method of signaling equally as good as anything in the electric line and from the depot the shouts passed along Tenth street to Farnam and thence up Farnam to the city hall, where a mighty concourse had been patiently waiting for several hours. Soon the entire town was yelling and cheering and waving hats and handkerchiefs. It was a glorious ovation which was given to the nation's chief executive on his entrance into the exposition city.

 

MILITARY AND DIPLOMATIC TRAIN.

Delayed in Reaching Omaha, but Warmly Received When It Arrives.

It was due to no lack of appreciation of the merits of the commanding general of the army of the United States and the gallant officers with him that the crowd which greeted his train at the Union depot last night was small and that there was an apparent lack of enthusiasm. When the presidential train arrived it was rumored among the thousands who were at the depot that the parade would start immediately after the distinguished guests were driven to Farnam street, without waiting for the military train, and the crowd quickly dispersed to witness the pageant. Further, the people had been waiting at the depot for nearly two hours when the presidential train pulled in and the prospect of a further wait of an hour and a half was not welcomed by them.

It was 10:35 when the train bearing General Miles and staff and other military officers, members of the diplomatic corps, newspaper correspondents and government officials pulling up at the Union depot. General Sumner, temporarily in command of the Department of the Missouri, was present to greet his superior officer and the members of the reception committee were also there to see that the distinguished guests were properly cared for.

Personnel of the Party.

The following made up the party on the train: Major General Nelson A. Miles and wife, Colonel Francis Michler, Colonel William M. Black, Colonel James Allen, Captain W. H. Whitney, staff officers; Mr. Dawson, secretary to General Miles; Brigadier General A. W. Greeley, chief signal officer, wife and daughter, chief signal officer, wife and daughter; Brigadier General C. F. Humphrey, wife and daughter and Miss Page Carr; Major H. O. S. Heistand and wife and Miss Martin; Prof. Willis L. Moore, chief of the Weather bureau, and wife; Dr. W. T. Harris of the Bureau of Education and wife; Dr. R. W. Baker, U. S. A., and wife; Mrs. J. V. Creighton, president of the White Cross society; Senator John M. Thurston and stenographer; G. R. Butlin, A. J. Leonard, stenographer at the White House and George Scott, messenger for the party.

In the diplomatic corps were the following: Wu Ting-Fang, Chinese minister plenipotentiary, and wife and maid and their son, Wu Cho Chu; Chow Tsz-Chi, Hwang Chung-Huli, Li Kwang-Hang, secretaries; Chin Pom Ye, Korean minister plenipotentiary, and wife and their son, We Chong Ye; Tam E. Ye, secretary; Henry Guillaume; Gonsalo de Quesada, charge d'affaires, Cuban junta, and his wife and daughter; Mr. Meron, minister for the Argentine Republic, and his secretary, Mr. Del Viso; Mr. Brasil, the Brazilian minister, and his secretary, Mr. Lima.

The following were the members of the Washington press gang: Charles S. Albert, New York World; George Grantham Bain, Harper's Weekly; Fred Benzinger, Chicago Times-Herald; W. E. Curtis, Chicago Record; C. A. Hamilton, Sioux City Journal; James S. Henry, Philadelphia Press; Raymond Patterson and L. E. Reed, Chicago Tribune; Frank Richardson, Baltimore Sun; George W. Rouzer, New York Herald; John S. Shriver, New York Mail and Express; Howard N. Thompson, Associated Press; William Osborn, Army and Navy Register; J. H. Maddy, press agent of the Baltimore & Ohio, and E. C. Snyder, Omaha Bee.

The diplomatic corps were the first to alight from the train. The Korean minister and suite led, followed at once by the Chinese minister and family. These, of course, attracted the most attention for the moment owing to the peculiar style of their dress. The Argentine minister and Brazilian minister came next, followed by Mr. Quesada, representing the Cuban junta.

General Miles and his immediate party left their car promptly and were hurried to their carriages. The general and staff wore their fatigue uniforms, but the other military men were clad in civilian costumes.

