A History of the TransMississippi & International Exposition

A History of the TransMississippi & International Exposition

by: John Wakefield

May 1903

TABLE OF CONTENTS

About the Secretary's Report

Cover Letter

INTRODUCTORY

OFFICERS

STATE COMMISSIONS

ORIGIN

ORGANIZATION

EXPLOITATION

REORGANIZATION

LOCATING THE EXPOSITION

GENERAL OPERATION

DIRECTORS

BUREAU OF SUBSCRIPTIONS

DISBURSEMENTS

WAYS & MEANS DEPARTMENT

BUREAU OF ADMISSIONS

BUREAU OF SOUVENIR COINS

THE MUSIC OF THE EXPOSITIONS

BUREAU OF SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLICITY & PROMOTION

BUILDINGS & GROUNDS DEPARTMENT

Landscaping

Machinery & Electricity

Water System

Fire Protection

Losses by Fire

Insurance

Emergency Hospital

Guard Force

Lost & Found Bureau

General Statement of Expenses

DEPARTMENT OF EXHIBITS

Bureau of Education

Bureau of Fine Arts

Bureau of Mines & Mining

Ladies Bureau of Entertainment

Bureaus of Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry, and Irrigation

Bureaus of Live Stock, Dairy Products, and Pet Animals

Cattle Awards

Horse Awards

Sheep Awards

Swine Awards

Fat Stock Awards

Poultry Awards

Dairy and Dairy Products Awards

Nebraska Farmer Magazine Awards

Bureau of Bee Industries

Bureau of Machinery & Electric Exhibits

Bureau of Manufactures & International Exhibits

Bureau of Liberal Arts

Bureau of Machinery & Agricultural Implements

Bureau of Awards

List of Exhibitors (Award Winners)

Report of Assistant to the Manager, Department of Exhibits

CONCESSIONS & PRIVILEGES DEPARTMENT

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

THE PRESIDENT, DAILY PROGRAMMES, SPECIAL DAYS

Laying of the Corner Stone

Opening Day

Nebraska Dedication Day

Wisconsin Dedication Day

National Federation of Women's Clubs

Illinois Dedication Day

Kansas Dedication Day

Iowa Dedication Day

Dedication of Pottawattamie County Wigwam

Swedish-American Day

Royal Arcanum Day

Montana Dedication Day

Turners Day and Musical Congress Day

Texas Melon Day

National Council of Congregational Churches

Independence Day

Massachusetts Day

Children's Day

Military Day

Minnesota Dedication Day

Indian Day

Flower Day

National, State & City Days

Kansas City Day

Redmen's Day

United States Life-Saving Service Day

St. Joseph Day

Texas Day

Des Moines Day

Omaha World-Herald & Nebraska Editor's Day

Sioux City Day

Bohemian Day

Cody Day

Kansas Day

Nebraska Peach & Pottawattamie County, Iowa, Grape Day

National Editorial Day

Montana Day

Military Day

Lumbermen's Day Hoo-Hoo Day

Shriner Day

Oklahoma Day

Iowa Day

Modern Woodmen Day

22nd U.S. Infantry Day

Swedish Day

Georgia Day

Chicago Day

Live-Stock Day

Pennsylvania Day

Ohio Day

New York Day

Peace Jubilee Week

Mayor's Day

Governor's Day

President's Arrival

President's Day

Army & Navy Day

Civil Government Day

Children's Day

German Day

Ancient Order of United Workmen Days

Nebraska Day

Utah Day

Railroad Week

Tri-City Day

Omaha Day

SUMMARY OF EXPO

DAILY PROGRAMMES

BUREAU OF EDUCATION

GENERAL MANAGER

BUREAU OF ENTERTAINMENT

LEGAL AFFAIRS OF THE EXPOSITION

THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT EXHIBIT

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF MANAGEMENT, UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT EXHIBIT, TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION, OMAHA, NEBRASKA, 1898

Report of the Board Proper Organization of Board of Management

Apportionment of Funds

The Government Building

Awards

Pamphlets Distributed

Cost of the Exhibit

Exposition Postal Service

Exhibitions of Life-Saving Service

Indian Congress

Co-Operation of Exposition Officials

Efficient Assistants

HISTORY OF BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS INTRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATES SENATE AND HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, RELATING TO THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE DEPT OF STATE

Relics Exhibited

Cost of Exhibit

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE TREASURY DEPT

Bureau of the Mint

Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Register of the Treasury

Coast and Geodetic Survey

Internal Revenue Bureau

Office of the Secretary of the Treasury

Marine Hospital Service

Lighthouse Establishment

Life-Saving Service

Office of the Supervising Architect

Cost of the Exhibit

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE WAR DEPT

Adjutant General's Department

Quartermaster's Department

Engineer's Department

Ordnance Department

Medical Department

Signal Corps

Cost of Exhibit

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE DEPT OF JUSTICE List of Exhibits

Prisons and Prisoners

Cost of Exhibit

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE POST OFFICE DEPT

Stamp Division

Equipment Division

Dead Letter Division

Division of Mail Depredations

Division of History, Records and Statistics

Cost of Exhibit

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE NAVY DEPT

List of Exhibits

Bureau of Ordnance

Bureau of Steam Engineering

Cost of Exhibit

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF DEPT OF THE INTERIOR

Cost of Exhibit

Patent Office

General Land Office

Bureau of Indian Affairs

Bureau of Education

Geological Survey

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF DEPT OF AGRICULTURE

Weather Bureau

Division of Pomology

Division of Entomology

Division of Chemistry

Bureau of Animal Industry

Division of Botany

Division of Vegetable Physiology & Pathology

Division of Forestry

Office of Fiber Investigations

Cost of Exhibit

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION AND NATIONAL MUSEUM

Smithsonian Institution Proper

Bureau of American Ethnology

National Zoological Park

Bureau of International Exchanges

Astrophysical Observatory

National Museum

Department of Anthropology

Department of Biology

Cost of Exhibit

REPORT OF THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE COMMISSION OF FISH AND FISHERIES.

Aquarium

Scientific Inquiry Section

Fish Culture Section

Fisheries Section

Live Fish Display

Cost of Exhibit

INDIAN CONGRESS

Report of Captain Mercer

Name of Tribe,Reservation & Number in Delegation

Report of Mr. James Mooney

REVIEW

CONCLUSION

ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION

BY-LAWS OF TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION

RULES OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION

Chas. F. Manderson, Chairman

Committee of Revision and Approval

Omaha, Nebr.

My Dear Sir:

You will remember that in June, 1902, the Board of Directors of the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition, placed upon the writer the duty of collecting and compiling a story of that enterprise, upon completion of which he was to deliver same to the Committee of which you are Chairman, for their revision and approval, and upon receiving same it was found to be filed in the Omaha Public Library as a record.

Pursuant to this instruction I hand you herewith the result of my labors in this direction, and I trust that after your Committee has given full consideration and careful attention to the subject matter, that it may in the main, at least, receive your approval. The relation of the story, is I think, complete, except that a chapter on "Architecture of the Exposition" which Mr. Thomas R. Kimball kindly consented to write, has not as yet been received. Mr. Kimball now assures me that it will shortly be forthcoming, and I hope to be able soon to send you same for insertion in its proper place in the story herewith transmitted to you.

It is sincerely hoped that a way be found through which the publication of this history may be secured. If published it should of necessity be very profusely illustrated, because in this case pictures may tell the story better than the written relation.

If arrangements can be made for publication, all the illustrations needed can be readily secured, as photographs and pictures are available when needed for such purpose.

Should you or the Committee desire to communicate with me at any time relative to this subject, please address me in care of Concessions, Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis, Mo.

Yours sincerely,

John Wakefield

Secretary

Committee:

Chas. F. Manderson

I.W. Carpenter

Chas. W. Lyman

C.S. Montgomery

Edward Rosewater

INTRODUCTORY

In accordance with the requirements of a resolution adopted by the Board of Directors of the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition at a meeting held on June 30th, 1902, the General Secretary of the Corporation has compiled "a statement of the affairs of the Exposition, including a recital of the Inception, organization operation, management and results of the Exposition." Which statement has been submitted by him to the Revision Committee consisting of Charles F. Manderson, Isaac W. Carpenter, Charles W. Lyman, Carroll S. Montgomery and Edward Rosewater, and which statement has been revised and approved by them. The Certificate of said Revision and approval follows: this introductory

In considering the plan of the preparation of this statement it was finally deemed wisest to prepare same under the following divisions, devoting a chapter to each division, and thus endeavoring to make the statement as nearly consecutive as possible. The said divisions are as follows:

I. Origin

II. Organization

III. Exploitation

This chapter is devoted to the actions and efforts in exploiting the enterprise under the government and direction of the first Board of Directors, covering the period from June 18, 1896 to December 1st, 1896.

IV. Reorganization.

This chapter covers the story of the reorganization of the enterprise, broadening its work and increasing the Board of Directors in relation to the same.

V. Locating the Exposition.

A statement of the efforts in this cause and the action of the Directors in relation to the same.

VI. General Operation of the Exposition, Under the Board of Directors.

Covering a period from December 16th 1896 to June 30th, 1902 and relating the actions of said Board to special or particular interest other than those necessarily referred to in other parts of this work and being intricately and inseparably connected with such parts.

VII. Department of Ways & Means

VIII. Department of Publicity & Promotion

IX. Department of Buildings

X. Department of Exhibits

XI. Department of Concessions & Privileges

XII. Department of Transportation

XIII. Mr. President.

Covering statement of the Special features of the Exposition operation, including events in connection with the Special Days, Special Events Ladies Bureau of Entertainment, etc.

XIV. Legal Affairs of the Exposition.

XV. U.S. Government.

Its Representation in buildings and Exhibits at the Exposition.

XVII. Indian Congress, Exhibit U.S. Government.

XVII. A General Review of the Exposition. Project.

Designed to be, was it were, a bird's eye view of it operation from its beginning to its end.

XVIII. Conclusion.

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION.

OFFICERS.

President, Gurdon W. Wattles.

Resident Vice-Pres., Alvin Saunders.

General Colonel, Carroll S. Montgomery.

Treasurer, Herman Kountze.

Secretary, John A. Wakefield.

VICE-PRESIDENTS FOR TRANS-MISSISSIPPI STATES.

Alaska, James Sheakley, Sitka.

Arizona, Charles R. Drake, Tucson.

Arkansas, W.G. Vincenheller, Little Rock.

California, Geo. W. Parsons, Los Angeles.

Colorado, Edward F. Bishop, Denver.

Georgia, Augustus Dupont, Dupont.

Idaho, B.P. Shawhan, Payette.

Illinois, R. Hall McCormick, Chicago.

Iowa, George F. Wright, Council Bluffs.

Kansas, C.A. Fellows, Topeka.

Louisiana, C. Harrison Parker, New Orleans.

Minnesota, Frank H. Peavey, Minneapolis.

Missouri, John Doniohan, St. Joseph.

Montana, W.H. Sutherlin, Helena.

Nebraska, Wm. Neville, North Platte.

Nevada, H.B. Maxson, Reno.

New Mexico, L. Bradford Prince, Santa Fe.

North Dakota, C.A. Lounsberry, Fargo.

Oklahoma, Eugene Wallace, Oklahoma City.

Oregon, B.S. Cook, Salem.

South Dakota, Thomas H. Wells, Hot Springs.

Texas, S.J.T. Johnson, Dallas.

Utah, Lewis W. Shurtliff, Ogden City.

Washington, Geo. W. Thompson, Tacoma.

Wyoming, Frank P. Graves, Laramie.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

Zachary T. Lindsey, Chair

Mgr. Dept. Ways & Means.

Edward L. Bruce

Mrg. Dept. Exhibits.

Edward Rosewater

Mgr. Dept. Publicity & Promotion

Abram L. Reed

Mrg. Dept. Concessions & Privileges

Freeman, P. Kirkendall

Mgr. Dept. Bldgs. & Grnds.

William N. Babcock

Mgr. Dept. Transportation

T.S. Clarkson, General Manager.

Walker & Kimball, Architects in Chief.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

Babcock, W.N.

Bidwell, Geo. F.

Brandeis, J.L.

Brown, J.J.

Bruce, E.E.

Carpenter, I.W.

Creighton, Jno. A.

Dickinson, Edw.

Evans, John H.

Hibbard, F.B.

Hitchcock, G.M.

Holdrege, G.W.

Hussie, John H.

Hoctor, Thos. R.

Jardine, Walter

Johnson, Jno. A.

Kilpatrick, Thos.

Kimball, Thos. L.

Kirkendall, F.P.

Korty, L.H.

Kountze, Herman

Lee, Dr. E.W.

Lindsey, Z.T.

Lyman, C.W.

Manderson, C.F.

Markel, J.E.

Metz, Chas.

Millard, J.H.

Montgomery, C.S.

Murphy, Frank.

Noyes, A.H.

Payne, Geo. H.

Paxton, W.A. Sr.

Price, E.C.

Reed, A.L.

Rector, A.T.

Rosewater, Edw.

Saunders, A.

Smith, Arthur C.

Smith, Dudley

Thompson, H.A.

Wattles, G.W.

Webster, Jno. L.

Weller, C.F.

Wells, Lucius

Wharton, Jno. C.

Wilcox, R.S.

Wilhelm, C.M.

Yost, C.E.

Youngs, Fred M.

S T A T E C O M M I S S I O N S.

ARIZONA

T.J. Barkeley, Phoenix.

B. Heyman, Phoenix.

Winfield Scott, Phoenix.

Chas. R. Drake, Tucson.

J.B. Breathett, Tucson.

Selim Franklin, Tucson.

W.R. Stone, Florence.

E.B. Gage, Prescott.

F.A. Tritle, Prescott.

H.J. Allen, Jerome.

J.H. Carpenter, Yuma.

Albert F. Potter, St. Johns.

W.R. Campbell, Winslow.

M.J. Egan, Clifton.

Ben Williams, Bisbee.

E.H. Cook, Globe.

T.A. Riordan, Flagstaff.

J.R. Halsey.

ARKANSAS

W.G. Vincenheller, President, Little Rock,

W.P. Fletcher, Lonoke.

S.C. Dowell, Walnut Ridge.

H.L. Cross, Bentonville.

J.F. Walker, Rogers.

E.M. Funk, Rogers.

F.P. Hall, Prairie Grove.

R.H. James, Mena.

J.C Irby, Newport.

A.W. Pool, Ozark.

E.T. McConnell, Clarksville.

L.P. Berry, Marion.

J.B. Butts, Helena.

Emmett Rogers, Jonesboro.

A.S. Layton, Yellville.

R.B. Weaver, Rally Hill.

H.H. Gallup, Lion Hill

W.T. Hopper, Mountain Home.

D.S. Helvern, Mammoth Spring.

J.R. Newman, Harrison.

Steve Carrington, Hope.

Eugene Barkman, Arkadelphia.

W.M. Price, Stuttgart.

X.O. Pindall, Arkansas City.

Rev. J.M. Lucey, Pine Bluff.

H.G. Hanna, Pine Bluff.

Thomas Matthews, Monticello.

J.R.B. Moore, Heber.

L.H. Owens, De Valls Bluff.

J.C. Yancey, Batesville.

J.T. Pomeroy, Eureka Springs.

W.B. Folsom, Brinkley.

J.R. Harris, Springdale.

A.C. Hull, Little Rock.

Geo. R. Brown, Little Rock.

A. Bertig, Paragould.

L.A. Byrne, Texarkana.

George Sengel, Ft. Smith.

W.D. Matthews, Secretary, Little Rock.

CALIFORNIA

M.H. DeYoung, San Francisco.

Robert, McMurray, San Francisco.

William H. Mills, San Francisco.

Frank S. Johnson, San Francisco.

Terry L. Ford, San Francisco.

Wendell Eaton, San Francisco.

C.M. Wooster, San Jose.

COLORADO

Gov. Alva H. Adams, President ex-officio, Denver.

Prof. Anton Ellis, Denver.

C.B. Schmidt, Pueblo.

Miss Grace Epsy Patton, Denver.

Mrs. A.E. Thayer, Pueblo.

Harry A. Lee, Ouray.

E.F. Bishop, Treas. Denver.

Col. E.R. Goodell, Leadville.

M.L. Allison, Grand Junction.

John H. Barrett, Denver.

J.B. Swan, Loveland.

Mrs. M.A. Shute, Asst. Sec. Denver.

Chas. E. Ward, Denver.

W.J. Bennett, Saguache.

A.T. McDonald, Secretary, Denver.

FLORIDA

Hon. Geo. W. Wilson, Pres. Jacksonville.

Hon. Henry Curtis, Vice Pres. Quincey.

Hon. W.W.K. Decker, Tres. Tarpon Springs.

John D. Peabody, Ozona.

M.R. Parks, Orlando.

W.R. Carter, Jacksonville.

Frank P. Fleming, Jacksonville.

C.B. Rogers, Jacksonville.

B.L. Porter, Grand Ridge.

George W. Scobie, Titusville.

J.C.S. Timberlarke, Rockledge.

Hon. George Lawton Bryant, Lakeland.

Eric Van Axelson, Laurie Hill.

C.K. McQuarrie, DuFuniak Springs.

W.S. Jordon, Madison.

G.A. Danley, Chipley.

Dr. H. E. Stockbridge, Lake City.

W.B. Keith, Dade City.

Hon. J.B. Johnson, Dade City.

H. Cunningham, Tampa.

J.B. Reilly, Miami.

M.E. Gruber, Palm Beach.

Guy I. Metcalfe, West Palm Beach.

Thomas Courser, Myers.

Prof. E.F. Wilson, Arcadia.

R.E. Rose, Kissimee.

C.H. Campbell, Ocala.

W.H. Cerry, Quincey.

Mahlen Gore, Orlando.

J. Ira Gore, St. Petersburg.

J.S. Fairhead, Jacksonville.

F.L. Robertson, Brooksville.

W.W. White, Jacksonville.

B.B. Tatum, Bartow.

G.E. Gay, Palatka.

I.E. Webster, Gainesvile.

George L. Bartlum, Key West.

E.D. Oslin, Melbourne.

W.E. Pabor, Interlachen.

T.J. Appleyard, Sanford.

T.C. Watson, Pensacola.

F.C. Chaffin, Milton.

John C. Ruge, Appalachicola.

Mrs. Neva C. Childs, Arcadia.

S. Boteler Thompson, Sec'y, Lake City.

E.I. Vason, Tallahassee.

GEORGIA

W.J. Northen, Chm. Atlanta.

Geo. C. Smith. Tres. Atlanta.

C.E. Harman, Atlanta.

W.A. Hemphill, Atlanta.

F.H. Richardson, Atlanta.

J.S.B. Thompson, Atlanta.

J.F. DeLacy, Eastman.

Gov. W.Y. Atkinson, Atlanta.

Edwin Brobston, Brunswick.

W.A. Knowles, Rome.

Thomas K. Scott, Augusta.

George Ketchum, Macon.

J.F. Hanson, Macon.

H.M. Coer, Savannah.

P.A. Stovall, Savannah.

E.F. Blodgett, Sec'y, Atlanta.

IDAHO

B.P. Shawhan, Vice Pres. Payette.

Montie B. Gwinn, Caldwell.

Jas. Hutchinson, Silver City.

Edward Richards, Hailey.

George Chapin, Idaho Falls.

J.H. Murnane, Montpelier.

J.P. Clough, Salmon.

A.B. Campbell, Wallace.

B.F. Morris, Lewiston.

Jos. Vincent, Kendrick.

R.E. Green, Sec'y, Boise.

ILLINOIS

Clark E. Carr, Pres. Galesburg.

Wm. H. Harper, Chm. Ex. Committee, Chicago.

John M. Smith, Chicago.

L.O. Goddard, Chicago.

Ferdinand W. Peck, Chicago.

E.S. Conway, Chicago.

James P. Whedon, Chicago.

Charles A. Mallory, Chicago.

George Wall, Du Quoin.

Oscar P. Trahern, Rockford.

William B. Brinton, Peru.

Edward M. Craig, Mattoon.

Louis H. Miner.

Louis H. Miner, Tres. Springfield.

William H. Stead, Ottawa.

Lafayette Funk, Bloomington.

James A. Black, Carthage.

Randolph Smith, Flora.

Charles C. Williams, Hoopeston.

C.H. Keeler, Dixon.

Martin Kingman, Peoria.

C.E. Hambleton, Sec'y, Chicago.

INDIANA

Frank B. Von Behren, Evansville.

Mason, J. Niblack, Vincennes.

W.W. Stevens, Salem.

Warder H. Hamilton, Greensburg.

Claude Matthews, Clinton.

Mrs. Virginia C. Meredith, Cambridge City.

D.M. Parry, Indianapolis.

William Fortune, Indianapolis.

Horace E. Kinney.

W.H. Sanders, Marion.

Eli Marvin, Frankfort.

Mortimer Levering, Lafayette.

Fred Heath, Muncie.

Charles McCulloch, Ft. Wayne.

IOWA

S.H. Mallory, Pres. Chariton.

S.B. Packard, Marshalltown.

John H. Wallbank, Mt. Pleasant.

S.D. Cook, Davenport.

J.E.E. Markley, Mason City.

R.H. Moore, Ottumwa.

J.F. Murray, Independence.

Allen Dawson, Des Moines.

Geo W. McCoid, Tres. Logan.

Owne Lovejoy, Jefferson.

A.W. Erwin, Sioux City.

J.F. Merry, Manchester.

F.N. Chase, Sec'y, Cedar Falls.

KANSAS

Geo. W. Glick, Pres. Atchison.

Jno. E. Frost, Vice Pres. & Tres., Topeka.

A.W. Smith, Groveland.

A.C. Lambe, Weelington.

A.H. Greef, Sec'y Pittsburgh?

KENTUCKY

Mrs. Jno. B. Castleman, Louisville.

Mrs. Jas. F. Buckner, Louisville.

H.H. Houston, Paducah.

Chas. H. Todd, Owensboro.

C.N. McElroy, Bowling Green.

Charles Blandford, Bewleyville.

Logan C. Murray, Louisville.

Ed. C. Hopper, Covington.

Wilbur R, Smith, Lexington.

George W. Welsh, Danville,

J.P. McCartney, Flemingsburg.

Ed. C. O'Rear, Mt. Sterling.

W.B. Hansford, Somerset.

MARYLAND

Gen. Thos. J. Shyrosk, Pres., Baltimore.

John M. Carter, Baltimore.

Chas. C. Homer, Jr. Vice Pres., Baltimore.

A.E. Booth, Baltimore.

Mrs. William Reed, Baltimore.

Mrs. Matthew Markland, Oakland.

Miss Frances C. Davis.

Miss Lillie Forwood, Bel Air.

J. Edward Abbott, Annapolis.

John M. Carter Jr.

George D. Landwehr.

Harry J. Hopkins, Sec'y,

MINNESOTA

Gibbs, Pres. Geneva.

Frank H. Peavy, Minneapolis.

W.D. Kirk, St. Paul.

W.J. Footner, St. Paul.

George R. Finch, St. Paul.

Conde Hamlin, St. Paul.

R.A. Kirk, St. Paul.

Chas. P. Noyes, St. Paul.

E.J. Phelps, Minneapolis.

W.W. Heffelfinger, Minneapolis.

L.C. Pryor, Minneapolis.

Fred R. Salisbury, Minneapolis.

J. Newton Nind, Minneapolis.

J.M. Anderson, Minneapolis,

C.H. Graves, Duluth.

J.L. Greatsinger, Duluth.

A.T. Stebbins, Rochester.

Hudson Wilson, Faribault.

W.J. Olcott, Duluth.

John Rich, Red Wing.

N.S. Gordon, Austin.

E.E. Gartside, Winona.

E.G. Valentine, Breckenridge.

M.E. Leland, Wells.

Elmer E. Adams, Fergus Falls.

Geo Pervis, Crookston.

John I. Bernard, Pipestone.

George T. Barr, Mankato.

W.H. Garlock, Winona.

E.G. Potter, Minneapolis.

J.H. Seymour, Minneapolis.

A.M. Marshall, Duluth.

Geo. Spencer, Duluth.

Chas. A. Duncan, Duluth.

E.L. Danforth, Sec'y, Minnesota.

MISSOURI

Clark H. Sampson, Pres. St. Louis.

Col. Jno. A. Knott, Hannibal.

W.H. Mansur, Chillicothe.

J.C. Evans, North Kansas City.

E.T. Abbott, St. Joseph.

L.A. Vories, St. Joseph.

R.M. Davis, St. Joseph.

Dr. J.H. Hedgepath, Rockport.

Jesse H. Davis, Rockport.

Frank Freytag, St. Joseph.

John F. Richards, Kansas City.

Geo. W. Fuller, Kansas City.

J.W. Baldwin, Sedalia.

J.D. Tolson, Fayette.

Jno. R. Rippey, Columbia.

Jerre Cravens, Springfield.

H.W. Ewing, Jefferson City.

John R. Kirk, Jefferson City.

A.S. Houston, Mexico.

H.A. Blossom, St. Louis.

Charles A. Lemp, St. Louis.

C.H. Spencer, St. Louis.

C.P. Walbridge, St.Louis.

F.M. Sterrit, St. Louis.

Geo. D. Reynolds, St. Louis.

Hon. John F. Davidson, Hannibal.

L.C.Burnes, St. Joseph.

F.W. Maxwell, St. Joseph.

Louis Max, St. Joseph.

A.J. Fleming, St. Joseph.

Frank J. Graham, Kansas City.

Phil E. Mullins, Kansas City.

W.W. Morgan, Kansas City.

Hugh J. McGowan, Kansas City.

Frank B. Hearne, Independence.

Judge J.N. Dalby, Sedalia.

Dr. R.H. Jesse, Columbia.

John O'Day, Springfield.

G.A. Atwood, Springfield.

C.D. McLure, St. Louis.

F.E. Marshall, St. Louis.

P.J. Tumey, St. Louis.

W.H. Phelps, St. Louis.

A.H. Danforth, Charleston.

Henry Whitmore, St. Louis.

D.A. Emery, Carthage.

John H. Taylor, Joplin.

John H. Carroll, Unionville.

Ruben H. Payne, Milan.

L.A. Goodman, Westport.

J.N. Ballard, Montrose.

C.C. Davidson, El Dorado Springs.

J.H. Bershire, Winona.

W.W. Ward, Fredericktown.

S.A. Stuckey, Carthage.

C.M. Manker, Webb City.

C.C. Bigger, Laclede.

W.J. Rouse, Monroe City.

Ed. Aleshire, Stanberry.

N.F. Murray, Oregon.

Harry E. Wyatt, Rockport.

W.H. Allen, Clinton.

Willis Humphrey, Stockton.

A. Nelson, Lebanon.

Frank Farris, Steelville.

C.B. Farris, Caruthersville.

W.B. McRoberts, Monticello.

J.H. Pelham, Hannibal.

G.W. Waters, Canton.

M.A. Bates, Memphis.

Andrew Ellison, Kirksville.

Isaac Guinn, Milan.

E.M. Harber, Trenton,

Alex Maitland, Richmond.

A.J. Hitt, Maysville.

Dr. Jno. S. Logan, St. Joseph.

Dr. C.W. Fassett, St. Joseph.

Mrs. Laura Scamon, Kansas City.

Mrs. Henry E. Ess, Kansas City.

W.A. Miller, Kansas City

B. Holzmank, Kansas City.

W.B. Williams, Rich Hill.

J.D. Allen, Butler.

Dr. J.J. Stevens, Clinton.

E.R. Hightower, Jerico Sprgs.

Horace W. Shapard, Warrensburg.

Ben P. White, Harrisonville.

W.B. Lewis, El Dorado Sprgs.

N.H. Gentry, Sedalia.

O.A. Crandall, Sedalia.

Prof. J.W. Damel. Jefferson City.

A.W. Elsner, Jefferson City.

Prof. D. Lee Roe, Otterville.

Prof. C.G. Williams, Boonville.

Dr. Geo. E. Ladd, Rolla.

John A. Gallaher, Jefferson City.

Alten M. Walker, Louisiana

Joseph Wheless, St. Louis.

F.C. Stierlin, St. Louis

Rob't McDonald, S. Louis.

J. Milton Turner, St. Louis.

Henry Studniezka, St. Louis.

J.B. Merwin, St. Louis.

Mrs. W.E. Fischel, St. Louis.

S. Waterhouse, St. Louis.

L.M. Rumsey, St. Louis.

R.N. Wiggins, Webster Grove.

Joel F. Short, Mountain Grove.

F.P. Graves, Doe Run.

C.M. Richards, Birch Tree.

Lincoln Nelson, Seymour.

Alex Carter, Van Buren.

Robert Lemar, Houston.

R.L. Sandige, Houston.

E.C. Markham, West Plains.

Edward Colburn, Willow Springs.

C.H. Morgan, Lamar,

Geo. W.B. Garrett, Lamar.

S.B. Minor, Aurora.

M.V. Carrol, Sc'y, Jefferson City.

MONTANA

W.H. Sutherlin, Chm. Helena.

Marcus Daly, Anaconda.

A.L. Babcock, Billings.

W.G. Conrad, Great Falls.

W.A. Clarke, Butte.

A.J. Selingham, Helena.

J.R. Latimer, Missoula.

W.W. Morris, Pony,

NEBRASKA

Wm. Neville. Chm. No. Platte.

H.M. Boydston, Neb. City.

C.A. Whitford, Arlington.

W.A. Poynter, Albion.

W.M. Dutton, Hastings.

C.D. Casper, Sec'y, David City.

J.N. Campbell, Asst. Sec., Omaha.

NEVADA

W.C. Grimes, St. Clair.

J.F. Dangburg, Gardnerville.

George Russell, Elko.

J.A. Yerlington, Hawthorne.

Abram Laird, Eureka.

Geo. S. Nixon, Winnemucca.

J.A. Blossom, Battle Mountain.

T.J. Osborne, Pioche.

D.C. Simpson, Weelington.

Andrew Maute, Belmont.

John Wagner, Carson City.

Jas. H. Kindkead, Virginia City.

Enoch Strother, Virginia City.

J.B. McCullough, Reno.

Wm. Burker, Schellbourne?

NEW JERSEY

Robert Mitchell Floyd, Pres. Jersey City.

Eva H. Williams, Jersey City.

Elisha B. Gaddis, Tres. Newark.

J.H. Blackwell, Trenton.

Walter S. Lenox, Trenton.

John E. Barbour, Paterson.

E.C. Hazard, Sec'y. Shrewsbury.

NEW MEXICO

L.B. Prince, Pres. Santa Fe.

J.T. McLaughlin, San Pedro.

John Morrow, Raton.

W.S. Hopewll, Hillsboro.

W.H.H. Llewellyn, Las Cruces.

J.J. Leeson, Socorro.

S.H. Day, Santa Fe.

Robt. W. Tansill, Eddy.

T.J. Curran, Albuequerque.

NEW YORK

Chauncey M. Depew, Pres. New York.

Henry B. Hebert, Tres. New York.

Geo Creighton Webb, New York.

Abel E. Blackmar, New York.

John Jacob Astor, New York.

Jno. C. Graves, Vice-Pres, Buffalo.

Jacob Amos, Syracuse.

Chas. N. Stowe, Deposit.

Alger M. Wheeler, New York.

NORTH DAKOTA

C.A. Lounsberry, Pres. Fargo.

C.B. Little, Tres. Bismarck.

J.B. Power, Sec. Power.

OHIO

Sen. H.E. Valentine, Bucyrus.

Sen. W.G. Brorein, Buckland.

Harry C. Mason, Cleveland.

Stacey B. Rankin, So. Charleston.

OKLAHOMA

Gov. C.M. Barnes, Guthrie.

J.C. Post, Chm. Kingfisher.

S.T. Varrico, Alva.

J.C. North, Northville.

C.W. Points, Shawnee.

M. Burke, Perry.

John Globie, Sec. Guthrie.

OREGON

W.S. Mason, Pres. Portland.

C.C. Beekman, Jacksonville.

J.G. Day, Ollala.

H.B. Miller, Gants Pass.

J.O. Hanthorne, Astoria.

O.J. Olsen, Grants Pass.

R.D. Inman, Portland.

Henry E. Doch, Portland.

J.A. Wright, Saprta.

E.P. McCornack, Salem.

B.F. Alley, Baker City.

E.J. Frasier, Eugene.

W.E. Hurd, Granite.

O.N. Denny, Lafayette.

Philip Metschan, Salem.

E.V. Carter, Ashland.

W.C. Tweedale, Albany.

F.S. Stanley, Perry.

Lot Livermore, Pendleton.

D.M. French, The Dalles.

J.F. Batchelder, Sec. Portland.

F.S. Peet, Portland.

PENNSYLVANIA

SOUTH DAKOTA

A. McKinney, Vice Pres. Lead.

W.L. Gardner, Rapid City.

Harris Franklin, Tres. Deadwood.

Martin Chapman, Lead.

John Stabler, Hot Springs.

Hance Murphy, Elk Point.

C.A. Jewett, Sioux Falls.

O.H. Mann, Okoboji.

Hugh Smith, Howard.

John Hayes, Ft. Pierre.

C.V. Gardner, Pierrepont.

J.L. Baker, Hot Springs.

J.V. Putnam, Lead.

Wesley A. Stuart, Sturgis.

Chas. E. Davis, Sec. Deadwood.

TENNESSEE

Theodore Cobley, Nashville.

John J. McCann, Nashville.

Van. L. Kirkman, Nashville.

John W. Morton, Nashville.

H.C. Ward, Nashville.

W.T. Davis, Nashville.

J.B. Killebrew, Nashville

J.M. Safford, Nashville.

Joe W. Allison.

Geo. M. Goodwin, Nashville.

A.J. Harris, Nashville.

W.R. Rankin, Jasper.

Paul F. Kefauber, Madisonville.

F.H. Ewing, Cedar Hill.

J.W. Roseman, Gadsen.

H.L. Bedford, Bailey.

W.L. Chapman, Knoxville.

C.V. Brown, Chattanooga.

G.W. Davenport, Chattanooga.

S.M. Yancey, Dixon's Springs.

John T. Essary.

TEXAS

C.S. Penfield, Chm. Houston.

Rufus Gage, Sec. Houston.

M.G. Rannye, Yoakum.

W.A. Childress, Houston.

C.M. Peterson, Normanna.

Geo. F. Lupton, San Antonia.

R.M. Johnston, Houston.

Chas. Peterson, Rock Island.

R.W. Andrews, San Antonio.

W.D. Cleveland, Houston.

T.J. Skaggs, Rock Island.

Chas. Dillingham, Houston.

Cyrus Thompson,Loskhart.

F.A. Reichardt, Houston.

F.B. Cole, Corpus Christi.

B.A. Reisner, Houston.

R.F. Skrehot, Hallettsville.

B.R. Warner, Houston.

F.R. Graves. Karne City.

T.W. Houston.

J.C. Howerton, Houston.

E.C. Crawford, Houston.

Jno. Wallacy, Portland.

John Linderholm, Chesterville.

J.C. Hutcheson, Houston.

Jas. Anderson, San Antonio.

E.Y. Hartwell, Houston.

C.I. Swan, Normanna.

T. Richardson, Houston.

A.J. Bell, Karne City.

L. Chan, Beeville.

E.H.Norvell, Rockport.

C.H. Flato, Shiner.

UTAH

L.W. Shurtliff, Chm. Ogden.

P.J. Lannan, Salt Lake City.

Heber Bennion, Taylorville.

T.R. Cutler, Hehi.

Miss Maggie Keogh, Salt Lake City.

WASHINGTON

Geo. W. Thompson,Tacoma.

G.B. Stetson, Seattle.

Philip F. Kelly, Seattle.

L.M. Wood, Seattle.

W.S. Spillman, Pullman.

J.E. Baker, Tacoma.

C.H. Thompson, Spokane.

C.H. Clark, Spencer.

WEST VIRGINIA

B.W. Peterson, Wheeling.

D.C. Westonhaver, Martinsburg.

H.G. Bayliss, Elkins.

J.W. Furbee, Mannington.

J.M. Camden, Parkersburg.

E. Ensign, Huntington.

P.W. Morris, Harrisville.

Lyman Steadman, Castonia.

John Preston, Lewisburg.

J.S. Hyer, Suttin.

WISCONSIN

John C. Koch, Chm. Milwaukee.

Aug. Uehlein, Milwaukee.

Jno. E. Hansen, Milwaukee.

A.C.Cas, Tres. Milwaukee.

J.A. Watrous, Milwaukee.

Ferdinand Kiechefer, Milwaukee.

E.E. Bryant, Madison.

R.G. Thwaites, Madison.

John Hicks, Oshkosh.

Walter Alexander, Wausau.

W.T. Lewis, Racine.

Isaac Stephenson, Marinette.

J.H. Stout, Menomonie.

J.B. Treat, Monroe.

Chas. H. Baxter, Lancaster.

Thos. M. Blackstock, Sheboygan.

H.D. Fisher, FLorence.

Ernest Funk, Oconto.

W.E. Carpenter, Waupaca.

Mrs. Angus Cameron, La Crosse.

Mrs. L. Lottridge, West Salem.

Mrs. Jno. Winans, Janesville.

Mrs. C.H. Bell, Milwaukee.

Mrs. T.B. Goodrich, Oconto.

Miss Ella Roberts. Waukesha.

A.J. Webster, So. Superior.

L.G. Kellogg, Ripon.

A.L. Hatch, Sturgeon Bay.

Prof. E.E.Goff, Madison.

Wm. Toole, Baraboo.

A.J. Phillips, West Salem.

G.H. Greenbank, Madison.

H.H. Gray, Darlinton.

W.W. Pollock, Sec. Milwaukee.

WYOMING

Joseph M. Carey.

W.R. Schnitger.

A.D. Kelly.

L.R. Bresnahen.

M.R. Johnson.

ORIGIN

AS TO THE BEGINNING? HOW WAS IT?

Since the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago, 1893, the belief had been prevalent throughout theGreat West that a Comprehensive Exposition, held at some central point, would be of incalculable and lasting benefit to every state, territory and interest within the Trans-Mississippi Country.California held its Mid-Winter Exposition,- a state enterprise,- at San Francisco, January to July, 1894.Kansas City advocated the holding at that city of a Mid-Continent Exposition.Denver had proposed a Western States Exposition and had secured subscriptions for a large amount, and had extended some $15,000 in exploiting it, but feeling that the times were not propitious, had determined to postpone and planned to hold it in 1903, celebrating the purchase of Louisiana territory from France.Texas had planned to hold a Western and Southern Stages Exposition at Galveston, celebrating particularly the opening of deep water transportation from Gulf points.Minneapolis and St. Paul advocated a Northwestern States Exposition for the twin cities.

The Trans-Mississippi Congress (see foot note) meeting in St. Louis, Mo. in November, 1894, was persuaded, through the efforts of the Nebraska delegation, headed by Robt. W. Richardson, Judge L.H. Bradley of Omaha and Hon. W.J. Bryan of Lincoln, and on the invitation of the then mayor of Omaha. Hon. George P. Bemis, to hold its ensuing session of said Congress at Omaha in November, 1895.

The pledges made to secure this Congress involved assuming the expenses of the meeting (about $3,000.00) and a conference on the subject was held with the then mayor, Hon. George P. Bemis.Mr. R.W. Richardson suggested the sending of invitations to a meeting to arrange for securing the needed sum, and further suggested that, as a general feeling existed favoring a great Exposition somewhere in the Trans-Mississippi country, Omaha, entertaining the Trans-Mississippi Congress, might reasonably hope to have such an Exposition officially sanctioned by the Congress, locating it at Omaha.The suggestion was accepted and the mayor requested Mr. Richardson to prepare the letter of the invitation, which he did.(This was not the origin of the Exposition idea, which was in the general desire for one, but it was the origin of the successful purpose to secure the official approval of the Exposition by the Trans-Mississippi Congress and its location at Omaha)Mayor Bemis issued the call, the meeting was held, a Committee as appointed with Mr. Isaac Carpenter as Chairman, who with the able and earnest assistance of Judge L.H. Bradley, Mr. A.L. Fields, and others soon secured and made available the desired amount.

At the Omaha meeting of said Congress, held November 25, 26, 27, and 28, 1895, resolutions prepared under instructions of the Nebraska delegation, by a Committee of five, viz:Orville C. Holmes, Chairman, Prof. Wm. Rees, James Walsh, Jas. C. Dahlman and Dudley Smith were presented for consideration on Nov. 27th by the Hon. William J. Bryan, who had just been elected as President of said Congress, as follows:(quoting from official proceedings of the Congress).

"At the unanimous request of the Delegation of Nebraska I ask consent to offer the following resolution at this time. It won't take but a few minutes of time, and I believe we have five minutes in which to present it.This resolution, while it immediately concerns the city of Omaha, concerns also, in a general way all of this Trans-Mississippi country.Those of you who attended the World's Fair know you met people who have never been West.I have met a number of people who have never been West, and they told me that they thought Chicago was "West".There is now being held in Atlanta what is know as the Atlanta Exposition, and people are going there and seeing that country who have never visited that country before, and who would not have been there but for this Exposition.It is not only necessary that the merchant shall have good wares on his shelves, but it is also necessary that the people who want to buy, shall know that he has the wares there.People who live in the East do not know the West.Any person who travels from the West to the East will be astonished by ignorance he finds there in regard to our Western country.They have no idea of our resources, and we believe an Exposition here will bring the people from the East and other parts of the World, and it will be of a great and lasting benefit to the whole Western country.It was said by one man down east, that under certain conditions the West would do all of the manufacturing for the country.It does furnish productions that are not know down in the East.We believe that an Exposition here will draw people here that will be of great value to all of the citizens.The only difference of opinion would be as to the particular place for holding this Exposition.There are other great cities that would like to have it; Saint Paul, Minneapolis, Denver, Kansas City.We believe that Omaha would be the best place.All of the northern part of the country can find its way here on direct lines.We believe this City is the proper place for this Exposition and therefore we state it in the resolution.All we ask is to have a vote upon this resolution, and we would like to have all votes in favor of a Western Exposition, and to locate it at this place.If the people here think this is the best place, we ask you to vote for this in this resolution.I ask the unanimous consent that this resolution be placed upon its final passage at this time.

"Whereas, We believe that an Exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the States west of the Mississippi River, made at some central gateway where the world can behold the wonderful capabilities of these great wealth-producing States, would be of great value, not only to the Trans-Mississippi States, but to all the home-seekers in the world;therefore,

Resolved, That the United States Congress be requested to take such steps as may be necessary to hold a Trans-Mississippi Exposition at Omaha during the months of August, September, and October in the year 1898, and that the representatives of such States and Territories in Congress be requested to favor such an appropriation as is usual in such cases to assist in carrying out this enterprise."(Applause.)

Member from Minnesota:I might say on behalf of the State of Minnesota that there is a movement on foot to have a North-Western Exposition to be held in Minneapolis upon which work has already commenced.I think there should be two of these; Atlanta for the South west, and I think Nebraska would be a good place for the North-west.There can be arrangements made whereby there will be no friction.

Hon. John Doniphan (of St. Joseph, Missouri):I rise with the desire to second the resolution of the President of this Congress and to ask that I may be permitted to give the explanation of why I think it should be held here.I desire to say to the Convention, that I don't think a more appropriate place than the City of Omaha could be selected at which to have an Exposition of the wealth, of the growth and the products of this Trans-Mississippi country.

It would be an Exposition that would be united in bringing people from all parts of the world-the United States at least.It is nearly central as to point of location.As has been well said, the people East of us know but little of the capacity and nothing of the possibilities of this great Trans-Mississippi country.Indeed the City of Omaha is the best example that could possibly be made of what can be done.Ninety years ago, if you recollect, the first civilized expedition was made up this river by Lewis and Clarke.In the city where we now stand the first treaty was made with the savage men of the West.This country then was an unknown wilderness.We find now, what?Fourteen States and another soon to be admitted.(Applause from the New Mexico delegation).We find nearly twenty million people occupying it. We find that the wealth of the country has been added-at least one-third of the wealth of the country has been added since the census of 1850, on this side of the Mississippi River.This City of Omaha is one of the grandest inland cities of the whole United States.Therefore, I hope we will not divide in reference to two or three cities, but that we will be united on a central point in trying to have one Exposition and have it at the City of Omaha, the gateway, as it were, of the West.(Applause).If we could throw the reins to imagination and think what the next half a century will do with this country; if we could go to sleep and wake up fifty years hence, we would see the mighty wealth which would be developed far beyond we could conceive of.I could imagine that, at that time, Omaha would be as great as New York-greater perhaps than New York or Chicago or any other city that exists on this continent, because of the wealth in these mountains and the great wealth in these valleys.(Applause).