The newspaper men dodged reception committees and friends and without ceremony or loss of time made for the telegraph offices to file their stories of the trip for their papers. They will be quartered at the Millard during their stay in the city. While they were engaged in the performance of their professional duties the other members of the party were taken in carriages, in charge of members of the reception committee, and while the parade of the evening had passed up Farnam street, they were driven over the route to see the illuminations and caught a glimpse of a portion of the parade as it passed along one of the other streets. They saw the vast crowd which had lined the streets during the early part of the evening, although it was at this time in a disorganized and tangled condition, and drove by the reviewing stand where a few people yet remained to greet them.

Delayed in Ohio.

The first delay of the train bearing this party, save that caused by the stops for speechmaking, was just east of Cambridge, O. There a wreck on the main line of the Baltimore & Ohio made it necessary to make a detour of about 300 miles. Even this did not ruffle the general, for he was enabled to speak and arouse the patriotism of thousands of Americans whom he could not have addressed otherwise. This made the train an hour and half late in Chicago.

From Chicago to Omaha there is not a town of importance that has not had the pleasure of seeing and listening to the eloquence of General Miles.

At Cedar Rapids and Marshalltown the enthusiasm was so great that it reached Wu Ting-Fong, the Chinese minister, and he made two rousing speeches. The unusual sight of a United States general and a Chinese minister, the one in his uniform, the other in his native dress, side by side, speaking on the same themes, roused the people to thunders of applause.

Little Wu Cho Chi, the Chinese minister's son, hobnobbed with little We Ching Ge, the Korean minister's son, and all along the route the distinguished foreigners showed the liveliest interest and wonder.

The party will remain here till midnight on Friday.

The train of three sleepers, a buffet, a dining and a private car for General Miles, was in charge of General Passenger Agent W. B. Kniskern and his assistants, John L. Furgerson and R. H. Aishton of the Northwestern road, while G. H. Maddy accompanied the party as the representative of the Baltimore & Ohio.

RECEPTION AT THE CITY HALL.

Welcome Accorded the President, Who Reviews the Parade.

Unparalleled in the annals of Omaha was the reception accorded to President McKinley last night by the vast concourse of people assembled on and about the reviewing stand in front of the city hall. The ovation to the great war president, which was continuous from the union depot to the Omaha club, reached its climax in the block on Farnam street between Seventeenth and Eighteenth streets. Here the three great buildings of Omaha, the city hall, the county court house and The Bee building, were taxed to their utmost capacity by enthusiastic spectators, while the broad streets surrounding them were packed to suffocation and the spacious lawn surrounding the court house for an entire block was lost to view in a solid covering of humanity.

It was just forty minutes after 9 o'clock when a burglar stationed far aloft in the tower of the city hall sounded the signal that excited the 500 spectators on the grand stand and the 100 times 500 men, women and children who surged as a mightly​ sea for a block about the reviewing stand and transformed the laughing chattering multitude into one that appeared beside itself with enthusiasm, every component member of the great throng wildly cheering as though his throat must break and waving a hat or a flag or a handkerchief in patriotic greeting to the president of the United States.

Welcome is Spontaneous.

The bright red coats of the Board of Governors of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben were already seen nearing the crest of Farnam street hill and the outlines of the carriage containing the most honored guest of the Exposition city could be barely descried. And the great crowd doubled its cheers and waved its salutations more frantically. In less than five minutes from the sounding of the bugle signal the long expected guest was in front of the great reviewing stand and his carriage was flanked on both sides by crowds that seemed to have no dimensions that could be computed. From both sides came the renewed cheers and the martial air of the Seventh Ward band was drowned; the brilliant attire of the governors of the loyal Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben and the handsome trappings of the South Omaha Equestrian club momentarily lost their attractiveness, paled by the tens of thousands fluttering flags and waving hats. To force a way for the carriage of the president and the long line of equipages that followed through the dense throng that occupied every foot of space in the street seemed an impossibility, but the four score of mounted governors, equestrians and policemen gradually cleared a way and the carriages penetrated the multitude without serious interruption.