Mr. H.R. Whitmore (of St. Louis, Mo.):I do not wish to be considered conceited when I say there is no one on this floor that realizes more fully than I do what it means for any city to undertake to entertain a Convention like this.We are indebted to Omaha for the invitation; we accepted the invitation and we are here.The people of Omaha have labored for weeks in preparing for this Congress and making arrangements for our entertainment while we are here, and I don't think these people would ask anything from this Congress which we would not willingly grant, and I think in no better way can we show our appreciation of their courtesy and generosity than by the unanimous passage of this resolution.

Hon. Geo. Q. Cannon (of Salt Lake City, Utah):I rise to second the proposition of an Exposition, and to have it held in Omaha.I thoroughly agree with all of the remarks that have been made concerning the hospitality of this city, as being a suitable place for this Exposition.Standing as it does as the gateway of the Great West it seems to me that it will attract more people now and in 1897-8 than any other spot that might be selected.I have had great interest in Nebraska and especially in the City of Omaha.It was my pleasure to roam over these hills fifty years ago this coming summer.I spent the summer of '46 in the hills around Omaha, and the winter of 1846-7 I spent six months above here on the river.Of course this was all Indian territory.The Omahans roamed over this country undisturbed.I have taken great interest, in consequence of these early associations, in Omaha and its growth,I confess that I felt very great surprise, and I might say I was amazed when I was taken around by the Mayor and proprietor of the Bee, to see the structures that have been erected, especially the city hall.I have never seen a building that attracted me more than your city hall here.The council chamber I think is a marvel of beauty, more beautiful than the Senate of the United States.I went through the Bee office and I was astounded at it.I went through it with a feeling of amazement to think that such a structure was erected in this town, where my recollection of its early days are so vivid.I could not help but compliment the Mayor and Mr. Rosewater on the wonderful structures that have been erected.I have not had much opportunity to look through the town, but what I have seen so impresses me with enterprise of the citizens who have built up such a grand city on the banks of the mighty Missouri River.Therefore, in view of all my feelings in regard to these matters, I most heartily second that resolution, that we shall have an Exposition of the Trans-Mississippi products, manufactures, etc., and that the Exposition be held in Omaha. (Applause).

Mr. Howell Jones (of Topeka, Kansas):I rise to state that at the conference of the deep water convention held at Topeka, Kas., on the first day of October, 1895, a permanent committee of five from all the States and Territories west of the Mississippi River was selected and that committee was clothed with power to hold an Inter-American Congress or Inter-American Exposition anywhere in the West and the intention is to call an Inter-American Exposition to be held on the Gulf of Mexico in 1897, exhibiting everything that it is possible to exhibit and it was their intention to invite the American people to make an exhibit of what products and manufactures they have to exchange, and therefore I think it is my duty to explain to these people here what the people on the Gulf of Mexico intend to do in 1897 so that you can look forward to getting a great deal of information and products for your Exposition in 1897.

A Delegate(from Arizona):I do not care to make a talk, but I rise to present an explanation.One of these gentlemen, I won't say which one, insisted that I should make a speech in favor of this Exposition in 1898.I decline to make a speech on a question on which there is absolutely no difference of opinion.

The resolution was carried unanimously.

And thus it was!

The Trans-Mississippi Congress is composed of the leading and representative men of all classes, professions, and business interests of the states and territories lying west of the Mississippi River, who assemble at stated periods to discuss measures for promoting the Commercial and material welfare of the region they represent, and recommend such measures as their judgment dictates to the National Government, the states and the people for adoption.It is representative in its capacity, its membership being secured through operations of Section Six (6) of its plan of organization, reading as follows:

"Six.The basis of representation shall be as follows:

The Governor of any state or territory may appoint the delegates; the Mayor of each city one delegate, and additional delegate for each five thousand inhabitants; provided, however, that no City shall have more than ten delegates; each County may appoint one delegate through its Executive officer; every business organization one delegate, and an additional delegate from every fifty members, provided, however, that no such organization shall be entitled to more than ten delegates."

It is advisory in character, and its discussions are mainly on any subject, national or local, bearing upon the welfare of its constituency.This region embraces nineteen states and five territories, or more briefly, twenty-four states and territories, and embraces two thirds of the area, one third of the population, and one half the wealth of this great republic.

(Foot note to chapter on origin.)

ORGANIZATION

The first public meeting to consider the subject of holding an exposition, pursuant to the resolution of the Trans-Mississippi Congress, was held at the Commercial Club Room on December 22nd, 1895.At that meeting Mr. Charles F. Weller presided.There were twenty-five or thirty citizens of Omaha present. After some informal discussion of the purpose of the meeting, Mr. Carroll S. Montgomery moved that a committee of nine (9) be appointed, Mr. Weller to be Chairman of the Committee, to consider the matter of holding an Exposition and a plan for an organization, and report at a citizens meeting to be held subsequently, provided the preliminary Committee should determine it best to proceed.The motion, after considerable discussion, was adopted, and, pursuant thereto , the following named persons were appointed to constitute the committee: Chas. F. Weller, Carroll S. Montgomery, Isaac W. Carpenter, H. Bradley, James Walsh, Dudley Smith, E.V. Lewis, Arthur B. Jaquith, and Gurdon W. Wattles.

This Committee held its first meeting at the Commercial Club Rooms on December 27th, 1895, Mr. C.F. Weller in the chair, Mr. John E. Utt, Secretary, and unanimously decided that the project of an Exposition should be carried out, if possible, and proceeded to determine the principal points of an organization.

On motion of Mr. E.V. Lewis, it was determined that the name of the enterprise be "The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition."

On motion of Mr. L.H. Bradley it was decided that the principal place of business be in the city of Omaha, Nebraska, and that the life of the Corporation commence January 1st, 1896, and terminate at the end of ten (10) years from that date.

On motion of Mr. G.W. Wattles, it was declared that the object of the Exposition shall be the same as indicated and set forth in the Preamble and Resolution unanimously adopted by the Trans-Mississippi Congress on November 27th, 1895, which shall be the basis and may be enlarged upon and added to as may be deemed advisable.

On motion of Mr. C.S. Montgomery the capital stock of the Corporation was fixed at $1,000,000.00 divided into shares of $10.00 each.

On motion of Mr. D. Smith it was agreed that the organization may organize and commence business when shares of capital stock to the value of $10,000.00 shall have been subscribed.

On motion of Mr. I.W. Carpenter, it was determined that the officers of the organization should be as follows:

A President; Twenty-four Vice Presidents, composed of a resident Vice President in Omaha, and a Vice President for each State and Territory of the Trans-Mississippi Territory; a Treasurer; a Secretary, and A Board of Directors Eleven (11) in number.

On motion of Mr. I.W. Carpenter a Committee of three (3) comprising C.S. Montgomery, Chairman; with Mr. L.H. Bradley and Mr. G.W. Wattles as associates, to prepare Articles of Incorporation, and report to the full committee, on the call of the chairman.

The Articles of Incorporation were prepared by the sub-committee, and at a full meetingof the Committee held early in January 1896, the Articles were again considered and approved, and it was ordered that a Citizens meeting be called to meet at Commercial Club Rooms on evening of January 18th, to receive and act upon the report of this preliminary Committee.

January 18th, 1896, 9 o'clock p.m. at Commercial Club Rooms there assembled fifty or more citizens under the call for the meeting, Chairman Weller being absent, Mr. Z.T. Lindsey was chosen as Chairman, Mr. J.E. Utt, Secretary.

The Articles of Incorporation were read as reported by the preliminary Committee, and then fully discussed, and on motion of Mr. Edward Rosewater the reading, "during the year 1898, in the months of August, September, and October," was changed to read "beginning in the month of June and ending in the month of November, in the year 1898," with this change, and motion of Mr. O.C. Holmes, the Articles as read were approved.On motion of Mr. J.E. Markel a Committee of five (5) was appointed to solicit stock subscriptions.Committee Messrs. Z.T. Lindsey, W.R. Bennett, Charles Metz, I.W. Carpenter and C.C. Belden.Subscriptions were at once called for and in a short time the following subscriptions were secured, viz:

Amt.Amt.

Edward Rosewater 500.00 Helin & Thompson100.00

W.J. Connell500.00 W.C. Bullard100.00

J.H. Evans500.00 O.C. Holmes100.00

Dan Farrell, Jr. 500.00 C.S. Hayward100.00

Lee Clark Andreesen Hdw. Co. 500.00 Johnson Bros. (Trans.100.00 Line

W.R. Bennett Co. 500.00 L.H. Bradley 200.00

J.E. Markel 500.00 Fisher & Lawrie 100.00

Thompson Belden & Co. 500.00 G.W. Wattles 100.00

William Krug 500.00 Jno. A. Wakefield 100.00

Oscar J. Pickard 500.00 John E. Utt 100.00

Metz Bros. Brewing Co. 500.00 J.J. Gibson 100.00

Frank B. Hibbard 500.00 Euclid Martin 100.00

Dudley Smith 500.00 M.H. DeLong 100.00

Kelley Stiger & Co.500.00 Geo. N. Hicks 100.00

John A. Weaver 400.00 W.H. Robertson 100.00

Ashton Clemens 300.00 I.E. Burdick 50.00

G.S. Ambler 300.00 Robt. W. Richardson100.00

Z.T. Lindsey250.00 G.A. Rathbun50.00

Lyman Richardson 250.00 Isaac W. Carpenter 100.00

C.S. Montgomery 200.00 G.A. Payne 50.00

_________

$10650.00

More than a sufficient amount having been subscribed to permit organization, it was, on motion, agreed to resolve the meeting into a stockholder's meeting.

First Stockholders meeting:Mr. Z.T. Lindsey was chosen chairman and Mr. J.E. Utt Secretary.The Articles of Incorporation as prepared and finally amended in Citizens meeting were again read at length and on motion approved.(See copy of same on page ______).

The chair stated that the election of a Board of Directors, eleven in number, would be the next business in order. Nominations were then made. The chair appointed John A. Wakefield and John E. Utt as tellers of election and the ballots were cast and the count of votes made resulting as follows:

J.E. Markel 970 votes Chas. Matz835 votes

H.A. Thompson 835" C.S. Montgomery780"

Dan Farrell, Jr. 930" Geo. H. Payne690"

W.R. Bennett895" W.J. Connell490"

J.H. Evans910" F.B. Hibbard225"

I.W. Carpenter885" C.W. Thompson145"a

G.W. Wattles825" O.C. Holmes 135"

Dudley Smith875" J.H. Johnson 85"

L.H. Bradley 65"

The following named persons having received the highest number of votes cast, and a majority of the votes cast, were declared elected.Jacob E. Markel, Henry A. Thompson, Daniel Farrell, Jr., William R. Bennett, John H. Evans, Isaac W. Carpenter, Gurdon W. Wattles, Dudley Smith, Charles Metz, Carroll S. Montgomery, George H. Payne.The meeting then adjourned.

First meeting of Directors:The first meeting of the Board of Directors of the Corporation was held at the Millard Hotel on Monday, January 20th, 1896, at 10 o'clock a.m. with all the members present.Mr. Markel was chosen temporary chairman and Mr. Payne temporary secretary.The meeting proceeded to nomination and election of officers.An informal ballot was taken for office of President, resulting for Mr. Zachary T. Lindsey, 10 votes, for Mr. Dudley Smith 1 vote.Mr. Lindsey was sent for and later appeared before the board and positively declined to accept for valid and sufficient reasons.A second ballot was then taken, resulting for Mr. Dudley Smith 7 votes, scattering 4 votes.Mr. Smith positively declined to accept and nominated Mr. G.W. Wattles, who stated that he did not at all wish the position, but on motion the secretary was instructed to cast the ballot of the Board for Mr. Wattles for President, which was done and he was declared elected.

Mr. President Wattles took the chair.On motion the secretary was instructed to cast the ballot of the Board for Mr. Jacob E. Markel for the office of Vice-President, and for Mr. John Wakefield for the office of Secretary.At the next meeting of the Directors, on January 24th, on motion, the Secretary was instructed to cast the ballot of the Directory for Mr. Herman Kountz for the office of treasurer and he was elected as Treasurer.On motion, Mr. Carroll S? Montgomery was elected as General Counsel for the Corporation, and also Mr. John E. Utt was elected as Railway Commissioner for the Company. A set of By-laws for the government of the business of the company were prepared considered and adopted.They were afterward changed in part after the reorganization, by the Board of Directors.As finally adopted and used, see page ____ .

EXPLOITATION

The holding of an Exposition having been favored by many citizens of Omaha, officially sanctioned by the Trans-Mississippi Congress, and having been duly organized as a Corporation under the laws of Nebraska, it now became important to proceed in all earnestness and steadfastness to promote the purposes of the organization to the end that the object sought should be fulfilled to a most thorough and satisfactory conclusion.The Board of Directors addressed their best thought and effort to this end.

At the first meeting of the Board of Directors Mr. E.H. Odell representing the manufacturers and merchants club of Council Bluffs, Ia., addressed the Directors, assuring them of the strong interest felt in the proposed enterprise by the people of that City, and particularly by the members of the business association which he represented.He presented an invitation to the Directors to attend a Banquet, in honor of the project, to be given by the Manufacturers and Merchants Club, at the Grand Hotel, Council Bluffs, Wednesday, January 22nd, at 8 o'clock P.M.The invitation was accepted, and at this dinner, the object, aims and purposes of the Corporation were discussed fully.

Very neighborly feelings and sentiments were expressed and by a resolution passed unanimously, the following named gentlemen were appointed a Committee, representing Council Bluffs, to act in conjunction with the Board of Directors, and aidthe enterprise in all ways possible.Committee:Mr. A.A. Hazleton, chairman, and Messrs. Thomas Bowman, Geo. F. Wright, J.J. Steadman, W.H.M. Pusey, M.F. Rohrer, W.W. Loomis, Thomas C. Dawson, William Moore, E.W. Hart, and Victor E. Bender.The Iowa Legislature being then in session and being one of the few western states whose Legislature would hold sessions that year, it was particularly desired that Iowa should early recognize the Exposition and provide for a state representation.The Secretary,byinvitation, met with the Council Bluffs Committee, including state senator Pusey of Iowa, in Council Bluffs on the evening of January 25th and went over with them the aims and purposes of the Exposition and best manner of presenting the subject to the Iowa Legislature to secure their commendation and early action.On January 27th the Council Bluffs Committee dines with the Board of Directors at Commercial Club Rooms and a joint Committee was selected to go to Des Moines, Ia., to interest the Legislature and the Newspapers in the project and exploit it as fully as possible.This Committee consisting of President G.W. Wattles, Secretary John A. Wakefield, Ex-Gov. Alvin Saunders, Judge W.S. Strawn, Mr. Z.T. Lindsey of Omaha, and Messrs. E.H. Odell, Chas. R. Hannan, I.L.M. Treynor, W.G. Moore and Thos. C. Dawson of Council Bluffs, went to Des Moines on February 10th and spent two days in Iowa's capitol City, meeting Committees of both houses of the Legislature, who treated the subject and the delegation kindly and both branches of the Legislature passed unanimously.The following resolutions:

WHEREAS:Delegates representing the twenty-four states and territories lying west of the Mississippi River, at the Trans-Mississippi Congress of 1895, adopted a Resolution providing for the holding of an Exposition for the purpose of exhibiting the products, manufactures, arts and industries of these states and territories; and

WHEREAS:The said Convention voted to hold said Exposition at the City of Omaha in the year 1898, and

WHEREAS, The Common interest of the states and territories constituting this greatregion as well as the country at large, will be greatly prompted thereby, and the interest of the state of Iowa, lying at its gateway, will be especially benefited by such an exposition on her borders; therefore, be it.

RESOLVED, By the General Assembly of the State of Iowa, That the holding of said Trans-Mississippi Exposition is hereby heartily approved, and that the Senators and Representatives from our sister state, Nebraska, and the other Trans-Mississippi states in procuring the passage at this session of congress, of a bill giving national recognition top said exposition, and providing for an appropriation for a National Exhibit and the necessary and proper buildings to contain the same; and be it further

RESOLVED; That a copy of these resolutions be certified by the Secretary of State under the seal of the state and sent to the Senators and Representatives in Congress from Iowa.

This was the initial state Legislation in aid of the Exposition. Meanwhile, United States Senator William V. Allan of Nebraska had introduced in the National Senate, January 3rd, 1896, Senate bill #1306, recognizing and approving the holding of the Exposition and providing an appropriation of Fifty Thousand Dollars ($50,000) for a Government building.The bill was read twice and referred to the Committee on International Expositions of which Committee, United States Senator John M. Thurston of Nebraska was Chairman.

Hon. David H. Mercer representative in Congress for the second district of Nebraska including Omaha, had introduced in Congress a bill in aid of the Exposition H.R. 6193, similar in terms to Senate bill #1306, but providing for anappropriation of $500,000.00 to coverexpense of the Governments participation therein.The bill had been favorably received and Mr. Mercer was confident that its passage in the House of Congress could be executed, but a controversy as to amount could only result in lessening the appropriationto the smaller stated sum.

A meeting of the Directors and others with Senator John M. Thurston, was held at Commercial Club Rooms on February 19th, 1896, at which meeting Senator W.V. Allan's bill and its probabilities for passage was considered, and the Senator expressed his belief that passage of the bill could be secured of actions as he advised be taken.It was agreed that an appropriation of funds and the sum thereof be subject of later efforts, was left to the judgment and action of the Congressional delegation of this district.Copy of bill amended to provide for $200,000 appropriation, and further amended in other and minor particulars and as passed by Congress, will be found on page_____.

The Board of Directors on January 31st declared its present object was to secure, First:formal resolutions of approval and endorsement from Congress, states, cities, organizations and individuals. Second:, and later; Appropriations of adequate amounts to properly and fittingly represent the resources, products and capabilities of each of the Trans-Mississippi States, the National Government and such other states as could be sufficiently interested.

A Press Bureau was created and Messrs. Isaac W. Carpenter, C.S. Montgomery and John A. Wakefield placed in charge thereof/their duty being to have charge of matter and correspondence in relation to the newspapers of the country, etc. Circular letters were prepared and sent to Boards of Trade,Commercial organizations, Governors and Mayors of Cities, etc., asking both approval and the forwarding of Resolutions favoring the project to their various representatives in the National Congress, strong letters of prominent men and well knownnewspapers were printed on postal cards, and each day for some weeks.Such postals were sent to each of the U.S. Senators, Representatives, the President and the Cabinet officers.Efforts of this and kindred kind were put forth with indefatigable energy and in almost unlimited quantity, and the success which finally came to the enterprise in such large degree, is attributable in large part to the interest aroused and results secured from these early and well directed efforts to secure approval of and participation in the project.

The Legislature of Utah held a session in winter of 1895-6 and it was early decided that good results would follow the sending of a delegation of Omahans to visit them and more fully present the Exposition aims to their notice. Accordingly on Friday, March 20th, 1896, a delegation consisting of President, G.W. Wattles, Secretary John A. Wakefield, Hon. Gilbert M. Hitchcock, Capt. H.E. Palmer, Z.T. Lindsey, A.S. Hazleton of Council Bluffs, and Directors W.R. Bennett, Charles Metz, J.H. Evans, H.A. Thompson, left Omaha in the Pullman Car, Montana, kindly donated for the trip by the Pullman Company, the transportation being generously donated by the Union Pacific Company; the delegation providing personally for all the other expenses of the trip. Saturday was spent in Cheyenne, Wyoming.Meetings were held with Governor W.A. Richards, the state officials, and prominent citizens, and newspaper men, and were cordially received and much enthusiasm in the project was aroused.On Monday following the delegation met Governor H.M. Wells and Joint Committee of the Utah Legislature then in session were most kindly received, and Utah's participation was pledged, both branches of the Legislature unanimously passing Resolutions as follows:

"Resolved, By the Senate and House of Representatives of the state of Utah, that the holding of said Trans-Mississippi exposition is heartily approved, and that the people of Utah are urged to cooperate with the people of the other states of the trans-mississippi region, and to take this opportunity of making a fitting display of their resources, and be it further

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the senators and representatives from Utah in the national congress by the secretary of state, with the request that they promote as far as possible the said exposition." Thus Utah was the second state to officially recognize and commend the Exposition by Legislative act.On Tuesday the delegation dined with the mayor and city officials of the city of Ogden, Utah, and Ogden's best efforts and aids were promised.Wednesday and Thursday found the delegation in Denver, Colo., where many meetings were held, first with Gov. A. W. McIntyre and the state officials, then with Mayor McMurray and city Officials, President Henry P. Steele and members of the chamber of Commerce, the Denver Mining Exchange, etc., At each of these meetings great interest was shown and approval of the project, with promise of Colorado's best representation was given.The delegation reached Omaha Saturday eve, March 28th, feeling that they had done good work for the Exposition and that good results would follow.At each place visited the Newspapers treated the delegation most kindly and published elaborate and full information of the object in view, and to them much of the success resulting from this Exposition trip was due.On return of the delegation the Directors ordered that a telegram be sent to Hon. D.H. Mercer, our member of Congress embodying a succint statement of situation and results accomplished to date.Telegram was as follows:

"March 31st, 1896

To Hon. H. Mercer,

Washington, D.C.

Governors and leading State Officials of Iowa, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, South Dakota, Missouri, California, Arizona, and Nebraska, have all pledged State appropriations, and other will follow as soon as your Bill becomes a law. Legislatures do not meet until next Winter except Iowa and Utah.They had passed Joint Resolutions and formally promised appropriations as soon as Government recognition and appropriation passes.

G.W. Wattles, Pres.

John A. Wakefield, Sec'y."

Regarding further subscriptions to the capital stock.The matter was fully considered by the Directors and at meeting on February 21st, 1896, it was ordered no further soliciting be done, and any outstanding lists be called in - the total subscriptions amounted at this time to $_____________ upon which a call of Five (5) per cent had been ordered on January 24th, 1896, and a second assessment of Five (5) per cent was ordered on April 17, 1896.The reason for above action was the belief that unless the National Government recognized, approved and arranged for its participation in the Exposition, it would be inadvisable to further proceed in the matter.If Government passed the bill now before it, then a justifiable basis would exist for further work and efforts.Otherwise, the project would be abandoned.The effects of the financial panic of 1893, followed throughout the west by successive crop failures in 1894 and 1895 resulting from drought, had made business conditions the worst possible and it required strong resolution and supreme faith to anticipate best financial results for the Exposition, under the then present circumstances and conditions, even with the aid and support of the Government. Every effort was henceforth directed toward forwarding the passage of the Exposition bill by Congress.Reports from Washington were conflicting; it seemed to be a comparatively easy matter to get a bill through the Senate but opposition sprung up in the House and our reports were sometimes sanguine, then disheartening, sometimes encouraging, causing belief in final success to obtain, then doleful causing hopes to fall to low ebb.Mr. Mercer never seemed to lose confidence in being able to finally secure the passage of the bill - and the hopes of the Directors were largely dependent upon the sanguine confidence of our Congressman, and faith in the belief that "If any one kin, He kin."

April 10th, 1896, the following telegram was received from Hon. Geo. F. Wright, Vice President for Iowa, for the Exposition, who had spent much time at Des Moines, working for Exposition recognition.

"Des Moines, Iowa, April 10th, 11:50 a.m. Trans-Mississippi Exposition, Omaha.

Both houses Iowa Legislature passed unanimously.Appropriation of $10,000 for preliminary expenses Trans-Mississippi Exposition and promise any additional amount necessary for Iowa's exhibit, at next session."The fact of this action was at once wired to Senator W. V. Allan and representative D. H. Mercer at Washington.Speaker of the House of Representatives, Hon. Thos. B. Reed was opposed to the bill arguing economy, that Government was even then borrowing money to conduct its affairs.

Representative Dingley, while not strongly opposing it, thought that properly a provision should be attached requiring the Exposition to raise the sum of $500,000 before the National act should become operative.The Directors considered this proposal and decided that this was, perhaps, a good proviso, for if Government passed the bill, it would certainly be necessary to raise such an amount to permit a successful exposition and the fact that the Government act required it, might help in the securing of it.As a result the Directors ordered that Senators Allan Thurston and Representative Mercer be advised that they favored the idea, but that the amount should not properly be for a sum, much, if any, greater than the Government's appropriation.It was finally agreed that the amount to be placed in the bill for Government appropriation be the sum of $250,000.00 and that Exposition be required to secure bona fide subscriptions of undoubted character, in the sum of $250,000.00 before the Government act should become operative.

April 10th, 1896.On receipt of telegram advising of Iowa's action, Senators Allan and Thurston decided to push Mr. Allan's Senate Bill #1306 as it was becoming clear that favorable action by the Ways and Means Committee of the House on Mr. Mercer's bill #6143, could not be depended upon, as being obtained early enough to secure passage at that session of Congress, which was most important.They had the bill called up, and after amending it, on demand of Senator Allison to carry $200,000.00 in place of $250,000.00 as the bill read, it was passed by the Senate that day.Mr. Allison stated that the appropriation for Atlanta, Ga., was for but $200,000.00, and he thought that sum would be sufficient for and satisfactory to Omaha.The bill now went to the House, and Mr. Mercer discovered that he had the fight of his life on hand to secure passage.On the request of the Directors, Mr. President Wattles went to Washington to endeavor to assist as he might in passage of the bill.On April 30, 1896, the Ways & Means Committee of the House made a favorable report on the Exposition bill, tacking on the requirement that Exposition secure $250,000.00 subscriptions, that requirement not being attached to the bill passed by the Senate.

President Wattles having returned from Washington and the Directors feeling again the need of a special representative there, that Mr. Mercer could be aided in any additional way possible, the Directors requested Ex-Senator Chas. F. Manderson and Hon. Edward Rosewater to go to Washington.Mr. Rosewater started at once on May 7th, 1896; Mr. Manderson was unable to leave the city at the time.Opportunity for passage of bill by congress was now felt to be assured, but vexations obstacles prevented and annoying delays ensued, and as the session was fast drawing toward its close, the fear of non success was strong, and great anxiety was felt over the situation.It was expected that the bill would be called up for passage early in May, and again at several later dates in May.It was assured that recognition of Speaker Reed would be secured permitting the placing of the bill before the House for passage,but all of no avail; one obstacle after another intervened, and the anxiety grew greater, notwithstanding the able assistance of Senators Allison and Gear of Iowa, Senators Allan and Thurston of Nebraska, of practically the whole Iowa and Nebraska delegations and their friends, the situation could not be improved, nor the desired opportunity secured.A demand upon the speaker for a set day met with no response.It was only watch and wait.

On June 5th Mr. Mercer found his opportunity.The request for consent to place the bill on its passage was made, when lo! objection was made, and by whom? by one Omar M. Kem, sent to the House of Congress to represent the wishes and desires of the Sixth (6th) Congressional district of Nebraska.Yet who in this case frightfully misrepresented them, as the rain of denunciatory telegrams from his district fully demonstrated to him, but stubborn to the last he kept up his opposition and aided not in passing the bill.

On June 9th at 6:30 p.m., Mr. Mercer again secured recognition by the speaker, but again he was doomed to disappointment, for Mr. Bailey of Texas objected, as he said from conscientious motives, to unanimous consent to consider the bill.It now looked like sure defeat as Congress was scheduled to adjourn the following day.But on June 10th recognition was again secured, and Mr. Kem having left for home, and Mr. Bailey being absent at lunch unanimous consent was secured, the bill passed, hurried over to the Senate, which body Senator Allan had held in session purposely, the amended bill was passed by the Senate, was finally engrossed, taken at once by Mr. Mercer to the President, Hon. Grover Cleveland and at once signed, and thus became a law after one of the most memorable struggles in Congress.

Speaker Thos. B. Reed stated that no bill that he knew of had been so well exploited as was this one; that the bombardment of Congress was not only courteous and of good and convincing argument but that it had been continuous, never letting up from the early beginning to the final passage of the bill and signing it by the President.Be it also, yet without the untiring, indefatigable, indomitable, yet urbane and polite efforts of Hon. David H. Mercer, aided and assisted though he was by many others, the Congressional bill would not have passed and there would not have been an Exposition to need and deserve a history.

The news of the passage of Congressional bill released the tension of anxiety, and cheerfulness and confidence in ultimate success prevailed generally.On June 13th, 1896, Council Bluffs had a great celebration parade with music, fireworks and speeches and good cheer was on every hand.

The Commercial Club of Omaha took up and arranged for a grand civic demonstration in honor of the passage of the bill and in honor of the men who secured its passage, this was planned to and did take place on the evening of Friday, June 26th, 1896.A procession several miles long and composed of many military and civic organizations added to the splendor of the demonstration, and the booming of cannon, setting off of fireworks, and the music of many bands, supplied the embellishments of a great occasion.It seemed indeed that everybody was there, and the route of the procession and Jefferson Square, where the speaking occurred were packed with those who came to see and cheer.

The parade was under the direction of Grand Marshal Robt. S. Wilcox, and starting at 8:15 p.m., disbanded at Jefferson Square shortly after 9:00 o'clock, and the speaking of the evening began at once.

On request of Chas. F. Weller, President of the Commercial Club, President G. W. Wattles of the Exposition presided.With a few complimentary words he introduced Nebraska's Governor, Hon. Silas A. Holcomb, who was greeted with applause and spoke briefly in congratulation.He was followed by Hon. David H. Mercer, who was greeted by loud and long applause, really an ovation.He complimented the management of the Board of Directors and those who so ably assisted them and in conclusion presented President Wattles with the pen with which President Cleveland signed the Exposition bill.

Senator W. V. Allan was cheered vigorously and continuously for some minutes when next introduced.His speech was felicitous and complimentary to Omaha and its enterprise.Letters and telegrams of regret were read from Gov. W. A. Richards of Wyoming, Gov. A. W. McIntyre of Colorado, Gov. C. H. Sheldon of South Dakota, U.S. Senators W. B. Allison and John H. Gear of Iowa, John M. Thurston of Nebraska, Congressman W. E. Andrews, E. J. Hainer and O. H. Kem of Nebraska, D. B. Henderson, Thos. Updegraff, Geo. D. Perkins, Robt. G. Cousins, S. M. Clark, John C. Lacey, J. P. Dollivar, Geo, M. Curtis of Iowa, Ex-Congressman W. J. Bryan of Nebraska, Hon. C. F. Joy of Mo., and others.

Ex-Gov. Robt. W. Furnas of Brownville, Nebraska was introduced as a man who had been working on Exposition in Nebraska for a half century past.He responded in his usual happy manner, and was followed by Hon. John N. Baldwin of Council Bluffs, Iowa, who delivered the oration of the evening, an eloquent address, thoroughly western in spirit and it was received with great enthusiasm.

Ex-Senator Chas. F. Manderson spoke next; he grew reminiscent and compared the parade of a mere handful of people in 1869 celebrating the completion of the Union Pacific Railway with the parade of the present occasion.He addressed complimentary remarks to those who had been instrumental in passing the bill.He was especially complimentary to President Wattles whom he styled the "inspiriting soul of the enterprise, a man endowed with energy, character, and all the elements of true manhood."

J. H. Van Dusen of South Omaha followed.Mr. Wattles gave assurance of South Omaha's great interest and its fullest support to the Exposition.Hon. John Doniphan, Vice President for Missouri, was the next speaker.He Spoke briefly, being reminded of the fact that ninety two years ago on the site of Council Bluffs, Ia., a treaty was drawn, treating with the Indians with reference to the land acquired by the Louisiana Purchase.This being the last speech, the audience adjourned with a rousing three cheers and a tiger for the Exposition and its promoters at home and in Congress.

Now that the great object sought, national recognition, approval and participation, had been pledged and the enthusiasm following this success had settled to strong resolve to go forward to ultimate success, it was determined by the management that the scope of the work should be broadened and the business men of the city be called upon to lend their best efforts in the work and particularly toward securing the stick subscriptions required by Congress.

A meeting of merchants and citizens was called at the Commercial Club rooms on the evening of June 18th, 1896, and the rooms were packed with representative citizens and the utmost enthusiasm prevailed, many speeches were made - all favorable.The result of the meeting was the adoption by unanimous vote, amid great cheering of the following:"Resolved, that it is the sense of this meeting that the Directors of the Exposition proceed with the work outlined, at their discretion, and that we pledge to them the hearty support of the business men and capitalists of the city."

The Board of Directors met on June 19th, 1896, and it was decided to call a meeting on July 20th, by invitation, of citizens to serve as a Bureau of Finance for the Exposition.The meeting was held, and after full consideration adopted, as its action, the following, "Resolved:That this meeting recommends that the sum of $500,000.00 be raised by stock subscriptions, and that the following named persons, viz:

H. Kountz,H. W. Yates,Guy C. Barton

J. H. MillardV. B. Caldwell,Frank Colpetzer

Frank MurphyA. L. ReedW. S. Poppleton

F. P. Kirkendall E. E. Bruce C. E. Yost

Z. T. LindseyE. RosewaterW. A. Paxton

G. W. WattlesEdwin CudahyJ. A. CreightonG. W.

Lininger Alfred Millard C. F. Manderson

Alvin Saunders Lucius WellsHarold McCormick

David Anderson

be appointed as a permanent Finance Committee to secure subscriptions of stocks and have charge of the collection and disbursement of all funds and have general financial management of the Exposition." It was further ordered that this Committee prepare a report and present same to a citizens meeting to be held on June 22nd, 1896.

On that date this Committee reported to the large meeting of citizens as follows:

Mr. Chairman:

Your Committee appointed to examine into the Articles of Incorporation of the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition, and to recommend such changes as might be deemed conducive to the popularizing and success of the Exposition, report as follows:

We recommend that Article IV of Articles of Incorporation be amended to make the par value of each share of capital stock $5.00 in place of $10.00

We recommend that Article VII of the Articles of Incorporation be amended to read as follows:

"The affairs of this Corporation shall be conducted by a Board of not less than fifty Directors, to be elected from among the stock-holders and stock-subscribers of this Corporation, at a special stock-holders' meeting to be called immediately when shares of stock aggregating the par value of $50,000 shall have been subscribed.Such Board of Directors shall elect a President, Vice President, a Treasurer and a Secretary, the duties of which officers shall be fixed by the Board.Such officers shall be elected from among the Directors or other stockholders.Such Board of Directors shall also elect from its number, an Executive Committee of not less than five or more than nine, which said Executive Committee shall have all the powers of the Board of Directors when said Board is not in session, and shall choose a chairman from their own number.There shall be twenty-four additional Vice-Presidents, one for each state and Territory west of the Mississippi River, who shall be the same persons heretofore chosen by this Corporation as heretofore organized.The Board of Directors shall have authority to appoint such other officers, agents, servants, employees, committees or Boards as they may deem necessary for the conduct of the business of the Corporation, and they may from time to time prescribe the duties of all such appointees in such manner as they may deem best.

The Board of Directors shall have authority to delegate to any subordinate committee or Board, such duties as the Board itself might otherwise exercise. The Directors, when elected, shall serve during the life of this Corporation, and shall have powers to fill vacancies in their numbers caused by death, resignation or other reason, and may for cause expel any member of said Board."

We recommend that Article VIII of the Articles of Incorporation be amended by substituting for the first sentence thereof, the following words:

"A stock-holders meeting of this Corporation shall be called immediately when the aggregate sum of $50,000 par value of the capital stock of this Corporation shall have been subscribed, at which meeting the election of Directors hereinbefore provided for shall take place.notice of said meeting shall be given to said stock-holders and stock-subscribers, by publication in the daily papers of Omaha at least two days before the time fixed for holding said meeting," and by adding to said Article the following language:

"At all stock-holders' meetings, any stock-holder or stock-subscriber may vote who has made the payments on his stock-subscription called for by the Board of Directors, and voting by proxy shall be allowed."

We recommend that Article XI of the Articles of Incorporation be amended by striking out the following words:

"and the stock represented at such meeting shall be considered a quorum without regard to the amount represented," and substituting therefor the following words:

"And at such meetings one quarter of the stock subscribed present and voting shall be considered a quorum."

We report that of the two subscription papers containing the subscriptions of the stock already made to this Corporation, the paper compromising the greater number and amount of subscriptions is not in legal form and does not give the subscribers whose names are attached thereto the status of the share-holders in the Corporation, and we recommend that such subscriptions be re-taken in due form and that the form of subscription employed be uniform in all cases.

We recommend that the changes heretofore outlined in the Articles of Incorporation and in the form of subscriptions to stock, be required by this Committee of Twenty-four as a condition precedent to the acceptance by this committee of its appointment and to the work of raising further subscriptions.

We recommend that upon the completion of the reorganization of the Corporation, as herein outlined, the action of the Corporation in creating the present Bureau of Finance be rescinded to the end that the Corporation may take such action regarding the division of the work of said Corporation as may be desired.

Signed-

Committee Herman Kountz,

Jos. H. Millard,

H.W. Yates,

Guy C. Barton,

C.E. Yost,

F.P. Kirkendall.

This report was submitted to the Directors and considered by them on June 27th, and it was ordered that a meeting of the stockholders be called to meet on Friday, July 10th, 1896, to consider and vote upon amendments to the Articles of Incorporation.The Directors decided to recommend to stockholders meeting that no election of Directors should occur until the sum of $300,000.00 at least should be subscribed, the election then to be for a full board of fifty Directors, the present Board of Directors tendering their resignation, effective upon such election of a new Board.

At the meeting of the stockholders in July 10th, 1896, 795 shares of stock being present and voting, the Articles of Incorporation were changed by vote as follows:

Article VII was amended to read as follows:

"The affairs of this Corporation shall be conducted by a board of not less than fifty (50) directors, to be elected from among the stockholders and stock subscribers of this corporation at a special meeting of stock-holders to be called immediately when shares of stock aggregating the par value of three hundred thousand ($300,000) Dollars shall have been subscribed.Such Board of Directors shall elect a President, a vice-president, a treasurer and a secretary, the duties of which officers shall be fixed by the board.Such officers shall be elected from among the directors or other stockholders.Such board of directors shall also elect from its number an executive committee of not less than five (5) nor more than nine (9), which said executive committee shall have all the powers of the board of directors when said board is not in session, and shall choose a chairman from their own number.There shall be twenty-four additional vice-presidents one (1) for each state and territory west of the Mississippi river.The board of directors shall have authority to appoint such other officers, agents, servants, employees, committees or boards as they may deem necessary for the business of the Corporation, and they may from time to time prescribe the duties of all such appointees in such manner as they may deem best.The board of directors shall have authority to delegate to any subordinate Committee or board, such duties as the board itself might otherwise exercise.

The directors when elected shall serve during the life of this corporation, and shall have power to fill vacancies in their numbers caused by death, resignation or any other reason, and may for cause expel any member of said board by a two-thirds vote of the entire board.

Article VIII was amended by substituting for the first sentence thereof the following words:

"A stockholders' meeting of this corporation shall be called immediately when the aggregate sum of three hundred thousand ($300,000) dollars shall have been subscribed, at which meeting the election of Directors herein before provided for shall take place.Notice of said meeting shall be given to said stockholders and stock subscribers by publication in the daily papers of Omaha at least two days before the time fixed for holding said meeting," and the last sentence of the Article was amended to read as follows:

"Special meetings of the board of directors may be held at any time and place within the said County of Douglas, on call of the president or on call of one-third (1-3) of the members of the board,"and further amended by adding to said Article the following language:

"At all stockholders' meetings any stockholder or stock subscriber may vote who has made the payments on his stock subscription called for by the Board of Directors, and voting by proxy shall be allowed."

Article XI was amended by striking out the following words:

"And the stock represented at such meeting shall be considered a quorum without regard to the amount represented," and substituting therefor the following words:

"And at such meetings, one quarter (1/4) of the stock subscribed, present and voting shall be considered a quorum."

The Committee appointed to act as a Bureau of Finance then met and considered this action, and decided to accept same, upon agreement that following form of subscription blank be adopted and used:

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION.

STOCK SUBSCRIPTION.

We, the undersigned, hereby subscribe each for himself, and not one for another, and agree to pay for capital stock in the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, a corporation organized "to provide for holding, beginning in the month of June and ending in the month of November in the year 1898, within or near the city of Omaha, in Douglas County, Nebraska, an exposition of all the products, industries and civilization of the States and Territories of the United States of America, west of the Mississippi River, and also such exhibits as may be provided by the United States, or any State in the United States, or any foreign country, for the purpose particularly of exhibiting to the world, the products, industries and capabilities generally of the States and Territories west of the Mississippi River," equal to the amounts hereinafter written opposite our names respectively; payment to be made at such times and such installments as may be called for by the Board of Directors.

Provided, that not more than ten (10) per cent. of amount subscribed shall be called during the year 1896, and not more than sixty (60) per cent. shall be called during the year 1897, and provided further that no call shall be made until the aggregate amount of Three Hundred Thousand ($300,000) Dollars shall have been subscribed:

This was agreed to unanimously.

Thus again was the good Exposition ship in safe water, with the prow pointed toward Progress.

The Legislature of the State of Louisiana being in session in June and early July, the Directors decided that an effort should be made to secure the cooperation of that state.A delegation comprising of President Wattles, Thos. Kilpatrick, Judge Macomber and Jas. B. Sheehan proceeded to Baton Rouge, La., where after diligent effort result stated in following telegram from President Wattles, was secured.

"Baton Rouge, La. July 3rd, 1896. Too late to secure direct appropriation, but concurrent resolution has just passed both houses, authorizing the Bureau of Agriculture to make an exhibit, and pledging the state to pay for same."

Louisiana was therefore the third state to officially recognize and direct that the state be represented at the Exposition.It is much regretted that Louisiana was prevented, subsequently, from making a showing of exhibits at the Exposition.

Attention was now given especially to the work of securing subscriptions, the work was mapped out, Committees appointed and the campaign proceeded with vigor and success.August 20th, $270,000.00 had been subscribed, but many large interests held aloof, stating their desire to await results of the Presidential Campaign, then in full force.Yet the Directors struggled on aiming to reach the $300,000.00 amount by Sept. 1st, 1896.On Sept. 12th the Directors met and received report of subscriptions.It was found that $320,000 was subscribed, and that about $40,000.00 additional was assured.The Directors therefore ordered that an assessment of Five (5) per cent be made on the capital stock subscribed, payable prior to six o'clock p.m. Sept. 29th, 1896, and that a stockholders meeting be called to be held in the Hall of the Board of Trade on October 1st, 1896, at seven (7) o'clock P.M., to elect fifty (50) Directors, as provided for in Articles of Incorporation.Sept. 25th, 1896, the Directors were requested to give audience to a number of citizens and at once did so. There were present in addition to the full directory, Mssrs. C.F. Manderson, Thos, Kilpatrick, C.W. Lyman, John S. Brady, Arthur C. Smith, A. T. Recotr, Wm. A. Redick, E.M. Andriesen, M.T. Barlow, J.H. Millard, C.S. Hayward, Oscar Williams, Frank Murphy, H. Kountze, W.A. Paxton, H.F. Cady, C.F. Weller, F.P. Kirkendall, C.E. Yost, Edward Rosewater, O.C. Holmes, John Powers, W.W. Marsh, A.L. Reed, E.E. Bruce, Sam'l Katz, Louis Huggins and others.

Mr. Manderson, as spokesman, stated that owing to the closeness of the times, the excitement attending the campaign relating to the coming national elections, debates on the money situation, and the fact that some individuals and corporations that should subscribe largely to the Exposition, would not do so, until after the November elections, and yet desired a voice in the election of the Board of Directors, and was therefore aid that might be altogether lost if election of Board of Directors was held, as now proposed and called, that, therefore the gentlemen present desired to request that the proposed election of Directors be deferred until some date in November 1896, say November 10th. The request was discussed, and a Directors' meeting was at once convened, and Mr. Montgomery offered the following which was adopted:

"Whereas, More than forty (40) of the largest stock subscribers of this Corporation, representing about one-half of the aggregate subscriptions, have requested that the stockholders meeting, called for October 1st, 1896, be postponed until November, 10th 1896, therefore,

Resolved, That the call for the stockholders meeting to be held October 1st, 1896, for the election of a Board of Directors, fifty (50) in number, be rescinded and withdrawn, and that the said stockholders meeting be postponed to and held on Tuesday, the First day of December, 1896 at seven o'clock p.m., in the Board of Trade Hall, and that the Secretary be and he is hereby directed to mail to each stock subscriber proper notice of this action, and that period for payment of the Five (5) per cent assessment in stock subscriptions, heretofore, made, be extended to November 28th, six o'clock p.m."