Wherever they were recognized the members of the cabinet and other government officials were also accorded a hearty reception, and Governor Holcomb and "Our Dave Mercer" were especially well remembered. Major Robert S. Wilcox, King Ak-Sar-Ben IV, received an ovation from the twin grandstands of the city and the county that was second in intensity only to that accorded to the president and all of the Board of Governors were given "the glad hand" [?]

Reviews the Parade.

President McKinley entered the city hall from Eighteenth street and was escorted to the offices of Mayor Moores by the mayor and President Wattles of the exposition directory. He remained there a few minutes, chatted pleasantly with a few friends and then was taken to the reviewing stand in front of the building to witness the joint parade of the two grand parades of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben. As he entered the grandstand the great crowd arose and cheered, while the president, walking slowly down the center aisle to his seat at the front, smiled and bowed, with his hat in his hand, turning from one side to the other, acknowledging the remarkable demonstration in his honor. Reaching his chair at the front of the stand, he stood several minutes with uncovered head bowing to the immense crowd that stood in front of him and seemed to have no limit to its voice capacity. The president was kept busy acknowledging the demonstration until the head of the procession was seen in front of The Bee building. A few enthusiastic spectators who had seats near the chair of honor seized the interval to press forward and shake hands with the president. He was followed by 100 members of the party from Washington and their Omaha hosts and hostesses.

As the head of the mighty pageant of legendry and light reached the reviewing stand President McKinley arose and, lifting his hat, bowed graciously and gracefully to the mounted Board of Governors. He extended the same compliment to the Equestrian club, while all the riders placed their hats on their left shoulder while passing the reviewing stand. For each float the president arose, removed his hat and bowed, while there was not a single horseman or knight who saluted the president who failed to receive a kindly recognition. The knights who assumed the apparel of princesses on the beautiful floats illustrative of "The Feast of Alhambra" kissed their hands to his excellency and the well appointed attendants of the "Two Discreet Statues" brought out two beautiful American flags and waved them as they passed the stand.

Proceeds to the Club.

The president stood and plainly well pleased saw sixteen of the gorgeous floats pass by. Then there was an unfortunate break in the procession. The president sat down for a few minutes and then, as there appeared to be no sign of the march being resumed, withdrew with President Wattles, at 10:30 o'clock. The spectators of the grandstand arose and cheered again and again as he passed out, though they regretted that he could not remain to see the unique electrical display, which constituted the second portion of the pageant. The president was driven directly to the Omaha club, where a supper was served to the presidential party in the elaborately appointed private dining room.

Most of the other guests from Washington remained on the stand throughout the passing of the long parade and showed their appreciation of it by frequent applause. The last two of the electrical floats, one representing the army and the other the navy, were particularly well received. During the last part of the electrical parade, Managers Lindsey and Rosewater of the exposition executive committee entered the stand with General Miles and several prominent representatives of the diplomatic corps. As these distinguished visitors were recognized another shout of welcome went up from the great crowd. Following the last float of the pageant the street crowd took up the line of march past the reviewing stand and, although the "conquering hero" was not there, the throngs by the thousands pressed near and cheered loudly in his honor.

How the Party is Cared For.

Following is a list of the visitors of the city and the persons to whose especial care they have been consigned during their stay:

Carriage No. 1—President McKinley, escorted by Mr. G. W. Wattles; Omaha club.

Carriage No. 6—Secretary Lyman J. Gage and Mrs. Gage, escorted by Mr. Herman Kountze and Mrs. G. W. Wattles; Omaha club.

Carriage No. 2—Dr. Garcia Meron, escorted by Mr. Alvin Saunders and Mrs. Alvin Saunders; Paxton hotel.

Carriage No. 17—General Charles F. Humphrey and Mrs. Humphrey, escorted by Mr. John A. Wakefield and Mrs. John A. Wakefield.

Carriage No. 16.—General A. W. Greeley and Mrs. Greeley, escorted by Mr. C. S. Montgomery; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 3—Mr. Wu Ting Fang and Mrs. Wu Ting Fang, escorted by Mr. Z. T. Lindsey and Mrs. Z. T. Lindsey; Paxton hotel.

Carriage No. 4—Mr. Chin Pom Ye and Mrs. Chin Pom Ye, escorted by Mr. E. Rosewater and Mrs. E. Rosewater; Paxton hotel.