On October 9th, 6124 persons had subscribed the total amount of $343,080.00 and still the canvas for additional subscriptions was continued.

Meanwhile, other promotive work had been pushed, and particularly the efforts to induce the holding of annual meetings of large organizations, conventions, congresses, fraternal national meetings, etc., etc., and very gratifying success had been achieved.The Governors of States in most of the Trans-Mississippi Territory had appointed their State Vice-Presidents, and the correspondence and circular work had grown to large proportions, and the influences favoring the Exposition were ever widening and spreading.The newspapers of the country generously published information regarding the project, and a firm basis for the enterprise was being constantly strengthened.

November 27th Directors in meeting assembled were advised that the Burlington & Mo. River Railway Co., had subscribed $30,000.00.

This information was greeted with cheers of acclaim, for now the ice was broken that overlapped the subscriptions of the various Railway Companies, the Burlington system being the first to uncover and send in its subscription, and it was confidently predicted that the other lines entering Omaha would soon follow the good example of the Burlington lines.It had been a matter of grave concern to the management that all efforts to persuade the various railway lines to support the exposition by liberally subscriptions had failed to bear fruit.Grateful appreciation of the action of the Burlington system was expressed, and a resolution of thanks was ordered forwarded to them, both for the subscription to the Exposition and for their further pledge to at once proceed to build a new and commodious Passenger station, thus supplying a long felt want, and forcing a general action on similar lines by the other Railways entering the city.

(Insert Attaching "A")

With the election of new Board of 50 Directors, which occurred on December 1st, 1896, the first Board of (11) Eleven Directors with their labors, efforts, and anxieties, became of the past, a thing apart.They had secured the Exposition, put it upon a firm and sound basis, had exploited the enterprise finely, and at a total expense to December 1st, 1896, of $3,898.36, a record indeed of which to be proud.

Mention should not be omitted of the appointment of soliciting committees and of the earnest and untiring labors of the committeemen in accomplishing their tasks.Committees were designated to be particular class of vocations and their energies were thus concentrated and directed toward the fullest canvas of their particular allotment.These committees were appointed on July 11th, 1896 and were as follows:(Insert "A")

STOCK SOLICITING COMMITTEE.

Appointed July 11th, 1898. (sic.)

Capitalists and Real Estate Owners, Bankers, Brokers, Collection Agencies and their employees

H. Kountze, Chairman.

G. W. Wattles.A. E. Benson

A. L. Reed W. L. Selby

W. G. Shriver.

Transportation Companies and Franchised Corporation and Their Employees

Frank Murphy, Chairman.

Dan Farrell, Jr.

E. RosewaterZ. T. Lindsey.

Manufacturers and Wholesalers and their employees

Z. T. Lindsey, Chairman.

C. F. WellerE. E. Bruce

F. P. KirkendallEdgar Allen

O. C. Holmes,F. Colpetzer, et al.

Retailers and their employees N. A. Thompson, Chairman.

A. Hospe, Jr.O. D. Kiplinger,

John Hussie, et al.

Hotels, Restaurants, Boarding Houses, Theatres and Their Employees.

I. W. Carpenter

W. R. Bennett

E. Brandeis

Brewers, Liquor Dealers and their Employees

Charles Metz, Chairman.

Otto Seimssen

H. E. Palmer

Otto Seimssen

Jno. A. Johnson

Dudley Smith.

Printers, Publishers Engravers, Advertising Agents and their employees:

I. W. Carpenter

G. M. Hitchcock

A. M. Comstock.

Judges, Lawyers, Court and Public Officials and their Employees:

C. C. Belden, Chairman

C. H. Klopp.

W. J. Connell.

R. W. Richardson.

Physicians, Dentist and their Employees:

J. H. Evans, Chairman

Dr. E. W. Lee

Dr. W. H . Hanchett

Dr. C. E. Smith.

Livery and Boarding Stables Dairymen and their Employees:

Jacob E. Markel, Chairman.

H. K. Burkett

L. Littlefield.

Fire and Police Department

Alfred Millard, Chairman.

W. C. Bullard

Frank B. Johnson

Teachers, Musicians, and Artists.G. H. Payne, Chairman.

Clement Chase

C. G. Pearse

J. H. McIntosh

Fire and Fire Insurance Companies, Agents and Their Employees:

G. H. Payne, Chairman.

John Steele

W. H. Alexander

Architects, Civil Engineers and Contractors:

John H. Harte, Chairman

A. J. Vierling

W. S. Wedge

Laundrymen and Barbers

M. Collins, Chairman.

Fred Buelow

L. W. Pains

John A. Johnson

Railway Officers, Clerks and Trainmen:

J. E. Markel, Chairman.

F. W. Mills

George W. Loomis.

J. W. Munn.

Packing Houses, Stock Yards and their Employees:

W.A. Paxton, Chairman

W.N. Babcock

E.A. Cudahy

A.C. Foster

T.W. Taliaferro

Walter Woods

Organized labor and Trades Unions:

H.A. Easton, Machinists Union.

Robt. M. Kenna, Carpenter's Union.

T.F. Sturgis, Typographical Union.

Julius Meyer, Musician's Union.

B.P. Flood, Pressman's Union.

South Omaha.

Mayor T.H. Ensor.

T.J. O'Neill.

David Anderson.

Council Bluffs.

Lusius Wells, Chairman.

Geo. F. Wright.

C.R. Hannan.

Wm. Moore.

E.W. Hart.

J.A. Patten.

N.P. Dodge.

Thos. Officer.

W.D. Hardin.

Geo. Carson, Mayor.

Clarence Judson.

Letter Carriers, Post Office Employees and Railway Postal Clerks.

A.H. Fuller

Geo. J. Kleffner

Ernest Beale.

Brady.

Those named in above committees were assisted by others and the roll of honor would be considerable increased if if were possible to now learn the names of all the "Willing Workers."

On December 1st, 1896, the results of the labors of these committees, by classes, was practically as given in the following list:

Archt's, Civil Engineers & Contractors,.......$11740.00

Brewer's, Liquor Dealers & Saloons,............24410.00

City and County Officers,.......................2520.00

Capitalists, Real Est.,Bankes,Brokers and Collection Agencies,...........................49600.00

Council Bluffs Residents,.......................6110.00

City Fire Department,...........................2200.00

Florence residents,..............................680.00

Hotels,Restaurants & Boarding Houses,...........4980.00

Insurance Companies, Agents & Employees,.......11370.00

Judges, Lawyers, Court and Public Officials,...19630.00

Laundrymen, Barbers & Employees.................6190.00

Letter Carriers & Railway Postal Clerks,........4900.00

Livery and Boarding Stables and Dairymen,.......4810.00

Jobbers Manufacturers and Employees,...........59030.00

Organized Labor,................................4400.00

Smelting Works, Employees,......................1560.00

Physicians and Dentists,........................5030.00

Printers,Publishers, Engravers and Employees,..14200.00

Pacific Express Co. Employees,..................1210.00

Railway Officers, Clerks and Trainmen,.........12605.00

Retail Dealers,................................67930.00

Street Car Co. Employees,......................12560.00

South Omaha and Stock Yards District,..........19120.00

Transfer Lines, Expressmen and Employees,.......2510.00

Teachers, Musicians and Artists,................6960.00

Transportation Co.'s Railways and Franchised Corporations,.................................600000.00

REORGANIZATION

On December 1st, 1896, the Stockholders meeting for the election of Directors was held, according to the call therefor.President Wattles was chosen as Chairman of the meeting.Mess. C. S. Montgomery, R. W. Richardson and Edward J. Cornish were designated as Judges of Election.Mr. Anton Hospe, Jr. and Mr. W. C. Patterson were appointed as Clerks of Election.Messrs W. F. Holmes and Ben Robidoux assisted the Secretary, John A. Wakefield, in proving and certifying the ballots and proxies offered.Mess. John Daugherty, Chas. E. Ford and W. Farnam Smith were selected as Tellers of Election.The balloting began promptly and was concluded shortly prior to 12 o'clock p.m.538 separate ballots were cast, representing 31492 shares of stock.

On this date 6468 subscribers had subscribed for stock aggregating $404,340.00. Of this number 4720 had paid the 5% assessment covering 35087 shares.The result of the count was as follows:

We, the undersigned Judges and Clerks of the Election for members of the Board of Directors of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, held at this meeting, beginning December 1st 1896 do hereby certify that we have carefully and correctly canvassed the votes cast at said election and that the correct result is shown upon this and the six (6) other sheets hereto attached, giving the names of all persons voted for and opposite each name the number of shares of capital stock voted for each person, including shares voted upon the accumulation plan, the addition of votes upon the accumulative plan does not change the result.

(Signed.) C. S. Montgomery)

E. J. Cornish )Judges.

R. W. Richardson)

John M. Daugherty)

W. Farnam Smith ) Tellers

Chas. E. Ford )

The correct copy of this list, appended to said report, is found immediately following:

1.Manderson, Chas. F.------30,51652Hoctor, Thos.--------12,333

2Murphy/ Frank -----------30,34753Holmes, O.C.---------10,134

3Millard, J. H.-----------30,32454Davis, F. H.--------- 8,381

4Lindsey, Z. T.-----------29,99355Frye, Thos. A.------- 7,824

5Kilpatrick, Thomas,------29,69556Cady, H. F.---------- 6,846

6Bruce, E. E.-------------29,67557Conte, Jno. B.------- 6,151

7Thompson, H. A.----------29,58558Palmer, H. E.-------- 5,896

8Wilhelm, C. M.-----------29,42259Cudahy, E. A.-------- 5,893

9Wells, Lucius,-----------29,29360Christie, D. H.------ 5,011

10Holdrege, G. W.----------29,21861Baum, J. E.---------- 4,773

12Wilcox, R. S.------------28,59662Thompson------------- 4,447

13Creighton, Jno, A.-------28,80063Youngs, Fred--------- 4,249

14Paxton, W. A.------------28,77664Hanchett, Dr.-------- 3,947

15Babcock, W. N.-----------28,77665Craig, J. Y.--------- 3,972

16Evans, Jno. H.-----------28,69366Victor, Wm.-----------3,945

17Bidwell, Geo. H.---------28,60767Walsh, J.-------------3,845

18Dickenson, E.W.----------28,55268Hospe, A. Jr..--------3,816

19Noyes, A.H.--------------28,50969Enser, Dr. T.H.-------3,307

20Farrell, Dan, Jr.--------28,44270Andreesen, E.M.-------3,178

21Smith, A.C.--------------28,41171McCord, W.H.----------3,144

22Metz, Chas.--------------28,32772Garner, L.A.----------3,072

23Wattles, G.W.------------28,25273Ruth, Jno. B.---------3,039

24Brandeis, J.L.-----------28,20374Hartman, Chris.-------3,035

25Weller, C.F.-------------28,04375Foster, A.C.----------2,974

26Smith, Dudley------------27,86876Kennard, F.B.---------2,919

27Carpenter, I.W.----------27,74577Hardy, Hy-------------2,689

28Markel, J.E.-------------27,64178Martin, J.G.----------2,292

29Kimball, T.L.------------27,61079Ricahrdson, R.W.------2,390

30Kirkendall, F.P.---------27,43080Bell, Wm. H.----------2,288

31Yost, C.E.---------------27,38281Connell, W.J.---------2,064

32Hitchcock, G.M.----------27,24182Phelps, J.W.----------2,038

33Kountz, Herman-----------27,11483Dumont, J.H.----------2,022

34Payne, G.H.--------------26,96584Thornton, T.P.--------1,948

35Korty, L.H.--------------26,88085Schuebell, Fred-------1,891

36Wakefield, Jne. A.-------26,14886Redell, Jno.----------1,882

37Reed, A.L.---------------26,12987Starr, C.A.-----------1,861

38Hussie, Jno. H.----------25,99787Starr, C.A.-----------1,861

39Price, E.C.--------------25,95388Benewa, G.W.----------1,716

40Jardine, Walter,---------25,94689McConnell, J.---------1,767

41Lyman, C.W.--------------25,77990Comstock, A.H.--------1,714

42Montgomery,C.S.----------25,60991Jamieson, J.----------1,660

43Saunders, Alvin----------24,54792Colpetzer, F.---------1,658

44Brown, J.J.--------------23,69093Rees, Sam'l-----------1,510

45Johnson, Jno. A.---------23,58994Millard, Alf.---------1,947

46Webster, Jno. L.---------23,18495Wiley, S.L.-----------1,484

47Hibbard, F.B.------------22,37095Adams, W.R.-----------1,373

48Lee, Dr. E.W.------------21,64297Hall, Chas.-----------1,326

49Wharton, J.C.------------19,85398Dufrene, A.R.---------1,298

50Bennett, W.R.------------14,75999Lentz, G.M.-----------1,175

51Liniger, G.W.------------12,440 100Rush, Jno.------------1,105

52Hoctor, Thos-------------12,333 101Creigh, T.A.----------1,093

102Miller, Dr.G.L.

Necessary to elect, 15747 votes.Scattering votes were also cast for 131 other persons, the highest having 939 votes, the lowest 1 vote. On motion the forty-nine persons having received a majority of all votescast were declared elected, and the stockholders' meeting adjourned sine die

On December 5th, 1896, Thefirst meeting of the newly elected Board of Directors was held.42 members present.Ex.-Gov. Alvin Saunders, Chairman, John A. Wakefield, Secretary.The matter of the fiftieth Director for the full Board, (49 only having received a majority of votes cast at the election) was first considered and was laid over until the next meeting.A committee of five was appointed to consider and draft a plan of organization and report at the next meeting.Committee,-Messrs. Rosewater, Manderson, Murphy, Dudley Smith and Wattles.Then adjourned to December 8th, 1896, 2 o'clock P.M.

December 8th, 2 P.M.Present 44 members.

Ex-Senator Alvin Saunders in the Chair.it was decided that the Board had full power to elect the fiftieth (50) Director,- a vacancy existing.Mr. F.H. Youngs, representative of organized labor, was unanimously elected to fill the vacant membership.The committee to consider, draft andreport a Plan of Organization, reported as follows:

"Mr. Chairman: Your Committee, appointed to formulate a plan of Organization beg leave to report as follows:

We would respectfully recommend that the Executive Committee shall consist of seven (7) members, each of whom shall be the head of a Department, viz:

1st.A Department of Ways and Means.

2ndA Department of Publicity.

3rd.A Department of Promotions.

4thA Department of Buildings and Grounds.

5thA Department of Exhibits.

6thA Department of Concessions and Privileges.

7thA Department of Transportation.

Each of these Departments to embrace as many Bureaus as may be found necessary for carrying on its objects and purposes."

On motion, the Report was adopted.

On motion, a Committee of seven (7) was appointed, composed of Directors Rosewater, Murphy, Holdrege, Montgomery, Farrell, Lindsey and Wharton, whose duty was to report the names of available persons, consenting to serve, for the positions of Officers and members of the Executive Committee to present in its report the name of any candidate for any office, recommended by two or more Directors, and that no recommendations shall be made as to selection, by the Committee.The following Resolution offered and adopted.

Resolved,That no Director of this corporation shall receive any compensation for services performed in any capacity, for the corporation."

On December 16th, 1896.Present 45 Directors.

Mr. Rosewater, as chairman of the Committee, presented the following report.

"Mr. Chairman: Your Committee appointed to submit for the consideration of this board, a list of names of persons qualified to serve as officers of the Exposition Association and members of the Executive Committee, has endeavored to perform its duties to the best of its ability:the list herewith submitted contains the names of all persons recommended or endorsed by two (2) or more Directors, and whom we found willing to accept. It is to be regretted that a number of the gentlemen whose names had been endorsed, positively declined to serve by reason of their inability to devote the requisite time to the discharge of the duties that would devolve upon them, or through disinclination to assume the responsibility.In submitting their names, your committee would recommend that each of the Department heads of the Executive Committee be elected separately.

President,) Executive Committee.

)

G. W. Wattles) 1st.Ways & Means.

)

Vice-President) Z. T. Lindsey

)

Alvin Saunders,) 2nd.Publicity,

Thos. L. Kimball )

J. E. Markel) G. M. Hitchcock

T. S. Clarkson ) E. Rosewater.

)

Secretary ) 3rd.Promotion,

)

John A. Wakefield) C. F. Weller.

)

Treasurer ) 4th,Exhibits,

)

Herman Kountz) E. E. Bruce

C. E. Yost. ) Dudley Smith.

)

) 5thConcessions,

)

) A. L. Reed,

) Geo. H. Payne.

)

) 6th,Grounds & Buildings,

)

) F. P. Kirkendall.

)

) 7th,Transportation.

)

) W. N. Babcock.

(Signed)E. Rosewater, Chairman.

The report was accepted and the election was proceeded with, resulting as follows:

President,Gurdon W. Wattles.

Vice President,Alvin Saunders.

Secretary,John A. Wakefield.

Treasurer,Herman Kountz.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

Ways & Means Department, Zachery T. Lindsey.

Publicity Department, Edward Rosewater.

Promotion Department, Gilbert M. Hitchcock.

Buildings & Grounds DepartmentFreeman P. Kirkendall.

Exhibits Department Edward E. Bruce

Concessions & Privileges Dept.Abraham L. Reed.

Transportation Department, William N. Babcock.

Director John A. Wakefield presented his resignation as a Director, as being required as secretary to devote his entire time and service to the Corporation, it was not possible to do so under the resolution concerning services of Directors.On motion, the resignation was accepted and an election ordered to fill the vacancy, resulting in the election of Mr. Allan T. Rector.By-Laws for the government of the affairs of the Exposition, as prepared by the Executive Committee, were then read and, on motion, unanimously adopted. (See copy of same on page ___________)

Meeting July 9th, 1897.33 Directors present. Mr. Hitchcock presented his resignation as member of the Executive Committee and Manager of the Department of Promotion, as follows:

To the Board of Directors,

Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition:

Gentlemen:

I herewith resign my position as Manager of the Department of Promotion and member of the Executive Committee.

I also take the liberty of recommending that President Wattles be elected to succeed me for the reason that he is familiar with the work of the department and in constant attendance at the Executive Committee meetings.

In resigning at this time I carry out my intention expressed at the time I unwillingly accepted the position.It seemed to be desirable that I should take the position, at least during the first few, troublous months, and I did so.

The Departmentis now well organized and the work well in hand.Legislative work is over and what remains to be done will be to build upon foundations already laid.Were it notforthe pressure of private business I should be glad to continue my agreeable relations as a member of the Executive Committee and I regret the necessity which compels me to retire from the management.

(Signed.)G.M. Hitchcock

On motion and after much discussion, it was ordered that the Promotion Department be consolidated with the Publicity Department.The following substitute for Section IV of the By-Laws was offered and on motion,- agreed to.

"Resolved:That the following substitute for Section IV of the By-Laws be adopted.

Section IV.EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:The Executive Power and Administrative authority of this Exposition shall be placed in the hands of an Executive Committee of Six Directors, who, as such Committee, shall have full general power and authority of the Board of Directors in all matters except such as Board of Directors shall by resolution, specifically reserve to itself in advance of final action by the Executive Committee.

In the event of a tie vote, the President shall cast the deciding vote."

Directors Meeting, August 20th, 1897.28 Directors present.President called attention to the death of Director Dan Farrell, Jr. and the vacancy in the directory therefore existing.Mr. Farrell was one of the men earliest interested in the Exposition project.Was a member of the first Board of Directors.Was always earnest and prompt in his support of the work, and his genial good nature and happy disposition always brought the glad sunshine into the deliverations of the Directors, and of committees, of which he was a member.

On motion, Directors Rector, Wharton and Saunders were appointed to prepare suitable resolutions relative to the decease of this valued member.

The next business was the election of a Director to fill the existing vacancy, and nomination and ballot resulted in election of Mrs. Thomas ____ Hoctor of South Omaha.

In the summer of 1897 much difficulty was experienced in holding meetings of the directors on account of lack of a quorum, a majority of the Board, and much feeling and discussion was indulged in over the seeming lack of interest on the part of the Directors.This culminated August 28th, 1897 in the adoption of the following:

"Resolved:That this Board of Directors may declare vacant themembership of any Director who shall absent himself twice in succession from meetings of this Board, while such member is in the city.Sickness only shall be deemed sufficient excuse for such non-attendance."

LOCATING THE EXPOSITION

The location of a public enterprise deemed to be of general benefit to a whole community, but of special and increased advantage to the locality immediately surrounding the institution itself, isgenerally attended with special effort on the part of those having opportunity for benefits, real or imaginary, toward the selection of the location which seems calculated to best advance their interests.This is an altogether human feeling, in consonance with the commercialism of thisAge and, as all cannot be benefited in the same degree by the same cause, it follows naturally that a rivalry should spring up over the location of such a project as an Exposition of magnitude.At all events, such was true in this case.

Immediately upon organization of the exposition Corporation the site question came to the front.Council Bluffs was first in the field, advocating the choice of a site in East Omaha, east of Cut-Off Lake, on land which, while on the west side of the Missouri River, was really in the state of Iowa.The Council Bluffs Exposition Committee, appointed by the Manufacturers and Merchants Association of that city, presented resolutions to the Board of Directors on February 10th 1896, stating that all support and aid from Council Bluffs should be conditioned upon the choosing of the location urged by them, otherwise they would withdraw their support.

On February 23rd a Mass-meeting of the citizens of Council Bluffs was heldin the Superior CourtRoom of the County Court House to consider the Exposition and their participation in it.They promptly passed resolutions as follows:

"Resolved, that the Merchant's and Manufacturer's Association of Council Bluffs, meeting in conjunction with other citizens, heartily approve of the proposed Exposition and that they render what help they can to the project, Provided; that any National, state or city aid shall be conditioned upon an assurance that the Exposition shall be located on a site within the boundaries of what is known as East Omaha, such assurance to be in the form of a joint pledge on the part of the Directory of the Exposition Company and the East Omaha Land Company.

And be it further resolved that we request our representatives at Washington and Des Moines to use their efforts to secure liberal appropriations for this project, Provided:that such appropriations are made subject to the foregoing condition, and to otherwise oppose any appropriations sought."

These resolutions with a large map of the proposed location, were printed in the Daily Nonpareil of that city and copies were mailed to all the members of Congress, the Iowa Legislature, state officers and to each of the Directors and Officers of the Exposition.

In Omaha the advocates made haste to present arguments and petitions in favor of various sites, viz:Elmwood Park, Southwest part of the city, Riverview Park, in Southeast part of city, Miller Park, north of the city, Hanscom Park location, in Southwest part of city but closer in than Elmwood Park, was later put forward as a most advantageous location.

The Board of Directors, while admiring the zeal and enthusiasm of the various advocates, yet deplored the seeming anxiety to locate something that was not yet secured, being proposed and planned only.

On February 28th, 1896, the Board of Directors deemed it wise to define their position on the subject, and the following was prepared and adopted by them.

"WHEREAS, to secure the largest success to the proposed Exposition, entire harmony of feeling and effort should exist, to the entire exclusion of personal and corporate interests, and

WHEREAS, it is deemed unwise and impracticable to endeavor to hold said Exposition without the recognition of Congress, and National encouragement through appropriations providing for National buildings and Exhibits, THEREFORE, Resolved that for the purpose of carrying out the purpose of the proposed Exposition, it is indispensably necessary,

First, That an Act of Congress be passed, recognizing and endorsing the Exposition and providing an adequate appropriation for National Buildings and Exhibits.

Second, The securing of subscriptions to the capital stock of this corporation to an amount sufficient to guarantee the successful promotion and conducting of the enterprise to a complete and honorable conclusion.And,

Resolved, That until the foregoing pre-requisite aids are secured, we deem it impolitic, inopportune, and unwise to discuss or seriously consider the matter of the location.For, until said necessary aids are secured we cannot assume that there is any Exposition to locate.And Be it Further Resolved, That at the proper time a fair and impartial hearing will be given to all parties interested in the various sites proposed, and that a location will be selected with due and fair consideration to the interests of all concerned."

This action calmed the sea that was becoming troubled, and all interests united to aid in securing pre-requisite aids.

In October, 1896, the aids referred to having been secured, the site boomers were to the fore again, and each location had its special representatives.The greatest verbal argument and epistolatory efforts were devoted to the Miller Park and Riverview Park sites; though, as time passed the Hanscom Park site's advantages seemed to become more and more prominent.

The meeting of stockholders had been called to meet December 1st, 1896 and great were the efforts to secure proxies of stockholders, that Directors favorable to this or to that site might be aided to an election.

The new Board of Directors having been duly elected, were at once in the midst of a contention over the matter of location and proceeded to consider and determine the subject without delay.

December 16th, 1896, the Board of Directors adopted the following resolutions.

"Resolved, that the selection of the site for location of the Exposition, and the appointment of all committees, officers or agents to investigate proposed sites shall be made by the full Board of Directors, and that these questions shall not be settled, nor any powers delegated by the Board of Directors, except by majority vote at a meeting regularly called for that purpose.

"Resolved, That the secretary is hereby authorized to receive sealed proposals for the location of the Exposition until Saturday noon, January 9th, 1897, and shall open and read said propositions to this Board of Directors at a meeting which shall be held at 2 o'clock p.m. on Saturday, January 9th, 1897.

"Resolved, That said propositions shall specify,

1st,-The number of acres of land offered, and the boundaries thereof.

2nd,-The use of what streets, roads and private ways approaching said land, which will be open for public use during the construction and operation of the Exposition.

3rd.-All other inducements, including donations or subscriptions of stock, which may be offered."

January 9th, 1896. (sic.)45 Directors present.

The responses to the request for propositions for location for the Exposition were then opened and read by the secretary.Propositions were received covering the following locations.

Riverview Park and adjacent thereto.

East Omaha Site.

Hanscom Park and North and West of same.

Miller Park and adjacent thereto.

Elmwood Park and the state Fair Grounds.

After the reading, the following resolution was presented and adopted

"Resolved, That a committee of three (3) be appointed, consisting of Casper E. Yost, J. H. Millard and R. S. Wilcox, to whom shall be referred all the propositions pertaining to the selection of the site for the location of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition; and that said committee be authorized and empowered to employ a good non-resident engineer and a good non-resident Landscape Architect to carefully go over and examine all of the proposed sites and make out a report in writing of their findings and conclusions pertaining to the sites which have been proposed.Said report, when so prepared to be delivered to said committee and by them referred to the full Board of Directors at a special meeting to be called January 23rd, 1897 at 2 o'clock p.m. for action, without any recommendations of said committee as to its views or conclusions, as to the most desirable site to be selected."

January 23rd, 1897.49 Directors present.

Owing to the disposition to defer the opening and reading of the Report of Committee on Sites, until after the Nebraska Legislature had taken action on the bill in aid of the Exposition, and now pending, it was ordered that the committee shall have two weeks from this date, in which to hand in its report.

February 6th, 1897.42 Directors present.

The Chairman of the Committee on Site submitted the report of the Committee, bearing the date of January 18th, 1897, to which was attached the report of the experts employed,- Messrs. A.C. Shrader and H.C. Alexander, both of Chicago, Ill.The Committee stated that their recommendations or the selection of the grounds for the Exposition was based upon the following points:

First,-Topography and general availability of the grounds for building purposes.

Second,- Transportation facilities by Street car, steam railway and other vehicles.

Third,-Sewerage and water supply.

Fourth,- Distance from Post Office.

The report recommended the sites as to their availability, as follows:

First,Miller Park

Second,Miller Park (sic).)

Third,Hanscom Park

Fourth,Riverview Park

Fifth,East Omaha Site

On motion, it was ordered that report be received, filed and published in the paper.The following was then presented and adopted.

"Resolved, That when this Board adjourns it be until Tuesday next, February 9th, at 2 o'clock P.M. to act upon the selection of an Exposition site and that supporters of all sites be required to present at that time,-

First,-Proof of the character of the legal titleand of power of possession.

Second,-Proof and specification of the sufficiency of approaches, including both public highways and trackage, and maps of the ground offered.

Third,-A bond of $5,000.00 conditioned to furnish possession and approaches without expense to the Exposition, and that free and unobstructed useof the site shall be given to the Exposition; that the site so selected by the Directors shall be at their disposal whenever the Directors ask for it, and continue during the Exposition and thereafter until the Exposition Directors shall have removed all Exhibits, structures, etc., not later than April 1st, 1899.

Fourth,-That the promoters of each site shall be given ten minutes at the meeting on Tuesday in which to present the merits of their proposed site."

February 9th, 1897.39 Directors present.

It was a decided that the proposed sites be called in alphabetical order.This was done and their merits were set forth by their representatives, as follows:

East OmahaNo Representative.

Elmwood ParkMr. W.R. Bennett.

Hanscom ParkHon. W.J. Connell.

Miller Park Mr. R.W. Richardson.

Riverview Park Hon. E.J. Cornish.

The following resolution was then offered and adopted:

"Resolved, That in selection of site for Exposition, a majority of Directors shall be necessary to constitute a choice, and that as ballotting proceeds, in each ballot the site receiving least number ofvotes shall be dropped, until two sites only remains, and that ballotting shall then proceed until one of such sites shall receive a majority of the entire Board of Directors."

Ballotting then proceeded as follows:

First Ballot,

Miller Park 19, Hanscom Park 13, RiverviewPark 4,

Elmwood Park 1.

Park 4, Elmwood Park 1.

Second Ballot,Miller Park 21, Hanscom Park 15, Riverview Park 1.

Third Ballot,Miller Park 21 Hanscom Park 16

Fourth Ballot,Miller Park 23 Hanscom Park 16

Fifth Ballot,Miller Park 22 Hanscom Park 16

Sixth Ballot,Miller Park 22 Hanscom Park 17

Seventh Ballot,Miller " 22 Hanscom " 17

Eighth Ballot,Miller " 22 Hanscom " 17

Ninth Ballot,Miller " 22 Hanscom " 17

Tenth Ballot,Miller " 21 Hanscom " 17

Eleventh Ballot,Miller " 21 Hanscom " 15

Twelfth Ballot,Miller " 21 Hanscom " 14

Thirteenth Ballot,Miller " 20 Hanscom " 15

Fourteenth Ballot,Miller " 23 Hanscom " 13

Fifteenth Ballot,Miller " 23 Hanscom " 13

Sixteenth Ballot,Miller " 21 Hanscom " 12

Seventeenth Ballot,Miller " 23 Hanscom " 12

Moved to adjourn until to-morrow evening, February 10th at 8 o'clock P.M. and that secretary get expression from every Director absent, and that on to-morrow evening the written reply of those absent be permitted vote, as if present. Agreed to.Adjourned.

February 10th, 1897.36 Directors present on rollcall. After some preliminary skirmishing, a ballot was proceeded with, resulting as follows:

18th Ballot, MILLER PARK,-- Babcock, Bidwell, Brown, Bruce, Creighton, Hibbard, Hussie, Jardine, Kilpatrick, Kountz, Lee, Lyman, Markel, Metz, Millard, Murphy, Paxton, Rector, Saunders, Wattles, Webster, Weller, Wells, Wharton, Wilcox, Wilhelm, Yost, Youngs, Total,--28. HANSCOM PARK,-- Brandeis, Carpenter, Dickenson, Evans, Farrell, Hitchcock, Holdrege, Johnson, Kimball, Kirkendall, Korty, Lindsey, Manderson, Montgomery, Noyes, Payne, Price, Reed, Rosewater, Smith, (Arthur C.) Smith (Dudley) Thompson, Total,--22.

The following Directors were voted on letters and telegrams received by the secretary.

Bidwell, Babcock, Dickenson, Evans, Kirkendall, Korty, Lee, Markel, Paxton, Rosewater, Smith (Dudley), Thompson, Wilcox, Wells.

Mr. Manderson moved that Miller Park be the unanimous choice of the Directors for the location of the Exposition.Carried unanimously by a standing vote.

Mr. Connell moved three cheers for Miller Park and the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.And thus did the location seem to be finally chosen,- but such was not the fact.

Mr. Kirkendall, as Manager of Department of Buildings and Grounds, had visited the Miller Park site frequently, and was much impressed with the feeling that the location was too far from the city, (something more than four miles) and feared the distance would tend to minimize the city attendance, an important factor in Exposition attendance.He quietly sought to ascertain if a nearer site could not be so arranged for, as to be available, and being successful in this, he advised with the Executive Committee concerning it, resulting, at Director's meeting of March 13th, in appointment of a committee under the following:

"Whereas, a public demand has risen for the location of the Exposition at point at near as possible to the business center of the city, therefore,

Resolved, That it is the sense of this Board that, if proper arrangements can be made, the old Fair Grounds site should be selected as the location of the Exposition.For action upon this matter the President is hereby authorized to appoint a special committee of three, consisting of the President, Mr. Kirkendall and Mr. Wharton, to consider the details of a proposition to locate at the old Fair Grounds site.

This Committee shall report in full at an adjourned session of this meeting of the Board of Directors, to be held at 4 o'clock P.M., Wednesday, March 17th, 1897."

At said meeting the Committee reported at length and in detail, in effect,that sufficient ground could be secured for the purposes of the Exposition, lying between 24th Street east to the river bluff east of Sherman Avenue, and from Pinckney Street, north to Ames Avenue, and at an expense, practically, of the taxes for the years 1897 and 1898.Mr. Herman Kountz generously offered, not only the use of what was called the Kountz tract, but offered to sell to the Exposition 11 acres of said tract for $15,000.00, of which amount he would donate $5,000.The said tract to be deeded to the city of Omaha and to be forever kept maintained by the city as a Park, and to be known and called Kountz Park.The opportunity being so favorable it was,-

"Resolved, That the action of this Board, locating the Exposition at the Miller Park site, be reconsidered, and if so reconsidered, the vote thereafter shall be taken upon arelocation at Miller Park site from the Old Fair Grounds site; and that no other site be considered, and that voting by proxy, either by letter or wire, be received as to such relocation."

The vote on the proposition was then taken, resulting in 37 votes in favor of the resolution and no votes against.

The details in connection with the leasing and purchase of the required properties, was by vote, referred to the Executive Committee, who completed alldetails, secured all needed lands, executed the leases and arranged with Mr. Herman Kountz for lease of what was termed the "Kountz Tract": and arranged with him also for purchase of 11 acres to comprise what should be called KountzPark.Which agreement was prepared and presented to the Board of Directors at meeting July 9th, 1897.Resolutions approving the agreement and authorizing its execution, were adopted as follows:

"Resolved, That the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition accepts the proposition of the United Real Estate and Trust Company with reference to the donation by said company of tract of number one (1) to the city of Omaha for park purposes and the purchase from said company of tract number two (2) by said Exposition to be by said Exposition donated to said city for park purposes, which proposition is contained and said tracts described in a written contract and lease entered into on the 17th day of April, 1897, by and between said Exposition and said company, and that, in full compliancewith, and absolute discharge of, all of its obligations arising or existing by virtue of said proposition and with reference to said tracts, said company be, and is hereby authorized and directed to execute a good and sufficient deed, conveying to the city of Omaha, both of said tracts, subject to the following conditions: first,- That said tracts of land shall forever be conjointly used and maintained as a public park, with the right of the city of Omaha to erect and maintain on either or both thereof, any park or other buildings suitable and proper to be erected and maintained on park grounds; second That said tracts of land shall forever be conjointly designated and known as Kountz Park; third,- That during the years 1897, 1898 and 1899, no curbing,paving or macadamizing shall be placed or laid on Twentieth Street in said city, from Locust to Pinckney Street, at the cost of the owners of the property abutting upon said portion of Twentieth Street; fourth,- That one or more drive-ways and walks shall be constructed and forever maintained through both of said tracts from east to west, which shall be kept open at all times, for public use, and subject to such reasonable limitations, rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Board of Park Commissioners or by the Mayor and Council of said city; fifth,- That during the year 1897 the sum of, at least, five thousand dollars ($5,000) shall be expended by said city through its Board of Park Commissioners, in making improvements upon said tracts; sixth,- That the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, a corporation organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the state of Nebraska, for the purpose of holding an exposition in said city, shall have the right to use both of said tracts for exposition purposes, during the years 1897, 1898 and, if required by the said Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, during the year 1899.And said United Real Estate and Trust Company be, and is hereby further authorized and directed to execute a deed, conveying to said city, for street purposes, and as a public street for the use and benefit of the property abutting thereon, and of the public, the strip of land lying between said tracts; that both of saidconveyances shall be subject to the taxes upon the lands described therein, which may be levied and those which may become delinquent during the year 1897, and of the right to the use and occupation in and to said lands of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition; that the secretary of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition be, and is hereby authorized and directed to deliver to the First National Bank of Omaha, Nebraska, a certified check of said Exposition, in the sum of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000) in payment of said tract number two (2), in accordance with said proposition, and with directions to said bank to deliver said check to said United Real Estate and Trust Company only upon the delivery of said deeds by said city, and upon thedelivery to said Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition of the certified check of said United Real Estate and Trust Company in the sum of five thousanddollars ($5,000) which shall be in full of the donation agreed to be made to said Exposition by said company in said written contract."

The site as secured and used, and the properties comprising same are specifically designated on the following plat of grounds.Thus was the location finally determined upon, secured and used, and great credit must be given to Manager Kirkendall for discovering and his discretion in practically securing this location.For without this change of location, it is certain that the financial success which came to the Exposition, would not have been realized, for nothing seems to be more certainly proven that, an Exposition to be successful, must be located as near the center of population as is possible, that easy, quick and comfortable access thereto may be had.

GENERAL OPERATION

Under the Direction of

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

December 16th, 1896 to June 30th, 1902.

December 16th, 1896.45 Directors present.

On motion, a committee of five (5) consisting of Messrs. Reed, Dudley Smith, Wakefield, Youngs and W.H. Robertson of Dunn's Mercantile Agency, were appointed to investigate the list of subscribers in aid of the Exposition and report as to the solvency of said subscribers and also as to whether such subscriptions were made in good faith.

Mr. A.L. Reed for the full committee, appointed December 8th inst? reported as follows:

"TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS:

Gentlemen:

Your committee to whom was referred the question of examining and auditing the list of subscriptions to the capital stock of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, and donations thereto, respectfully report that they have carefully examined same, and find the total amount to be $404,720.00; that a 5% assessment on same would amount to $20,236.00 and that of said assessment $18,174.50 has been paid on the call of the secretary, and small subscribers are still making payments; that we find no fake subscriptions, and no large subscriptions of doubtful character, and that, in our opinion, 90% of the amounts so subscribed and donated will be collectible under the plan of assessment proposed, extending over a period of eighteen (18) months.

(Signed)A.L. Reed, Chairman)

W.H. Roberson )

F.M. Youngs )Committee.

John A. Wakefield)

Dudley Smith)

The report was adopted and ordered filed and used as a basis for certificate to the treasury of the United States that the requirements of the Act of Congress in aid of the Exposition had been fully complied with.

December 26th,1896.40 Directors present.

Proposals for officers for the corporation, which had hitherto been at 320 Bee Building, were ordered advertised for, were received, considered, resulting in selection of rooms on sixth floor of the Paxton Building, at 16th and Farnam Streets, where they remained until removed to the Exposition grounds just before the opening of the Exposition period.

The Executive Committee to whom had been referred the matter of preparation of By-Laws for the Corporation, here presented their report, which was read and on motion, adopted.(See copy on page ________)

January 9th, 1897.Present 45 Directors.

An assessment of fifteen per cent (15%) was ordered on subscriptions, due and payable, February 1st, 5 per cent, March 1st 5 per cent and on April 1st, 5 per cent.

On March 13th, 1897.Present 32 Directors.

The committee appointed at the meeting on December 26th, 1896, on request of the secretary, for an auditing of his accounts, etc. to date of reorganization now reported as follows:

"To the Board of Directors, Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition. Omaha, Nebraska

Your Committee appointed to check up and audit the accounts of Secretary Wakefield, from the organization of the Exposition Association, toand including December 2nd 1896, the date of re-organization, beg leave to report as follows:

First:We find that the total amount of stock subscriptions up to December 2nd, 1896, amount to $404,720

Second:We find that the total amount of cash received up to and including December 2nd, as shown by journal, and checked withstubs of receipts,-----------------------$18,015.00

EXPENDITURES

Third:We find that the total amount paid out for all purposes up to and including December 2nd, to be as follows:

Receipts carried forward: $18,015.00

EXPENDITURES:

Salaries and wages,----------------------------$2171.95

Freight and Express,---------------------------.25

Advertising,-----------------------------------31.85

Printing and stationery,----------------------573.15

General Expenses,------------------------------170.40

Telegrams and telephone,-----------------------45.09

Traveling, messengers, etc.-------------------427.15

Postage,---------------------------------------313.52

Rentals,------------------------------------- 165.00 3,898.36

$14,116.16

Balance on hand at the inception of the new organization, December 3rd, 1896.

Respectfully submitted

G.H. Payne

A.T. Rector

Isaac W. Carpenter

Having examined and checked the Secretary's books, I certify to the foregoing facts and figures.

3/13/97 John Rush Auditor

On motion, the report was adopted.

At the request of organized labor the matter of wages to unskilled workman was considered, and resulted in the adoption of the following:

"Resolved:That all contracts entered into by this Board of, its officers or agents, for work pertaining to the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, shall stipulate therein,that unskilled labor shall be paid a minimum of one dollar and fifty cents ($1.50) per day, ten hours to constitute a day's work."

Meeting of April 19th, 1897.Quorum present.

Speaking to the subject under consideration, viz:the making of further assessments upon stock subscriptions, Mr. Manderson referred to the expressed doubts of our citizens as to whether it was wise to go on with the Exposition in view, particularly of the fact that the adjoining states had not made the Legislative provisions for participation which it was expected and hoped they would do.Mr. Hitchcock spoke feelingly on the subject, and said that everything pointed to success; that this Exposition was greatly advanced over other previous Expositions at a like period in their history and offered the following resolutions which was promptly adopted.

"Resolved:That there is no grounds for the vague rumors concerning a possible postponement of the Exposition, and that the progress of the Exposition is satisfactory."

On motion, the Secretary was instructed to make an engrossed copy of the resolution, and under direction of the Executive Committee, a copy of same be sent to each Director, not present at this meeting, for his sanction or disapproval.

Meeting May 7th, 1897.27 Directors present.

Onmotion,an assessment of twenty-five per cent (25%) on the subscriptions to the Exposition was made due and payable, June 1st, 1897.

Meeting of June 19th, 1897.33 Directors present.

The following, from the Executive Committee with recommendations for adoption, was presented.

"Resolved, That for the purpose of securing, speedily benefits to the Exposition, arising under the act of the Nebraska Legislature, the Executive Committee recommends to the Board of Directors that the 35% of subscriptions not assessable under the terms of the subscriptions, until 1898 be subject to discount of five (5) per cent, if paid by or prior to June 10th prox.And that the Secretary be authorized to accept payments on this basis."

After discussion of twenty minutes, adopted.The following was also adopted.

"Resolved, That the thirty-five (35) per cent of subscriptions to the Exposition not assessable until 1898, be not subject to discount until the previous sixty-five (65) per cent has been paid."

The legislative act referred to contained a provision that no money should be available under the act, until there had been paid to the Exposition Treasury, by subscribers, the sum of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($250,000.00), and the state commissioners being anxious to proceed with their duties, action as above seemed necessary and politic.

On motion, a further assessment of twenty (20) per cent was made in subscriptions to the Exposition, due and payable on or prior to August 1st, prox.

At meeting October 12th, 1897.36 Directors present.

The executive Committee presented the report of the special committee previously appointed by it to examine into and report upon various charges preferred against Mr. Dion Geraldine, Superintendent Building and Grounds Department, charging that in his conduct of affairs he usurped the powers and prerogatives of the Executive Committee, was guilty of willful deception, indefensible partiality to contractors, flagrant disregard of the interests of the Exposition, and expensive incompetency.

The report of the committee was very full and lengthy, and was read to the meeting. The pith of it was contained in its concluding paragraphs, which read as follows:

"It appears from all the testimony submitted to your committee that in his administration of the duties connected with his employment, Superintendent Geraldine has not had that regard for the manager of his Department, and for the Executive Committee that would seem proper, by way of submitting general information concerning the work to his manager and to the Executive Committee, through his manager in order that the approval and endorsement of the manager of the Department might be securedin advance of actual execution of proposed details; and it would seem that this was a matter of which could be remedied for the benefit of the service.If Superintendent Geraldine remains in the employ of the Exposition he should in all cases adhere strictly to the rules of the Department and instructions of the manager.The subordinate employee should and ought to be willing to keep in close touch and report fully to and act under clearly stated instructions of the Department manager.