Carriage No. 5—Mr. Brasil, minister of Brazil, and Mr. Gonzalo de Quesada, escorted by Mr. F. P. Kirkendall and Mrs. F. P. Kirkendall; Paxton hotel.

Carriage No. 8—Secretary C. Bliss, escorted by Mr. E. E. Bruce; Omaha club.

Carriage No. 9—Secretary Wilson and Miss Wilson, escorted by Mrs. E. E. Bruce; Omaha club.

 

Carriage No. 10—Governor Alva Adams and Governor Silas A. Holcomb, escorted by Mr. A. L. Reed; private car in the exposition grounds.

Carriage No. 11—Senator W. V. Allen and Mrs. Allen, escorted by Mrs. A. L. Reed; Paxton hotel.

Carriage No. 14—General Miles and Mrs. Miles, escorted by Mr. W. N. Babcock and Mrs. W. N. Babcock; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 12—Dr. R. W. Baker, Mrs. Baker and Mrs. Creighton, escorted by Senator Thurston; Mr. Thurston's home.

Carriage No. 15—Brigadier General Sumner, escorted by Hon. D. H. Mercer; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 24—Mr. Chow Tsz Chi, Mr. Whang Chan Huli and Mr. Kwang Hany, secretary of the Chinese minister, escorted by Mrs. D. H. Mercer; Paxton hotel.

Carriage No. 18—Major H. O. Heistand and Mrs. Heistand, escorted by Hon. John L. Webster and Mrs. John L. Webster; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 27—Captain McWilliams and Mrs. McWilliams, escorted by Hon. John C. Cowin and Mrs. John C. Cowin; Omaha club.

Carriage No. 7—Secretary Charles E. Smith and Mrs. Smith, escorted by ex-Senator C. F. Manderson and Mrs. C. F. Manderson; Omaha club.

Carriage No. 25—Prof. W. L. Moore, Mrs. Moore and Hon. J. D. Yeomans, escorted by Hon. J. C. Wharton; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 26—Dr. W. T. Harris and Mrs. Harris, escorted by Mrs. J. C. Wharton; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 19—Assistant Secretary of War Meiklejohn and Secretary to the President Porter, escorted by Major H. C. Ward; Omaha club.

Carriage No. 22—Colonel Samuel Reber and Captain H. H. Whitney, escorted by Mrs. H. C. Ward; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 20—Captain Arthur Paget, escorted by Mr. J. R. Dunn; Paxton hotel.

Carriage No. 21—Colonel Francis Michler and Colonel W. M. Black, escorted by Mrs. J. R. Dunn; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 23—Secretary A. Delviso of Argentine, Secretary Tam E. Ye of Korea and Secretary Lima of Brazil, escorted by Mr. W. W. Bingham; Paxton hotel.

Carriage No. 28—The Misses Wheeler, escorted by Mrs. H. T. Clarke; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 29—The Misses Wheeler and General Miles' secretary, escorted by Mrs. W. A. Redick; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 30—Miss Wheeler and Mr. Cortelyou, escorted by Mrs. G. M. Hitchcock; Millard hotel and Omaha club.

Carriage No. 31—Miss Humphrey and Mrs. Howland, escorted by Mrs. J. E. Summers, jr., and Mrs. George A. Joslyn; Millard hotel.

Carriage No. 32—General John C. Black and Mrs. Black, escorted by Mr. George F. Bidwell and Mrs. C. W. Lyman; Millard hotel.

Carriages No. 33, 34, 35 and 36—Fifteen newspaper men, escorted by Mr. G. M. Hitchcock; Millard hotel.

PASSAGE OF THE GREAT PARADE.

How the Pageant Formed and Deployed in Review.

Under the shadow of the searchlight that threw its rays from the top of the B. & M. headquarters the forty floats that were to compose the parade waited to fall in behind the presidential party. The structures that delineated in their passage the story of Alhambra were lined on Farnam street east of Tenth and as fitted the personal following of King Ak-Sar-Ben were scheduled to follow directly after the carriages of the distinguished visitors. On Tenth street north of Farnam the electrical pageant of the celestial bodies was in waiting to pursue its glowing course in the rear of the royal procession. All of the knights and their servitors had kept faith with the royal edict and were on hand at the den in ample time to complete preparations. The combined parades took several hundred men to equip the floats and with the attendants a small army of the knig's​ subjects were required in the service. The party of sixty composing the South Omaha Equestrian club assembled on Harney street below Tenth and later rode to meet the visitors to act as guard of honor. Two attended each carriage on either side under command of Colonel A. L. Lott and made an attractive showing in their tall riding boots, white trousers, black coats and light fedora hats. Tenth street had been additionally lighted as far as the viaduct with overhead lines of incandescents and when the searchlight detected the first carriage descending the viaduct the torches were lighted and final preparations made to fall in.

When the carriage containing the chief executive was borne along within finger touch of the multitude, the pride and enthusiasm of the people burst forth in a shout of welcome that attended the carriage along the course. Sergeant Iler in front of his mounted platoon endeavored to make his direction heard, that the parades would follow close behind the presidential party. Just behind this escort rode Major Wilcox, king of Quivera, with the Board of Governors of the kingdom trusting to no lesser hands the attendance of William McKinley. The latter was drawn by snow white horses, while a bevy of knights in scarlet coats and caps rode close beside to keep back the eager populace pressing in upon the carriage for a glimpse of the kindly faced gentleman, who acknowledged their homage with bared head. In front of the whole party marched the Seventh Ward band, which heralded the coming of the nation's chief. Nearly two score carriages followed the presidential equipage and all received a demonstration of western cordiality.

The people who were massed from the building walls to the wheels of the carriages were then pressed back to make way for the pageants which followed with small delay. As minutely described on the occasion of their former appearance, they reflected the splendor of Ak-Sar-Ben;s realm, setting forth first the magic creations attending the Legends of Alhambra and following it the visitation of the heavenly bodies. Beside the admirable arrangement and construction of the floats, a display was made of increased illuminations along the streets. The public buildings on the route were lighted and adorned. Along Farnam street were hung large American flags and many congregations on private stands were individually provided with similar means of salute. The features of McKinley were presented on thousands of engravings and bunting decorated the entire route.

Before the first pageant had passed the reviewing stand the only unfavorable incident of the evening occurred. An electric light wire at Eighteenth and Douglas streets became unfastened and the procession was delayed for almost twenty minutes until repairs were made.

After the last float had passed, thousands of people made their way up Farnam street to win a sight of the city's guest. The thoroughfare for over a block east of Eighteenth was filled with a solid mass of humanity. The president and his party had left the reviewing stand, but men, women and children scanned the official stand eagerly, with cries of "Where is he?" High school boys in flying wedges and tandem files crushed their way through with the slogan, "McKinley, or bust." The crowds were finally cleared away safely, however, and the dense throng dispersed.

AFTER THE PARADE HAD GONE BY.

People Crowd the Streets in Indescribable but Good Natured Confusion.

Immediately after the last float of the parade had passed any given point along the line turmoil, confusion and pandemonium followed in its wake. The press which had been wedged in tight against the walls of stone and brick expanded and swept out into the street in an indiscriminate mass; the majority followed the final car in the parade and when Seventeenth and Farnam streets was reached there was a solid mass of people filling the last two blocks and a fringe extending a half a dozen blocks in every direction.

The street car company had made excellent arrangements to take care of the passenger traffic, but even these were utterly inadequate. A score and more of motor trains were waiting to transport the people to their homes or their lodging places from every central point. Despite these arrangements, however, hundreds of people were compelled to remain and wait for hours before they were able to secure street car facilities that would land them at the nearest junction to their homes or the places at which they passed the night.

The greatest jam occurred at Sixteenth and Farnam streets, where the east and westbound street cars interfered with the cross-town line. For a full half hour the parade had passed this intersection was packed with people who were seeking to obtain transportation and they preempted every inch of space in these cars. The remainder of the crowd was forced to wait for following cars to be able to get to their night's resting places.