We are unable to discoverany indications of dishonesty on the part of the Superintendent or any employee connected with the Exposition, and believe the controversy tobe one of misunderstanding of the motives and positive acts which can readily be adjusted in future transactions by a union of heart and sentiment in the great work by all under the guiding wisdom of the Executive Committee as a whole.

Your Committee would extend its influence in its present relations as a special committee and recommends that such a result be arrived at.

Herman Kountz)

Lucius Wells)Committee

George F. Bidwell)

Mr. Rosewater offered the following:

"Resolved, that the services of Dion Geraldine, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, be dispensed with from and after this date."

After a very full, free and spirited discussion of the situation, on motion, a note by ballot was taken on the resolution of Mr. Rosewater, resulting 12 votes for, 22 votes against.Chair declaredthe resolution lost.

Mr. Rosewater thereupon tendered his resignation as a member of the Executive Committee, effective October 15 inst.Without action thereon the meeting, on motion adjourned.

Meeting October 19th, 1897.40 Directors present.

Mr. Manderson presented the following.

"Resolved, That the Board of Directors of the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition regret the conflicts that have arisen, growing out differences of opinion, among those charged with the actual work of preparation for the exposition; realizing fully that success can only be secured by the harmonious action and earnests co-operation of all interested in the enterprise and particularly among those charged with Executive power."

In the matter of the charges preferred before the Executive Committee against an employee of the Exposition, charged with the superintendence of the Grounds and the erection of buildings, the Board endorses the action of the Executive Committee in the appointment of Directors Kountz, Bidwell and Wells as a Committee of Investigation andexpresses its conviction that the findings of this committee, made after full, careful disinterested and impartial investigation, were just and true, and that the conclusions of fact reached by them are worthy of credit and belief.So believing the Board of Directors approve the same by the adoption of the following resolution:

"Resolved:That we affirm our confidence in the wisdom integrity and efficiency of the President and Officers of the Exposition, and the members of the Executive Committee.Amid adverse and untoward circumstances, under undeserved criticism, without reward or the expectation thereof and at an immense personal sacrifice of time and expenditure of labor they have pursued their course.

If mistakes have been made they have been minor and unimportant and only those usually incident to enterprises of great moment.With this expression of confidence we declare our unswerving purpose to hold up their hands and aid them with all our force and power to carry on this greatwork to the full success that means so much for the Trans-Mississippi Country, and particularly for this state and community."

On vote, Roll-call, the resolution was adopted.Yeas 37, Nays 1. Mr. Youngs offered the following:

"Whereas, Organized Labor and other have protested against the longer detention of Dion Geraldine as Superintendent of Construction of the Exposition, Therefore, be it

Resolved, that the services of Dion Geraldine be and are hereby dispensed with."

On vote, Roll-call, the resolution was referred to the Executive Committee. Yeas 32.Nays, 8.

Mr. Rosewater then stated that in view of this resolution, referred to the executive Committee, he withdrew his resignation as a member of the Executive Committee and would await its action on the resolution.

Meeting October 28th, 1897.29 Directors present.

Mr. Kirkendall presented the resignation of Superintendent Geraldine and advised that it had been accepted by himself and the Executive Committee, effective at once, with full pay for the month of October.Letter of resignation was as follows:

"Omaha, Neb. Oct. 26th, 1897.

F.P. Kirkendall,

Mgr. Grds. & Bldg. Dept.

Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition,

Omaha, Nebraska

My Dear Sir:

I am informed that it is claimed by certain parties or elements that my retention as Superintendent of your Department threatens the success of the county bonds of $100,000.00 for the Exposition to be voted on next week. While I feel keenly the utter injustice of such a a claim, I cannot consent to be in any sense, nor in any degree an obstacle to the success of the Exposition.

I therefore tender my resignation to take effect at your option. I shall always be deeply grateful to you for the manly unwavering support and confidence you have steadily given me.I am thankful to your Executive Committee for its kind indulgence and endorsement: and to your Special Committee of the Directory for its fearless vindication of my character and ability.

Very truly yours,

(Signed) Dion Geraldine

The following communication advising of recommendations of Executive Committee was then read, as follows:

"Omaha, Neb. Oct. 28th, 1897.

Board of Directors,

Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition,

Omaha, Nebraska.

Gentlemen:

For the purpose of presenting to you the object of this meeting, the following extract from the record of proceedings of Executive Committee at meeting held Oct. 27th is given:

Mr. Hitchcock of the Committee appointed by the Board of Directors, at meeting held Oct. 19th, Committee consisting of Messrs. Hitchcock, Hoctor and Montgomery, reported a proposed form of contract by and between the Exposition of the one part and the Building Trades Council & Central Labor Union of the other part, covering the subject of wages and hours for skilled workman on constructive work.The various points of the agreement were discussed, and it was thought advisable to have legal counsel on some of the points, and Messrs. John L. Webster and W. J. Connell were sent for, and consulted with on the subject.

As a result of the conference, Mr. Rosewater drew up and presented the following resolution:

RESOLVED, That from and after this date, all contracts for construction which shall be awarded by the Exposition, shall provide that the Union scale of wages, as appended, in force on October 1st, 1897, shall govern in the payment of skilled labor, and that eight hours shall constitute one days work, providing that extra shifts of eight hours may be used without overtime charge. Resolved, that for all skilled labor employed directly by the Exposition, the union scale of wages and eight hour day, as provided above shall prevail."

Mr. Rosewater moved, Mr. Reed seconded, that this Committee recommended to the Board of Directors their approval of the foregoing resolution, a meeting of the Directors for this purpose be called to meet to-morrow, October 28th, at Four o'clock P.M.Motion carried, six votes "Aye"

Respectfully submitted,

(Signed) John A. Wakefield

Secretary

BUILDING AND TRADES COUNCIL OF OMAHA AND VICINITY

Omaha, Neb. Oct. 28th, 1897.

THIS IS TO CERTIFY that the appended schedule of wages of the trade unions, affiliated with the Central Labor Union and Building Trades Council, were in force and effect on October 1st, 1897.

Carpenters and Joiners, No. 427,------- 30 cents per hour.

Bricklayers, No. 1--------------------- 50"""

Plasterers, No. 4---------------------- 30"""

Painters and Decorators, No. 109,------ 30"""

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters, No. 16 -------- 45"""

Sheet Metal Workers, No. 3 ------------ 30"""

Staff Workers, Modellers,-------------- 50"""

" "Casters,----------------- 30"""

CENTRAL LABOR UNION,BUILDING TRADES COUNCIL.

W.H. Bell, President. T.O. Slack, President

V.B. Kinney, Secretary.O.P. Shrum, Secretary.

On motion, the resolution and scale of wages were adopted unanimously.

Meeting November 12th, 1897.30 Directors present.

Mr. President stated that he understood that some of the Directors thought it wise to have a Director General to the Exposition, and perhaps some other changes in the Organization.If there was such feeling, opportunity was now offered for its expression.

The subject was discussed by Directors Kilpatrick, Wharton, Rosewater, Kountz, Kirkendall, Lee, Lindsay and Youngs, resulting in appointment of a committee consisting of Directors Kountz, Bidwell, Carpenter, Manderson and Webster, to consider the subject and report to a special meeting.

SPECIAL MEETING, November 15th, 1897.34 Directors present.

Report of Special Committee was presented and read as follows:

"TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition,

Gentlemen:

Your special committee, appointed at the meeting of the Board held on November 12th, to investigate and report upon the question of the appointment of a Director General or some other supervising officer, to promote the energetic completion of the arrangements for the Exposition, beg leave to report as follows:

Your committee has held an extended conference with the Executive Committee and discussed the entire situation as fully as it was possible to do, the President of the Exposition and all members of the Executive Committee being present, and are pleased to report that a substantial consensus of opinion was eventually arrived at, that the present situation does not seem to make it necessary that the office of Director General be created at this time, but that the work of all the departments might be energeticallypushed perhaps, more satisfactorily than by any other arrangement, by the appointment of a General Superintendent, a practical builder, at a maximum salary of $200.00 per month, whose office and headquarters should be upon the Exposition Grounds, and who should be placed in charge ofall work in the line of construction of any or all of the departments, with the express duty of overseeing and pushing all such work to energetic completion.As the greater proportion of the work would be in the Department of Buildings & Grounds it would seem advisable to Your Committee, that the nomination of such an officer should be conceded to the manager of that Department, and that such nomination should be approved by the Executive Committee in the usual manner.

Your committee have had under consideration certain amendments to the By-Laws, touching the powers and duties of the President, but have not sufficient time to conclude its deliberations on this subject and would ask that it have further time to consider and report on the same.

Herman Kountz,

Chairman."

On motion, the report and the recommendations contained therein, were approved.

At Meeting January 19th, 1898.26 Directors present. The Executive Committee recommended that assessments be made on the subscriptions to the Exposition of the 35% payable in 1898, as follows

20% due and payable on or prior to February 1st, 1898.

15%"" """" " March 1st, 1898.

and that a discount of one (1) per cent on the unpaid portion of subscriptions be allowed of subscription be paid in full prior to February 1st, 1898.

On motion, the recommendations were adopted and the assessments ordered in accordance therewith.

On request the secretary presented a statement of the financial situation, as follows:

Total subscriptions to this date,--------------------$490,080.00

Assessments made 65%,----------------$318,552.00

Amt. of same collected,-------------231,990.15

Bal. of 65% uncollected, 86,561.00

35% of subscriptions yet to assess $171,500.00

Less already paid on same,-------- 53,945.32

Bal. yet to collect, 117,554.68

Total available when collected204,116.53

Existing contracts will require within

ensuing 60 days, expenditure of----------------------$200,000.00

Current Expenses 60 days, salaries-------------------20,000.00

Total required within 60 days-------------220,000.00

COLLECTIONS JAN. 1st, 1898 to date,

From subscriptions,-----------------------$11,553.25

From concessions Exhibits,---------------28,988.05

$40,541.30

Disbursement vouchers issued

January 1st to date,--------------------$43,454.52

If all vouchers drawn were issued and paid an

overdraft would exist of----------------------$5,109.13

The situation was discussed pretty generally, but no action was taken beyond considering the suggestion of issuing $250,000.00 of Bonds secured by a portion of gate receipts.

Meeting February 11th, 1898.33 Directors present.

Continuing discussion of finances of the Exposition, Mr. Manderson moved

"That the Manager of the Ways & Means Dept. be instructed to bring suit within 30 days against all subscribers of $500.00 and upward, who were, in his opinion, good on execution, who are delinquent on their subscriptions to the Exposition."

Motion agreed to.

Meeting April 8th, 1898.31 Directors present.

Secretary presented an accumulation of protests received, protesting against the sale of liquors on the Exposition grounds during the period of the Exposition.After consideration the following, prepared by Mr. Manderson was adopted.

"Resolved, That it is the sense of this Board of Directors that the same policy be pursued by the management that was pursued at Philadelphia, Chicago and other Expositions, and that is, that the sale of beer and light wines be permitted, but that open bars and the sale of whiskey etc. be prohibited

Again considering the finances of the Corporation it was ordered that Ways & Means Department be instructed to institute suit against all delinquents on subscriptions of $50.00 or over, who shall be delinquent on May 1st prox.The subject was still further considered but no further action was taken.

Meeting April 12th, 1898.28 Directors present.

The following was presented and on motion, adopted.

"Resolved, That it is the sense of the Board of Directors that the Executive Committee should not enter into any contract or let any concession, in which a member of the committee is directly or indirectly interested, without first advertising for bids."

Meeting May 9th, 1898.34 Directors present.

For a considerable period past, there had been arguments advanced by a few of the Directors that a Director General should be appointed or elected and that the best interests of the Exposition would be advanced by such action.On May 6th, on the call of 17 Directors for a special meeting to consider this subject, a meeting was convened, but after some discussion adjourned until May 9th without action.On May 9th the subject was again discussed, and the Chairman of the Executive Committee presented the following as representing the views of all, excepting one of the Committee.

"WHEREAS, the Executive Committee fails to see the necessity for a Director General, General Superintendent or General Manager and Staff, who, as is contemplated, shall exercise supreme Executive authority in all matters pertaining to the Exposition, and furthermore, believing that no such necessity exists, therefore, be it

Resolved, 1st.That it is unwise at this late date, to change the general plan of organization, and the present method of conducting the business of the Exposition.

2nd. That we recommend that the title of General Superintendent be abolished, and that said title be changed to that of Superintendent of Dept. of Buildings & Grounds.

(Signed)(Z.T. Lindsey

(E.E. Bruce

(W.N. Babcock

(A.L. Reed

Mr. Rosewater stated that he regretted his inability to concur in the conclusions of his colleagues of the Executive Committee, and that when all was said and done, he still deemed it his duty to recommend the enlargement of the powers of the General Superintendent, subject only to such legislative restriction by the executive committee as shall keep the supervisory executive power in his hands.

After submissions of various resolutions and the offering of various motions, a motion was offered that the whole subject be laid on the table, which motion prevailed, not however, until roll-call was demanded Ayes 19. Nays 15.

Meeting May 13th, 1898.37 Directors present.

The request for Director General, General Manager, General Superintendent, or some or any such officer, was again placed before the Directors, and after much more discussion of the matter, the following was prepared by Mr. Manderson and offered for action thereon.

"Resolved, That a General Manager, to be selected by and to be under the direction of the Executive Committee, be placed in charge of and held responsible for the orderly, economical, and systematic conduct of affairs in the Exposition grounds, and be in full charge thereof; suggesting to the Executive Committee such general rules and regulations or changes therein may produce the best results.

Such suggestions of Rules and Regulations shall be acted upon and be subject to the approval of the Executive Committee.

Such General Manager shall have the power, for cause, to summarily remove and discharge any employee of the Exposition employed in the buildings or on the grounds of the Exposition, except the Superintendents of Departments, and shall immediately report his actin in that behalf and give the cause for such discharge to the manager of the Department in which such person is employed."

Vote was then taken on the resolution in a call of the roll.Ayes 34?

Nays 1.

The executive Committee subsequently, on May 23rd, 1898, elected Mr. Thaddeus S. Clarkson as such General Manager.Mr. Clarkson had been previously engaged in assisting the President in his duties, and his services continued, under the title of General Manager, to the close of the Exposition.

At the same meeting, after full discussion, the following resolution was adopted.

"Resolved, That is the sense of the Directors of this Exposition that there should be no free list or passes to the Exposition on and after June 1st, 1898, except as follows:

The Board of Directors of the Exposition.

The Executive Committee of the Bureau of Education.

The Executive Committee of the Bureau of Entertainment.

Vice-Presidents, and the Commissioners of countries, states and territories.

Executive Officers of countries, states, Territories

Exhibitors.

Concessions.

Employees in actual discharge of their duties.

Newspaper representatives, as per rules.

Mayor and City Council of Omaha.

Board of Omaha Fire and Police Commissioners.

Board of Education.

Board of Park Commissioners.

Board of County Commissioners. (Douglas County.)

Sheriff of Douglas County.

The subject of finance was then again taken up for consideration.It was shown that $700,000.00 has already been disbursed, but that about $300,000.00 more was needed to properly take care of the liabilities and expenses up to opening day and the cash on hand amounted only to the sum of $1,570.89.The usefulness of a loan of funds was very apparent therefore, and the Executive Committee had been unable to borrow any funds on the notes of the corporation.A committee, to whom the situation had been referred after consideration of the subject, reported the following as their recommendation, for action.

"Resolved, That an issue of $200,000.00 negotiable bonds be, and is hereby authorized to be secured by a mortgage upon 50% of the gross receipts (exclusive of stock subscriptions and donations) from June 1st, 1898, and upon all the buildings and other property of the Exposition on the grounds, and an assignment of the insurance on said buildings.

That the bonds be issued in denominations of $500.00 each, to draw interest at seven (7) per cent from date and to be payable pro-rata from the mortgage receipts or otherwise, on or before the first day of November, 1898, on call of the Trustees, and that said bonds be sold at not less than par, and that three trustees be appointed by the Executive Committee, to whom the mortgage shall run and who shall receive, hold and disburse the mortgaged property in payment of said bonds.

Resolved, That installments of said bonds be paid on the first day of July, August, September, October and November 1898, the amounts of such installments to be determined and directed by the trustees, and that the said bonds provide that the interest shall cease on each installment from the date the same became payable, as ordered by the trustees."

On Motion, the resolution was adopted.

Mr. Manderson of the Committee, further reported that for the better safeguarding and protection of the bonds above provided for, he offered the following:

"Resolved, That all employees who are paid by the month, shall be paid, beginning June 1st, 1898, part in cash and part in warrants as follows:

Those receiving $50.00 and under per month, 75% in cash and 25% in warrants.

Those receiving $50.00 to $75.00 per month 70% in cash and 30% in warrants.

Those receiving $75.00 per month and over 60% in cash and 40% in warrants.

Resolved, further that all contractors to whom payments are now due, or to become due, shall be paid 50% of their dues in cash and 50% in warrants.And, Resolved, further, That all warrants shall draw seven (7) per cent interest per annum from their date, to be registered by the secretary, and to paid by the treasurer in the order of their registration as cash funds may be in the treasury, available for such purchase.

On motion, the foregoing was adopted, all voting aye.

It proved to be impossible to dispose of the bonds by subscription, the banks and other financial institutions entertaining doubts as to their authority to invest deposits in bonds of this character, and the business men of the city felt that the banks ought to arrange to take at least, one half of the issue of bonds.Else the business men should not be held to take any of them.The bonds and the mortgage to protect them, were prepared, providing that Joseph H. Millard, President Omaha National Bank, and Charles W. Lyman, President of the Commercial National Bank, Frank Murphy President Merchants National Bank, should be the trustees required, but none of the bonds were ever issued and were eventually destroyed by a committee appointed for that purpose.On May 30th, the Executive Committee found a condition present that required action. The Treasury was $14,000.00 overdrawn and unpaid contractors were clamoring for their dues, and it was threatened that measures taken by creditors might prevent the opening, June 1st.To meet this emergency, The President, Secretary and Members of the Executive Committee, subscribed to a fund to carry the enterprise over the shoals, taking the corporation notes for the amounts; which notes were subsequently paid.

Regarding the resolution for issue of warrants, their issue under the resolution proved to be impracticable, and the Secretary was compelled to use his best judgment in the dealing with creditors and be guided largely by the conditions surrounding each case, and conclusions were reached requiring the issue only of warrants, aggregating $35,488.17 and notes of the corporation aggregating $47,502.63.The handling of the indebtedness was materially aided by the Treasurer consenting to an overdraft on funds of $20,000.00.No warrants were ever offered or issued to employees.

At same meeting, a number of protests against Sunday opening were presented and the Sunday opening question, which had long been held back was taken up for consideration.After considering various motions and resolutions the following was presented and adopted:

"Resolved, That the Exposition Grounds and Buildings be kept open on Sundays from One (1) p.m. to Ten (10) p.m. and conducted in the same manner as on week days, except that the sale of liquors be not permitted; that concerts be given and that religious services be held in the Auditorium on Sunday afternoons."

The following was also offered and adopted on recommendations of the Executive Committee.

"Resolved, That the title of General Superintendent be abolished, and that the present General Superintendent be retained under the title of Superintendent of the Buildings and Grounds Department."

DIRECTORS,

After June 1st, 1898.

Meeting June 24th, 1898.27 Directors present.

Mr. Manderson offered the following resolution, which were unanimously adopted.

The Directors of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, in parting with the professional services of the Architects-in-Chief of the Exposition, their great work being now accomplished, desire to express their unbounded satisfaction with the result and their unqualified approval of the methods that have been pursued.The World has not seen a more perfect aggregation of buildings than those that constitute the Exposition proper and the able Architects who designed them, are entitled to the enthusiastic praise that comes to them from all who view them.Much credit is due to all, and, with no desire to be invidious, the Board desires particularly to commend the ability, skill and devotion of the Architects-in Chief, Messrs Walker & Kimball of Omaha.On behalf, not only of the Exposition, but of the Trans-Mississippi country, we extend to them our congratulations and hearty thanks.

We recognize also the skill and ability of Mr. Rudolph Ulrich, Landscape Artist and of Mr. Luther Steiringer, Electrician and Mr. Henry B. Rustin, his Assistant, and thank these gentlemen for the magnificent results we have found, in which they have been prime factors.

Resolved, That copies hereof be sent to the gentlemen named and be published in the Press."

Meeting July 21st, 1898.30 Directors present.

Certain disquieting reports of irregularities, mismanagement and misdoings in various branches of the Exposition, and grave charges affecting the character, reputation and conduct of persons employed by the Exposition had been circulating for some time, and the need for a thorough investigation of all of the books, records and papers of the Exposition had been editorially urged in the Omaha Bee.And the Directors considered that, in justice to all parties, and especially to those under accusation it would be wise to provide for an investigation and audit of all affairs, and therefore, the following resolution was presented and adopted:

"Resolved, That a Board of Revision, audit and investigation is hereby created, consisting of five members of this Board, exclusive of the Executive Officers and the Executive Committee, who are hereby empowered and directed to make a thorough examination of the books, papers and records of all departments, without interfering with their active operation, and that said Board is hereby authorized to employ one or more expert accountants of clerks and stenographer and that the officers and employees of the Exposition shall, upon request, furnish all information called for by said Board.And that said Board shall make report from time to time, of its findings and conclusions to the full Board of Directors.

Resolved, That the duties of the Board of Revision, Audit and Investigation, be and hereby are defined as follows:First,- To audit the books and accounts of the corporation to ascertain what, if any, errors exist in said books and accounts.Second,- on presentation of written charges involving the honesty or charging corruption against any officer, director, or employee of this corporation, they shall investigate such charges and report their findings in all cases to the Board of Directors for final action by the said Board.It shall not be the duty of this Board to investigate the transactions of officers or employees of this Exposition wherein only questions of the rights of the respective parties are involved, and where no dishonesty or misappropriation is charged."

An election following, Directors, Kilpatrick, Wharton, Price, Lyman and Payne were elected as members of said Board of Revision, Audit and Investigation. (See their report, end of this Chapter at Meeting of Directors June 30th, 1902.

Meeting August 22nd, 1898.27 Directors present.

Mr. President Wattles had suggested that the War of the United States with Spain being now happily ended, it would be of advantage to arrange for and hold, a great Peace Jubilee in celebration of such fact.The executive Committee had expressed favor for the proposal and at this meeting Mr. Webster prepared and offered resolutions on the subject, briefly as follows:

"Resolved, That the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition hold a Peace Jubilee under its auspices on the Exposition Grounds at Omaha, from the tenth day to the fifteenth day of October 1898, to celebrate the victories of the Army and Navy in the war between the United States and Spain and the terms of the proposed peace in the protocol between the two nations, entered into by approval of the National Administration.And Be it Further,

Resolved, That the President of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Gurdon W. Wattles, be and is hereby authorized and requested, either by direct communication or by the instrumentality of such persons or committees as he may see proper to call to his assistance, extend a formal invitation to be present and participate in such "Peace Jubilee" the following persons and officials"

To His Excellency, Wm. McKinley, President of the United States and the Members of his Cabinet.

To the Members of the Supreme Court of the United States.

To the Judges of the United States Circuit Court and District Courts.

To the Members of the United States Senate and House of Representatives.

To the Ambassadors and Ministers of Foreign Countries, resident in the United States.

To the Governors of the various States and Territories of the United States with their Official Staffs and other state Officers.

To the Officers of the United States Army and Navy and other Distinguished Citizens.

To the President of the Republic of Mexico and his official family.

To the Governor-General and other officials of the Dominion of Canada.

Be it Further Resolved, That the arrangement of the details of the Peace Jubilee proceed with all convenient speed as may be ordered and directed."

The resolutions were adopted unanimously and was the basis upon which was builded the great "Peace Jubilee" held so successfully and which reflected so much credit upon all concerned in its management and conduct and marked an Epoch in the history of our County.

Meeting October 7th, 1898.Quorum present.

The Exposition period now drawing toward itsclose, it was urged by some that the period be extended into November, thus allowing opportunity for many to visit the Exposition who could not arrange to come by November 1st prox.After discussion, action resulted in the adoption of the following resolution

"Resolved, That the Executive Committee are directed to invite proposals to be opened in November 15th next, for the purchase of the buildings and materials belonging to the Exposition, as a whole or in such proportions as they may be required, subject to the conditions of contracts for lands used by the Exposition.And it is ordered that the Exposition close its doors November 1st next, and proceed to the liquidation and settlement of its affairs."

Mr. Manderson offered the following:

"In view of the historical value of every incident connected with the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition and the importance of preserving in a safe public depository all material connected with its inception, its progress, its development and its triumphant success, it is Resolved, That the President and Secretary of the Exposition are hereby directed to obtain by purchase or otherwise, one at least of every medal, souvenir, program, photograph, illustration, magazine or newspaper article, and all other matters and things connected with its history, that can be procured. Resolved, That all such material when gathered, shall be placed in suitable cases or receptacles in the building of the Omaha City Library, Provided that said Library shall agree to furnish suitable places therefor and give due care to the preservation of the same.It is further, Resolved, That the President shall appoint from the Directors of the Exposition a Committee of three to constitute and be called, "The Historical Committee." Such Committee shall be authorized and empowered to employ a suitable person as Historian who shall at once proceed with the gathering of the material and information for a complete history of the Exposition and prepare the manuscript and select the illustrations and plates therefor.Such manuscript and material to be ready for the printer by June 1st 1899.It is Further, Resolved, That the sum of $10,000.00 or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be appropriated for such purpose.The sums needed to be expended under the direction of the Historical Committee, upon vouchers approved by a majority of them and countersigned by the President of the Exposition.The said Committee shall serve without compensation or emolument but are authorized to employ a stenographer, at not exceeding $75.00 per month. The material prepared for publication shall be approved before printing by the said committee, who shall also direct the form of the book to be published, and provide for its binding.One copy of said book shall be furnished to Omaha Public Library, to the University of Nebraska, to the Omaha High School Library, to Creighton College, to each state library of the Trans-Mississippi States and to each one of the Directors of the Exposition. All other of said publications shall be sold at not exceeding the cost of printing and binding and ten per cent additional.The fund resulting from such sales to be paid to the treasurer of the Exposition.

On motion Resolution was adopted with but one dissenting vote.

Messrs Manderson, Lyman and Carpenter were appointed as such committee.

Meeting, November 4th, 1898.Quorum present.

This meeting resulted in adoption of the following resolutions.

"Resolved, That the Secretary at once draw a voucher on Herman Kountz, Treasurer for $225,000.00 payable to Frank Murphy as trustee for the holders of certificates to stock and that said Frank Murphy, as trustee, pay to holders presenting certificates of stock record at this date, the sum of 75% on the par value of said stock so presented to him."

"Resolved, That so far as the collection of stock subscriptions is concerned, that the books be closed on November 4th, at six o'clock p.m., and that no more money be received from subscribers, and that all suits for the collection of same be dismissed without prejudice."

Meeting November 11th, 1898.31 Directors present.

Contentions having arisen as to just what constituted a stockholder and it being deemed wise to more clearly state the privileges extended to subscribers for stock, the following resolution was presented and adopted.

"Resolved, That all stock subscribers who have paid a part of their stock subscription, may pay the balance thereof before December 1st next, plus costs where suits have been begun, and thereupon certificate shall issue to them and 75% shall be paid thereon by Trustee Murphy, and a sufficient sum therefor shall be placed with him, and on the date named all monies that have been received from party paid subscribers shall be forfeited to the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.All subscriptions upon which nothing has been paid are hereby declared to be without further consideration and said subscriptions shall be held for naught.

That the President publish a notice in the daily papers, over his official signature, giving notice to subscribers to the Exposition who have paid but a part of their subscriptions, of the above action."

Meeting November 16th, 1898.28 Directors present.

The Executive Committee reported the proposals received for the buildings and other property of the Exposition, and after consideration of them, it was ordered by a roll-call vote, Ayes 16 Nays 12, that the proposal of Peter E. Iler, et al. to pay $17,500.00 for all of said property and materials, be accepted subject to conditions as follows.

Sale to include only such interest as the Exposition owns in the property at this date, and does not include the books, papers, bills and claims or cash of the corporation.

Sale to be consummated, purchase money paid and possession given on or before, November 21st next.Purchasers shall procure releases to this corporation from the principal property owners to restore to them their real estate, and provided that a good and sufficient bond shall be given by the purchasers on date of transfer, to perform their several agreements.Should Peter E. Iler et al, fail to complete the transaction by said November 21st, then the Executive Committee shall sell the buildings, materials, and appurtenances to the highest bidders on the proposals heretofore received."

The sale was duly consummated on November 21st, 1898, the money paid, and the properties delivered over to the purchasers and a conclusion was reached by the Exposition so far as the physical properties were concerned.

Referring to resolutions adopted October 7th, provided for the appointment of an Historical Committee.The Committee had proceeded with their work and had assembled a large amount of exhibits, souvenirs, mementos, etc. for preservation, but were stopped from proceeding further by a restraining order, secured from the District Court at the instance of Edward Rosewater, he making the claim that as Manager of the Department of Publicity and Promotion, the duty of editing and supervising the production of a history of the Exposition was one that peculiarly and properly belonged to him.

The restraining order of the court was based upon the claim that, as the Articles of Incorporation did not specifically grant the authority to publish a history, that therefore the Directors had no authority to use the money of the stockholders to aid in such publication, even though as contemplated, the temporary use of the funds was all that was needful, the sales being expected to fully re-imburse the monies advanced.

At this meeting the situation was discussed with much feeling, and as a result, action settled into the simple adoption of the following resolution:

"Resolved, That the Executive Committee are hereby directed to resist and defend injunction proceeding of the said Edward Rosewater vs. the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition and are authorized by the employment of counsel and the taking of all needed proofs to carry on such defense that the order and wish of the Board of Directors as heretofore expressed, may obtain."

The defense was made as directed but the temporary restraining order was made permanent, and hence no result as ordered and desired could follow, except that the valuable souvenirs thus far collected were assembled, and by arrangement with the Public Library Board were all deposited in a Musee room in the Public City Library, for view, where they yet remain, with the Fine Art Paintings purchased by the Exposition and donated to the Public Library for public use and benefit.

Meeting April 7th, 1898.Quorum present.

The following was adopted.

"Resolved, That a 12-1/2% distribution of assets be ordered to paid up stockholders.Payable April 10."

Meeting June 30th, 1902.25 Directors present.

This meeting had been called by the President on authority of the Executive Committee, to close up the affairs of the Exposition, by receipt of final reports, etc. and disposal of the balance of funds on hand.The meeting was held at the Omaha Club, and after a splendid banquet had been enjoyed, the business of the meeting proceeded.There were also present as guests of the Director, Architect-in-Chief Thos. R. Kimball.Supt. of Light & Power Henry Rustin and, as representatives of the Press, Mr. Victor Rosewater of the Omaha Bee and E. C. Hunt of the World Herald.

The committee appointed July 21st, 1898 as a board of Revision, Audit and Investigation, now submitted their report, which was as follows:

"Omaha, Neb. October 8th, 1900.

Mr. G. W. Wattles,

President of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.

Dear Sir:

I send you on behalf of the Auditing Committee what may be considered its final report.The same consists of three papers marked respectively "A", "B" and "C" and fifty-two other reports numbered from one to fifty-two inclusive. I also enclose you a statement, somewhat in the form of an index showing what these fifty-five papers refer to.

These papers were submitted to Mr. J. C. Wharton and C. W. Lyman, G. H. Payne and E. C. Price, the other members of the committee.you will notice that Mr. Lyman in a letter, which I enclose, calls attention to reports forty-five, forty-six and forty-nine; and I may say that these reports contain about all that is if any special importance in our report.It is the unanimous opinion of the committee that even these show only clerical errors, and though all the work appears in the name of Mr. John A. Wakefield, it is well known to the committee that these errors happened without his knowledge, as his time was more than occupied with other important duties in connection with the Exposition.It is also known to the Auditing Committee that a desire for economy on the part of the Executive Committee led them to apportion work to Mr. Wakefield which properly belonged to a separate department, and which should have, from the beginning, been under the management of a competent auditor.

It will be remembered by the Board of Directors that there were vague reports as to loose management and perhaps fraud in connection with the several departments of the Exposition, and it was for that reason that the auditing committee was appointed.

VINDICATION OF MANAGEMENT.

It therefore affords me great pleasure to say upon behalf of the auditing committee that after a most thorough and painstaking investigation, both by the committee itself and by its paid agent, Mr. W. S. Streeter, we failed to find any fraud or mismanagement in any of the departments; and we are satisfied that the success and honest management of the enterprise on the part of subordinates, were due to the close attention, business ability and integrity of the president, the secretary and the executive committee.

It seems to the auditing committee like presumption to even mention the president and executive committee in this report, but inasmuch as the duties of the committee covered an investigation of all connected with the management of the Exposition, we feel it to be a duty, as well as a pleasure, to say that we know them to have performed their various and arduous duties, constantly with a view to the best interests of the Exposition and with absolute integrity.

On behalf of the auditing committee,

Thomas Kirkpatrick, Chairman."

On motion, approved and ordered spread upon the records.

Director Wharton moved that a committee of three (3) be appointed by the secretary, and of which the secretary shall be chairman, to select and secure a proper and suitable gold medals, to be presented to the President and each of the Executive Committee in token of high regard of the Board of Directors for their honorable and self-sacrificing services to the Exposition.Motion carried unanimously.

Mr. Lindsey, chairman, made a report for the Executive Committee, as follows:

"The Executive Committee beg leave to report that all lawful claims against the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition have been fully paid, and that there remains on hand the sum of about $2,000.00.

The committee believing it impracticable to disburse this balance among the large number of its shareholders, and recognizing the efficient services of Mr. John A. Wakefield, Secretary of the Exposition, hereby recommends that this balance be paid to the Secretary, as additional compensation for his services in the past and in full for his work in the compilation of a statement of the affairs of the Exposition, including a recital of the inception, organization, operation management and results of the Exposition. which statement shall be submitted by him to a committee consisting of Chas. F. Manderson, Chairman, Isaac W. Carpenter, Chas. W. Lyman, Carroll S. Montgomery, and Edward Rosewater, to be revised and approved by them, and afterwards filed in the Public Library of the City of Omaha, or published by private subscription, or by any corporation, firm, or individual, having first obtained the consent and approval of the above named committee.Said publication to be without expense or liability to this corporation."

On motion, report and recommendations were unanimously adopted.

Mr. Montgomery, General Counsel, then offered the following:

"Resolved, That all the acts and proceedings of the Executive Committee, and of the officers of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, from the commencement of the corporation to this date, as shown by the records of the corporation, are hereby approved and ratified."

On motion, resolution was adopted.

Mr. Montgomery as General Counsel, also offered the following, which was, on motion, unanimously adopted.

"Whereas, all lawful claims and demand, and obligations of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition have been paid and all of the funds and property of said corporation have been disposed of and properly distributed and disbursed, and the objects for which said corporation was organized have been fully consummated and performed.Now, Therefore, Resolved, That the said corporation be dissolved and that further business by or in the name of the corporation be discontinued."

There were held in all sixty-four (64) meetings of the Board of Directors, 37 prior to the opening of the Exposition and 27 thereafter.Director John A. Johnson takes credit for attendance at every one of these meetings, with Director Thomas Kilpatrick a close second, he having been absent but one meeting.

WAYS AND MEANS DEPARTMENT

Zachary T. Lindsey, Manager

Willliam F. Holmes, Cashier

Roy Bousinot, Asst. Cashier

Robert A. Findley, Auditor

Wm. M. Carson, General Bookkeeper

V. S. Burley, Special Bookkeeper

Wm. Hearle, Special Bookkeeper

Wm. M. Byrne, Collector

D. G. Rhoads, Collector

Miss Nannie McGough, Stenographer

Miss Emma Quick, Stenographer

Solomon Yoder, Messenger

Herman Lehmer, Messenger

The ways and means part of any organization or enterprise, is always one of the most important and one to which most careful thought and attention is absolutely necessary.It is doubly important in any project of semi-public character, and more particularly so in an enterprise such as the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition was to Omaha and its citizens. The success or failure of any enterprise is very largely dependent upon the Ways and Means Department, and while success does not always bring a shower of credit to those to whom it is due, yet certain it is that failure always brings condemnation and opprobrium upon, not only those to whom it may be justly due but upon all who had to do with its government and management.

BUREAU OF SUBSCRIPTIONS

The Ways & Means Department of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition took charge of this branch of the work after subscriptions aggregating $404,720.00 had been secured, as evidenced by the certificate of the committee appointed to review the subscriptions obtained up to December 1st, 1896 (See General Operations, page _____)and the task of securing further subscriptions to an adequate amount, and of making collections of the assessments on the subscriptions, was at once begun and pursues with indefatigable energy.This kind of effort is familiar to many and it is unnecessary to dwell upon the details of it in this case, but only to give results.

Manager of this department by untiring effort of himself and of aids called to his assistance, succeeded in increasing the subscriptions by $221,242.70, making the aggregate amount of subscriptions to the Exposition $625,962.70, of which amount there was collected the sum of $548,415.20, or eighty eight (88) per cent of the entire subscriptions.

When the financial situation and possibilities of the years 1896 and 1897, are considered it will be quickly granted that this was a remarkable record of collections of such a general and promiscuous subscription list.

The subscriptions to the Exposition were in number and amounts as follows:

3,284subscriptions of $ 10.00 each

1,113 20.00

439 30.00

66 40.00

790 50.00

10 60.00

5 70.00

4 80.00

494 100.00

1 110.00

1 120.00

22 150.00

94 200.00

48 250.00

37 300.00

2 350.00

4 400.00

64 500.00

3 600.00

6 650.00

3 750.00

36 1,000.00

1 1,250.00

3 1,500.00

9 2,000.00

9 2,500.00

6 subscription of $3,000.00 each

8 5,000.00

4 10,000.00

1 15,000.00

1 20,000.00

1 25,000.00

2 30,000.00

----

6587

Of subscriptions of $5,000.00 and greater amounts the list is as follows:

The Burlington System $30,000.00

The Chicago and Northwestern System $30,000.00

The Union Pacific System $25,000.00

The Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific System $20,000.00

The Missouri Pacific System$15,000.00

The Chicago Milwaukee and St. Paul System $10,000.00

The Omaha Street Railway Co.$10,000.00

The Omaha Gas Co.$10,000.00

Mr. Herman Kountz$10,000.00

Mr. Edward Rosewater$ 5,000.00

The Union Stockyards Co. $ 5,000.00

The New York Life Inc. Co. $ 5,000.00

The Nebraska Telephone Co. $ 5,000.00

Mr. Frank Murphy $ 5,000.00

The Byron Reed Co.$ 5,000.00

Chicago Lumber Co. of Omaha$ 5,000.00

Mr. Philip D. Armour$ 5,000.00

Assessments on these subscriptions were ordered by the Board of Directors as follows:

November 28th, 1896 5 per cent

February 1st, 18975 per cent

March 1st, 18975 per cent

April 1st, 18975 per cent

June 1st, 189725 per cent

August 1st, 189720 per cent

February 1st, 1898 20 per cent

March 1st, 1898 15 per cent

100 per cent

The paid up subscriptions were in number and amount as shown in the following statement.

Statement of Paid-up Stock Subscriptions:

1,194 Subscriptions 1 shares each

4512

211 3

39 4

500 5

8 6

2 7

4 8

322 10

2 11

1 12

18 subscriptions 15 shares each

70 20

36 25

29 30

2 35

4 40

52 50

3 60

1 60

1 65

1 75

34 100

1 125

1 150

6 200

6 250

6 300

10 500

2 1,000

1 2,000

------

3,018

DISBURSEMENTS

All the disbursements of monies of the Exposition, was upon the order and direction of the Executive Committee.A regular approved form of disbursement voucher was used, showing the authority of the Executive Committee, checked and signed by the Auditor, certified as being correct by the Secretary and approved for payment by the Chairman of the Ways and Means Committee.They were then ready to present to the treasurer of the Exposition, and when properly receipted became a sight draft upon the Treasurer, payable on being presented at the First National Bank of Omaha.

Pay rolls, incidental and minor expenses were paid by Secretary's check upon a special account, which were in turn protected by the regular disbursement voucher when issued in due course.

In disbursing the funds of the Exposition upwards of 29,000 secretary's checks and 5,000 disbursement vouchers were issued.

In the receipt of Exposition monies, amounting to nearly $2,000,000.00 it is worthy of note that but $4.52 of counterfeit, spurious, defaced or defective coin was found, and no counterfeit, or bad notes were sent back to the secretary, and all of the monies of the Exposition was deposited in bank, thus passing the careful scrutiny of the Bank's teller, splendid detectors of bad notes or spurious coin.

The books and accounts of the Exposition being kept in this department, statements are submitted showing general ledger balances at closing, debit and credit.Also statements showing total receipts of the Exposition from all sources, the disbursement of said receipts both by departments and by requisition, and a summary of treasurer's statement showing all funds disbursed, is herewith given.

STATEMENT OF BALANCES FROM GENERAL LEDGER

October 1st, 1902

Debits:

Distribution of assets (90 per cent) $292,482.00

Subscriptions unpaid 77,547.50

Bills Receivable, scrip of State of Washington 851.85

Expense prior to December 1st, 18963,898.36

General Expense56,694.18

Ways and Means Department 138,691.62

Publicity and Promotion Department 97,784.92

Exhibits Department 100,126.40

Concessions and Privileges Department 52,745.25

Transportation Department 6,575.94

Buildings and Grounds Department 1,104,265.74

Interest and Discount 3,634.26

War Balloons (Balance of freight charges advan.) 2,537.94

Indian Congress (Cash advance)4,597.62

$1,942,433.58

Credits:

Capital stock (Stock subscriptions)$422,745.00

Donations (Donation subscriptions)141,670.20

Exhibits (Receipts)200,110.48

Concessions and privileges 286,146.68

Buildings and Grounds (Receipts)38,128.22

Admissions (Receipts)801,515.47

Music (Receipts)3,520.85

Publicity and Promotion (Receipts) 525.33

Water (Receipts)2,879.22

Souvenir coin medals (Receipts)5,963.00

Power and light (Receipts) 28,550.96

Indian Congress (Receipts) 159.05

Salvage (Sales of Buildings and appurtenances) 21,519.12

$1,942,433.58

STATEMENT OF TOTAL RECEIPTS TO DATE

Total receipts reported to June 26th, 1899 $1,972,194.40

Received from Bond Guarantee Acct.

Collected in $3,800.00

Received from Frank Murphy Trustee 1,265.00

Received on Acct. Exhibits Dept. 79.20

Total Receipts since June 26th 1899 5,144.20

$1,977,338.69

DISBURSEMENTS BY DEPARTMENTS

Distribution of assets (90 per cent) $293,884.50

Ways and Means Department138.949.57

Publicity and Promotion Department97,784.92

Exhibits Department 100,161.40

Concessions and Privileges Department52,846.96

Buildings and Grounds Department1,103,542.01

Transportation Department6,575.94

Interest and Discount3,634.26

General Expenses 56,610.06

Girls' and boys' building9,438.35

Refunds 4,671.04

Indian Exhibit (cash advances)4,597.62

Union Stock Yards (Special premiums) 875.00

War Balloons (freight charges paid)3,126.46

Bond Guarantee account36,800.00

$1,913,498.09

DISBURSEMENTS BY REQUISITION

Capital stock (90 per cent)$293,884.50

Salaries and wages356,831.75

Freight and express19,634.19

Advertising16,303.16

Printing and stationery37,623.88

Photographing 4,844.60

Commissions paid11,816.80

Souvenir medals3,027.63

Furniture and miscellaneous4,031.83

Telegraph and telephone 4,213.60

Interest and discount 3,637.56

Amusements 65,444.27

Insurance16,104.43

Traveling, messenger and livery30,134.66

Pictures and painting22,957.03

Postage and revenue stamps11,593.68

Taxes and license 17,273.69

Steam and electricity76,842.34

Miscellaneous125,357.49

Utensils10,599.82

Grounds111,994.55

Buildings 598,450.46

Sewers 3,690.54

Water 40,220,14

Awards26,985.49

$1,913,498.09

Expenses prior to December 1st, 1896 3,898.36

General fund warrants redeemed 35,488.17

Bills payable redeemed 23,602.22

Bills receivable on hand851.80

$1,977,338.69

Total disbursements since June 26th 1899,$6,975.71

TREASURER STATEMENT

Mr. Herman Kountz,

Treasurer.