The police arrangements were excellent and it was only because of this that accidents did not occur. A score of these guardians of the peace were stationed at the intersection of Farnam and Sixteenth streets to take care of the people and the vehicles that thronged the corner. It was long after midnight before the crowds had left the streets along which the parade had passed.

ARRANGEMENTS AT CLUB HOUSE.

Handsome Building Especially Furnished for Distinguished Visitors.

The Omaha club, which has been turned over to President McKinley and his official family during their stay in Omaha, has undergone a wonderful transformation in anticipation of its guests. Above the main entrance on Douglas street are beautifully draped festoons of flags, while a carriage canopy leads from the curb to the door. Inside the club house the apartments have been rearranged with special reference to the accommodation of the presidential party. All through the halls and the reception rooms the florist's art has made a bower of palms, plants and cut flowers. The walls have been hung with new pictures and the drapers and furniture men [?]

The quarters assigned to President McKinley are on the first floor opening off the drawing room, where formerly the women's ordinary was located. Two heavy brass bedsteads have been set up, one in the larger room and one in the smaller, while the toilet room has been turned into a bath. Had Mrs. McKinley come the two beds would have been in the larger room, but upon notice of her withdrawal from the party the smaller room was fitted up as a bedroom for the use of Mr. J. Addison Porter, the president's secretary. One surprise which the president met here was a picture of Mother McKinley, which has been hung in his chamber and which is a proper photographic copy of an old painting made by Peixotto. A portrait of President McKinley himself, which hangs in the reception room, has been prettily draped with the American flag. The large dining rooms on the second floor will be used for the president's party. Last night the table was laid for an evening supper for the guests and shone brightly with brilliant glassware and handsome silver.

Besides the rooms on the third floor, usually occupied for sleeping apartments, three additional chambers have been fitted up on the second floor in rooms formerly used as dining rooms and library. All these have been assigned to different members of the party. The entire service of the club, with all the waiters and attendants, is at the disposal of the guests, the members of the club having relinquished their rights entirely while the house is occupied by the president. The work of arranging the club for the reception of the president has been under the personal supervision of the directors, who are being warmly congratulated on the result of their labors.

TAKING CARE OF THE CROWDS.

How the Police Wrestled with the Jam that Choked the Streets.

Chief White and his 100 men, representing the entire strength of the police department, reinforced by fifty-two of the exposition guards, handling the crowd with credit. Not an accident occurred and but two pockets were picked. On Farnam street from Tenth to Seventeenth streets where the crowds filled the street from one side to the other the greatest difficulty was experienced by the police and guards in maintaining order. An officer was stationed every six feet on each side of this street from Sixteenth street to Seventeenth street.

During the early hours of the evening this force of men was able to maintain a clear street from curb to curb, but as soon as the head of the procession swung into Farnam street from Tenth the crowds that lined the sidewalks crowded out into the street despite the frantic efforts of the police to force them back. The surging crowd was reinforced from all the side streets the length of the route and by the time the president's carriage had started well on its way northward just a narrow lane, through which his carriage barely passed, was all the space the bluecoats could keep open. At Fourteenth and Farnam this lane began closing up and by the time the foremost carriage reached Sixteenth street the pavement was simply one mass of closely-wedged heads. From there to the reviewing stand the police had to fight their way through the crowds.

The carriages of the presidential party were besieged by anxious ones desirous of shaking hands with some one of the notables. The handshaking mania did not appear to the strike the crowd until Sixteenth street was reached.

At the Tenth street depot the dense crowds were more tractable than those on Farnam street and the ten officers under Sergeant Whalen were able to maintain a clear pathway for the presidential party from their trains to the waiting carriages. On the approach to the viaduct, over which the procession passed, a force of fifty officers, the combined forces of Sergeants Iler and Whalen, held in check the people and prevented them crossing the structure with the procession. This precaution was taken to insure the safety of the people.

After the parade, considerable difficulty was experienced at the Douglas street bridges in holding the crowds of Council Bluffs residents, who were anxious to return to their homes. The street cars were blockaded and the wagon roadway was congested by all manner of vehicles, which were wedged into one compact mass. But two officers were on duty at this point and they might just as well have been paper men, for all the good they did. A hurry call to the station for more aid was responded to by fifteen men, who succeeded in breaking the barriers and allowing the crowd to trickle out across the bridge.