From the detailed report of the treasurer, the following summary is taken:

June 26th, 1899, balance on hand$1,831.51

Deposits since June 26th, 1899 5,144.20

$6,975.71

Vouchers paid since June 26th, 1899 6,975.71

Balance on hand, October 1st, 1902, none.

WAYS AND MEANS DEPARTMENT

Zachary T. Lindsey, Manager.

BUREAU OF ADMISSIONS

0--------

Craig McQuaid, Superintendent.

W. H. Overbeck, Chief Clerk.

W. M. Carson, Ticket Custodian.

L.N. LeValley, Extra Clerk

G. Groff, Extra Clerk.

Arthur Chase, Ticket Clerk.

E.B. Van Arnam, Pass Clerk.

Arthur J. Webb, Chief Inspector.

C. A. Mitchell, Pass Inspector.

Miss Marie Patrick, Stenographer.

Edward Johnson, Messenger.

The Bureau of Admissions, Guardian of the Gates, is one of the most important divisions of an exposition in operation, and each Exposition has tried to profit by the experience of all previous Expositions in adopting the best methods of issuing tickets and providing checks upon the ticket sellers and ticket takers.The Bureau of Admissions of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition followed this plan, but being unable to find experienced men who were absolutely trustworthy, the bureau believed it was the part of wisdom to secure the services of honest men, even if their experience had to be gained at the expense of the Exposition.By reason of inexperience some vexatious delays occurred at the opening of the Exposition entailing considerable annoyance, but no serious loss.The greatest care and utmost vigilance was exercised by the Department to prevent abuses and even fraud on the part of unscrupulous ticket and pass holders.The matter of tickets of admission, their sale and redemption at the gates is a comparatively simple transaction, but in the multitude of pass admissions which must of necessity occur, the troubles of the bureau are mainly found.Special rules covering the transactions of the Admissions Bureau, providing for sales of tickets, etc., accounting for same, providing methods for issuance of passes of all kinds, and manner of record of same, were adopted and issued, but their length prohibits their insertion in this work, and no special reason exists for their publication.

One general form of paid admission tickets was used varied in colors, and colors changed from day to day, and sometimes several times in the same day, in order that the closest record could be kept, and by using absolute checks ascertain where irregularities existed and locate them exactly.

For pass admissions, a number of separate forms, as well as colors were used, the system devised was by comparison, as good and as safe as any that has yet been used at any Exposition.

Previous to the opening of the Exposition a special commutation coupon admission book was designed, photograph of holder inside front cover, good only for the photographed holder, and containing detachable coupons, one for each admission.Books of this kind, as a means toward pre-exposition revenues were sold at $20.00 for 100 admissions, $12.50 for 25 admissions.Their value and use was not generally understood and the sales were not large.They are a good style of admission, however, to benefit both the exposition and the purchaser.

For photographic coupon admission books to exhibitors concessionaires, employees, a charge of $2.50 each was made up to July 1st and $2 after that date.These books admitted the purchaser only during the exposition period, unless for some cause, their employment ceased, when the books were taken up, canceled and destroyed.The charges on this class of pass admissions was made only to cover their cost in various ways, to the exposition, and were hence classed as free admissions.Pass admissions were provided of various kinds, in series, each series bearing a different letter, and were as follows.

Series A.Complimentary Season Pass.

Series B.Complimentary Term Pass.

Series C.Complimentary Press Term Pass.

Series D.Paid Commutation Coupon Books.

Series E.Full Term Photographic Coupon Pass for Exhibitors and Concessionaires.

Series F.Monthly Photographic Coupon Pass for Employees of the Exposition, Exhibitors and Concessionaires.Books refilled at end of each month that employees services were retained.

Series G.Complimentary Trip Pass.

Series H.Complimentary Press Trip Pass.

Series I.Workman's Card Pass, for short terms of employment.

Series J.Full Term Wagon Pass, admitting Concessionaire with his own goods.

Series K.Waiters Single Admission Pass, used for temporary increase of forces at restaurants, etc.

Series L.Card pass permitting the crossing of 20th Street at Manderson Street.

Series Z.Sleeping permit, photographic, permitting holder to sleep upon the grounds, used for various employees required to remain on premises at night.

About 160 employees were required in Bureau of Admissions including office force, ticket sellers, ticket takers, inspectors, checkers and detectives.

There were seven (7) regular entrances to the exposition grounds.There were six (6) wagon gates and twenty-two (22) exits.Thirty-six (36) self-registering turnstiles were used for checking and record purposes at the seven admitting entrances.

The record of the gates, showing admissions of all kinds on each day of Exposition, the records of the office showing cash receipts from all sources, for each day of the Exposition, will be found in the subjoined table. (Insert the table if printed, not practicable to typewrite it.)

BUREAU OF ADMISSIONS

Resume of record of admissions:

Paid Admissions,.................................

Adult,...........................................1,385,733

Special Adult,................................... 2,146

Children,........................................113,556

Special child's,.................................43,741

Special night,...................................163,819

Commutation Coupons,.............................49,975 - 1,778,250

Free Admissions,-

Free (Bands, processions, etc.)..................28,516

Full term photo passes,..........................132,514

Monthly photo passes,............................497,578

Card passes,.....................................106,340

Trip passes,.....................................12,518

Workman's passes,................................57,792 -835,258

Total attendance................................2,613,508

.687 per cent paid plus .313 per cent free, equals 100 per cent.

Record of admissions by months:

JuneJulyAugust Sept.October Total

Paid,166,882187,654 311,943413,571 698,2001,778,250

Free 122,469144,030 162,234179,597 226,928835,258

Total289,351331,684 474,177593,168 925,1282,613,508

Resume for receipts from admissions:

Pre-exposition period,.................................$4,199.82

Commutation tickets,...................................14,850.00

Ticket sales,..........................................763,425.10

Workman's passes,...................................... 1,043.35

Exhibitors and concessionaires full term photo books,.. 4,304.75

Employees monthly photo books,.........................12,514.00

Wagon books,........................................... 154.00

Post Exposition period,................................ 1,024.55

Total admission receipts,....................$ 801,515.47

Attendance on some of the principal days was as follows:

October 12th, President's Day,......................... 98,845

October 31st, Omaha Day,............................... 61,236

September 22nd, Modern Woodmen's Day,.................. 52,725

October 13th, Army and Navy Day,....................... 49,710

October 11th, Govenor's Day,........................... 48,051

July 4th, Nation's Day,................................ 44,452

June 1st, Opening Day,................................. 27,998

Smallest day's total attendance, June 3rd,.............4,756

Smallest day's paid attandance, June 6th,..............1,752

The weeks of October 9-15 showed a total attendance of 314,151.Week of largest gate receipts was week of October 9-15, receipts totaled $116,320.10. Day of largest gate receipts was October 12th, gate receipts $42,822.00 Average Cash Receipts for each admission at gates.........$ 0.37 Average Cash Receipts for each Paid admission at gates....$44.78

WAYS AND MEANS DEPARTMENT

Zachary T. Lindsey, Manager.

BUREAU OF ADMISSIONS

0--------

Craig McQuaid, Superintendent.

W. H. Overbeck, Chief Clerk.

W. M. Carson, Ticket Custodian.

L.N. LeValley, Extra Clerk

G. Groff, Extra Clerk.

Arthur Chase, Ticket Clerk.

E.B. Van Arnam, Pass Clerk.

Arthur J. Webb, Chief Inspector.

C. A. Mitchell, Pass Inspector.

Miss Marie Patrick, Stenographer.

Edward Johnson, Messenger.

The Bureau of Admissions, Guardian of the Gates, is one of the most important divisions of an exposition in operation, and each Exposition has tried to profit by the experience of all previous Expositions in adopting the best methods of issuing tickets and providing checks upon the ticket sellers and ticket takers.The Bureau of Admissions of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition followed this plan, but being unable to find experienced men who were absolutely trustworthy, the bureau believed it was the part of wisdom to secure the services of honest men, even if their experience had to be gained at the expense of the Exposition.By reason of inexperience some vexatious delays occurred at the opening of the Exposition entailing considerable annoyance, but no serious loss.The greatest care and utmost vigilance was exercised by the Department to prevent abuses and even fraud on the part of unscrupulous ticket and pass holders.The matter of tickets of admission, their sale and redemption at the gates is a comparatively simple transaction, but in the multitude of pass admissions which must of necessity occur, the troubles of the bureau are mainly found.Special rules covering the transactions of the Admissions Bureau, providing for sales of tickets, etc., accounting for same, providing methods for issuance of passes of all kinds, and manner of record of same, were adopted and issued, but their length prohibits their insertion in this work, and no special reason exists for their publication.

One general form of paid admission tickets was used varied in colors, and colors changed from day to day, and sometimes several times in the same day, in order that the closest record could be kept, and by using absolute checks ascertain where irregularities existed and locate them exactly.

For pass admissions, a number of separate forms, as well as colors were used, the system devised was by comparison, as good and as safe as any that has yet been used at any Exposition.

Previous to the opening of the Exposition a special commutation coupon admission book was designed, photograph of holder inside front cover, good only for the photographed holder, and containing detachable coupons, one for each admission.Books of this kind, as a means toward pre-exposition revenues were sold at $20.00 for 100 admissions, $12.50 for 25 admissions.Their value and use was not generally understood and the sales were not large.They are a good style of admission, however, to benefit both the exposition and the purchaser.

For photographic coupon admission books to exhibitors concessionaires, employees, a charge of $2.50 each was made up to July 1st and $2 after that date.These books admitted the purchaser only during the exposition period, unless for some cause, their employment ceased, when the books were taken up, canceled and destroyed.The charges on this class of pass admissions was made only to cover their cost in various ways, to the exposition, and were hence classed as free admissions.Pass admissions were provided of various kinds, in series, each series bearing a different letter, and were as follows.

Series A.Complimentary Season Pass.

Series B.Complimentary Term Pass.

Series C.Complimentary Press Term Pass.

Series D.Paid Commutation Coupon Books.

Series E.Full Term Photographic Coupon Pass for Exhibitors and Concessionaires.

Series F.Monthly Photographic Coupon Pass for Employees of the Exposition, Exhibitors and Concessionaires.Books refilled at end of each month that employees services were retained.

Series G.Complimentary Trip Pass.

Series H.Complimentary Press Trip Pass.

Series I.Workman's Card Pass, for short terms of employment.

Series J.Full Term Wagon Pass, admitting Concessionaire with his own goods.

Series K.Waiters Single Admission Pass, used for temporary increase of forces at restaurants, etc.

Series L.Card pass permitting the crossing of 20th Street at Manderson Street.

Series Z.Sleeping permit, photographic, permitting holder to sleep upon the grounds, used for various employees required to remain on premises at night.

About 160 employees were required in Bureau of Admissions including office force, ticket sellers, ticket takers, inspectors, checkers and detectives.

There were seven (7) regular entrances to the exposition grounds.There were six (6) wagon gates and twenty-two (22) exits.Thirty-six (36) self-registering turnstiles were used for checking and record purposes at the seven admitting entrances.

The record of the gates, showing admissions of all kinds on each day of Exposition, the records of the office showing cash receipts from all sources, for each day of the Exposition, will be found in the subjoined table.

(Insert the table if printed, not practicable to typewrite it.)

BUREAU OF ADMISSIONS

Resume of record of admissions:

Paid Admissions,.................................

Adult,...........................................1,385,733

Special Adult,................................... 2,146

Children,........................................113,556

Special child's,.................................43,741

Special night,...................................163,819

Commutation Coupons,.............................49,975 - 1,778,250

Free Admissions,-

Free (Bands, processions, etc.)..................28,516

Full term photo passes,..........................132,514

Monthly photo passes,............................497,578

Card passes,.....................................106,340

Trip passes,.....................................12,518

Workman's passes,................................57,792 -835,258

Total attendance................................2,613,508

.687 per cent paid plus .313 per cent free, equals 100 per cent.

Record of admissions by months:

JuneJulyAugust Sept.October Total

Paid,166,882187,654 311,943413,571 698,2001,778,250

Free 122,469144,030 162,234179,597 226,928835,258

Total289,351331,684 474,177593,168 925,1282,613,508

Resume for receipts from admissions:

Pre-exposition period,.................................$4,199.82

Commutation tickets,...................................14,850.00

Ticket sales,..........................................763,425.10

Workman's passes,...................................... 1,043.35

Exhibitors and concessionaires full term photo books,.. 4,304.75

Employees monthly photo books,.........................12,514.00

Wagon books,........................................... 154.00

Post Exposition period,................................ 1,024.55

Total admission receipts,....................$ 801,515.47

Attendance on some of the principal days was as follows:

October 12th, President's Day,......................... 98,845

October 31st, Omaha Day,............................... 61,236

September 22nd, Modern Woodmen's Day,.................. 52,725

October 13th, Army and Navy Day,....................... 49,710

October 11th, Govenor's Day,........................... 48,051

July 4th, Nation's Day,................................ 44,452

June 1st, Opening Day,................................. 27,998

Smallest day's total attendance, June 3rd,.............4,756

Smallest day's paid attandance, June 6th,..............1,752

The weeks of October 9-15 showed a total attendance of 314,151.Week of largest gate receipts was week of October 9-15, receipts totaled $116,320.10. Day of largest gate receipts was October 12th, gate receipts $42,822.00 Average Cash Receipts for each admission at gates.........$ 0.37 Average Cash Receipts for each Paid admission at gates....$44.78

WAYS AND MEANS DEPARTMENT

Zachary T. Lindsey, Manager.

BUREAU OF ADMISSIONS

0--------

Craig McQuaid, Superintendent.

W. H. Overbeck, Chief Clerk.

W. M. Carson, Ticket Custodian.

L.N. LeValley, Extra Clerk

G. Groff, Extra Clerk.

Arthur Chase, Ticket Clerk.

E.B. Van Arnam, Pass Clerk.

Arthur J. Webb, Chief Inspector.

C. A. Mitchell, Pass Inspector.

Miss Marie Patrick, Stenographer.

Edward Johnson, Messenger.

The Bureau of Admissions, Guardian of the Gates, is one of the most important divisions of an exposition in operation, and each Exposition has tried to profit by the experience of all previous Expositions in adopting the best methods of issuing tickets and providing checks upon the ticket sellers and ticket takers.The Bureau of Admissions of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition followed this plan, but being unable to find experienced men who were absolutely trustworthy, the bureau believed it was the part of wisdom to secure the services of honest men, even if their experience had to be gained at the expense of the Exposition.By reason of inexperience some vexatious delays occurred at the opening of the Exposition entailing considerable annoyance, but no serious loss.The greatest care and utmost vigilance was exercised by the Department to prevent abuses and even fraud on the part of unscrupulous ticket and pass holders.The matter of tickets of admission, their sale and redemption at the gates is a comparatively simple transaction, but in the multitude of pass admissions which must of necessity occur, the troubles of the bureau are mainly found.Special rules covering the transactions of the Admissions Bureau, providing for sales of tickets, etc., accounting for same, providing methods for issuance of passes of all kinds, and manner of record of same, were adopted and issued, but their length prohibits their insertion in this work, and no special reason exists for their publication.

One general form of paid admission tickets was used varied in colors, and colors changed from day to day, and sometimes several times in the same day, in order that the closest record could be kept, and by using absolute checks ascertain where irregularities existed and locate them exactly.

For pass admissions, a number of separate forms, as well as colors were used, the system devised was by comparison, as good and as safe as any that has yet been used at any Exposition.

Previous to the opening of the Exposition a special commutation coupon admission book was designed, photograph of holder inside front cover, good only for the photographed holder, and containing detachable coupons, one for each admission.Books of this kind, as a means toward pre-exposition revenues were sold at $20.00 for 100 admissions, $12.50 for 25 admissions. Their value and use was not generally understood and the sales were not large. They are a good style of admission, however, to benefit both the exposition and the purchaser.

For photographic coupon admission books to exhibitors concessionaires, employees, a charge of $2.50 each was made up to July 1st and $2 after that date.These books admitted the purchaser only during the exposition period, unless for some cause, their employment ceased, when the books were taken up, canceled and destroyed.The charges on this class of pass admissions was made only to cover their cost in various ways, to the exposition, and were hence classed as free admissions.Pass admissions were provided of various kinds, in series, each series bearing a different letter, and were as follows.

Series A.Complimentary Season Pass.

Series B.Complimentary Term Pass.

Series C.Complimentary Press Term Pass.

Series D.Paid Commutation Coupon Books.

Series E.Full Term Photographic Coupon Pass for Exhibitors and Concessionaires.

Series F.Monthly Photographic Coupon Pass for Employees of the Exposition, Exhibitors and Concessionaires.Books refilled at end of each month that employees services were retained.

Series G.Complimentary Trip Pass.

Series H.Complimentary Press Trip Pass.

Series I.Workman's Card Pass, for short terms of employment.

Series J.Full Term Wagon Pass, admitting Concessionaire with his own goods.

Series K.Waiters Single Admission Pass, used for temporary increase of forces at restaurants, etc.

Series L.Card pass permitting the crossing of 20th Street at Manderson Street.

Series Z.Sleeping permit, photographic, permitting holder to sleep upon the grounds, used for various employees required to remain on premises at night.

About 160 employees were required in Bureau of Admissions including office force, ticket sellers, ticket takers, inspectors, checkers and detectives.

There were seven (7) regular entrances to the exposition grounds.There were six (6) wagon gates and twenty-two (22) exits.Thirty-six (36) self-registering turnstiles were used for checking and record purposes at the seven admitting entrances.

The record of the gates, showing admissions of all kinds on each day of Exposition, the records of the office showing cash receipts from all sources, for each day of the Exposition, will be found in the subjoined table.

(Insert the table if printed, not practicable to typewrite it.)

BUREAU OF ADMISSIONS

Resume of record of admissions:

Paid Admissions,.................................

Adult,...........................................1,385,733

Special Adult,................................... 2,146

Children,........................................113,556

Special child's,.................................43,741

Special night,...................................163,819

Commutation Coupons,.............................49,975 - 1,778,250

Free Admissions,-

Free (Bands, processions, etc.)..................28,516

Full term photo passes,..........................132,514

Monthly photo passes,............................497,578

Card passes,.....................................106,340

Trip passes,.....................................12,518

Workman's passes,................................57,792 -835,258

Total attendance................................2,613,508

.687 per cent paid plus .313 per cent free, equals 100 per cent.

Record of admissions by months:

JuneJulyAugust Sept.October Total

Paid,166,882187,654 311,943413,571 698,2001,778,250

Free 122,469144,030 162,234179,597 226,928835,258

Total289,351331,684 474,177593,168 925,1282,613,508

Resume for receipts from admissions:

Pre-exposition period,.................................$4,199.82

Commutation tickets,...................................14,850.00

Ticket sales,..........................................763,425.10

Workman's passes,...................................... 1,043.35

Exhibitors and concessionaires full term photo books,.. 4,304.75

Employees monthly photo books,.........................12,514.00

Wagon books,........................................... 154.00

Post Exposition period,................................ 1,024.55

Total admission receipts,....................$ 801,515.47

Attendance on some of the principal days was as follows:

October 12th, President's Day,......................... 98,845

October 31st, Omaha Day,............................... 61,236

September 22nd, Modern Woodmen's Day,.................. 52,725

October 13th, Army and Navy Day,....................... 49,710

October 11th, Govenor's Day,........................... 48,051

July 4th, Nation's Day,................................ 44,452

June 1st, Opening Day,................................. 27,998

Smallest day's total attendance, June 3rd,.............4,756

Smallest day's paid attandance, June 6th,..............1,752

The weeks of October 9-15 showed a total attendance of 314,151.

Week of largest gate receipts was week of October 9-15, receipts totaled $116,320.10.

Day of largest gate receipts was October 12th, gate receipts $42,822.00

Average Cash Receipts for each admission at gates.........$ 0.37

Average Cash Receipts for each Paid admission at gates....$44.78

WAYS AND MEANS DEPARTMENT

Zachary T. Lindsey, Manager.

BUREAU OF SOUVENIR COINS

Under the Act of Congress giving recognition to the Exposition, provision was made for the establishment and operation of a United States coining press in the Government Building on the Grounds.It was planned to provide an Exposition souvenir coin, to be coined upon such press, that would be especially typical and appropriate.It was decreed that upon the obverse side of the medal should be impressed the best composite type of Trans-Mississippi womanhood.This was obtained by collecting the photographs of the handsomest women of the states and territories of the Trans-Mississippi country, secured through the various state Vice-presidents, two from each state and territory, from which the composite photograph was secured.

The reverse side of the medal was modeled after a design submitted by Thomas R. Kimball of Omaha, representing an Indian spearing a buffalo and was indicative of the period when the Trans-Mississippi region was new and unknown.

By special arrangement, the dies for these coins were made at the United States Mint at Philadelphia, Penn. at a cost of $400.They were all "coined" at the press in the U.S. Government Building and sold from there and other points on the grounds.About 25,000 in all were "coined" and sold.The net cash results attending their issue and sale were as follows:

Total cash receipts,.....................$5,963.00

Total expenses and charges,..............$3,027.63

Net profits,........................$2,935.37

THE MUSIC OF THE EXPOSITIONS, by THOMAS J. KELLEY, Musical Director.

The music of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition marked an epoch in the development of the musical appreciation and in the actual musical history of the Great West.

Hundreds of thousands of people who represented the great "Corn Belt", were patrons and patronesses, in more or less degree, of the many musical feasts afforded by the management of the Exposition.

No Exposition, before or since, has done so much for the cause of good music and the popularizing thereof in its own particular locality.The Trans-Mississippi Exposition was open but five months and in that time many strong musical organizations, local and visitant, appeared to add lustre to the occasion, and incidentally to add lustre to themselves.

The celebrated Theodore Thomas Orchestra of Chicago, held sway for five weeks under the skillful conductorship of Mr. Arthur Mees, for some time assistant conductor to Mr. Thomas, now conducting (1903 January) the "People's Concerts" in New York and other large eastern musical societies, and eminent as an authority on musical matters, as well as a writer of no mean parts, his last work, "Choirs and Choral Music" published by Scribners', being a masterpiece in its line.Lest some should say that the real strength of the orchestra was missing it is sufficient to note that Emil Bare (now of Paris) was Concert-meister, Bruno Steindel was the Solo Cellist, Schuecker, the harpist and Quensel the solo flute, and the other instruments were also represented by the first men.

The Apollo Club of Chicago gave several concerts under the personal direction of Mr. William L. Tomlins, who work is too well known to require further endorsement herein, and who was the conductor of the society.This organization presented the "Swan and Skylark" (Goring-Thomas), "The Messiah" (Handel) (in part) and the "Elijah" (Mendelssohn), combining also with the Exposition Chorus of 150 voices, in "al fresco" concerts.

The Minneapolis Choral Society, under its conductor, Mr. Willard Patten, gave "Issaih" a work composed by him, bringing to the production a chorus of about 200 voices.

The Dubuque Choral Society, under the conductorship of Mr. Portius Gane, the "Creation" (Haydn) and "Barbara Frietszche" (Jules Jordan), with about 150 voices.

The Exposition Chorus of Omaha gave (with its 150 singers) "Fair Ellen (Max Bruch) the "Rose Maiden" (Cowen), the "Daughter of Jairus" (Stainer) and innumerable miscellaneous numbers at concerts in the Auditorium, on the Grand Plaza and by the Lagoon.

Assisting in the production of these works, which were given with the full orchestra, were the following; distinguished artists; Genevieve Clark Wilson; Helen Buckley, Jenny Osborn, Sophia Markel, Anna Metcalf (Sopranos); Katherine Fisk, Mabelle Crawford and Estelle Rose, (Contraltos) George Hamlin, Holmes Cowper and Stowe, (Tenors) Charles W. Clark (now of Paris) and Homer Moore (Baritones) Frank King Clark and Edmund Kuss (Basses).And in addition to these there were many lesser lights.

There were bands galore.The United States Band, under the baton of Mr. Phinney, formerly of the Iowa State Band.

The Mexican Band, under the chivalrous and suave Capitane Richardo Pacheco.

Innes, and his famous fifty, who captivated the people beyond measure at the close of the Exposition.

Santelmann and his great U.S. Marine Band, the President's own band from Washington D.C., who opened the Exposition.

Space forbids the mention of the numerous smaller bands which did good service and were engaged a week at a time.

The organ in the Auditorium, a fine three-manual, was a feature of the musical department, organ recitals being given daily at 1:30 p.m. by Mr. Thomas J. Kelley and others.The organ was built by Moeller of Hagerstown, Md. and was opened by Harrison Wild of Chicago.

The musical policy was outlined largely by Mr. Zachary T. Lindsey, Chairman of the Executive Committee, and was developed and carried out by Willard Kimball of the Nebraska University, up to June 30th and by his successor, Thomas J. Kelly of Omaha, from July 1st to the close of the Exposition on October 31st. Miss Julia Officer of Council Bluffs was engaged to assist the Bureau as a manager of artists.

The music of the Exposition was planned in such a way as to please all visitors.It was broad in its scope and, while entertaining, it was also highly instructive.It will not be soon forgotten.

BUREAU OF SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS.

There was a multitude of special attractions supplied.Balloonists, Day-light fire-works, High wire walking, High Diving, Log Rolling, Boat races, etc., etc., all of a character to fill in and round out the daily programs.

The special feature of the special attractions, however, was the splendid fire works exhibitions displayed under provisions of contract with the A.L. Due Fire Works Company of Cincinnati, Ohio, who were the official Pyrotechnists of the Exposition.They were the finest ever seen in the west and were greatly admired and praised by those who have seen and judged the best exhibitions of fireworks given in the United States.The total cost of fireworks was rather more than $12,000.00.

Special musical attractions were also provided, notably the Theodore Thomas Orchestra, and the Apollo Singing Club, both of Chicago.These organizations with other musical matters, are specially referred to in this record under the title of MUSIC BUREAU.

The chiefest special attraction perhaps, was the Indian Congress, which is also treated separately under the title of "THE INDIAN CONGRESS."

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLICITY AND PROMOTION.

Edward Rosewater, Manager

James B. Haynes, Prof. Max Edler.

Supt. Press Bureau.In charge Issues through German Press 0000-------

With this department rested the very important work of very thoroughly and broadly advertising and promoting the features and interests of the Exposition. In the beginning, as noted elsewhere, there was the Department of Publicity organized as above noted and the Department of Promotion, of which Mr. G. M. Hitchcock was the Manager and Mr. Ernest C. Hunt, assistant.The Promotion Department was maintained and operated under this organization until Mr. Hitchcock resigned from the work on account of the pressure of private business, on July 9th, 1897.Under Mr. Hitchcock's management much promotion work was accomplished in all of the states and territories.The campaign for an appropriation from the state of Nebraska was conducted and concluded with favorable results.

One of the features planned by Mr. Hitchcock was the holding at Omaha, during the Exposition period, of a Military Encampment, national in character, to be in charge of U.S. Military Department and to comprise some regiments of the United States troops of the various arms of the service, and also, a regiment or more of state troops from each of the states of the United States or so many thereof as could be induced to participate.The plan was received with much favor by the chief officials of the Army and, under direction of Maj.-Gen. John J. Coppinger, then in command of the Department of the Platte with headquarters at Omaha, made a careful examination of the plan, location, facilities, etc. and reported favorably on the project.Much correspondence and effort were expended in the further promotion of the plan, and the plan was so generally favorably considered that the future was bright with promise of successful fulfillment but the fear of coming war with Spain retarded the work and the breaking out of actual hostilities effectually prevented the results hoped for.

Upon the resignation of Mr. Hitchcock the Department of Promotion was merged with the Department of Publicity and thenceforth both branches of the work were conducted under the management of Mr. Rosewater. Through this department in its separated parts and as later joined in one department, and also through the able efforts of the Commercial Club of Omaha and the various organizations of the city, aided by individual effort, about one hundred conventions, congresses, national and state gatherings of fraternal societies, etc., were induced to hold their meetings for 1898, at Omaha during the period of the Exposition. Some of them were as follows:

The Mixed CongressThe Western Star Court

The Royal House of MidiSwedish Epworth League

Daughters of Sphinx Liberal Congress of Religious

National Cricket ClubsNebraska Veteran Free Masons

National Indian InstituteWestern Negro Press Association

Trans-Mississippi Turnfest Afro-American Protective League

National Philatelic SocietyAmerican Institute of Homeopathy

National Dental Congresses Danish Lutheran Church of America

Society of American FloristsNational Ass'n of Postal Clerks

Nebraska Dental AssociationNat'l League of Republican Clubs

Nat'l Pure Food Congress Nebraska Retail Grocers' Ass'n

Western Editorial FederationNebraska State Jewelers Ass'n

Nebraska Poultry Ass'nGrand Commandary Knights Templar

National Live Stock ExchangeNebr. State pharmaceutical Soc.

American Forestry ass'nWestern Dist. Bohemian Tournament

American Fisheries Ass'n Nat'l Convocation of Women's Clubs

National Congress of MusiciansNat'l Funeral Director's Ass'n

Nebraska State Medical SocietyNat'l Conv. of Bohemian Turners

Independent Order of ForestersAss'n of Theatrical Stage Employees

National Detective Ass'n Scottish Rite Masons of the U.S.

Swedish Evangelical Convention Am. Inst. of Electrical Engineers

Dairymen's Nat'l Ass'nNat'l Ass'n of Dental Examiners

Traveler's Protective Ass'nNat'l Household Economic Ass'n

The American maize Propaganda Neb. Grand Lodge of K. of P.

Nat'l Good Roads ParliamentNat'l Congress Retail Liquor Dealers

Nat'l Central Labor CongressState Ass'n of Retail Liquor Dealers

National Bee-Keepers' Ass'nNeb. State Photographer's Ass'n

Nat'l Eclectic Medial Society Trans-Miss. Fruit Festival Ass'n

Neb. Eclectic Medial Ass'n Western Trav. Men's Accident Ass'n

Neb. Saengerbund SaengerfestNeb State Homeopathic Medical Soc.

State Federation of Women's ClubsNat'l Enc'm't of Sons of Veterans

Old Time Telegrapher's Ass'nTrans-Miss. Conv. of Photographers

U.S. Vetrinary Ass'nAm. Ass'n of Nursery Men

Neb. State Horticultural Soc. Western Ass'n of Wholesale Nursery Men

Supts. of Ry TelegraphAm. Ass'n of Fairs & Expositions

Grand Lodge of Neb. A.F. & A.M. Am. State Ass'n of State Weather Nat'l

Ass'n Dental FacultiesService

Am. Agricultural Colleges &Fire Underwriters' Ass'n of the NW

Experiment Stations Annual Conv. of Am. Cemetery Supts

Am. Ass'n of Farmer's Institute U.S. League of B. & L. Association

ManagersAnnual Tournament of Northwestern

The Western Surgical and Cricket Associations.

Gynecological AssociationGen'l Assembly of United Presbyterian

Nebr. State Ass'n of Funeral DirectorsChurch

At the suggestion and through the efforts of the manager of this department, the United States Postal Department issued a series of postage stamps commermorative of the Exposition and of scenes, actions and accomplishments incident and pertaining to the Trans-Mississippi region.They were issued in denominations of one cent, two cent, four cent, five cent, eight cent, ten cent, fifty cent, $1 and $2 values, the particular description of them is as follows:

The Trans-Mississippi stamps differ materially in size from the ordinary series, the engraved space being about seven-eighths of an inch in width by one and three-eighths inches long.The designs are also radically unlike those of the ordinary stamps, - consisting of a border (substantially the same in all denominations except that the figures and letters representing values are different) and a central scene, indicative in some way of the development of the great region beyond the Mississippi River.The scenes and borders are all printed from lined engravings on steel, executed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing of the Treasury Department.

The border, which forms in its inner lines an irregular oval framework to each of the scenes represented, consists of a fluted figure on either side, with interior cross bars, beginning in a single line near the bottom of the stamp and enlarging until it reaches a shield in each of the upper corners, wherein is engraved in white the Arabic numeral of denomination, - the dollar mark being also included in the case of the one and two dollar stamps.At the top, connecting the two shields and united to the fluted framework on the two sides, is a curved tablet, on which are engraved in small white capitals the words, "United States of America."Above this on either side are heads of wheat and between these is a small scroll.Immediately below the central scene is the title of the picture, in diminutive white gothic letters on a curved tablet, and below this in either side, in scrolls are the words of value "one" "two" and so on, in white capitals, except in the case of the two highest denominations, when $1.00 and 42.00 are substituted for letters.Above each of these is a projecting ear of corn, and at the bottom of all on a straight black tablet are the words "Postage One Cent.", "Postage Two Cents.", and so on in white capitals.

The scenes represented on the stamps, together with the colors of the several denominations, are these:

One Cent,"MARQUETTE ON THE MISSISSIPPI", from a painting by Lamprecht, now in the possession of the Marquette College of Milwaukee Wisconsin, representing Father Marquette in a boat on the upper Mississippi, preaching to the Indians. Color dark green.

Two Cent,"FARMING IN THE WEST."from a photograph, representing a western grain field with a long row of plows at work.Color copper red.

Four Cent,"INDIAN HUNTING BUFFALO."reproduction of an engraving in Schoolcraft's History of the India Tribes. Color orange.

Five Cent,"FREMONT ON ROCKY MOUNTAINS."modified from a wood engraving, representing the Pathfinder planting the United States flags on the highest peak of the Rocky Mountains.Color dark blue.

Eight Cent, "TROOPS GUARDING TRAIN."representing a detachment of United States soldiers convoying an emigrant train across the prairies, from a drawing by Frederick Remington, permission to use which was kindly given by the publisher, R.H. Russell of New York.Color dark blue.

Ten Cent,"HARDSHIPS OF EMIGRATION."from a painting kindly loaned by the artist, A. G. Heaton, representing an emigrant and his family on the plains on a 'prairie schooner', one of the horses having fallen from exhaustion.Color slate.

Fifty Cent, "WESTERN MINING PROSPECTOR."from a drawing by Frederick Remington (permission to use which has been kindly given by the publisher, R. G. Russell of New York) representing a prospector with pack mules in the mountains searching for gold.Color olive.

One Dollar "WESTERN CATTLE IN STORM."representing a herd of cattle by the leader, seeking safety from a gathering storm, reproduced from a large steel engraving after a picture by J. McWhirter, the engraving having been kindly loaned by Mrs. C. D. Johnson.Color light brown.

Two Dollar"MISSISSIPPI RIVER BRIDGE."from an engraving a representation of the great Eads bridge over the Mississippi at St. Louis.Color sapphire blue.

They were issued in amounts as follows:

100,000,000 One cent stamps

200,000,000 two cent stamps

5,000,000 four cent stamps

2,000,000 eight cent stamps

5,000,000 ten cent stamps

500,000 fifty cent stamps

50,000 one dollar stamps

50,000 two dollar stamps

a total of 322,600,000 stamps.

Regarding the publicity work of the department the reports filed show that the department sent out 1,422,974 issues of 32 page pamphlets, news letters, cuts of buildings, photographs, bird's eye views, framed pictures, posters, buttons, etc., causing wide publicity to the enterprise.

The department estimates upon a careful and conservative basis, that they secured the publication in the various great dailies, weeklies, magazines, ready prints, etc., of as much as 65,000,000 words concerning the Exposition by the Omaha Newspapers.

As to promotion work the reports files show that the promotion work was prosecuted energetically and as a result of special and combined efforts 35 states and territories appointed commissions to provide and look after state and territorial representation in the Exposition.

The following appropriations were made to cover the expenses of participation in the Exposition;

State of Nebraska,............................$100,000

Douglas County, Nebraska,.....................$100,000

State of Illinois,............................$ 45,000

State of Iowa,................................30,000

State of Montana,.............................30,000

(One-half of this appropriation was given by Mr. Marcus Daly of Butte)

State of Georgia,.............................10,000

State of Utah,................................8,000

State of Ohio,................................3,000

State of New York,............................10,000

Territory of Arizona,.........................2,000

Total $438,000

The following states raised privately funds as follows:

Kansas,...............$22,000

Minnesota,............ 30,000

South Dakota,.........5,000

Wisconsin,............ 25,000

Oregon,............... 10,000

Washington,........... 15,000

Oklahoma,.............5,000

New Mexico,...........3,000

Wyoming,.............. 15,000

Los Angeles Co. Cal.10,000

$170,000

Grand Total,.........$608,000

BUILDINGS & GROUNDS DEPARTMENT.

FREEMAN P. KIRKENDALL, Manager

WALKER & KIMBALL, Architects-in-Chief.

Rudolph Ulrich, Landscape Architect.

Luther Stieringer, Electrical Engineer.

A.C. Foster, General Superintendent.

Henry Rustin, Supt. of Machinery and Electricity.

M.S. Ralls, Civil Engineer.

C.E. Llewellyn, Commandent of Guards.

John A. Templeton, Chief Clerk.

In the building of a great exposition the first steps naturally are to organize, exploit and secure the funds with which to proceed to that portion of the "Building of an Exposition" which includes all of the physical features, and is usually covered by the term BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS.

The Executive Committee planned that the buildings should be of the highest character for the purpose, and then, that as many of them would be built as wants should require and the funds allow; that the grounds should be made beautiful by their transforming from a series of cornfields, as they were when secured, to a fine retreat of green velvety grounds, well shaded by a plenteous supply of large trees and beautified by a generous planting of greens and flowering bushes and plants, the whole to be handsomely and brilliantly lighted with electricity.To this end the Department Manager was empowered to arrange for the services of Messrs. Walker & Kimball of Boston and Omaha as Architects-in-Chief, with Mr. Rudolph Ulrich of New York, N.Y. as Landscape Architect, and with Mr. Luther Stieringer of New York, N.Y. as Consulting Electrical Engineer.The work of these three divisions of the general scheme are specially treated under separate headings, by those best fitted to write upon the subject, having most intimate knowledge of them.

The site for the Exposition was not finally secured until late in March, 1897. Great rivalry existed over the choice of a site for the Exposition, between the friends of the five proposed sites, which resulted, on February 10th, 1897, in choice of Miller Park, but on viewing the situation and finding that the grounds finally obtained and used, could be had, Manager Kirkendall set to work to advocate and obtain the needed change of judgment and vote of the Board of Directors on this subject, which was had at meeting of Directorson the date named, March 17th, 1897.

The first work on the grounds was under the contract with Van Court and Winn to grade out the lagoon designed as a central feature of the Kountz tract, or main court, and this work was begun on April 28th, 1897.

On April 22nd, 1897, the "Corner stone" of the Arch of States entrancewas laid with appropriate Masonic ceremonies, preceded by a great civic parade, and was the iniatory ceremony on the grounds of the Exposition.

July 7, 1897, the first contract for the building was awarded, being for the "Administration Arch", first planned to house the offices of the administration.Work was begun on this contract on July 15th, 1897, just ten and one-half months prior to the time set for the opening of the completed Exposition.

Working forces were organized, the grading of the grounds and the Lagoon was proceeded with, buildings were designed, contracted for and pushed forward toward completion, a system of sewers and water supplywas devised and placed, machinery for power and light was secured, mainly on an exhibitor's basis, Electric supplies were leased and purchased, much of it being leased, the power plant was installed, an artesian well was bored which did not prove to be of value, owing to the scant flow of water, a Hospital Department was organized and established, the main court around the Lagoon was paved with bricks, all other roads were macadamized, with a top dressing of fine gravel, a complete and sufficient guard force was organized, secret service detectives were employed, and the multitude of large and small affairs pertaining to this department were closely looked after, always with an eye single to effect, service and economy.

The usual labor disputes were to be expected and they were in evidence, but the Department Manager conducted these disputes with such tact and with such evident disposition for fairness, that they at no time became serious, and were usually settled to the satisfaction of both parties and with good feeling resulting.

Some particulars in regard to a number of the divisions of the is department are as follows:

ARCHITECTURE OF THE EXPOSITION

(Chapter on this subject to be supplied by Walker & Kimball, architects-in-Chief.

LANDSCAPING.

Report of Rudolph Ulrich, Landscape Architect, to be inserted.)

THE LANDSCAPING OF THE EXPOSITION.

Landscape Architect, Rudolph Ulrich, New York City

Architect Ulrich at the close of his work prepared and delivered a report on the same, but in some manner the report has been lost or mislaid and it is not therefore possible to incorporate the same in this history.A very diligent search has been made to secure this report, which search has proved fruitless, as have been the efforts to communicate with Mr. Ulrich and secure from him either a copy or a newly drawn statement of the great work performed under his direction and supervision.From memory such data as is now obtainable the following statement of the work of the Landscaping Department is given.

When the grounds used by the Exposition, were secured by lease from the owners, the larger part had been used for the growing of corn crops and the stalks and stubble of the previous year were still upon the ground.This was particularly true in relation to the Kountze tract and Bluff tract.On the north tract a part of the ground had been used as a County Fair grounds, having thereon a fully equipped, half mile racing course.The North tracts and Bluff tracts required but little grading and such grading as was done thereon was for the purpose of leveling and shaping the ground for landscape effects.As to the Kountze tract, the west end was some 17 or 18 feet lower than the eastern end and in planning for the lagoon and lake occupying the center of said tract, it was necessary to remove large quantities of earth from the excavations for the lagoon to build up the western end of the grounds, making provision for the and protecting Mirror Lake, which was there situated.

The Kountze tract, 2950 feet long by 680 feet wide, containing 43 acres, the Bluff tract 3447 feet long by 50 feet wide, containing 38 acres, the North tract, embracing 87 acres with some small parcels comprising about 16 acres, required for intercommunication, comprised the grounds used by the Exposition, a total of 184 acres.

The work of the Department was begun April 27th, 1897, the first being the excavation for the Lagoon, the top soil being removed and held for use after all grading work had been completed.The excavations for the lagoon were completed at the end of June.It required the removal of 108,000 cubic yards of earth, which was accomplished by a force of 52 men, at a cost of $11,735.97. The construction of the embankment of the Lagoon required 4939 linear feet of sheet piling, which was secured at a cost of $7,104.14.The capacity of the Lagoon and Mirror Lake was 13,000,000 gallons and covered seven and one half acres.

The excavated material, which amounted to 118,103 cubic yards was used for the raising of the ground at its west end and for terraces on which the buildings surrounding the main court were erected.Besides the material secured from the excavation 170,000 additional cubic yards were required for grading and for the construction of approaches to the viaducts and the various buildings.The grading on the Bluff tract and the North tract was comparatively small, but the entire amount of earth handled on the three tracts of ground was 376,750 cubic yards, at a cost of $19,404.56 or an average cost 5.15 cents per cubic yard.

The construction of road ways and walks was an important feature of the landscaping, the total area of plazas, drive and walks was 125,018 square yards or 35,952 linear feet, equal to 6.6 miles.Crushed limerock was used for these, a depth of four inches being laid on the roads and two inches on the walks.The crushed lime rock was given a top covering of fine gravel, the whole being well packed by the use of a heavy steam roller.The total quantity of crushed rock and gravel used was 16,111 cubic yards.This feature of the landscaping cost $32,587.82 which included its maintenance during the Exposition.The entire work was performed during the Spring of 1898 with a force of 12 men, 8 teams, a steam roller, and a water sprinkler.The cost of these walks, including maintenance, was 17.4 cents per square yard.The cost of driveways, including maintenance was 22-1/2 cents per square yard.

In the Grand Court, in the small areas under the colonnades, the approaches to bridges, a brick pavement was laid, a very superior brick was used, well bedded on three inches of sand.This brick paving was contracted at a cost of 38 cents per square yard, the material remaining the property of the contractor, to be removed by him at the close of the Exposition.30,441 square yards of this brick pavement was laid at a total cost of $11,620.77.

With the exception of some half dozen large trees on the Bluff tract, the grounds were entirely barren of foliage when the landscape work was begun. About 1200 trees, bought from Nebraska nurseries, were planted along the boundaries of the Kountze tract in April, 1897. These were of the rapid growing varieties, such as the poplar and soft and elder maples.The planting of the Bluff tract, was begun in November, 1897.It was planned to place four rows, each 500 feet long, of large trees to shade the main avenue from the Grand Plaza to the Horticultural Building.For this, strong healthy soft maples, from 6 to 12 inches in diameter, were secured from the John I. Redick farm and transplanted to the grounds. About 100 of these were transplanted with most satisfactory and successful results.Some 200 maples, planes, elms and Catalpas, from 6 to 8 inches in diameter and 10 to 30 feet high were planted along the side roads and in groups.