 

Notes of the Parade.

Not an accident was reported during the night.

All of the theaters postponed their entertainments until 10:30.

In honor of the president coming Tenth street from Farnam to the depot was festooned and arched with strings of electric lights.

There was hardly a window in the buildings facing on Farnam street and those on the side streets near it but that was crowded with sightseers.

Mrs. A. V. Dunn of St. Paul, Neb., and Joseph Coppinger of Auburn, Neb., were the only victims of pickpockets reported up to midnight. The former lost a watch and the latter $58.

Harry Hunter, alias W. A. Hudson, and A. Tweed of Chicago and "Seno" Joseph Tiechman and a man only known as "Greeney" of Minneapolis were pickpockets who fell into the clutches of the police before they could do any work. Hunter and Tweed belong to the notorious McFarland gang of crooks and were arrested by Pinkerton detective Conway. Chief White himself arrested the other two.

On the top of the headquarters building of the Burlington Railroad company a big powerful electric searchlight was placed. Its broad beam of light made the pathway of the procession as light as day from the depot to the reviewing stand. On the front of the building was a large electric lighted crescent with a portrait of President McKinley in the center and with the word "Welcome" in red lights above it. This decoration was saluted by the president as he passed it.

DEATH RECORD.

Funeral of C. F. Beindorff.

A large number of sorrowing friends, old schoolmates and city and country officials attended the funeral yesterday afternoon of the late Charles F. Beindorff, who died Sunday evening after an illness of only a day. The services were conducted at 2 o'clock at the residence, No. 1025 South Thirtieth avenue, by Rev. S. Wright Butler, pastor of the St. Mary's avenue Congregational church. The interment was in Prospect Hill cemetery.

Mr. Beindorff died at the age of 35 in the noon of life. He had really been ailing for a year but was not taken down sick until Saturday afternoon in the German village at the exposition, of which he was the concessionaire. He leaves a widow and three small children, one of the children being only a baby. His father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Beindorff; his bother​, Otto; his sister, Mrs. Oliver P. Burnett, and his father-in-law and mother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Baker, were all among the mourners. The pall-bearers were Alfred Millard, H. D. Reed, George Scribner, Frank Colpetzer, F. B. Johnson and H. E. Palmer.

The deceased was born in this city and when the Sons of Omaha organized he became one of the charter members. He was the vice-president of this organization in 1891. As the architect of the city hall and the Omaha club his name had become a household word among builders. He was the superintendent of construction of the postoffice for the first year or two. He was also the architect of the Horticulture building at the exposition. A number of the courthouses of the state and several schoolhouses have been built after his plans. In In politics he was a republican and took a very active part in the campaign of 1896, acting as chairman of the city central republican committee. He was a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technicology​ in Boston.

HON. L. S. GATES DROPS DEAD

Dairy Commissioner of Iowa Stricken with Apoplexy While Speaking at the Convention.

While addressing the convention of dairymen yesterday afternoon Hon. L. S. Gates, dairy commissioner of Iowa, was stricken with apoplexy. He died fifteen minutes later at the emergency hospital.

Mr. Gates was the fourth speaker and was telling of the work of the dairymen in Iowa when he suddenly stopped and with the words "I'll have to quit," sank into his chair. Those who were sitting near him, thinking that he had fainted, supported his head while his face was bathed with water. The efforts to revive him continued for five minutes without success. Then he was lifted by four of his fellow delegates and carried out of the building where he could get more air, and the ambulance was called. While awaiting its arrival restoratives were used without avail.

On arriving at the hospital the case was pronounced apoplexy. In five minutes the fluttering pulse of the stricken man ceased to beat. Life with strength of mind and body that were so fully his had been snatched away without warning.

Mr. Gates was among the first dairymen to start a creamery in the state of Iowa and in recognition of his experience was appointed state dairy commissioner last January. His home for many years had been at Manchester, where he owned a large farm and furnished the market with a great deal of butter. He was at one time a member of the state legislature. He was 65 years of age and left a widow and one son.