The planting was resumed in the early spring of 1898 with 105 men and 20 teams. Trees were found in abundance on the Missouri River bottoms at no great distance from the ExpositionGrounds and consisted of cottonwoods, planes, mulberries, dogwoods, wild plums, birches, buckthorns, snowberry and various other varieties.In addition vast numbers of evergreens, creepers, vines, perennial and annual plants were transplanted to complete the conceptions of the architect. A particularly successful feature was the planting of more than 60 large catalpa trees from 8 to 10 inches in diameter at the foot of the terraces and as many North Carolina poplars near the Colonnades and adjacent to the Government Building.The entire planting included 13,500 trees and bushes; the total cost of those purchased from the nurseries was $3,766.47. About 200 Oleanders, Agaves and monumental evergreens in tubs and 85 large vases filled with plants, were distributed around the Lagoon and Main Court.

More than 100,000 plants and flowers, besides thousands of vines contributed to the floral beauties of the Exposition landscape.Geraniums, Cannas, Dahlias, Oleanders, Lilies and Arbutus are among the most prominent varieties and many other species were used in smaller quantities to complete the effect of the various designs.

Over 700,000 square feet of ground was seeded and 14,500 yards of turf were laid, comprising about 21 acres.The seed consisted of three fifths English Rye and two-thirds Kentucky blue grass with a slight addition of orchard grass and white cloverto emphasize the color.In such places as the soil was found to be of inferior quality sod was used, at a total expense of $10,02756.

The greatest number of men employed by the Landscape Department at any one time, was 210.Laborers received $1.50 per day; foreman $1.75 and $2.00 and teams $3.50 and $4,00

The total cost of the Landscaping Department was $127,707.91, distributed as follows:

Grading,....................................................$19,404.56

Macadamized roads and walks,................................ 32,587.82

Brick pavements,............................................ 11,620.77

Concrete steps and copings,................................. 528.62

Ornamental vases,........................................... 322.00

Fountains in Main Court,.................................... 746.75

Cost of sod,................................................1,027.56

Cost of Trees, shrubs, etc.,................................3,766.47

Cost of miscellaneous supplies,.............................2,876.80

Pay roll Landscape Department,.............................. 29,319.54

Lagoon

Sheet Piling,...............................$ 7,104.14

Excavations, etc.,.......................... 11,735.52

Repairs,....................................6,667.36

Total for Lagoon 25,507.02

Grand total Expense Landscape Department,..................$127,707.91

MACHINERY AND ELECTRICITY

BY HENRY RUSTIN,

Superintendent of the Department.

The decorative lighting at the Trans-Mississippi Exposition as a matter of history needs no written record to preserve it in memory.It remains in recollection one of the most attractive features of the most successful exposition ever held.At the start, and all through the construction period, this particular exposition was not guilty of a big bank account, and economy in all things was imperative.

The necessity for economy in the matter of lighting suggested, at first, that only sufficient arc lights be placed to care for the ordinary conditions of traffic at night and the immediate requirements for power among the exhibitors and concessionaires.To this end th markets were searched for apparatus to economically provide, approximately, 5000 H.P. in electrical energy.The Nashville Exposition having but recently closed, it was supposed that they would have sufficient machinery which might be obtained for use with the Trans-Mississippi Exposition.Agents were sent from Omaha to Nashville to make examination of the apparatus and material.After looking over their outfit it was discovered that much of their machinery had been rented or leased and that they had little machinery of their own for sale.After considerable dickering between the exposition companies the Trans-Mississippi finally purchased their outfit of steam piping and copper wire at a reasonable price.This was promptly shipped to Omaha and the layout plans were outlined so as to include this material in the scheme.The steam pipe purchased being of definite length and size had to be worked into the power plant details, and necessarily, the arrangement became one of manipulation rather than one of definite pre-arranged scheme.For this reason the engineering accomplished in the power house proper, was more a tribute to ingenuity than to designing, along best mechanical engineering practices.

The wire purchased was also of sundry length and assorted sizes and, while generally in good condition, needed considerable "doctoring" in order to permit it to pass the rather stringent insurance inspection.

While the general installation plan was being developed attention was given to the method of arrangement of the arc lamps about the grounds with reference to producing as high a unit of lighting as the energy at our command would permit. In this development it was suggested that the entire picture formed by the arrangement of the buildings in the grand court, probably could be illuminated by means of small incandescent lamps with a very little greater expenditure of energy and dollars than would be necessary in the use of arc lamps, more particularly since the supports for arc lamps would have to be ornamental to be in keeping with the exquisite architectural arrangement of the court, and the incandescent lamps could be supported, in part, by the buildings themselves and only a few cheap staff columns would be necessary for further assistance as incandescent lighting supports to produce an evenly distributed illumination.

This change from the plan of arc lighting to entire incandescent lighting, while highly desirable in theory, was so bold a departure from plans heretofore followed in lighting that a certain misgiving was felt as to its practical adoption.In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the incandescent lighting scheme, temporary posts were experimentally placed in front of the Electricity Building and incandescent lights were placed on the building itself, conforming in part to the architecture of the building.When the lamps were actually lighted and experiment made all doubts were removed as to its practicability. The results of this experiment were kept, so far as possible, from the public in order that the novelty of the arrangement could be saved as a surprise when th Exposition shouldbe illuminated in its entirety for the public's criticism.

No area of similar extent had ever before been thus treated and even with the buoyancy of feeling and surety of successful results demonstrated by these experiments, it was natural that so radical a departure in lighting should be accomplished by certainmisgivings.Nevertheless, plans were used on as if no other arrangement had ever been considered.This arrangement of lighting necessitated most careful developments of the plans of wiring.Those who viewed the Trans-Mississippi illuminations must have been impressed with the evenness of distribution, not only of the energy which became "candle power" illumination, but must have been impressed as well with the evenness of distribution of the lighting itself the resultant of even distribution of electric current.

The organization of the Trans-Mississippi itself, as a working machine, was one which lent itself splendidly to results.As recalled now, it is difficult to remember any family jars or frictions due to the matter of personal equation. Apparently the first thing considered in each solution of a problem, when brought before the Exposition authorities, was whether the results proposed were the best which could be obtained; the second, whether strict economy would permit its use as a factor in the Exposition.Probably no department of the exposition was dealt with more liberally than the Electrical Department in this work.It was peculiarly difficult to place before the proper committee a fair conception of what was sought in any plan of lighting as the subject of illumination is not easily committed to writing or placed on paper.Examples of this difficulty were found elsewhere, even after the illuminations had been approved by visiting crowds.It is almost amusing to pick up ones scrap book and read the accounts then written of the illumination and find extravagant adjective after adjective arranged in almost bewildering sequence and trying to do their duty towards describing an effect which would not be described.

The organization of the Exposition was composed distinctively of level headed business men, who could hardly be supposed to be acquainted with the details and technical phrases of electrical work, and it is a matter of great pride to the Electrical Department of the Trans-Mississippi to recall the confidence which they placed in those working for them.

As the work developed during the pre-exposition period the different apparatus and parts which went to make the complete total for service, were placed in position, one part after another.Sometimes great anxiety was felt when necessary machinery did not arrive on the expected date, but the assistance of some limb of Department of th Exposition, was called into requisition to assist, and invariably the material was found and brought out in the nick of time.When the opening day finally came around, we were almost afraid to breathe; the different machines were started up, one after another, some for their initial run, and as the lights gradually came up from no candle power to full brilliancy, words or actions failed to express the relief in seeingan actual working almost living, success.The cheer which the first night crowd gave as the lights gradually came to full brilliancy, meant more to me than any other occasion in my life. It seemed as though all efforts, hopes, fears and realization were all crowded into one exultant moment.The operation of such a plant and the necessity for keeping it up to its initial successful condition, would not permit remaining in simply an exultant mood.The details of maintenance required a conscientious and attentive organization and such fortunately, could be selected from the working force which had constructed the wiring and machinery plant.Of necessity this force was kept down to a small number, barely one-eighth of those used in construction work were retained for the operative period.

The power plant equipment consisted of:

4,500 H.P. Climax Boilers.

2,250 H.P. Climax Boilers,

1,10"x6"x10" Marsh Feed Pump.

1,10"x6"x10" Dean Duplex Reed Pump.

1,7-1/2"x5"x6" Worthington Feed Pump.

3,Westinghouse Compound Engines,

1,Buffalo Forge Engine,

1,Murray Iron Works Engine.

1,Hamilton Corliss Engine.

In all about 2,000 available engine horse power.These engines drove General Electric Co.'s generators, alternating and direct current, sufficient to take care of, approximately 15000 - 8 candle power incandescent lamps and 400 arcs and 300 HP. in direct current motors.

The performance of this plant, under the circumstances was very creditable. While there was no provision made for feed water heaters, economizers, or like devices, in the scheme of the plant, the coal consumption never exceeded 17 pounds per kilo-watt hour.That is to say, one pound of coal would "run" two of our incandescent lamps for one hour.The total cost of operating the power plant, including labor and all expenses, never exceeded $.44 per kilo-watt hour, or, stated in another way, the current for 1000 of our lamps cost $1.32 per hour when considering the expenses at the power house. Bear in mind, however, that steam had to be maintained under most of the boilers, day and night, while the greater part of the electrical energy was used but four hours a night.The plant would run to its utmost capacity for four hours and it is probable that the coal consumption, and hence the total expense, could have been reduced, could these conditions have been regulated. But for the purpose and for the period of six months this installation served its purpose admirably.

A radical departure from former Exposition methods was made in the plan of operation of machinery in the main Exhibit Buildings.Heretofore it had seemed essential that all machinery be operated from countershafts by means of belting.More than frequently an intermediate system of shafting was necessary in order to arrive at a proper speed.It was customary that the Exposition should install and maintain this shafting and necessary supports at its own expense while the user of power supplied belts, pulleys and the like at his own expense.At the Trans-Mississippi Exposition all wheels in motion were operated by individual motors, supplied by the user of power, while the Exposition brought electrical energy to convenient points within the building. Thus the Exposition was saved a considerable expenditure for shafting and supports, and, at the same time, the whole equipment was in keeping with modern practice and the exhibitor was put to no greater expense than with the countershafting plan.

The individual motor plan of operating machinery had a further advantage.It was impossible to discover from the exhibitor just how much power he would require.He did not know definitely and his approximation was persistently elastic; it was somewhere between limits not stated.The individual motor plan permitted a postponement of the date of decision as all the Exposition had to do was to furnish current and the quantity and quality desired, which it could do on a day's notice any time.The counter-shaft plan at one of the earlier Expositions, brought it about, that after three hundred feet of 4 inch steel counter shafting with hangers and supports had been placed, and moreover a 500 horse power engine had been installed to run the shaft, it was found that there was required from this shafting only that power necessary to operate three sewing machines.The consumer using the greatest amount of power was the Westinghouse Company in the Machinery & Electricity Bldg.This company had a number of motors in service running electric generators and besides a number of interesting experimental coils and transformers, with which they kept the visiting public entertained.

The Government Building's demands for power were the most continuous and exacting of any customer we had to serve.It was essential to maintain electrical energy at two of their motor stations for 4500 consecutive hours. This was done successfully but not without effort as, aside from power house difficulties, we had a pole line to maintain against Nebraska zephyrs.

To sum up the machinery and electricity of the Exposition, it is fair to say that no startling novelties or innovations in apparatus, either prime movers, generators or auxiliary came to our assistance to entertain the public.The nearest approach to an electrical novelty was the X Ray machine in the General Electric Company's exhibit, although this device was then becoming well known to the public.We were compelled to rely on standard apparatus to produce any "coups" which might occur to us as practicable.So resort was had to standard incandescent lamps and reliance placed on our ability to arrange them for a picture setting; an accomplishment at night to the gem arrangement of the buildings about the grand lagoon.

It was a most successful illumination and commanded the admiration of all who witnessed it.

The cost of machinery and electricity to the Exposition, summarized as shown in statements elsewhere, was

Electrical Department,........................ $63,282.85

Machinery ".........................53,945.52

Power Plant in Transportation Building,.......2,045.44

Total cost,...............$119,273.81

Revenues from supply of power and lights...... $28,550.96

Net cost to Exposition 90,722.85

This does not include revenue from sale or power and light properties at close of Exposition, but as all Exposition assets of physical character were sold in bulk, it is not possible to apportion the proceeds.The materials of this department should easily have realized $10,000.00 as they included three Westinghouse compound engines which cost $8500.00 from a thousand and one other items of property.

WATER---SYSTEM

A complete system of water pipes were laid throughout the grounds, carrying an ample supply to all the buildings, fountains, hydrants and sanitary kiosks and to also provide for the complete sprinkling of the flower beds, grass, etc. The supply of water was received from the 36 inch main from the pumping station at Florence.The water was purchased from the Omaha Water Company.The amount of water used, pressure, price, etc., is shown by the following statement.

Pre-Exposition period,

for construction purposes, filling Lagoon three times

and seepage from Lagoon, estimate gallons,................60,000,000

Consumption in June,......................................24,759,750

Consumption in July,......................................32,006,325

Consumption in August,....................................36,389,287

Consumption in September,.................................40,064,425

Consumption in October,...................................37,833,652

Water pressure 100 lbs to 106-1/2 gallons.

Exposition paid 5 cents per thousand gallons of water used June 1st to November 1st.

Water used prior to June 1st was supplied gratis.

Exposition paid one-half cost of water meters.

Lagoon covered 7-1/2 acres and required 13,800,000 gallons to fill it.

FIRE -- PROTECTION.

Great care was shown in the planning and installation of the apparatus for the protection of Buildings, Exhibits, Concessions, etc.Two fire houses were provided, one near north end of "Bluffs tract" one on 20th Street at Manderson Street.The Exposition purchased Seagraves & Co.?, Columbus, Ohio, one hook and ladder truck $900.00 and two hose wagons at $300 each, all of their best product and latest design, also 8000 feet single jacket rubber hose, at 28-1/2 cents per foot for stations in buildings and 1600 feet test brand carbolized fire hose at 90 cents perft. less 20% from the New York Belting and Packing Co.In addition to this equipment, the city of Omaha installed one chemical apparatus and one hose wagon, so that the equipment for fighting fires was reasonably complete.The city of Omaha detailed men from the city fire department to be in charge and handle the apparatus.The city paid their salaries, the Exposition paying operating and maintenance expenses.

LOSSES BY FIRE

There were 25 alarms for fires, during the period of the Exposition.Losses were as follows:

On Buildings,...................................... $4,225.00

On contents,.......................................1,865.00

6,090.00

Insured for,.......................................3,000.00

Lossuninsured,................................... $3,090.00

The losses were in fires at California Gold Mining Tunnel on June 3rd and when the "Mt Nebo Chapel" at Old Plantation concession was completely destroyed on July 10.

INSURANCE

The fire insurance companies maintained that a high rate for insurance against fire losses, must necessarily be charged on account of great moral as well as physical hazard incurred by insurance of property of this character, notwithstanding the fact, that, despite their arguments, no serious losses by fire had occurred at any of the previous large expositions.

The management being guardians for large interests, believed that they should carry a reasonable amount of insurance andarranged with the insurance representatives for insurance on the following basis.Blanket insurance form, giving list and value of all buildings (Except statuary on same), values aggregating $300,000.00.70%Co-Insurance clause in policies, 10% depreciation agreed upon.Rate of insurance 2-1/2% Period of time covered by the insurance as follows:

"It is hereby understood and mutually agreed upon that one-sixth of the amount insured by this policy shall terminate at noon on the 30th day of June, 1898; one-sixth on the 31st day of July, 1898; one-sixth on the 31st day of August, 1898; one-sixth on the 30th day of September, 1898 and one-sixthon the 31st day of October, 1898;after which last named date, at noon, the remaining one-sixth shall continue in force until the date of expiration named in this policy, namely"November 20th, 1898; but in the event of the cancellation of this policy by the assured before its expiration no claim for return premium shall be made."

EMERGENCY HOSPITAL

The Emergency Hospital was a fine modern cottage, remodeled for the purpose with a wing added for an operating room.It was supplied with a modern ambulance and with complete hospital furnishings and instruments.A corps of physicians and trained nurses were always on duty, ready for instant service. There were upwards of 3,000 cases treated of character, cost, etc. as follows:

CLASSIFIED REPORT OF THE EMERGENCY HOSPITAL.

Total expense maintaining hospital,$4,075.13

Average number patients per day,20.25

Average cost per patient,$1.31

Diagnosis.

Acute Gastritis,----------------------------------110

Acute Pharyngitis,-------------------------------- 17

Acute Corryza,------------------------------------ 12

Acute Bronchitis,---------------------------------120

Acute Laryngitis,--------------------------------- 38

Acute Acholism,----------------------------------- 20

Acute Dermatitis,--------------------------------- 34

Accute Syncope,-----------------------------------117

Acute Glacoma,------------------------------------3

Angina Pectoris,----------------------------------2

Abscesses,---------------------------------------- 45

Appendicualr Colic,-------------------------------4

Abortion,-----------------------------------------2

Acute Oaphoritis,---------------------------------6

Burns and scalds,--------------------------------- 21

Concussion, (Brain),------------------------------7

Contused and lacerated wounds,--------------------330

Cholera Infantum,---------------------------------2

Conjuncteritis,-----------------------------------6

Dislocations,-------------------------------------2

Dentitis,----------------------------------------- 75

Dysmenorrhea,------------------------------------- 39

Exhaustion,---------------------------------------471

Enteritis,----------------------------------------633

Epilepsy,-----------------------------------------7

Erysipilas,---------------------------------------2

Epididims-Orchitis,-------------------------------2

Foreign bodies removed from eyes and ears, sand, cinders and insects,------------------------------140

Fractures,---------------------------------------- 25

Fallicular Tonsilitis,---------------------------- 18

Gunshot wounds,-----------------------------------4

Hemorrages, stomach, 2; lungs 12; Nose, 5,-------- 19

Hepatic Colic,------------------------------------ 27

Haematuria,---------------------------------------1

Hysteria,----------------------------------------- 35

Hiccoughm (severe),-------------------------------1

Insect Bites,------------------------------------- 29

Icterus,------------------------------------------1

La Grippe,---------------------------------------- 49

Malaria,------------------------------------------217

Manorrhagia,--------------------------------------2

Myalgia,------------------------------------------1

Neuralgia,---------------------------------------- 1w

Otitis Media,------------------------------------- 13

Pleurisy,----------------------------------------- 13

Sprains,------------------------------------------170

Sciatica,----------------------------------------- 41

Suicide (attempt) by strangulation (squaw),-------1

Tumors,-------------------------------------------1

Torticallis,--------------------------------------2

Typhoid Fever,------------------------------------4

Tends Vadinitis,----------------------------------2

Ulcerations,-------------------------------------- 83

3,095

Omaha, Neb. Nov. 1, 1898.

F. P. Kirkendall, Esq.

Manager Department of Buildings & Grounds.

Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition.

Dear Sir:

I have the honor to submit herewith a report of the organization and operation of the exposition guard force under my command.

I was appointed commandant of the force May 26, 1898, by yourself under authority granted by the executive committee and assumed the duties of the office May 27th.

A large number of applications previously received by you were turned over to me and I afterwards received a number of additional applications.All candidates for appointment were required to appear before me and to produce recommendations as to their character and fitness for the position.

The duties of the guards were to preserve order, to give information to Exposition patrons, see to the observance of Exposition rules by all persons upon the grounds, look to the prompt care of any injured or sick persons, etc., etc., as provided in a voluminous set of rules for Guidance of Guards, supplied to me by the Executive Committee through you as manager of the Department.

The salaries of the guard force were fixed by the Executive Committee as follows:Commandant $150; captain $75; First Lieutenant $65; Second Lieutenant $60; sergeants $50; Corporals $45; privates $40, all members of the force being required to furnish their own subsistence and a regulation uniform, consisting of helmet, navy blue blouse and trousers, the latter having a white stripe on the outside seam.Rank was indicated by shoulder straps and chevrons, following U.S. infantry regulations.

Members of the force were selected solely upon the recommendation and endorsement of reputable citizens as to their integrity and fitness.The personnel of the force at organization was as follows:

C.E. Llewellyn,Commandant

M. Covell,Captain.

J. Stebbins,1st Lieutenant.

John Regan2nd Lieutenant.

W. Norwood, 1st Sergeant.

J. Hanks, Sergeant.

G. L. Martin"

J. Murphy"

Jos. Hinton"

W. Carder"

G. T. Young"

M. J. Metcalf Corporal.

G. L. Treynor "

C. C. Northrup"

George Kay "

E. E. Brand Clerk

Bonnie Gans Stenographer.

About sixty privates.

As the occasion arose for increasing the force additions were made until 304 names were on the roll, but no more than 237 were ever on duty at one time. The average number of guards on duty was about 160.During the period of the Exposition about forty men were discharged for cause.A brief summary of the work accomplished by the guard force follows:

Arrests for misdemeanors,----------------------------- 239.

Sent to city jail and prosecuted,--------------------- 129

Detained at Guard house and expelled from Grounds,---- 110

A very large number of articles lost by visitors to the grounds were brought to the "Lost and Found Bureau"* at guard headquarters and many were returned to the owners upon proper identification.The remainder, together with a record book of the same, were turned over by me to the Superintendent of the Buildings & Grounds Department, November 1st at the termination of my services as Commandant of the Guard.

Thanking you and your associates in the Exposition management for the many courtesies shown me during my services with the Exposition, I am

Yours respectfully.

C. E. LLEWELLYN,

Commandant.

*LOST AND FOUND BUREAU.

In all large gathering gatherings of people it happens from a variety of causes, that many articles of value are lost by their owners, straps, parasols, umbrellas, Pocketbooks, Rolls of Money, Watches and Jewelry, finger rings, spectacles, eye-glasses, walking sticks, admission passes and a multitude of other articles, and where such gatherings continue daily for a long period, a watchful care over the interests of patrons requires an organization to care for such articles and endeavor to again put them in the possession of their owners.

Such an organization was perfected through the guard service.A Lost and Found Office was established at Guards Headquarters and thousands of these articles were found, listed and examined and in most cases sent to the owners.After the close of the Exposition several hundred articles, not claimed were advertised and sold and the proceeds turned into the Treasury of the Exposition.

GENERAL STATEMENT OF EXPENSES of the BUILDING AND GROUNDS DEPARTMENT

List of buildings, showing size and cost of each, exclusive of architects' fees, office expenses and salaries, superintendence and miscellaneous, which was about two per cent on the cost of the buildings, making a total cost of architects, superintendence and miscellaneous equal to seven (7) per cent on the cost of the buildings or a fraction more than five (5) per cent on the total cost of general construction.

Administration building, 50x50 feet, 55 feet 4 in. high,------- $11,621.24

Mines and Mining building, 400x140 feet, 48 ft. 6 in. high,----42,250.55

Manufacturers' building, 300x125 feet 40 ft high,--------------56,256.13

Auditorium building, 150x115 feet, 37 feet high,---------------12,358.29

Agricultural building, 400x140 feet, 40 feet high,-------------60,987.51

Machinery & Electricity building, 300x140 feet 31 ft 8 in high,50,019.90

Liberal Arts Building, 280x125 ft. 36 ft 4 inches high,--------31,183.26

Fine Arts Building, 240x125 feet, 39 feet high,----------------46,163.05

Power Plant Building, 150x120 feet, 18 feet high,--------------10,463.05

Horticulture building, 300 feet long, wings 70 feet, dome 110 feet, height 29 feet,----------------------------------------35,130.33

North Viaduct, Sherman Avenue,---------------------------------4,679.95

East Colonnades,-----------------------------------------------11,842.29

Mirror Colonnades,---------------------------------------------15,979.90

Administration Colonnades,-------------------------------------2,094.00

Sanitary Kiosks,-----------------------------------------------2,968.65

Warehouse building, 115x145 feet 14 feet high,-----------------3,022.03

South viaduct restaurants, each 100x50 feet, 29 feet high,-----24,832.00

South viaduct,-------------------------------------------------6,531.31

Band stand, 80x30 feet, 52 feet high,--------------------------3,861.66

North and south Colonnades,------------------------------------5,652.00

Hospital Building, 50x25 feet 22 feet high,--------------------1,821.00

Press Building, 50x50feet -------------------------------------3,548.46

Dairy building, 160x75 feet, 14 feet high,---------------------7,858.04

Service building, 100x60 feet, 22 feet high,-------------------7,022.65

Apiary building, 130x75 feet, 14 feet high,--------------------6,341.48

International building, 130x100 feet 20 feet high,-------------7,846.61

Fire and Police Building, 150x115 feet, 18 feet high,----------6,248.58

Transportation building, 430x300 feet, 17 feet high,-----------40,804.38

Arch of States, 50x20 feet, 67 feet high,----------------------7,353.00

Ticket booths, exits and gates,--------------------------------6,671.74

Refreshment Kiosks,--------------------------------------------3,292.00

Girls and Boys Building,---------------------------------------9,154.41

Live Stock building,-------------------------------------------19,157.13

$564,441.59

Architect's department (exclusive of super intendence)---------$ 29,426.38

Taxes paid,----------------------------------------------------4,524.43

General expenses,----------------------------------------------26,372.72

Fencing grounds,-----------------------------------------------6,483.63

Water system, permanent,---------------------------$ 22,224.94

Water system, temporary,---------------------------6,160.65

Paid Omaha Water Co. for water,--------------------7,515.43

$ 35,901.02

Fire protection, Apparatus,-----------------------------------------5,341.01

Wages and expenses,--------------------------------5,081.00

Insurance,-----------------------------------------13,508.21

$ 23,930.23

Preparation of Grounds.

Landscape Department,------------------------------58,022.31

Grading, 10 cts. per cubic yard,-------------------19,404.56

Macadamized roadways Walks, including maintenance, 17-4/10 cts per square yard, Driveways, including maintenance, 22-1/2 cts per square yard,-------------------32,587.82

lagoon,--------------------------------------------25,507.02

Fountains, Kountz tract,---------------------------746.75

Brick paving in Grand Court, 38 cts per square yd.

materials to remain the property the contractor and be removed by him,------------------------11,620.77 127,889.23

Sewerage and drainage,-----------------------------------------9,481.52

Engineer's department,-----------------------------------------10,202.96

Maintenance and care of grounds.

Janitor service,-----------------------------------14,708.69

Road cleaning,------------------------------------- 4,624.75

Road sprinkling,----------------------------------- 1,320.42

Sanitary service,---------------------------------- 824.80

Garbage,------------------------------------------- 1,216.90

Ice account,--------------------------------------- 1,051.11

Decorations, exterior of buildings,---------------- 4,495.67

Settees, benches and chairs,----------------------- 4,774.71

General repairs,----------------------------------- 8,054.79

41,071.84

Power and light.

Electrical department,-----------------------------63,282.85

Machinery department,------------------------------53,945.52

Power plant, Transportation building,-------------- 2,045.44

119,273.81

Police protection,

Guards,--------------------------------------------53,667.57

Secret service,------------------------------------ 3,115.4756,783.04

Hospital department,-------------------------------------------4,075.13

Office expenses, (Buildings & Grounds department)--------------6,964.21

Fireman's tournament, buildings north of M.P R tracks, Securing National Fireman's Tournament required construc- tion buildings to be burned illustrating, fireman's operations and competitions,------------------------------4,286.41

Artesian well,-------------------------------------------------4,844.54

Personal injuries, payments and expenses,----------------------8,200.00

Sundry claims,-------------------------------------------------1,972.00

Miscellaneous and sundry expenses, not classified,-------------18,143.87

Grand Total,1,104,268.46

DEPARTMENT OF EXHIBITS.

EDWARD E. BRUCE, Manager.

H. B. Hardt, Assistant.

The Exhibits, of all form, nature and character, are calculated to be the main attraction of an Exposition, and hence much thought, care and attention is necessary that the exhibits, whether considered singly or as a whole, shall be of such character as to not only compel the attention of the visitors but to enlist their interest in the qualities, nature and operation of them, so it follows that the most successful exhibits are those which most generally attracts the sympathy and inquiry of the exposition patrons.

It is a matter of much pride to the exposition management, that the exhibits as secured, arranged and grouped, excited so much favorable commendation from those whose long and varied experience in exposition work, qualified them as competent judges in such matters.

It is but fair to state that the general high quality of the exhibits in this exposition is due mainly to Manager Bruce of the department, and to his able assistant, Mr. Hardt; and is also due to the general high character and efficiency of the superintendents of the various branches of this department, selected by Manager Bruce for their special qualifications and fitness for the work placed in their charge.

To the fine business ability and the excellent judgment evidenced by the manager of this department is attributed, mainly the results obtained.

The operations and results of this department, in so far as they can be given at this late day, may be stated in the following way.

The first thought of the department management was given to its organization and to preparation of rules governing exhibits and exhibitors.To this end Manager Bruce, Manager Reed and the general secretary, as a committee carefully considered the subject of rules and form of application etc., noting the action of similar projects and considering their fitness in this case.As a result of the committee's consideration and conclusions on the subject the following Rules were recommended and were by them adopted.

(Insert General Rules and Regulations 7 pages typewritten, next attached.)

Manager Bruce divided the work of the Exhibits Department into branches, designated Bureaus, as follows:

Bureau of Education.

Bureau of Fine Arts.

Bureau of Mines and Mining.

Bureau of Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry and Irrigation.

Bureau of Live Stock.

Bureau of Diary Products.

Bureau of Poultry.

Bureau of Bee Industries.

Bureau of Machinery and Electricity.

Bureau of Manufactures and International Exhibits.

Bureau of Liberal Arts

Bureau of Transportation and Agricultural Implements.

The operations under these various bureaus, as gathered from reports of chief of bureaus, from observation and from the general records are outlined in the following divisions.

GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 1898, OMAHA, NEB. U.S.A. AUTHORIZED BY ACT OF THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS.

Rule 1.In accordance with an Act of Congress of the United States of America, approved by the President, June 10th, 1896, the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition will be held at the City of Omaha, in the state of Nebraska, U.S.A. from June to November, in the year of eighteen hundred and ninety eight, for the exhibition of resources of the United States of America, the progress and civilization of the western region and for a display and friendly competition of arts, industries, manufactures and products of the soil, mine and sea, comprising the whole range ofhuman progress, and exemplifying the growth of the United States, the foreign countries and the South and Central American countries, making same universal in its nature.The Exposition will be held under the joint auspices of the United States Government and the Trans-Mississippi states, under the control and government of fifty directors.

Rule 2.Governments of foreigncountries , states and others intending to participate in this Exposition are requested to intimate the same as soon as possible.Applications for space from countries officially represented, should be made through the commissioners of the respective countries or states where the article is produced or manufactured.From countries not officially represented, applications should be addressed directly to the Chief of Department of Exhibits, Omaha, Nebraska.Applications forspace cannot be received after March 1st, 1898, and are invited as early as possible, as in the allotment of space precedence will be given to priority of applications.

Rule 3.All wishing to participate in the Exposition will be charged for space as follows:for each square foot of wall space, 50 cents; for special positions on central aisle, isolated space or corner lots, an increase of 25 per cent will be charged above the quoted rates.In grounds:for each square foot a rate of 50 cents will be charged.The minimum application for space acceptable will be for twenty square feet.Any fraction of a foot to be computed as a whole foot.Governments and barge exhibitors will be granted liberal allowances, provided their applications are completed within the year 1897.To encourage exhibits in operation which are especially attractive to the public those making live exhibits will be given advantages.The nominal charges for space are not made for purposes of gain, but to exclude uninteresting, paltry features, to insure the illustration of the vast resources of the United States and to bring foreign and American progress into friendly competition in as compact a manner as possible.

Rule 4.All applications for space should be accompanied by a drawing to a scale of one-quarter inch to the foot of the plan and distribution of objects intended for exhibition,Dimensions of space desired should be given in feet and inches, without including any allowance for passageways; and should state whether the applicant is the manufacturer or producer of the article described, or a proposed concessionaire.Upon receipt of the notification of acceptance of the application by the Chief of Department of Exhibits a remittance of one-fourth of the total amount due for the space must be made, the balance will be payable upon receipt of notification of the allotment of space.Permits to occupy space will be issued only on production of receipt in full for payment of space charges.

Rule 5.All remittances must be made payable to the Trans- Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha, Nebraska.

Rule 6.Articles that are in any way dangerous, or nostrums, and empirical preparations whose ingredients are secret or concealed, can not be admitted to the Exposition.

Rule 7.Any single piece or section of any exhibit of greater weight than 20,000 pounds will be accepted only if the exhibitor provides at his own cost the required machinery for its installation; the ground flooring of the buildings will be calculated to bear a weight of 1,000 pounds to square ten feet, and when ever alterations and foundations to the floor are required, the consent of the Chief of the Department must be obtained, and the work to be done at the expense of the exhibitor.The same rule applies to any extra partitions which exhibitors may require.

Rule 8.Exhibitors will be strictly confined to such exhibits as are specified in their application, no transfer of space will be permitted; spaces not occupied one month previous to the opening day and spaces not fully occupied, or misused spaces, will revert to the exhibition authorities for reassignment, and payments made thereon forfeited.When allotment of space is made, exhibitors will be notified and will be furnished with permits to occupy the same, subject to the general rules and regulations adopted for the government of the Exposition, the special rules of the Department in which their exhibit will be located, as well as the laws of the United States Government, the laws of the state of Nebraska and the city of Omaha: permits will not be transferable.

Rule 9.Packages for the Exposition must be marked with diamond shaped device as a distinctive mark, and be addressed to the President, Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha, Nebraska, U.S.A. and in additions the following informationwritten on the outside packages, wrappers or covering.

a, The name and address of exhibitor,

b, The country, state or territory from which package comes

c, Department in which exhibit is installed.

d, The number of the permit for space.

e, Total number of packages sent, with serial numbers marked on each package.Official labels will be obtainable.A list of the contents should be enclosed in each package.Freight and terminal charges must be prepaid.

Rule 10.The expenses of freight, insurance, placing on the allotted space, receiving, unpacking and arranging exhibits, aswell as their removal at the close of the Exposition, must be defrayed by the exhibitor.

Rule 11.Exhibitors will have to provide, at their own expense all showcases, stands, fittings, etc.All platforms and counters, partitions, showcases, stands, appurtences of approved designs shall not exceed, measuring from the floor the following dimensions, without special permissionof the Chief of Department of Exhibits,-

Showcases and stands 15 feet high.

Partitions 15 feet high.

Counters 2 feet 10 inches high.

Platforms 1 foot high.

Rule 12.The general reception of goods at the Exposition Grounds will commence January 1898, and no article will be admitted after May 1st, 1898. Space not taken possession of by May 1st, 1898, will revert to the Exposition Authorities for reassignment.The installation of heavy articles should begin by special arrangements as soon as progress on the grounds and buildings will permit.

Rule 13.If no authorized person is at hand to take charge of exhibits at least 14 days before the opening day, they will be removed and stored at the cost and risk of whomsoever it may concern.

Rule 14.No exhibitor will be permitted to erect or arrange his exhibit in any way so as to obstruct the light, or occasion any inconvenience or disadvantageously affect the display of other exhibitors.

Rule 15.Decorations,signs, etc. must be in conformity with the general plan adopted by the Exposition authorities.No muslin signs will be permitted.

Rule 16.Duly approved exhibitor's business cards and circulars may be placed with the exhibitor's space for distribution.The right is reserved by the Exposition authorities to restrict or discontinue the distribution of such,if the contents are objectionable or if it is carried to excess or becomes an annoyance to visitors.

Rule 17.Exhibitors will be held responsible for the cleanliness of their exhibits and the space surrounding same.All exhibits must be in complete order each day at least thirty minutes before the hour of opening.Work of this character cannot be permitted during the hours when the Exposition is open to the public.In case of failure on the part of the exhibitor to observe this rule, the Chief of Department will have the work performed at the cost of the exhibitor.

Rule 18.Sketches, drawings, photographs or other reproductions of the articles exhibited will only be allowed upon joint consent of the exhibitor and the Chief of the Department; but general views of portions of the interior of the buildings may be made by special permit of the exposition authorities.

Rule 19.The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition authorities will take all reasonable precautions for the safe preservation of all objects in the exposition, but will not be responsible for damage, depredation or loss of any kind, or for accidents by fire, the elements otherwise, however originating.A thoroughly equipped fire department will protect the buildings and exhibits, and a large police guard force will maintain order.

Rule 20.Neither open fire nor naked lights will be allowed in the buildings or grounds without special permissions in writing.

Rule 21. Favorable terms will be arranged by which exhibitors may insure their own goods.Exhibitors may employ watchmen of their own choice to guard their goods during the hours the Exposition is open to the public.Such watchmen will have to be approved by the Chief of the Department and be subject to the rules and regulations governing employees of the Exposition.

Rule 22.Arrangement with transportation lines will be made to obtain concessions in regard to the carriage of exhibits to and from the Exposition.

Rule 23.The Exposition buildings and grounds will be constituted a bonded store for articles exhibited from foreign countries, without payment of duty, but on all goods offered for sale duty must be paid.

Rule 24.An International Jury of Awards will be formed and the awards will consist of:

Special Diploma of Honor.

Diploma for Gold Medal.

Diploma for Silver Medal.

Diploma for Bronze Medal.

Diploma for Honorable Mention.

Every diploma for medal will be accompanied by an official medal of bronze, prepared by Act of Congress at the United States mint.In addition to the above awards, special prizes consisting of six Gold Trophies, Six Silver Cups and Six Gold Medals, will be offered to the competitors in each of the following classes:

1 Gold Trophy, 1 Silver Cup and 1 Gold Medal as 1st, 2nd and 3rd prize for best display of an Irrigating System in operation.

1 Gold Trophy, 1 Silver Cup and 1 Gold Medal as 1st, 2nd and 3rd prize for best electric light service and display.

1 Gold Trophy, 1 Silver Cup and 1 Gold Medal as 1st, 2nd and 3rd prize for the best display illustrating the process of the manufacture of Beet Root Sugar.

1 Gold Trophy, 1 Silver Cup and 1 Gold Medal, as 1st, 2nd and 3rd prize for the best display of Manufacturing Plant in Operation, as well as two more lots of similar prizes for other high class exhibits, to be designated by the Exposition authorities hereafter.

In giving these special prizes, preference will be given to those inventions proving the most suitable to the requirements of the west.All awards will be apportioned on the reports of the International Juries, to every exhibitor whose contributions are pronounced to be of incontestable superiority.The jury work will be completed at least one month prior to the close of the Exposition, so as to give successful exhibitors the opportunity to advertise their awards in the Exposition.The full list of awards will receive the greatest official publicity.Rules will be prescribed for the guidance of the International Juries on awards in the discharge of their duties.Separate exhibitors' entries will be required for each class.

Rule 25.It should be stated in the application for space whether exhibits are intended for competition or not.Only bona fide exhibitors can compete for awards.Every intending privilege holder must make a creditable exhibit.

Rule 26.Any exhibitor may sell any part or the whole of his exhibit, but with express condition that the same is not deliverable until the close of the Exposition.An exhibitor desiring to sell any portion of his exhibit for immediate delivery must obtain the privilege and agree to replace immediately article sold.Privileges and Concessions.Privileges refer to the sale of such goods as are manufactured in order to illustrate a machine or process exhibited.Privileges will be granted to bona fide exhibitors. Concessions refer to the sale of all goods and operations of attractions from which the securing of revenue is the sole object of the applicant and will be allotted space only in the "Plaisance" Grounds, not in the Exposition buildings or grounds proper.Applications to see goods of any kind not manufactured on the grounds as the products of a machine or process exhibited or lessees of concession for restaurants, guide books, rolling chairs, messenger service, telegraph service, amusements, etc., and all other concessions must make arrangements with the Chief of the Department of Concessions.Applicants should set forth the size of the building, if special building is required, in the column headed, "Size of Building".If to be located in any of the Exposition buildings or grounds proper, under the head of "Space required." All applications for space must be made to the Chief or Department of Exhibits who will/after granting space, hand the same to the Chief of Department of COncessions for adjustment of percentages payable.Any person wishing to participate in the Exposition/must secure and arrange payment for space to be occupied, before he can obtain privileges or concessions to do business in the Exposition Grounds.The Exposition Authorities reserve to themselves the right to accept or reject any or all applications for exhibits, concessions or privileges.

Rule 27.Applicants for space desiring to exhibit machinery in motion, will be required to furnish, besides a drawing, the following information:

Actual Horse power required for each machine.

Cubic feet of steam per hour at a pressure of 70 pounds.

Diameter of steam, water or gas pipes.

Diameter of discharge or drain pipes.

Diameter of, width of faces and number of revolutions of Driving pulleys.

The main shafts will make 120 and 240 revolutions per minute.All shafting, pulleys, belting, machines, etc., for the transmission of power from the main shafting must be provided by and at the cost of the Exhibitor.Requisition for motive power, water, steam, gas, electric service, extra lights, etc., should be made at the same time.Same will be supplied to exhibitors at fixed cost prices, to encourage the display of machinery in motion.Demands for such must be settled at the time when the allotment of space ismade.Exhibitors may erect decorativerailings around their exhibits and provide canopies subject to approval, but they must be in every instance within the area of the allotted space; in cases of machinery in motion, it is imperative that it be well guarded.The Exposition authorities reserve to themselves the right of examining or testing any exhibit?If any damage or injury shall be occasioned in the exposition by any exhibited machine, implement, or article whatever to any visitor or other person, or to any officer, servant, or others there and then, the exhibitors to whom such machine, implement or article may belong shall indemnify, and hold harmless the Exposition authorities from and against all actions, suits, expenses and claims, on account of, or in respect to any such damage, or injury, which may be so caused or occasioned.Shaftingand motors will have to be under the care of exhibitors requiring same.

Rule 28.An official catalogue will be published in English.The Exposition authorities reserve to themselves the sole right of compiling and printing the same.Every exhibitor will have the right of one entry for each space, for the name, address and description of exhibit, consisting of twenty words, free of charge, and as at least 100,000 copies of the official catalogue will be issued, exhibitors will derive from this alone great benefits.All descriptive matter beyond the twenty words will be charged at fixed rates as an advertisement.The Exposition authorities will provide uniform cards with the name of the exhibitor and the catalogue number printed thereon, which are to be affixed to the exhibits.

Rule 29.The classification is not exhaustive.Where there appears no heading, the Department of the Juries on Awards will classify the exhibits satisfactorily.The six headings of the classification are:

A.Agricultural, food and its accessories, forestry and forest products, irrigation, its modern system and appliances; agricultural machinery, horticulture, viticulture, apiaryproducts, pomology, fish and fisheries, fish products apparatuses for fishing.Beet root industry of all description.

B.Mechanical arts, mines, mining, metallurgy, transportations, railways, vessels cycles, vehicles, electricity and electrical appliances.

C.Manufactures in general, liberal arts, education, engineering, public works, constructive architecture, music and drama, ethnology, archaeology, progress of labor and inventions.

D.Fine Arts, paintings, sculpture, architecture, decoration.

E.Women's work.

F.Isolated and collective exhibits.

Rule 30.The representatives of foreign countries states and of sanctioned collective exhibits will be allowed to group exhibits as they may consider proper, subject always to the approval of the Exposition Authorities, except machinery, which should be located in the machinery section.For every exhibit a separate application form and entry must be made.The aisles and passage ways are absolutely reserved for public convenience under the sole control of the Exposition authorities, no decorations, trophies, fountains or any exhibit whatever will be allowed to project into, or to be placed therein.The Exposition authorities shall have the right to cause the removal of any article from whatever quarter it may come if on account of its nature or appearance it be detrimental to or incompatible with the object of decorum of the Exposition, all goods must be exhibited in the name of the individual or firm signing the application from and no exhibitor will be allowed to transfer any portion of the space allotted to him, or to allow any other than his own exhibit to be placed thereon.No concessions or privileges will be allowed in the foreign section, State Buildings or Collective Sections of the Exposition except upon special terms and conditions as may be arranged with the Exposition authorities.All representatives must observe the general rules and regulations strictly.

Rule 31.Storage will be provided for empty cases, crates and packages at a rate not exceeding 25 cents for minimum single pieces, but it is understood that the Exposition authorities shall not be subject to any liability or damage resulting from loss of such empties by depredations or fire, or any cause whatever.

Rule 32.The removal of any exhibit will not be permitted prior to the close of the Exposition.Everybody shall keep exhibits uncovered and in best of order for inspection during all hours when the Exposition is open to the public.

Rule 33.To each bona fide exhibitor or his representative, one free pass to the Exposition grounds will be issued free of charge and the necessary workman's passes will be supplied.Special rules will regulate the terms and conditions of admission.

Rule 34.Upon arrival at Exposition grounds, prepaid consignments will be delivered by the Department of Transportation on or as near as practicable to the exhibitor's allotted space, at the fixed priceof six cents per hundred pounds or twenty cubic feet measurement.Transportation charges, together with terminal charges of six cents per hundred pounds on all consignments shipped destined to the Exposition must be fully prepaid at the initial point, as under no circumstances will these charges be advanced by the Exposition authorities. The terminal charge will apply to all consignments except those entering the grounds on their own wheels, small consignments, minimum car lots, an single pieces of an exhibit, weighingover 2,000 pounds.The charge on cars and coaches on their own wheelswill be $5 each and locomotives with tenders, $10 each.The minimum charge of 50 cents for any single shipment will be exacted by the Exposition authorities, and the minimum carload weight as established by the initial road will be the basis on which the Exposition charge is made for such car load shipments, and exhibits weighing more than 2,000 pounds, each piece will be subject to special arrangements.Such goods as are received at the Exposition with transportation and terminal charges unpaid or only partially paid will be stored at the expense and risk of the owner.

Rule 35.The buildings and grounds will be illuminated generally. Should any exhibitor require extra light, he can obtain same upon application and on payment of fixed rates.

Rule 36.Before March 1st, 1898, Representatives of Commissions should furnish the Chief of Department of Exhibits with approximate plans showing the manner they intend to group their display and furnish a list of exhibitors together with the individual application forms for spaces for the preparation of the general plans and official catalogue.

Rule 37.Such Representatives of Commissions, as may be designated shall be permitted to act as such representatives, provided they are duly accredited and produce to the Exposition authorities written evidence of having been authorized to act by the Proper.

Rule 38.Immediately after the close of the Exposition, exhibitors must remove their effects and complete such removal within 30 days from the closing.Goods then remaining will be chargedstorage.

Rule 39.Loan exhibits accepted by the Chief of the Department of Exhibits will be cared for without expense to the owner.Special arrangements will be madein each case for exhibits which are non-commercial in character, but designed to add to the completeness and educational value of the exposition.

Rule 41.Exhibitors furnishing machinery such as engines, boilers, etc. for use of the Exposition, may select their own men to operate them.Their wages will be fixed and paid by the Exposition authorities.

Rule 42.The Exposition authorities will defray the necessary expenses of exhibitors who loan their machine tools, etc. for the use of the Exposition, beyond the outlay they would have incurred as exhibitors, simple wear and tear expected.

Rule 43.Permits will be issued by the Chief of the Department of Exhibits to bring in such material as may be required for the successful operation of certain exhibits and such articles as may be required by concessionaires and privilege holders fifteen minutes before the opening of the expositionin the morning, also for the removal of such articles and products as come within the general rules and regulations.

Rule 44.The escape of steam into the atmosphere will not be permitted in any of the buildings and the exhibitor must provide care of its condensation.

Rule 45.It is not intended that machinery shall be installed in any other building outside of the Machinery Hall.But in order to encourage pleasing and attractive effects and to add life to the various exhibits where motion is required, a limited amount of noiseless motive power may b applied, subject to the approval of the Chief of the Department of Exhibits.

Rule 46.Works of art will be admitted to the fine arts section, whether previously exhibited or not.All works of art must be of highest order or merit and will be admitted on approval of the Committee of Selection.The installation of the works of art admitted will be under the supervision of the Superintendent of the Bureau of Fine Arts.All pictures round or oval, should be placed in square frames.Excessive breadths in frames or projecting moldings should be avoided.Shadow boxes must not project more than one inch beyond the frame.Works of art for sale will be so designated in the official catalogue and will be subject to special rules.

Rule 47.Each person who becomes an exhibitor thereby agrees to conform strictly to all the rules and regulations established for the government of the Exposition.

Rule 48.The Exposition authorities of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition reserve to themselves the right to construe, amend or add to these rules and regulations whenever it may be deemed necessary for the interest of the Exposition.

The Exposition authorities hope to secure such perfection of detail in the presentation of each separate exhibit and such logical, consistent and harmonious combination in the arrangement of the several classes and groups as will secure a display which will be both instructive and artistic.To this end they desire to aid exhibitors and to secure their hearty co-operation and assistance.Regulations are intended not to annoy exhibitors but to aid them in making the most effective display.

GURDON W. WATTLES, President.

E.E. BRUCE, Mgr. and Chief Dept. Exhibits

A.L. REED, Mgr. and Chief Dept. of Concessions.

BUREAU OF EDUCATION.

Conducted under the auspices of the Woman's Board of Managers.

President, Mrs. A.J. Sawyer, Lincoln.

Vice-President, Mrs. Thomas L. Kimball, Omaha.

Second Vice President, Mrs. William Dutton, Hastings.

Third Vice-President, Mrs. Frank Johnson, Crete.

Secretary, Mrs. Frances M. Ford, Omaha.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

Mrs. W.P. Harford, Chairman, Omaha.

Mrs. A.J. Sawyer, Lincoln. Mrs. Kate McHugh, Omaha.

Mrs. Thomas Kimball, Omaha.Mrs. J.R. Reed, Council Bluffs.

Mrs. W.W. Keysor, Omaha. Mrs. D.C. Giffert, West Point.

BOARD OF MANAGERS.

First Congressional District, Mrs. A.J. Sawyer, Lincoln;Mrs. A.W. Field, Lincoln.

Second Congressional District, Mrs. Angelina Whitney, Elk City; Miss Helen Chase, Papillion.

Third Congressional District, Mrs. D.C. Giffert, West Point; Mrs. Nettie Hollenbeck, Fremont.

Fourth Congressional District, Mrs. J.B. McDowell, Fairbury; Mrs. Frank Johnson, Crete.

Fifth Congressional District, Mrs. William Dutton, Hastings; Miss L.W. Fyffe, Hastings.

Sixth Congressional District, Mrs. M.A. Huntr, Broken Bow; Mrs. J.H. Kerr, Ansley.

Omaha,----Miss Anaa Foos, Miss Kate McHugh, Miss Alice Hitte, Mrs. O.S. Chittenden, Mrs. S.R. Towne, Mrs. W.W. Keysor, Mrs. W.P. Harford, Mrs. E.A. Cudahy, Mrs. Stella R. Feil, Mrs. T.L. Kimball, Mrs. Euclid Martin.

South Omaha,--Mrs. E.B. Towle, Mrs. A.Am. Munro.

Council Bluffs,--Mrs. J.R. Reed, Mrs. S.C. Key.

The Woman's Club of Omaha, deeply interested in the Exposition, desired that woman should have charge of some distinctive branch of the work, and aid in the general plan, and on February 2nd, 1897, Mrs. Z.T. Lindsey and Mrs. W.P. Harford, as a committee from the Woman's Club met with the Executive Committee to consider the subject and plan for woman's participation.After a second meeting a plan was agreed upon as follows.

PLAN OF ORGANIZATION.

Section 1.That the women be given charge of the Bureau of Education in it various branches, Viz:

The exhibits of the work of public school, kindergartens, manual training and industrial schools, schools for the deaf, blind and feeble minded, art schools, reform schools and all schools of special instruction, and that they also have charge of a series of Congresses on various scientific and philosophical lines during the months from June to November 1898.

Section 2.That this Bureau of Education be in the hands and under control of a Board of Managers of twenty-seven (27) in number, as more particularly specified in Section II, subject to the approval of the Board of Directors of the Exposition; eleven (11) of said managers shall be chosen from Omaha, two (2) from South Omaha, two (2) from Council Bluffs and twelve (12) from Nebraska outside of Omaha and South Omaha.

Section 3.That the local members of the Board of Managers be elected at a mass meeting of the woman of Omaha, that the members from South Omaha and Council Bluffs shall be elected at a mass meeting of the women in said cities, called for that purpose, each of said meetings to be called by the secretary of this Board to be held in said cities on Saturday February 13th, 1897, at 2 o'clock P.M.

Section 4.That from each Congressional District in the state, two (2) members of the Board of Managers shall be elected at a mass meeting of the woman of each district, for that purpose.

Section 5.That the Congressmen from each Congressional District shall designate where the said mass meeting shall be held and, if desired by the women of said district, the Board of Directors of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition will send a woman from Omaha to said district to fully explain the ends and aims of the Exposition.

Section 6.That the said Board of Managers may elect its own officers and adopt rules governing its actions.

Section 7.That two (2) women from each state outside of Nebraska, be selected to form an Advisory Council, auxiliary to the Board of Managers.

Section 8.That the Advisory Council be selected by the Board of Managers from names suggested to the Board by the different State Federations of Clubs and other educational organizations.

Section 9.That the members of the Board of Managers and of the Advisory Council do not receive remuneration.

Section 10.That in the work of the various departments and committees of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, where the services of women would be valuable, that they be asked to render such service.

Section 11.The powers of said Board of Managers shall be complete for the purposes above outlined, subject, however, to the approval of the Executive Committee of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, and to provide for this approval the Secretary of the said Board of Managers shall transmit a report of the proceedings of their meetings to the Secretary of the Exposition, who shall thereupon lay the same before the Executive Committee for their approval.

Mr. E.E. Bruce, Manager Dep't of Exhibits, Trans-Mississippi & Int. Exposition.

Dear Sir:

I beg leave to submit herewith the report of the Bureau of Education, Dep't. of Exhibits.

The operation of the plan of organization resulted in the selection of the Board of Managers as first given above.

The resignation of Mrs. McIntosh from the Board, was accepted and Mrs. N. P. Feil was elected to fill the vacancy.

An Advisory Council, as provided in the plan of organization, was appointed early in the summer of 1897, but it was found to be an adjunct of no very practical importance.Acknowledgments are due, however, to Mrs. Alice Babb of Iowa, Mrs. C.L. Scott and Mrs. M.G. Slocum, Mrs. T.K. Gray and Mrs. Carrie L. Backus of Minnesota, Mrs. Emory of Montana, Mrs. James Baird of Texas and Mrs. Ellen M. Henrotin of Illinois.

WORK OF THE BUREAU

The work delegated to the Bureau has been conducted under four general divisions, viz:

Educational Exhibits,

Collective.

Individual.

Women's Work.

Congresses.

Girls' and Boys' Building.

There will be reported seriatim.

EDUCATIONAL EXHIBITS

Collective

The work of securing educational exhibits was found to be more difficult than had been expected, owing, probably to two reasons.

First, experience in former expositions had demonstrated to teachers that the work of preparing educational exhibits of value, was great, while the interest of the public in that class of exhibits was small.

Second, the charge for space was unfavorable to exhibits having no commercial value, and as this was a new feature in our exposition, the objection to it from educational institutions, was loud and deep.Nearly all such institutions were solicited, however, by correspondence and in many cases personally or by delegation, and exhibits were secured from Columbia University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of California and from several business colleges.Special mention should also be made of a collection from the Chicago Art Institute.The largest collective exhibits were made by state institutions and paid for from state appropriations.The exhibit made by Nebraska included the public schools from Kindergarten to university and every institution for dependent or defective classes as well.Colorado made a similar exhibit.Kansas displayed work from grades below university.Missouri emphasized original work from university students and that done in schools for the Negro, the latter notably from the industrial standpoint.Oregon, Montana and Los Angeles Co., California, made representative exhibits.As an extra incentive, the Bureau gave, in addition to the exposition award a special diploma to the best state exhibit, to ten of the best county exhibits, and to the best exhibit from each of the thirty-two classes, including various grades, special schools and institutions for dependent and defective classes.The number of these awards was thirty-three.

The manual training exhibit from the Omaha High School in active operation, in charge of Mr. John Wigman, Professor of Manual Training, was of special interest and drew much attention to it.A fine exhibit of Ceramic products from Colorado and Nebraska was greatly admired, and interested many patrons.

INDIVIDUAL

In order to give pupils whose schools were not exhibiting, an opportunity to present their work, a plan was devised for individual competition in composition, history, penmanship, nature study, drawing and manual training.A premium list arranged by a committee consisting of Mrs. Sawyer, Mrs. Keysor and Mrs. Reed, was printed in pamphlet form and distributed in schools and teacher's institutes and through the correspondence of state and county officials.Members of the Board presented the plan in their various localities at teacher's meetings, and to individual teaches, and the secretary supplemented their efforts by a systematic correspondence with school officials, but the scheme failed to incite interest, and the exhibits were few in number, and for the most part inferior in quality.The number submitted in each subject is as follows:

Drawing128

Penmanship98

Composition 68

Manual Training21

History12

Nature Study 3

Total 320

An entry fee of 25 cents has been charged and gold, silver, and bronze medals had been promised as awards, but since the whole number of entries was less than the number of medals required to meet the provisions of the premium list, the committee decided to refund the entry fee and to give a diploma to exhibits of merit.This diploma is a facsimile of the exposition diploma, except that it is much smaller.About 200 awards have been made.

CONGRESSES

There was no branch of work entrusted to the Bureau which was accepted with so much enthusiasm as that given to congress work.Having been inaugurated at the organization of the Bureau, it was conducted through the preliminary stages by the Executive Committee and turned over Sept. 2nd, 1897 to a congress committee consisting of Mrs. Keysor, Mrs. Sawyer and Mrs. Reed.A little later Mrs. Feil was appointed to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mrs. Keysor, and Mrs. W.H. Hanchett and Mrs. T.K. Sudborough were added to the committee.These ladies served until July 9th, 1898 when the resignation of Mrs. Feil and Mrs. Hanchett were accepted and Mrs. Towne and Mrs. Martin were appointed to fill the vacancies.The organization of the congresses included a committee of arrangements and a local committee, the former to have the planning of the program, and them latter to be a committee of ways and means.Both these committees were appointed by the congress committee, which was successful in securing the services of experts as chairman in every case.The congresses were, however, planned with great difficulty, owing to the fact that it was impossible to secure when a provisional appropriation from the exposition as a whole, or for any one of them in particular, and also, because favors shown to certain congresses were denied to others.these conditions were responsible for the loss of several congresses for which plans had been formulated and considerable work done.Among such congresses were those of labor, temperance, social economics, literature and Trans-Mississippi history.The congress of Christian Activities was also dropped on account of the removal from the city of the chairman when it was too late to supply his place.The abandonment of this congress which had been planned with sufficient breadth to include all form of religious work, was a distinct loss, but it was compensated for by several other congresses, as none below.

A R T. -- Chairman, Mr. Lorado Taft, Chicago.

Local Chairman, Mr. Paul Charlton.

This congress occupied the greater part of three days and comprised six sessions.The programs consisted in the main, of illustrated lectures on art topics, which were given by some of the best known critics and artists in the west.

MUSIC. -- Chairman, Mr. Homer Moore, Omaha.

Local Chairman, Mr. Martin Cahn.

Twelve sessions extending over four days were held and the programs contained the names of over thirty musical artists and composers.Indian music day was one of the features of this congress, and on that occasion Miss Alice Fletcher of Harvard University, Mr. Francis LaFlesche of Washington and Prof. J. H. Filmore of Pomona, California, gave the results of original investigations among the American aborigines, while a group of Omaha Indian illustrated their addresses by native songs.American Music day gave opportunity for the presentation of American music and the discussion of its possibilities.Wagner day was devoted to the music and the theories of Richard Wagner, and the program included a discussion of his works illustrated by the stereopticon. The musical congress, planned on a large scale, was accordingly expensive, although the artists participating, made no charge for their services, requiring only that expenses be paid.The orchestra was also a heavy item of expense, and the action of the exposition in making orchestral concerts free to exposition visitors, destroyed the commercial value of the orchestra on which the congress had counted when contract was made.Railroad transportation proportionate to that given other congresses, was not provided, and street entrance to the auditorium though granted in other cases was denied in this. It happened therefore, that while the congress was able to pay the Exposition $850.00 on its contract for the orchestra, it was unable to meet many of its bills from artists participating in the programs.The deficit, however, having been met by the exposition, is more than covered by the surplus from the Girls and boys' building fund, which has been left with the Exposition.

MONETARY. -- Chairman, Hon. J. Sterling Morton, Neb. City Local Chairman, Dr. Geo. L. Miller.

This congress occupied three days and held five sessions.It was participated in by many of the foremost financiers of the Unites States, and the papers presented constitute an important contribution to monetary science.

SINGLE TAX. -- Chairman, Mr. Louis D. Post, Chicago Local Chairman, Mr. W. D. Becket.

Six sessions occupied two days.The programs represented some of the best known exponents of the single tax theory.

RELIGION. -- Chairman, Rev. Jenkin Lloyd, Chicago.

Local Chairman, Mr. Thomas Kilpatrick.

The Liberal Congress of Religion covered four days and held nine sessions.Its programs were of broad and general interests, and such representative men as Dr. Thomas, Dr. Barrows and Rabbi Hirsch of Chicago, President David Starr Jordan of Leland Standford and Prof. Hanford Henderson of Brooklyn, were heard. This was the most largely attended of all the congresses.

The Women's congresses included the following:

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF WOMEN. -- Chairman, Mrs. May Wright Sewall, Indianapolis

Local Chairman, Miss Mary Fairbrother.

Five days, ten sessions.

TRANS-MISSISSIPPI CONGRESS OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. --

Chairman, Mrs. Belle M. Stoutenborough, Plattsmouth Local Chairman, Mrs. Philip Potter.

Three days, eight sessions.

SUFFRAGE DAY. -- Chairman, Miss Susan B. Anthony, New York.

Local Chairman, Mrs. Cornish.

One day, two sessions.

W.C.T.U. DAY. -- Chairman, Mrs. S. T. Walker, Lincoln.

Local Chairman, Mrs. M. G. Andrews.

One session.

MOTHER'S CONGRESS. -- Chairman, Mrs. Theo. Birney, Washington.

Local Chairman, Mrs. H. H. Heller.

Two days, five sessions.

JEWISH COUNCIL OF WOMEN. -- Chairman, Mrs. H. J. Solomon, Chicago.

Local Chairman, Mrs. A. Polack.

Two days, six sessions.

The Trans-Mississippi Teacher's Convention, the Library Congress and Congress of Charities and Corrections were carried on under other auspices, but much clerical work and all of the circularizing was done at the secretary's office.

The Omaha Woman's Club as its gift to the congresses furnished a suitable meeting place in its club rooms in the First Congregational Church.Several conventions not under the auspices of the Bureau were held there.The entire number of sessions for which the club provided being 103.

GIRLS' AND BOYS' BUILDING

Preliminary.

There was no building on the exposition grounds in which so many persons were interested as that devoted to boys and girls.Plans suggested at a meeting of the Executive Committee of the Bureau June 5th, 1897, and formulated on June 17th were immediately approved by the exposition, and were laid before the Board of Managers at its meeting of July 1st.It was decided to raise funds as far as possible from school children and a descriptive leaflet was circulated among the teachers of Nebraska and neighboring states as they assembled during the summer in county institutes.This method served to introduce the project and early in the fall a definite canvass was undertaken by local patronesses who collected the school contributions in their respective towns.About a hundred such workers were enlisted.

Three special incentives were offered to individuals and schools contributing to the building fund.

First, A certificate showing a picture of the building was offered to all contributors of one dollar or more.A design submitted by Miss Lydia McCague was chosen for these certificates, and 1737 of them have been awarded.

Second, The name of individuals, towns and schools contributing ten dollars or more were promised a place of honor on the honor roll.This roll of honor was exhibited in the hall of the building.

Third, It was agreed that the pictures decorating the building should be awarded at the close of the exposition to the schools making the largest contribution per capita one-half to be given to rural schools.At the solicitation of Mrs. W. W. Keysor, gifts of pictures to the number of thirty one were made by the following:

Braun Clement Co. New York.

Berlin Photo Co. New York.

Hanfstanxel Co. New York.

Prang Educational Co. Boston.

Elson & Co. Boston.

Soule Photo Co. Boston.

Miss Sarah McSheahe, Omaha.

One of these pictures, being deemed unsuitable for school use, was given to the Omaha Public Library, and the remaining thirty were divided between rural and other schools.

Desiring to extend the award of pictures still further the Board purchased, at the close of the Exposition, nineteen additional ones, and these have been given for the most part, to village schools.

In February a single edition of a boys' and girls' newspaper known as "The Hatchett" was issued and sold for the benefit of the building fund.The net receipts of this venture were about six hundred dollars.

RESULTS.

At a meeting of the executive committee, March 18th, the architect, stated that in order to complete the building by June 1st it would be necessary to begin at once, and the secretary reported the funds on hand as insufficient to meet the architects estimate.In this dilemma the committee asked for credit from the exposition, which was granted, and the building was immediately begun.It was completed June 15th and was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies on the 4th of July.

Among the features of this building was the creche, operated under the jurisdiction of the Bureau, and conducted by Mrs. A. Moore and five assistants. Upwards of 2,000 children were cared for here while their parents viewed the exposition and the institution after the first month became somewhat more than self supporting.

"The International Doll Collection" sent from Boston and exhibited by Miss Arabel Kimball for the benefit of the Omaha creche, and the "Model School Room" presented by the Prang Educational Co. were important exhibits, and the restaurant operated in the upper gallery by Mrs. Geo. Tilden was the most fruitful source of income.Besides the above there were thirteen exhibits and concessions in the building, exclusive of the children's exhibits and which was displayed upon the walls and in the reading room.The hall was used daily for cooking lectures and four children's entertainments were given there.It was also the rendezvous for eleven children's excursions and was in constant use with the reception and toilet rooms, as a place of public comfort.

The committees connected with the building were,

BUILDING COMMITTEE,

Mrs. T. L. Kimball.

Mrs. A. Monroe.

Mrs. E. A. Cudahy.

OPERATING COMMITTEE,

Mrs. T. L. Kimball.

Mrs. W. P. Harford.

PICTURE COMMITTEE,

Mrs. W. W. Keysor.

Mrs. J. B. Crabtree.

Mrs. E. M. Reed.

The surplus of receipts over expenditures was $937.82, which by action of the executive committee, was given to the exposition.

WOMAN'S WORK.

By request of the Department of Exhibits, the Bureau, immediately after its organization undertook the charge of a class of exhibits known as Woman's Work. It was understood, however, that such exhibits were not to be placed apart as had been the case in other expositions and that there was to be no classification as regards sex.The work of women was therefore to be found in all the exhibit buildings, and this report will be concerned with those exhibits only for which the Bureau of Education is directly responsible.There were two working exhibits of foods and household utensils conducted by Mrs. Mac Murphy in the Agricultural Building and one by Miss Ranche in the Boys and Girls Building.These included daily demonstration lectures, which were well attended.The exhibits of art needle work and ceramics was placed in the Liberal Arts Building, and special mention is due the Nebraska Ceramic Club for an attractive showing of hand painted china.

The Colorado women made a fine display of art needlework and ceramics, and the booth occupied by the Missouri woman contained a similar exhibit.

The headquarters of the Nebraska Federation of Women's Clubs contained club literature and programs and thus served as an exponent of women's work of a different kind.

All these booths were furnished in a manner that made them attractive as rest places, but their location in a gallery was unfortunate.

Ceramic art and needlework have heretofore enjoyed similar advantages to those given fine arts, but here a radical distinction was made, and while fine arts was given free space on the ground floor, with all expenses paid, ceramic art was obliged to pay for space in a gallery and furnish its own fittings.This fact was invariably stated by artists when declining to exhibit, and to it is undoubtedly due the failure to secure a representative exhibit of china painting.

In concluding this report it is proper to say that the work of the Bureau of Education differed from that of other divisions, in that it had to do with non-commercial and somewhat intangible matters.The Girls and Boys' building had a success which may be measured in terms of dollars and cents, but woman's work, congresses and Educational exhibits cannot be judged from a material standpoint.We trust therefore that whatever approval be given us in your mind will rest upon the fact that we helped to make the exposition symmetrical and dignified.

Respectfully submitted,

Frances M. Ford, Secretary Bureau of Education.

BUREAU OF FINE ARTS.

Armand H. Griffith, Director Art Museum, Detroit, Mich. Superintendent.

ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

Paul Charlton, Chairman

C. S. Huntington,Clement Chase.

F. W. ParkerEarl W. Gannett

Z. T. LindseyW. S. Poppleton

C. W. Hamilton Herman Kountz, Jr.

HONORARY COMMISSIONERS AND COMMITTEES OF SELECTION

Jules Rolshoven,England.Thomas B. Walker,Minnesota.

Frederick Mayer,FranceF. L. Ridgely, Missouri.

Dr. C. Hofsteded

De Groot,Holland John W. Bookwalter, New York.

W.M.R. French,IllinoisFrank Duveneck,Ohio.

John L. Griffith,Indiana Daniel Baugh,Pennsylvania.

Stephen N. Crosby, MassachusettsThoe Cooley,Tennessee.

Chas. L. Freer, MichiganJohn L. Mitchell Wisconsin.

Detroit, Mich. Jan 3, 1899.

Mr. E. E. Bruce,

Chairman & Mgr. of Deps of Exhibits.

Omaha, Nebraska.

Dear Sir:

As Supt. of the Fine Arts Department of the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition, I beg to submit the following report.

When in the month of July, 1897, your executive committee so kindly appointed me to the position which I held during your successful exposition, I immediately realized that under existing circumstances, Omaha being so very far from the general art centers, that it would be extremely difficult to interest and secure the co-operation of the artists, art societies and the various organizations which I felt we would be able to rely on for the collection; I suggested to you that in the place of the old manner of giving medals, awards and prizes that the exposition management guarantee the sale and purchase of pictures to the extent of $5,000.I believe then that it was by far the wisest, and in fact, the only plan by which we could hope to secure a representative exhibition, and now, as I look back over the work, I am more than ever satisfied that that was the only plan and I feel gratified and complimented to learn that it is being adopted by other exhibitions all over the country.I further realized that your exhibition, particularly in the lines of art, would have to be of a different nature from that usually held in the more densely populated and older sections of our country, and while some of the plans did not wholly succeed, the general success of this department is one of which I am quite pleased.

The work of publicity was of the first importance, and this was largely secured through circulars sent to the various art societies and to the prominent artists over the country.A number of personal visits to the cities of the East and to various exhibitions, secured for the exhibition wide public notice, but required considerable personal effort and a visit to many of the studios resulted finally in awakening the interest and cooperation of the right person. Fortunately the exhibition came at the time of the year when many pictures could be secured out of the winter and spring exhibitions.In this way we secured an important collection by Scotch artists and the great painting of Charles the Bold by Boybet, from the St. Louis Exposition.This required an unusual amount of red tape and correspondence, both by reason of their being foreign pictures and the fact that they had been sent to this country for one exhibition only, and further that the artists objected to having their work boxed up and out of sight for six months or more.This objection was overcome by sending some of the pictures to the Detroit Museum of Art and to the Chicago Art Institute for exhibition, during the winter.Thus making of these two points a sort of rallying ground as it were.From here they were finally sent to Omaha.A number of pictures were secured from the exposition at Nashville under the same circumstances.

When I arrived on the grounds in May, I found that the building was far from being ready for me, but this was to be expected as it occurs at almost every exposition.However, the workmen made every effort to clear the way, and while we were very greatly delayed, I take opportunity in calling your attention to the fact, that aside from the Government Building, the Art Building was the only one on the grounds completely ready for visitors on opening day.

In all some 700 pieces were hung on the walls, many of them loaned by art institutions and from the collections of private individuals.This gave the people who visited the exposition an opportunity to compare the work that had stood the test of time with that of the modern artists, and while many people did not understand and failed to appreciate the opportunities given them in the shape of a great exhibition, it was the universal verdict of those people who had made art a study even slightly or in an amateur way, that the exhibition was a notable one and the question was even asked, "How were you able to secure such pictures for such a length of time to be placed in a temporary building?"

Aside from the paintings, there were some 200 black and white drawings loaned by the Century and Scribner's magazines.These were the originals of those published from time to time in their magazines, and were the creations of our foremost painters and illustrators.These were greatly enjoyed by the people, as many of them were recognized and while they lacked the charm of color, they were so beautiful that I am certain they added greatly to the exhibition.In addition to this there was quite an important collection of reproductions of drawings from the old masters, loaned by Mr. George Busse.These together with the Copley reproductions of the important Mural and decorative painting s in America today, I find attracted a great deal of attention.There was also in one room a very fine collection of Braune Autotypes, comprising reproductions in carbon of the masterpieces of the world.

It was my opinion, and is now, that this would bring the people face to face with the best art in the world, as could be done in no other way, the originals being utterly out of the question to secure.In the Department of Statuary the department was not what I wish it might have been.It was possibly the only weak part of the art collection.This, however, is easily accounted for from the great expense and risk connected with the shipping of marble, bronze and plaster reproductions.Sculptors as a rule are not willing to risk their works at so great a distance, unless guaranteed in some way the actual value or more than the possible value of their work.Unlike pictures, statuary from its bulk and weight, is very easily damaged, even in the moving of it, and this will readily explain why this part of the Fine Arts exhibit was rather meager.

You, as well as myself, were largely indebted to the generous kindness of many private collectors.They and the public institutions who aided in our efforts have been recognized by you with diplomas and medals, and every one, without an exception, have written thanking your executive committee for the honor and compliments paid them in these diplomas and medals, it being an unusual recognition which they greatly appreciated.

During the progress of the exposition, there was, as there always is, some trying situations, but these, as a rule have passed away, and I find but very few cases of complaint for which there was any real cause.

In the closing of the exposition I venture to say that no collection of such magnitude was ever so promptly returned to the artists and owners.This has been universally commented on.The exception being in the case where, through misunderstandings of the railroads cases have been detained which otherwise would have been delivered promptly, this, together with some little delays necessary through the red tape of our custom laws, for while under the present tariff laws a great encouragement is given to the American Artist it is quite the reverse to pictures from foreign lands.At the present time nearly every picture is accounted for and the whole matter being rapidly brought to a finish.I take this opportunity of paying my respects to all the officers and the executive committee with whom I was brought in contact.Their uniform courtesy and willingness to do the things requested from my department made it a pleasure to be connected with the Exposition management.Especially do I wish to thank the Department of Exhibits for the promptness with which they have honored my many requests for anything needed, both before, during and since the close of the exposition, and I wish to thank you all for the "Bank" promptness with which they have honored the necessary expenses and my own salary.

I am particularly indebted to Mr. E. E. Bruce, Chief of Exhibits departments and his able assistant, Mr. H. B. Hardt for the manner in which they so generously took and discussed suggestions made them in the prosecution of the work.The Art Building at all expositions is looked upon as an expense from which there can be no return in a money way and it is apt to be considered in the light of a white elephant, its wants utterly ignored or but grudgingly granted.In this case, however, there was but little cause for complaint beyond some trifling items, which, while annoying at the time soon righted themselves.

With the kindest feelings and good wishes to all the Exposition Management, I am

Very truly yours

A. H. Griffith

Supt. Fine Arts Bureau

BUREAU OF MINES AND MINING.

Dr. David T. Day, U.S. Geological Survey, Washington, D.C.

Superintendent.

The Report of the very able and affable chief of the Bureau of Mines and Mining, was as below

Hon. E. E. Bruce,

Manager of the Department of Exhibits,

Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.

Mr. Dear Sir:

I have pleasure in submitting the following report of the administration of the mining department of the Exposition.

Organization.When appointed special commissioner in charge of this department on March 5, 1898, the mining building was completed and ready for the reception of exhibits.

The work of securing exhibits had been well advanced by the energetic work of your representative, Mr. H. B. Hardt.The floor plan was laid off to show the arrangement of aisles and exhibit spaces.Much of the space had already been paid for and allotted to various states and private exhibitors.Arrangement with women of the principal state exhibitors had been made by which a certain style of staff front for the exhibits facing on the main court had been stipulated by Mr. Hardt.By this an unusually handsome court in the center of the building was made possible.One exhibit, anthracite from Pennsylvania, - had reached the building.

Much of the work collecting the minerals for the various states was in the hands of the state commissioners.My first work, therefore, was to visit these commissioners and see that their collections were in such actual progress as would yield the best results.For this purpose a journey was made including California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, Missouri and the Black Hills of South Dakota.In San Francisco, Mr. Richardson was already actively at work.By my advice, and after conference with Mr. M. DeYoung, Mr. Richardson prevailed upon the Governor of California to appoint Mr. DeYoung Chairman of the State Commission to which were added several good workers, including for mining, Mr. Tirey L. Ford and Mr. Charles G. Yale.After Mr. DeYoung had duly received his title of Chief Commissioner, a few meetings were held and then the work was promptly abandoned.

In Oregon the work was found to be well in hand.By the vigorous campaign of the secretary of the commission, Mr. J.F. Batchelder of Portland, money had been raised by private subscription and Mr. H.E. Dosch had been associated most successfully in collecting exhibit material.

On arriving at Spokane Falls, Mr. H.C. Thompson, Chairman of the Mining Commission of that state, stated that he was on the point of resigning from lack of local support.He was not only induced to continue, but the interest of the mayor of Rosslands, British Columbia, was also aroused, and good exhibits resulted.

In Idaho the assurances were good, but the commission abandoned the work later and without warning, too late for a new campaign.

In Wyoming and Colorado, much apathy was successfully contended with, and the exhibits obtained.The same conditions were encountered in the Black Hills and with the same fortunate result.

On returning, my office in the United States Geological Survey sent out about five thousand requests for exhibits to mine operators, in states where no commission was at work and where, as in Colorado, the need of an extra stimulus was very evident.

The aim of the mining exhibits as a whole was to show uniformly and systematically, the underground assets of the entire region west of the Mississippi River.Also such additional exhibits from states farther east as would show principle achievements in mining and metallurgy attained since the Columbian Exposition at Chicago.Further exhibits were obtained which served to familiarize western producers with such mineral products of the East as may be reasonably sought further west.

Results obtained.The extent to which the above aims were accomplished, is perhaps well indicated by the reports of the Jury of Awards given on a later page, not because the judgment of these experts is especially commendatory, but because it furnishes the most exact method of measuring the results.Thus, it may be taken that a gold medal is evidence that the exhibit was either better than the corresponding exhibit at Chicago, for example the state exhibit of Utah, or that the material exhibited represents a marked achievement beyond the development at that exposition, such as the exhibit of New Mexican Turquoise.

Other examples of recent achievements were:the cross section of the largest electric furnace known, in which the charge of coal, sand, etc. had been converted by the power generated at Niagara Falls, into the new abrasive carborundum.Another metallurgical exhibit of great importance, which was first shown at Omaha, was a large piece of artificial graphite made in the same electric furnace.While this discovery is very recent, nevertheless, useful industrial articles were shown made from this new form of graphite.

The display of gold nuggets from every known camp in the Klondike Country, also represented a new development.The very complete collection of all varieties of crude petroleum included a specimen from a field in Alaska, discovered fourteen months ago.Other exhibits of materials not known at the time of the Columbian Exposition, included a large collection of the rich telluride gold ores from Cripple Creek, Colorado; the development of the Cyanide Process, as carried out in Utah; the new deposits of onyx from the same state; the new iron ores of the Mesabi region in Minnesota; the new and important siliceous gold ores of the Black Hills, where the gold contents of an acre can be measured with greater accuracy than anywhere except in South Africa.The state of Washington showed the achievement of successfully using the cyanide process to some fine gold in the peculiar gold ore of the Republic mine.They also brought a good representation of the ores of the newly discovered British Columbia.A cement plaster company showed the progress in that art by which the cheapest of all raw plaster materials can be made into an efficient substitute for a tiled wall, at a small expense.Even Arizona, without any state commission, exceeded past records for beautiful displays of copper carbonated.Another private exhibitor from Arizona excelled the exhibit of silicified wood at Chicago, and beautified the building with more than one hundred polished specimens of polished sections of silicified tree trunks.

Montana's contribution also excelled the remarkable exhibit at the World's Fair.Another exhibit of unusual educational value was the column of forty eight pure silver ingots, worth $40,000 and showing one day's product of the Omaha & Grant Smelting Company.

The gold medals in California's column are due to a second trip to that state made as soon as possible after the opening of the Exposition.By this trip, private firms were induced partially to make up for the short comings of the commission.These exhibits were supplemented by such gold nuggets and other interesting and characteristic specimens as I could purchase on my own account. Among these exhibits was the verd-antique from Santa Catalina Island, the beautiful result of a revival of the ancient fashion of the cutting vases, bowls, etc., out of solid rock and polishing them to translucent thinness.

The most instructive achievement was the collection by various states, railroad companies and private individuals of the coals of the west, shown by full sized sections of coal veins, and by which the fuel assets of the west could be seen at a glance.A significant detail of this exhibit was the advance in coal mining methods, by which the harder varieties of western coals could be sized by "breakers" according to the Pennsylvania anthracite methods.

Installation.Past experience has shown two prominent faults in installing collections of ores, and by strenuous efforts these were remedied.

First,- there is a tendency of the exhibitor to pile the ore in indiscriminate heaps, by which the individuality of the specimen counts for nothing.The result is only a trophy for the aggrandizement of some mining camp for the education of none.

Second, Up to this time no mining exhibits had ever been carefully and efficiently labeled.

To correct the first fault, the free loan of more than forty show cases was obtained from the United States National Museum through the Hon. Charles D. Walcott, Director of the Geological Survey of the United States, and at that time, also acting in charge of the National Museum.The exhibitors were prevailed upon to use these and abandon the fashion of ore heaps to a sufficient extent.

Labeling.After much effort, the Remington Company was induced to construct a special typewriting machine, which would hold cards of any size, and for which a special type was cut of large size and distinct outlines.The exhibitors were so encouraged to use this form of label that the descriptions of specimens were thorough and complete.

Decorations.The mining industry has many features which cannot be brought into an exposition, and can only be shown in picture.It was therefore determined to to use the large sized water-color reproductions of mines, smelting works, and other important items which otherwise could not have been illustrated at all.This idea originated with Mr. R.T. Browne, color expert of the Exposition Company.It was so efficiently carried out by Decorator Allen that the exhibitors have been induced to contribute a part of the expense. Further decorations of the interior roof was simplified by the loan of the large United States flag, 150 by 87 feet, which was made by the ladies of Utah at the time of her admission to the union of states.A continuation of the picture decoration was attempted by obtaining from the Government photographer large photographs on glass.But the experiment proved of great cost and highly unsatisfactory, except where the pictures were hung in the windows over the ends of the aisles.This was because the principal light came from the roof. The effort to induce state commissioners to obtain and display more of these costly glass pictures was successful as to getting the orders, but seldom in getting them to pay their bills, much to the photographer's loss.

Maintenance.In so far as my experience goes, the mining building is the best that has ever been built for the display of mineral exhibits.It afforded the great amount of light necessary for inspecting minerals.The floor was exceptionally well constructed and required no bracing for even the heaviest objects.Certain features, however, rendered it difficult to maintain the exhibit in good condition.The building leaked in two ways.The roof was bad and the locks on the doors were a farce.They were forced repeatedly.In first taking charge of the building, early in March, over forty leaks were found and these increased to the proportion of a seive during the heavy rains of May and June.

On June 15th I secured the services of Mr. John B. Goodman as an assistant.He had become an expert in the maintenance of exposition buildings at the World's Fair and at the Field Columbian Museum, where he had occupied a similar position.His work left little to be desired, as concerns the work of maintaining the building in good condition.The cleaning of the building by force of night janitors under the control of the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, has been exceptionally well done, and too much cannot be said for the good work by which the toilet rooms have been kept in far better condition than ever before at an Exposition.In spite of the size and character of the crowds, they were normally in better condition than in good hotels.

Awards.The system adopted by the Bureau of Awards for the selection of jurors and the methods of work, were enforced exactly in the Mining Building.The jurors selected mutually by the Exposition company and the exhibitors, were Prof. F.W. Clark, Chief Chemist of the U.S. Geological Survey and Representative of the Interior Department on the Government Board, Prof. J.A. Holmes, State Geologist of North Carolina, and Mr. Walter Page, Superintendent of the Omaha and Grant Smelting Works.It is a pleasure to testify not only to the expert character of their work, but to the fidelity with which they worked in spite of severe weather.

The system devised by the Bureau, having each judge record his own opinion separately and of having these opinions reviewed by the Superintendent of the Department, was new to the jurors, but they unanimously agreed that the innovation was a marked advance in jury work.The following table shows the awards given for mining.

AWARDS FOR MINING, ARRANGED BY STATES

Gold:Silver: Bronze: Hon. Men.Total

Alabama,1:1: 2:4

Arizona,1:4: 6::11

British : : ::

Columbia, 1:3: 3::4

California, 1: : 1: 1:3

Colorado, 4:12 : 11 ::27

Arkansas,:1: ::1

Georgia,2:1: 3::6

Illinois, 1:1: 1: 1:4

Indian: : ::

Territory, : : : 1:1

Iowa, :2: ::2

Michigan, 1: : ::1

Kansas, :9: 5: 2:16

Minnesota,1:1: 2::4

Missouri, 3:16 : 8: 3:30

Nebraska, 2:1: 1: 1:5

Nevada, :1: 6: 10 :17

New York, 1:3: ::4

Mexico,1: : ::1

Pennsylvania,1:1: 1::3

New Mexico, 2:1: 1: 2:6

Utah,2:5: 10 : 4:21

Oregon,1:1: 6: 12 :20

Wyoming,2:5: ::8

Washington,: : ::

D.C.,1: : ::1

Washington,:1: 2:2 :5

27697039205

LADIES BUREAU OF ENTERTAINMENT.

By the direction of the President of the Exposition, one-fourth of the gallery space in the Mining Building was assigned to the ladies of the Bureau of Entertainment, which was fitted up in a manner which added much to the attractiveness of the building, and this feature of having the bureau in the mining building was carried out successfully.

REMOVAL OF EXHIBITS.In addition to the permits issued by the Transportation and Exhibits Departments, each exhibitor has been required to give up a pass at the door to the guards for every package removed from the building, this pass being signed by no one but myself.Under this arrangement, no complications have arisen so far as I know.

RECOMMENDATIONS.There is little to be said concerning how the Mining Building should be administered, if the work should be repeated, although several lessons can be learned by what has been written here.I should recommend that, in addition to the complete system of lectures, such as was contemplated here, should be added.

First,- A general description of the exhibits in the building to be spoken from a phonograph at frequent intervals during the day, showing the order in which the exhibits should be visited for the most instructive result, and describing their characteristics.

Second,- Much time and energy should be given to securing demonstrations of mining and metallurgic processes, especially the panning process, so frequently described, but so unfamiliar to most visitors; the extraction of free gold by quicksilver and the retorting of the resulting amalgamation.Finally, a series of elementary lectures on mining topics, will do more to popularize a mining exhibit than large sums spent in the effort to obtain more complete mineral collections.

I would recommend that more responsibility should be expected of the superintendent of buildings, and that the guard force should be directed to take their orders concerning the details of each building, and that far closer relations should exist between the head officials of the guards and the superintendents of buildings.In the case of the Mining Building, the lack of such instructions might have been severely felt, but for the unusual efficiency and tact of Major Llewelyn, Commandant of the Guards, which I have had reason to thoroughly appreciate.

GUARD SERVICE.On the opening day of the Exposition two guards were assigned to the Mining Building.At my request this was increased to four, both day and night.Most efficient men were selected by Major LLewelyn for this work, and they served without any complaint during the entire Exposition.Their services must be thoroughly commended.In addition to this force, several of the states exhibits employed private watchmen.The valuable exhibit of gems in the center of the building was furnished with an electric alarm attachment on the case.

CONCESSIONS.The concessions assigned to the mining Building occasioned the principal difficulty to good administration.Of course, this assignment for the sale of materials, inappropriate to an exhibit of mines, is perhaps the just consequence of having unfilled space after the Exposition opened.Of all of them, the noise of the piano was most generally objectionable.But in all this array of incongruous shopkeepers, the only serious disgrace to the building was the concession to the Western Optical Company, which might with some propriety have been allotted space in the Liberal Arts Building.

I mention these details to bring up the question as to whether the concessions and the Exposition Company would not have been mutually benefited had these concessions been placed elsewhere.

In conclusions, I wish to testify to my appreciation of the fact that the results obtained in the Mining Building are due primarily to the forethought of Mr. H.B. Hardt, and the spirit of earnest work which he aroused in the state commissioners, whose work has accomplished the greater part of this result. For my own work, I wish to acknowledge the courtesy and confidence displayed toward me by President Wattles and General Secretary Wakefield, as well as others of the Executive Committee, without which success would have been impossible.