MONEY COULD NOT GET BEDS

Thousands of People Compelled to Bunk in Public Places or Walk the Streets.

It is estimated that nearly 10,000 people walked the streets all of last night because of their inability to secure sleeping accommodations. Every lodging house, hotel and temporary sleeping structure in the city was crowded to its utmost capacity. The hotel lobbies were crowded with people, who gladly paid 25 cents for the privilege of sleping​ in chairs or on desks and tables. The dining rooms of the hotels were turned into sleeping rooms by laying mattresses on the floors. At the court house every available bit of floor space was occupied by tired sightseers and hundreds were turned away. This same condition of affairs existed at the old Coliseum building on North Twentieth street, which had been fitted up by the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben as temporary sleeping quarters. Even the rooms at police headquarters were crowded with people unable to obtain other shelter. The various railway depots housed hundreds of people.

Thousands finding themselves outcasts moved over to Council Bluffs and to South Omaha, but only about 40 per cent of these could be accommodated. Those who found themselves unwilling outcasts, walked the streets or rolled up in the front doors of buildings out of the reach of the raw wind. The big reviewing stand in front of the city hall afforded shelter for hundreds.

The entire police department and the exposition guards detailed to police duty were on duty all night and their orders this morning were to remain on duty all of today and tonight.

Between the hours of 6 o'clock and 11 this morning the downtown streets were almost as densely crowded as they were last night at the time of the parade. Every incoming trains swelled the crowds by thousands. The street cars from Council Bluffs and South Omaha kept pouring into the city a stream of humanity from early morning until almost noon. Every available car the street car company could spare from its allied lines was used in the transportation of the crowds to the exposition grounds. The tracks to the grounds were studded with crowded cars from the center of the city to the exposition gates.

One of the officials of the road said that during the early morning hours nearly 150,000 people were unloaded at the grounds by the street car company. Long before the ticket windows at the gates were opened thousands had congregated about them. To ease the jam at the windows the exposition officials stationed ticket sellers at all the down town street crossings and hundreds of people availed themselves of the chance to buy tickets. Men with megaphones were stationed with every ticket seller, whose duty it was to announce the sale of tickets. Squads of policemen, whose faces showed signs of the arduous work they had performed the night before, were detailed at every prominent crossing to handle the clamoring, surging, anxious crowds.

The vigilance of this handful of peace guardians prevented accidents and turbulence. The creditable handling of the vast concourse of people by the department called forth the thanks of the governors of the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben to Chief White. In a short letter to him this morning they thanked him and his men for their efforts and complimented him highly. Tonight the entire force of police and guards, with the exception of a detail to watch the downtown streets, will be divided between the railway stations. Chief White anticipates that the hardest work is in store for his men, as fully 90 per cent of the visitors, he thinks, will leave the city tonight for their homes. He is highly pleased with the work of his men. The record, he thinks, of not a single accident and but two cases of pocket picking is a wonderful one and equal to the record of the police department.

PRESIDENT'S MORNING HOURS

Breakfast at the Club and Correspondence Fills His Limited Time.

PATRIOTIC PEOPLE OUT TO WATCH FOR HIM

Many Citizens Crowd Around the Club House to See the Honored Guest of the City Leave for the Grounds.

President McKinley arose this morning at 8:15 o'clock, but an hour before this time the streets surrounding the elegant club house of the Omaha club at Twentieth and Dodge streets were thronged with thousands of citizens and visitors moved with one desire—to catch a glimpse of the president and add their greetings to those so numerously conferring the evening before.

In the handsomely appointed private dining room set apart for the president breakfast was served to the guest of honor, his nephew, Captain James McKinley, and his secretary, J. A. Porter. Immediately after breakfast the president returned to his suite of beautiful rooms on the first floor, and put in about an hour's work with necessary correspondence, dictating quite a batch of mail and telegrams to his secretary. It was now nearly time for the formation of the party to start to the Transmississippi Exposition, and the president enjoyed a few minutes' leisure. With his nephew he strolled through the artistically decorated first floor of the club, and graciously responded to the morning greetings of the few club members who were on hand to see that everything was perfection in the matter of appointments. The president said he felt fully