With sincere respect, yours,

(Signed) David T. Day,

Superintendent of Mining

BUREAUS OF AGRICULTURE--HORTICULTURE--FORESTRY--AND--IRRIGATION

Prof. Frederick W. Taylor,

University of Nebraska,

Superintendent

Richard S. Berlin,

Assistant Supt. of Agricultural Bureau.

During 1897, Prof. Taylor engaged partly in promotive work for the Exposition, the securing of Conventions, National and Annual meetings of Societies, etc. The best comment that could be offered on his work in this regard, is the fact that he got everything he went after.It is results that give value to service.

Pro. Taylor's report to the Department, was as follows

December 27, 1898.

Mr. E.E. Bruce,

Chief Department of Exhibits,

T.M. & I.E., Omaha, Nebr.

Dear Sir:

I beg to submit to you the following report of the more important matters connected with the administration of the bureaus placed in my charge on June 1st, 1897.

After laying out the general plans along which it seemed desirable to have the exhibits handled, the first work taken up was the attending of a number of the various national organizations whose work relates toAgriculture and Horticulture in order that they might be put in touch with our plans, and also that they might be invited to hold their 1898 meetings in Omaha.THe first one of these attended was the American Association of Nurserymen at St. Louis, early in June, 1897.The matter of the 1898 meeting when presented was decided in favorof Omaha, and at the proper time their organization held a very satisfactory meeting.

At various times throughout the summer I visited the following organizations with the same ends in view.

Society of American Florists, Providence, R.I.

American Forestry Association & Nat'l Goods Roads Parliament, Nashville.

Nebraska State Horticultural Society, Lincoln.

American Ass'n of Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Stations, Minneapolis.

American Association of Farmers' Institute Managers, Columbus, Ohio.

American Maize Propaganda, Chicago.

All these organizations, without exception voted to hold their meetings in Omaha, in accordance with our request, but in the case of one, The American Association of Agriculture Colleges & Experiment Stations, the Executive Committee saw fit to decide otherwise during the interim before the time to hold the meeting.Through reaching these various organizations, much was done in the way of advertising and giving information concerning the intentions of the Exposition along agricultural and horticultural lines, and I think the latter work was much facilitated through the fact that the more important firms and organizations in these lines of work, already knew, when asked to participate individually, about what was to be done.One very important result of drawing the attention of the larger growers to the Exposition was the securing of the materials for nearly all the bedding down of the Bluff Tract from exhibitors.Had this not been done, it would have been necessary to purchase for similar use, a large amount of material. The two buildings provided for housing the exhibits which were in my charge, - viz:The Agricultural Building and the Horticultural Building, were very good structures in general, and very well suited to the requirements.

There was one very serious defect in the Agricultural Building, arising from a misconception of the entrance which was likely to be used by the people, which caused no small amount of trouble, although nothing serious occurred.I refer to the small size of the east and west doors of the building.It was doubtless thought by the architects, that the south doors would be largely used by the public, but such provednot to be the case, and the east and west doors were entirely inadequate to serve the needs of the large crowds especially on the special days.Another serious trouble in this building was the defect in the roofing, resulting in bad leaks.The Horticultural Building was very satisfactoryto all the exhibitors and to the public, and I think was fully as well suited to its uses, as any building on the grounds.The securing of the large century plant, as a center piece under the dome, was a very satisfactory arrangement, especially during the early part of the season, when exhibits were hard to maintain.

INSTALLATION.

It was not an easy matter to bring about concerted action on the part of exhibitors so that the installation should be a of high class, which it was essential to have in order that the general results might be desirable, and when we consider the small amount of funds available by many exhibitors, I think the results were all that could have have been expected, and more.The exhibits in the Horticultural Building were participated in by thirteen states, as well as a number of individual exhibitors.Many of the state exhibits was participated in by a large number of individuals so that in the whole, there was probably, not less than six hundred different exhibitors in this building. We had no way of knowing the exact number, as reports were not made to us of the number of individuals participating in each exhibit.

In Agriculture the number of states participating was, fifteen, and there were in addition, many exhibits by private persons and corporations.In this building were put nearly all of the forestry exhibits and such irrigation exhibits as were admissible inside buildings.From this it will be seen that, although my work was divided into four bureaus, it practically was but two, as forestry came with agriculture, and irrigation might have been classed, either with agriculture or irrigation.

The feature most commented upon with regard to the exhibits in the Agricultural Building was the large use made of the various grains in a decorative way to illustrate the productiveness of the various states.It was said repeatedly, and I think with truth, that in this particular this exhibit stood ahead of any exhibit of the kind, ever made.There seems to have been a general growth dating from the Trans-Mississippi Exposition, a natural consequence, perhaps of the immense strides made by this industry in America, resulting in putting the United States far ahead of all other grain growing countries in acreage, as well as in bushels produced.

In Horticulture, perhaps the most notable thing was the fact that from the opening day to the closing day there was never a time that there was not upon the table a large and attractive exhibit of fresh fruits.At all other expositions it has been impossible to open on advertised time with a good exhibit, because of the fact that so little attention has been paid to the use of cold storage by the states of Nebraska, Iowa and Illinois for this particular purpose and in most cases the fruit came through in excellent condition so that when put upon the table it might have been fresh from the trees so far as fine appearance was concerned.

AWARDS.

In Agriculture three member jury was used in judging exhibits, in Horticulture, on the other hand, a more modern method of using a single expert juror was followed with the most satisfactory results to all concerned.We were fortunate in being able to secure the services of the Hon. E.E. Vandeman of Virginia, for a number of years United States Pomologist, and his decisions were in every case satisfactory to those who made the exhibits, as well as to the representatives of the Exposition.In both departments, however, there was no complaint practically and the highest commendation should be given to the gentlemen who consented to act as jurors.They were all men of the highest standing whose decisions were above suspicion.

CONCESSIONS.

My own opinion, as frequently expressed, was that the putting of concessions in exhibit buildings is never desirable and when carried beyond the smallest percentage possible as compared with the number of exhibits is not only troublesome but absolutely pernicious.In the Horticulture Building only three concessions were admitted and these were conducted in such a way as to interfere in no wise with exhibitors nor with those who were visiting the exposition in order to study the exhibits.In the Agricultural Building, however, many more concessions were admitted and, to my mind, there is no question that they reduced the value of the exhibits to a certain extent?I think the judgment of those connected with expositions, both here and elsewhere, has been that the admissions of more than a very small number of well conducted concessions detracts from the dignity of the exposition and is a means of producing dissatisfaction and adverse comment from visitors.

OUTSIDE EXHIBITS.

There was secured through the Bureau of Horticulture as exhibits,twenty seven exhibitors, who furnished material for beds on the grounds on the Bluff tract. These were of the greatest value to the Exposition as such, and also proved a highly satisfactory method of exhibiting their wares on the part of the various florists, all of whom have expressed to me their entire satisfaction with that method of exhibiting.Of those directly connected with me in the more public work of the bureau of my charge, I wish to express my sincere appreciation of the assistance rendered by Mr. H.B. Hardt, the Assistant Chief of the Department, who by his wide knowledge of expositions in general, was able to afford very much valuable information and many helpful suggestions.Shortly before the opening of the Exposition, Mr. R.S. Berlin was appointed by the Executive Committee, assistant superintendent of the Department of Agriculture, and to him also, I wish to express my hearty appreciation of valuable services rendered.Mr. Berlin was always willing to assist in every way possible and he proved very popular with the exhibitors and was very helpful in every way.

In summing up, itmay not be out of place to mention that, as representing the department of exhibits, not only in my own bureaus, but often in other ways, I visited, not only the organizations which are enumerated at the beginning of this report, but made many trips which took me, in the aggregate, into 22 different states east of the Mississippi River and eight west of it.During my trips it was my duty and pleasure, not only to look after exhibit work in general but also to do more or less along the line of Publicity and Promotion, in which work I co-operated under the instruction of the General Secretary and the Executive Committee and with the chief of the Department of Publicity and Promotion.In this way I visited the governors commissioners and other officers, who were co-operating in one way or another with the Exposition, and did what I could to stimulate them in their work.Exact results from work of this kind are almost impossible to present, but in general it may be said that whatever states were visited and the officials thoroughly informed as to just what was actually being done prepatory to the exposition, there was a noticeable increase of interest thereafter, due to the fact of their having definite knowledge.In this way it seems likely that all such visits were productive of much more than enough good to pay for their cost.

In closing, permit me to extend my thanks to you, who as chief of the department of Exhibits, always supported my work in that way which makes it easy and withal a pleasure to carry it on.

Yours very truly,

(Signed.)F.W. Taylor

Supt. BureausAgriculture, Horticulture Etc.

BUREAUS OF LIVE STOCK, DIARY PRODUCTS AND PET ANIMALS.

John B. Dinsmore, Superintendent.

C.H. Elmendorf, Asst. in Live Stock.

S.C. Bassett, Asst. in Dairy Products.

J. Llewellyn, Asst. in Poultry.

Live Stock Bureau.

The Exposition Management when considering the subject of awards to be made in the Bureaus of Live Stock and Dairy Products planned to depart from the usual custom of Expositions, State Fairs and other exhibitors and in place of making awards of cash prizes and ribbons decided to award trophies, gold, silver and bronze medals and diplomas and plans for this exhibition were made upon this basis.This decision did not meet with the approval of the live stock interests of the country and upon their urgent request and solicitation the plans were, later, changed.The Board of Directors determined that cash prizes with the usual accompanying ribbons should be offered to the amount of $35,000 and new rules and classifications were prepared, providing for distribution of said amount of money in prizes in the various classes of live stock.

The report of Mr. Dinsmore in charge of the Department of live stock, is as follows:

E.E. Bruce, Manager Exhibits Dept.

Dear Sir:

I beg leave to submit the following reports of the various divisions of exhibits under my charge.The Superintendent of the Department of Live Stock, Poultry and Dairy being appointed June 25th, 1897, the work of organizing and preparing the exhibits of these several departments was taken in hand at once by notifying the live stock, poultry and dairy organs of the appointment and the intended scope of the exhibit, and the probable total premiums that would be awarded.This was at once followed up by thousands of circular letters forwarded to the principal breeders of live stock and poultry throughout the United States and Canada, asking their co-operation in the enterprise of the live stock, poultry and dairy exhibit, and a promise that, as soon as prepared the premium list, rules and regulations would be forwarded for their guidance and government.After consulting with persons of large experience in connection with the live stock shows of the country, rules and regulations were formulated, presented to the executive committee and by them approved.It contemplated the distribution of $35,000 in cash premiums in the live stock and poultry department.The premium list showing the classification and the amount of money offered to each breed of stock was forwarded as widely as our knowledge of the breeders extended, and authority was given through the press that contemplated exhibitors or others interested would be furnished copies of the premium list upon application either to Mr. E. E. Bruce, Manager of the department of exhibits, or to J. B. Dinsmore, Superintendent of the department of live stock, poultry and dairy.These premium lists were forwarded very generally throughout the United States and Canada, and in some instances being sent upon request to parties in Mexico.

In the preparation of the department and the spreading of the information as to its scope, and making acquaintance with the exhibitors in the field at the various state fairs, your commissioner visited the Minnesota State Fair at Hamlin, Minnesota also that of Iowa held at Des Moines and the Nebraska State Fair at Omaha, making personal acquaintances among the exhibitors that he had not heretofore met, and urged upon them the benefits to be derived by attending the Trans-Mississippi Exposition with the products of their herds and flocks. He also attended the national Live Stock Convention at Denver, in January, 1898, also the National Dairy Mens' Association held at Topeka Kansas, in February, 1898.These several visits entailed the expenditure of considerable time and money but the results obtained are believed to have fully justified the expenditure of time and money.

In the Live Stock Department Mr. C. H. Elmendorf of Lincoln, Nebraska was selected as assistant Superintendent in August, 1898, assuming his duties at once and proved a most efficient and valuable assistant.I desire to return my thanks to him for the painstaking care displayed and the thoroughness of his preparation of the department and especially that portion of it relating to the preparation of the official catalogue.

Special rules, information and premium lists were prepared, published and circulated generally among the live stock interests of the country.A copy of the rules in brief is given below, together with a list of the exhibitors of live stock and also a list of the prize winners in each of the classes.

SPECIAL RULES AND INFORMATION OF BUREAU OF LIVE STOCK

1.The exhibition of Livestock will open September 19th and close October 20th, 1898 and will comprise the following divisions:

A,-- Cattle

B,-- Horses, Jacks, Jennets and Mules.

C,-- Sheep

D,-- Swine

E,-- Fat Stock

F,-- Poultry

2.The dates for exhibits of the various Divisions are as follows:

Divisions A, B, C, and D, Monday, October 3rd to Saturday, October 20th, 1898, inclusive.

Division F, Monday September 19th to Friday September 30th, 1898, inclusive.

Division E, Monday October 13th to Saturday October 20th, 1898, inclusive.

3.Entries will close in the several divisions of the Live Stock Bureau as follows:

Division A, August 10th, 1898

Division B, August 10th, 1898

Division C, August 10th, 1898

Division D, August 10th, 1898

Division E, August 15th, 1898

Division F, AUgust 10th, 1898

4.In Divisions A, B, C, D and E, exhibitors will be restricted to two entries in each section, i.e. two one-year-olds two 2-year-olds, etc.

5.All the animals must be on the grounds of the Exposition not later than the opening date mentioned in Rule 2 of the division in which they belong, and must remain on the grounds until the closing date for the exhibit in such division, unless special permission in writing is granted by the manager of the department for their removal prior to such date.

6.For the convenience of exhibitors, arrangements will be made to receive animals in each division three (3) days before the opening date of such division.

7.Ages of animals offered for entry must be computed to the following dates:

Cattle, Wednesday, August 10th, 1898.

Horses, Wednesday, August 10th, 1898.

Sheep, Wednesday, August 10th, 1898.

Swine, Wednesday, August 10th, 1898.

Fat Stock, Wednesday, August 10th, 1898.

8.Exhibitors must in each case file an application showing that they have owned the animal offered for entry for a period of at least thirty days prior to the date for the close of entries in the division to which said animal belongs, giving the name, age, sex and description of the animal, and must furnish in accordance with the rules governing entries in said Division, a copy of the certificate of registration issued by the association, signed by the secretary and under the seal of said Association, in whose registry such animal is registered, or evidence, satisfactory to the manager of the department, that the animal offered for entry is a representative of a recognized breed for which there is not established record, and in Divisions E and F such evidence and information as required therein, provided that the names, ages, sex, etc. of animals composing herd, pens, collections, etc., may be submitted ten days previous to the date fixed for judging the classes to which such animals belongs.

9.In addition to the provisions of Rule 8, all applications for entry of animals from foreign countries will be subject to the quarantine regulations of the United States Department of Agriculture.

10.Evidence satisfactory to the manager of the Department of Exhibits must be submitted,

(a)That stallions five years old or over have sired a live foal within two years immediately preceding September 1st, 1898; that mares five years old or over have produced a live foal within two years immediately preceding September 1, 1898.(Animals in classes 21, 22 and 37 excepted from the operation of this rule.)

(b)That bulls four years old or over have sired a live calf within two years immediately preceding September 1st, 1898; that cows four years old or over have produced a live calf within two years immediately preceding September 1st, 1898.

(c)That rams three years old or over have sired a live lamb within two years immediately preceding September 1, 1898; that ewes three years old or over have produced a live lamb within two years immediately preceding September 1, 1898.

(d)That boars two years old or over have sired live pigs within two years immediately preceding September 1, 1898; that sows two years old or over have produced live pigs within two years immediately preceding September 1, 1898.

11.Should any exhibitor misrepresent any material fact required, or attempt to perpetrate a fraud upon the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition Association authorities, he will thereby forfeit all rights as an exhibitor, and the animal or animals entered by him will be excluded from the grounds.

12.In addition to the exhibits provided for in rule 1, the Manager of the Department of Exhibits is authorized to admit for exhibition, but not for competition or award, animals which, in his opinion, possess sufficient merit, interest or utility to entitle them to admission to an International Exhibition.

13.The Manager of the Department of Exhibits is authorized to create classes in addition to those enumerated in the premium list when, in his judgment, the interest of the Exposition will be advanced thereby.Animals entered in such additional classes will have the right to compete for such premiums as the manager of the Department of Exhibits may designate at the time the classes are formed.

14.The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition being open to the world, it is important that in the exhibits provided for by rule 1 only the best animals of their kind be exhibited.For this reason the manager of the Department of Exhibits has authority, if, in his opinion, any animal offered for admission is not a typical representative of its kind, to exclude the same from the grounds of the exposition.

15.The manager of the Department of Exhibits is authorized to order the removal of vicious or fractious animals from the grounds.

16.Exhibitors will be required to furnish necessary attendants, who will be subject to the Rules and Regulations governing employees of the Bureau of Live Stock.In case of failure on the part of any attendant to obey said rules and Regulations, the exhibitor agrees to discharge him, upon the request of the Manager of the Department.

17.The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition will provide accommodations for such exhibits of Livestock as may be accepted by the Department of Exhibits.All stalls and pens will be regularly numbered; corresponding numbers on labels will be furnished exhibitors, and no animal will be allowed to pass from its stall or pen without having its proper number attached.

18.Exhibitors will be required to keep the stalls occupied by their exhibits and the grounds adjacent thereto thoroughly clean, in accordance with the stable and ground regulations to be hereafter issued by the Manager of the Department of Exhibits.Failure to comply with these regulations will subject the exhibit to peremptory removal from the Exposition grounds.

19.The manager will appoint a veterinary surgeon and such other assistants as may be necessary.The veterinary surgeon shall cause all animals to be examined before their admission to the grounds, as a safeguard against infectious or contagious diseases, and shall make inspection of the grounds, stables, stalls and pens and make report in writing to the manager of the Department of Exhibits of the condition in which said grounds, stables, stalls and pens are kept.In case of sickness of any animals, the same shall be removed, when ordered by the manager of the department to a separate enclosure, where the exhibitor may either direct the treatment of the animal himself, or employ the veterinary surgeon appointed for the Bureau of Live Stock, for whose services and other necessary expenses incurred, a reasonable charge will be made by the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.The right is reserved to the Manager of the Department to order the peremptory removal from the grounds of any animal to which this rule applies.

20.Ample facilities will be provided for the distribution of water throughout the grounds.

21.Forage, grain and bedding will be furnished at reasonable prices, at depots conveniently located within the grounds, or may be purchased outside and brought onto the grounds under regulations to be prescribed by the manager.

22.Animals will be exhibited for award in the arena provided for this purpose, subject to such special regulations as the Manager of the Department of Exhibits may deem necessary.

23.In awarding premiums in Divisions A, B, C, D and E experts will judge all animals taking part in each section, placing them in order of their relative superiority; beginning with the first, they will number all such animals consecutively, and report to the manager of the department the number given each animal in such competition, and also the regular number assigned to such animal on the register of the Live Stock Bureau.Premiums will be paid in accordance with the numbering so returned by the judge; i.e. 1st, 2nd 3rd, certificate of Highly Commended and Certificate of Commended will be issued for animals rated next in order of merit to those to which premiums are awarded. In the event of expulsion or disqualification of an animal after such numbering, its rating will be expunged form the record and the subsequent numbers of competing animals will be correspondingly advanced.

24.In case of doubt by a judge acting under authority of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, as to any fact required by the Rules of the Live Stock Bureau in connection with the entry of an animal for competition, satisfactory proof in writing must be furnished by an exhibitor within a specified time (to be named by said Judge) unless the doubt exists as to the age of an animal, in which case an examination shall be made by the veterinary surgeon; and should his report be that the age has not been correctly stated, or should the evidence submitted by an exhibitor in answer to the inquiry of the Judge be unsatisfactory, the said animal shall be barred from competing in the Live Stock Bureau.

25.No appeal from the decision of any judge, acting under authority of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, will be entertained; awards so made will be final.

26.Protests must be made in writing, and filed with the manager of the department of Exhibits before the close of the period assigned for the exhibit in the division to which the animal protested belongs.

27.Numbers alone will be used to designate stock on the Exposition grounds prior to the award of premiums.

28.No animals will be admitted from districts of the United States from which the shipment of such animals on account of infectious or contagious diseases, is prohibited by the regulations of the United States Department of Agriculture or the regulations of the state of Nebraska in force during the period of the Exposition.

29.In the event of death of any animal entered for competition, or such disability as in the opinion of the Manager of the Department of Exhibits disqualifies such animal for exhibition.The Manager of the Department of Exhibits may authorize the substitution of another animal, provided that such substitute was in all respects eligible at the date of filing of the original application.

30.The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition will not be responsible for any injury to or for the death of any animal.

31.An official catalogue will be issued by the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.

32.In addition to the foregoing rules exhibitors in each divisions will be subject to the general rules as well as to the special rules and regulations governing such divisions found herein or hereafter made public.

33.Animals that have been in attendance at state or county fairs and are detained in transit, will be admitted at the grounds as late as 8 a.m. October 6th, 1898, Provided, the same were entered in proper season.

34.Blank applications may be obtained by addressing E. E. Bruce, Manager Department of Exhibits, Omaha, Nebraska, or J. B. Dinsmore, Superintendent Bureau of Live Stock, Dairy and Poultry, Omaha, Nebraska.

35.The right is reserved to add to, interpret, change or amend the foregoing rules, as the interest of the Exposition may demand.

36.Successful exhibitors may, at their option, in writing receive Diploma for Gold, Silver or Bronze Medal in lieu of cash prizes, for first, second or third premiums.Notice of such election being filed with the commissioner in charge not later than October 20, 1898.

37.There will be a charge for stalls of 50 cents per foot, linear measure, for space occupied by cattle and horses.There will be a charge for swine and sheep 30 cents per linear foot.Pens will be eight feet wide on alley and seven feet deep.

There will be a terminal charge of $5.00 on each car of stock, each way, that is, in and out.

DIVISION A

A copy of the certificate showing registration in one of the recognized standard breed associations, signed by the Secretary, over the seal of the Association publishing the same, must accompany each application for the entry of cattle of the following breeds:

Short Horns; Herefords; Aberdeen Angus; Galloway; Devon; Jersey; Holstein-Frieseian; Ayrshire; Guernsey; Red-Polled; Polled Durham; Dutch Belted; Brown Swiss.

In class "A" Cattle, barns were occupied by exhibitors as follows.

Iowa Agriculture College,Ames, Iowa.Barn 22.

Albert Harrah, Newton, Iowa.""

H. F. Brown Minneapolis, Minn."22

G. E. WardHawarden, Iowa."23

Chas. C. NortonCorning, Iowa. "23

T. R. Westrope & Sons Harlan, Iowa."23

Thomas Andrews & Sons Cambridge, Nebraska "24

John Cresswell,Bonaparte, Iowa"24

W. P. HarnedBuncetown, Mo. "24

Beam & BogertColumbus Grove, Ohio, "24

E. E. Day,Weeping Water"24

Geo. H. Adams, Crestone, Colorado. "25

C. G. Comstock Albany, Mo. "25

Peter MouwOrange City, Iowa."25

O. S. Cross Emporia, Kansas"26

Clem Graves Bunker Hill, Ind."26

F. A. Nave, Attica, Ind."26

Gudgell, & SimpsonIndependence, Mo."27

Z. T. KinsellMt. Ayr, Iowa"27

C. H. ElmendorfLincoln, Nebr. "27

Jas. FunkhouserPlattsmouth, Mo. "28

Stanton Breeding Farm Stanton, Nebr. "28

Cornish & Patten Osborne, Mo."28

Scott & March, Belton, Mo. "28

Wm. S. van natta & Son.Fowler, Ind."29

Steward & HutcheonGreenwood, Mo. "29

T. F. B. SothamChillicothe, Mo. "29

John Evans & Son Emerson, Iowa. "30

Chas. Escher & Sons Botna, Iowa "30

S. R. PierceCreston, Illinois"31

Dewitt N. Syford Lincoln, Nebraska"31

A. C. Binne Alta, Iowa"31

W. A. McHenryDenison, Iowa"32

W. H. McAllister Joy, Nebraska"32

Edward Paul Dundee, Minn."32

J. F. Davis & SonTriumph, Illinois,"33

John Hudson,Moweaqua, Illinois, "33

Michael Hilgert, St. Joseph, Mo."37

R. D. ButtonCottons, New York"37

Miller & SibleyFranklin, Penn."37

James B. DukeSomerville, New Jersey"38

Geo. C. Hill & SonRosendale, Wis."39

H. C. Glissman Omaha, Nebraska"40

Henry Stevens & SonsLaconia, New York"40

H. C. Young Lincoln, Nebraska"40

I. W. Chappell Normal, Nebraska "40

L. E. Williams Glenwood, Iowa "40

John C. DoubtUniversity Place, Nebr."41

W. B. BarneyHampton, Iowa"41

S. McKelvie Fairfield, Nebraska "42

S. A. Converse Cresco, Iowa"42

Nixon & McLaughlinAuburn, Nebraska "43

E. M. BartonHinsdale, Illinois"43

J. W. MartinRichland City, Wis. "43

Division A,-Cattle

Premiums awarded exhibitors in this Division of exhibits as follows:

CLASS A

DIVISION B. HORSES.

Driving horses may be shown to pole, in harness or by the halter at the option of exhibitor.A copy of the certificate showing registration in one of the recognized standard stud books, signed by the secretary over the seal of the association publishing the same, must accompany each application for the entry of horses of the following breeds.

Standard Bred; Thoroughbred; French Coach; Oldenburg, Trakenhen, Hanoverian and Holstein Coach.Cleveland Bay; Percheron; Clydesdale; Shire; French Draft; Belgian; Suffolk Punch; Hackney; Morgan; French Trotters; Saddle Horses; Jacks and Jennets; Shetland Ponies; Other Breeds.

Application for the entry of horses of breeds other than those mentioned above must be accompanied by the information required by Rules 8 and 9.

In Division "B" Horses, the following exhibitors were present:

Frank IamsSt. Paul, Neb.Barn 1

Iowa Agricultural CollegeAmes, Iowa "1

Robert Burgess & Sons Wenona, Illinois"2

Mark M. CoadFremont, Nebraska "3

E. M. BartonHinsdale, Illinois"3

McLaughlin, BrothersColumbus, Ohio"4

Wm. McLaughlin """4

N. P. ClarkeSt. Cloud, Minn."4

Peter HopleyLewis, Iowa"5

W. L. DeclowCedar Rapids, Iowa"5

Thomas Andrews & SonCambridge, Neb. "5

Lefebrue & SonsFairfax, Iowa"5

MULES, JACKS AND JENNETS.

C. G. Comstock Albany, Mo.Barn 5

W. L. DeclowCedar Rapids, Iowa"6

Geo. E. Morris Genoa Bluffs, Iowa"6

J. H. McAllister Joy, Nebraska"6

The display of horses was very fine in quality and fully up in point of numbers to what had been expected prior to the closing of entries.The small number of horses shown is accounted for in this way; owing to the great depression in the horse and mule industry and the dispersionof many of the valuable studs, owing to the financial difficulties extending back to 1893, 1894 and 1895.

Awards were made for horses exhibited in this division of exhibits as next below stated.

Class I. STANDARD TROTTERS.

F. M. Whelchel, Judge

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00 C. G. Comstock, Albany, Mo.

STALLION ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 C. G. Comstock, Albany, Mo.

Class II. THOROUGHBRED.

No entries were made in this Class.

Class III. FRENCH COACH.

F. M. Whelchel, Judge.

STALLION FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

2nd " $12.00 E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

STALLION THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 McLaughlin Bros., Columbus, Ohio

2nd " $12.00""" "

3rd " $ 8.00 Wm. McLaughlin," "

4th """ " "

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 McLaughlin Bros, Columbus, Ohio

STALLION UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premiun $12.00 E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

2nd " $ 8.00 """""

MARE FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

3rd " $ 8.00 E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

MARE THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

MARE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 "" """

MARE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

MARE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

2nd " $ 8.00 "" """

STALLION ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 McLaughlin Bros., Columbus, Ohio

2nd " $12.00""""

3rd " $ 8.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

4th " E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

5th " "" """

MARE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

2nd " $12.00 E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

3rd " $ 8.00 "" """

4th " "" """

5th " Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

COLLECTION.

1st Premium $18.00 E. M. Barton, Hinsdale, Ill.

Class IV. OLDENBURG, HANOVARIAN, TRAKEHNEN AND HOLSTEUN COACH.

F. M. Whelchel, Judge.

STALLION FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark, St. Cloud, Minn.

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

MARE FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

STALLION ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark, St. Cloud, Minn.

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

MARE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

Class V. CLEVELAND BAY.

F. M. Whelchel, Judge.

STALLION THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 McLaughlin Bros., Columbus, Ohio

STALLION ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 McLaughlin Bros., Columbus, Ohio

Class VI. PERCHERON.

Joseph Watson, Judge.

STALLION FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

3rd " $ 8.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

4th " Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

5th " Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

STALLION THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 """" "

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 McLaughlin Bros., Columbia, Ohio

3rd " $ 8.00 Iowa Agricultural College, Ames, Ia.

4th " McLaughlin Bros.

STALLION ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $10.00 " """ "

3rd " $ 7.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

STALLION UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $ 8.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

STALLION AND THREE OF HIS COLTS, EITHER SEX, UNDER FOUR YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & SOn, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

MARE FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess, St. Paul, Neb.

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

3rd " $ 8.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

4th " "" " " "

MARE THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

2nd " $12.00 Robert BUrgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

MARE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

MARE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

MARE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

2nd " $ 8.00 "" " " "

MARE AND TWO OF HER COLTS, EITHER SEX.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

STALLION ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 """ ""

3rd " $ 8.00 """ ""

4th " """ ""

5th " Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

MARE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 """ ""

3rd " $ 8.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

4th " R. Burgess & Son

5th " Mark M. Coad

COLLECTION.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 Mark M. Coad, Fremont, Neb.

Class VII. CLYDESDALE.

Joseph Watson, Judge.

STALLION FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark, St. Cloud, Minn.

2nd " $12.00 "" "" " "

STALLION THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark, St. Cloud, Minn.

2nd " $12.00 "" "" ""

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark, St. Cloud, Minn.

2nd " $12.00 "" "" ""

STALLION ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 C. E. Clark, St. Cloud, Minn.

2nd " $10.00 "" "" ""

MARE FOUR OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark,

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams

MARE THREE AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark

2nd " $12.00 "" "

MARE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark

MARE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 C. E. Clark

MARE AND TWO OF HER COLTS, EITHER SEX.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark

STALLION ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark "The Abbott"

2nd " $12.00 """ "Senator"

3rd " $ 8.00 """ "Prince Mahomet"

4th " """"Prince McGregor"

MARE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark "Prince Zenda"

2nd " $12.00 """ "Lady Darnley"

3rd " $ 8.00 """ "Luther Maid"

4th " """"Princess Louise"

5th " Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

COLLECTION.

1st Premium $18.00 C. E. Clark, St. Cloud, Minn.

Class VII. SHIRE.

Jos. Watson, Judge.

STALLION FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Wenona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 """ ""

STALLION THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son.

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Wenona, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 """ ""

STALLION ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 Robert Burgess & Son

2nd " $10.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

3rd " $ 7.00 Robert Burgess & Son.

STALLION UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 Robert Burgess & Son

STALLION AND THREE OF HIS COLTS, EITHER SEX, UNDER FOUR YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son

2nd " $12.00 """

MARE FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

MARE THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR

1st Premium $18.00 Frank Iams, St. Paul, Neb.

STALLION ANY AGE

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Wenona, Ill."Hawkston"

2nd " $12.00 " "" " ""Sparkle"

3rd " $ 8.00 " "" " " "Gen Miles"

4th " " "" " ""America"

5th " " "" " ""Jim Cahill"

MARE ANY AGE

1st Premium $18.00 Frank Iams

2nd " $12.00 " "

Class IX. FRENCH DRAFT

John Watson, Judge

STALLION FOUR YEARS OR OVER

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams

3rd " $ 8.00""

STALLION THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams

3rd " $ 8.00" "

STALLION ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO

1st Premium $15.00 Robert Burgess & Son

2nd " $10.00 Frank Iams

MARE FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams

MARE UNDER ONE YEAR.

2nd Premium $ 8.00 R. Burgess & Son

MARE AND TWO OF HER COLTS, EITHER SEX

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams

STALLION, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son "McKinley 2nd "

2nd " $12.00 """"Bruce"

3rd " $ 8.00 Frank Iams "James Banker"

4th " " ""Black Ball"

5th " Robert Burgess"Tom"

MARE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son

2nd " $12.00 Frank Iams

Class X. BELGIAN.

Joseph Watson, Judge.

STALLION FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebure Sr., Fairfax, Ia.

2nd " $12.00 " "" " "

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebure, Sr.

STALLION ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $15.00 E. Lefebure, Sr.

STALLION UNDER ONE YEAR.

2nd Premium $ 8.00 E. Lefebure, Sr.

STALLION AND THREE OF HIS COLTS UNDER FOUR YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebure, Sr.

MARE FOUR OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebure, Sr.

2nd " $12.00 " ""

MARE THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebure, Sr.

MARE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebure, Sr.

2nd " $12.00 " ""

MARE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $18.00 None awarded

2nd " $12.00 E. Lefebure

MARE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 E. Lefebrue, Sr.

MARE AND TWO OF HER COLTS, EITHER SEX.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebrue, Sr.

2nd " $12.00 " ""

STALLION ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebrue, Sr.

2nd " $12.00 " ""

MARE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebrue, Sr.

2nd " $12.00 " ""

3rd " $ 8.00 " ""

COLLECTION.

1st Premium $18.00 E. Lefebrue, Sr.

Class XI. SUFFOLK PUNCH.

Joseph Watson, Judge.

STALLION FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley, Lewis, Ia."Blazer"

2nd " $12.00 " " """Bell Boy"

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley "Ben Bolt"

STALLION ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 Peter Hopley."Jimmy"

2nd " $10.00 " ""Bob Burgees"

STALLION UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $15.00 Peter Hopley"McKinley"

STALLION AND THREE OF HIS COLTS, EITHER SEX, UNDER FOUR YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley"Blazer"

2nd " $12.00 " ""Bell Boy"

MARE FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley"Smart"

MARE THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley"Jessie"

2nd " $12.00 " ""Alice"

MARE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley"Dora"

2nd " $12.00 " ""Lucy"

MARE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 Peter Hopley"Mary"

MARE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 Peter Hopley"Juno"

MARE AND TWO OF HER COLTS, EITHER SEX.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley"Smart"

2nd " $12.00 " ""Lucy"

STALLION ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley"Blazer"

2nd " $12.00 " ""Bell Boy"

3rd " $ 8.00 " ""Ben Bolt"

4th " ""Jimmie"

5th " " ""Bob Burgees"

MARE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley"Jessie"

2nd " $12.00 " ""Dora"

3rd " $ 8.00 " ""Juno"

4th " " ""Smart"

5th " " ""Mary"

COLLECTION.

1st Premium $18.00 Peter Hopley"Ben Bolt"

Class XII. HACKNEY.

F. M. Wehlchel, Judge.

STALLION FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son, Winona, Ill.

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son.

STALLION ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 Robert Burgess & Son.

STALLION UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 Robert Burgess & Son.

STALLION AND THERE OF HIS COLTS, EITHER SEX, UNDER FOUR YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son.

MARE FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son.

MARE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 Robert Burgess & Son.

MARE AND TWO OF HER COLTS, EITHER SEX.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son.

STALLION, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son."Index"

2nd " $12.00 """ "Specialty"

3rd " $ 8.00 """ "Syntax"

4th " """ "Hobson"

MARE, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Burgess & Son."Flirt"

2nd " $12.00 """ "Black Queen"

Class XII. MORGAN.

No entries in this Class.

Class XIV. SADDLE HORSES.

No awards were made in this Class.

Class XV. SHETLAND PONIES.

C. F. Curtis, Judge.

STALLION TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $10.00 Thomas Andrews & Son, Cambridge, Neb.

MARE FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $10.00 Thomas Andrews & Son.

STALLION, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $10.00 Thomas Andrews & Son.

2nd " $ 7.00 """

MARE, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $10.00 Thomas Andrews & Son.

Class XVI. JACKS AND JENNETS.

N. H. Gentry, Judge.

JACK FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 Chas. G. Comstock, Albany, Mo.

2nd " $12.00 W. L. Declow, Cedar Rapids, Ia.

3rd " $ 8.00 """ "" "

JACK THREE YEARS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $18.00 W. L. Declow, Cedar Rapids, Ia.

JACK TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $18.00 C. G. Comstock

2nd " $12.00 W. L. Declow

3rd " $ 8.00 """

JACK ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 James H. McAllister, Joy, Neb.

JENNET FOUR YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00 W. L. Declow, Cedar Rapids, Ia.

JACK, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 C. G. Comstock, Albany, Mo.

2nd " $12.00 "" """

3rd " $ 8.00 W. L. Declow.

4th " """

Special Class. MULES.

N. H. Gentry, Judge.

No unsound mule will be permitted in this class.

Mules 5 years old or over to be eligible to entry must be not less than 16 hands high.

Mules four years old and under five to be eligible to entry must be not less than 15 hands high.

MULES ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 George E. Morse, Genoa Bluffs, Ia.

2nd " $10.00 " " " "" "

PAIR OF MULES UNDER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 George E. Morse, Genoa Bluffs, Ia.

DIVISION C.--SHEEP.

A copy of the certificate showing registration in one of the recognized standard flock books, signed by the secretary, over the seal of the association publishing the same, must accompany each application for the entry of sheep of the following breeds.

Shropshire; Southdown; Oxford; Hampshire; Cotswold; Leisester; Lincoln; Cheviot; Dorset Horn; American Merino; Delaine Merino; French Merino; Other breeds.

Applications for the entry of sheep of breeds other than those mentioned above must be accompanied by the information required by rules 8 and 9.

Sheep offered for admission under an entry must be accompanied by a sworn statement giving date of shearing, which for sheep exhibited from the United States and Canada, must not be earlier than April 1st, 1898.Experts of award will exclude from competition all sheep which in their opinion, have been improperly sheared, or have been so well clipped as to conceal natural defects or whose fleeces have been artificially colored, singed or oiled.

Unimproved Sheep.

Entries may be made of specimens of unimproved types of sheep which, in the opinion of the Superintendent of the Department of Live Stock possess historic or other interest to visitors.Sheep entered in this class will not be allowed to compete for premiums but may be viewed and referred to in the official report of the expert of awards.

In Division "C" Sheep, the following exhibitors were present and quartered in barns as follows:

George Harding & Sons Wauhesha, Wis.Barn 45

R. Miller Brougham, Ont. Canada"45

C. H. BallingerLexington, Neb. "45

W. J. WatsonCastlederg, Ont. Canada"44

Geo. McKerrowSussex, Wis. "44

J. R. Stone Stonington, Ill."46

Robt. TaylorAbbott, Nebraska"46

Geo. AllenAllerton, Illinois"47

Ed Wineland Avoca, Iowa"47

John Milton Marshall, Michigan"48

E. D. KingBurlington, Kan "48

Thomas TaylorWaynesville, Ill. "48

A. T. GamberColumbus, Ohio"48

A. C. Williams Church, Michigan"48

Chas. CookCyrus, Nebraska "48

A. A. Bates Irwin, Ohio"49

Blakely & Co.Grinnell, Ia."49

J. N. GrauAsherville, Kan."49

Dwight Lincoln Milford Center, Ohio Barn 49

W. G. Hughes & Co.Hastings, Texas "49

C. Hoover Borelus, Neb."49

Premiums awarded exhibitors in this Division of exhibits, as follows:

Class I. COTSWOLD.

John A. Craig, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Prize $15.00(15797)George Harding & Son, Waukesha, Wis.

2nd " $12.00(7833)"" " ""

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(11817)Geo. Harding & Son, Waukesha, Wis.

2nd " $12.00(16092)" "" ""

3rd " $ 8.00(14584)R. Miller, Brougham, Ont.

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(217) Geo. Harding & Son, Waukesha.

2nd " $12.00(16085)

3rd " $ 8.00(15148)Albert J. Watson, Castleberg, Ont.

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(16206)A. J. Watson, Castleberg, Ont.

2nd " $ 8.00(16205)"" "" "

3rd " $ 5.00(16172)Geo. Harding & Son.

4th "" ""

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00(8666)A. J. Watson.

2nd " $12.00(11278)Geo. Harding & Son.

3rd " $ 8.00(3047)A. J. Watson

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(15734)Geo. Harding & Son.

2nd " $12.00(15143)A. J. Watson

3rd " $ 8.00(15142)"" "

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(64)Geo. Harding & Son.

2nd " $12.00(15152)" ""

3rd " $ 8.00(982) A. J. Watson

4th "(15144)"" "

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(16209)A. J. Watson.

2nd " $ 8.00(16180)Geo. Harding & Son.

3rd " $ 5.00(16208)A. J. Watson

4th "(16179)Geo. Harding & Son.

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. Harding & Son.

2nd " $12.00" ""

3rd " $ 8.00" ""

4th "" ""

PEN OF FIVE EWES, TWO YEARS OR OVER, BREED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 George Harding & Son, Waukesha, Wis.

2nd " $12.00"""""

PEN TWO RAMS, 3 EWES UNDER TWO YEARS BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 George Harding & Son.

2nd " $12.00 " ""

RAM OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(217)1yr.George Harding & Son

2nd " $12.00(11817) 2yr.George Harding & Son

3rd " $ 8.00(16085) 1yr.George Harding & Son

4th "(16206) lambA. J. Watson.

EWE OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(15734)George Harding & Son.

2nd " $12.00(64)" ""

3rd " $ 8.00(16209)A. J. Watson

4th "(15143)

5th "(903) George Harding & Son.

Class II. LEICHESTER.

John A. Craig, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OLD OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 No awards in this Class.

RAM TWO YEARS OLD AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium(1890)Robert Taylor, Abbott, Neb.

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(2564)Robert Taylor, Abbott, Neb.

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(1929)Robert Taylor, Abbott, Neb.

2nd " $10.00(1932) """"

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(2558)Robert Taylor

2nd " $ 8.00(2557) " "

RAM AND THREE EWES ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $12.00 Robert Taylor.

RAM OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(1890)Robert Taylor

2nd " $12.00(2564)""

EWE OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(1929)Robert Taylor

2nd " $12.00(2558)" "

3rd " $ 9.00(1932)" "

Class III. LINCOLN.

John A. Craig, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00(1861)Gibson & Walker, Denfield, Ont.

2nd " $12.00(1742)William Oliver, Avon Bank, Ont.

3rd " $ 8.00(2202) """" "

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(2405)Gibson & Walker, Denfield, Ont.

2nd " $12.00(2945) """ "

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(3318)Gibson & Walker

2nd " $12.00(4402) ""

3rd " $ 8.00(3292)William Oliver

4th "(3288) ""

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(4976)Gibson & Walker

2nd " $ 8.00(4592) ""

3rd " $ 5.00(4573) William Oliver

4th "(4572) " "

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00(20)Gibson & Walker

2nd " $12.00(1728)William Oliver

3rd " $ 8.00(2258)Gibson & Walker

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(2412)William Oliver.

2nd " $12.00(3649)Gibson & Walker.

3rd " $ 8.00(2452)William Oliver.

4th "(4421)Gibson & Walker.

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(3205)Gibson & Walker

2nd " $12.00(37E)""

3rd " $ 8.00(4036)William Oliver

4th "(3299) ""

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(4597)Gibson & Walker

2nd " $ 8.00(4594) ""

3rd " $ 5.00(4576) William Oliver

4th "(234E) ""

RAM AND THREE EWES ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 Gibson & Walker

2nd " $12.00 William Oliver.

PEN OF FIVE EWES TWO Y EARS OR OVER, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 Gibson & Walker

2nd " $12.00 William Oliver.

PEN, TWO RAMS 3 EWES UNDER TWO, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 Gibson & Walker

2nd " $12.00 William Oliver

3rd " $ 8.00 Gibson & Walker

RAMS OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(1876)Gibson & Walker

2nd " $12.00(1742)William Oliver

3rd " $ 8.00(2405)Gibson & Walker

4th "(3318) ""

EWE OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(3205)Gibson & Walker

2nd " $12.00(37E)""

3rd " $ 9.00(2412)William Oliver

4th "(2452)Gibson & Walker

5th "(20E)""

Class IV. SOUTHDOWN.

John A. Craig, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00(8957)George McKerrow, Sussex, Wis.

2nd " $12.00(7369) """"

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(11445)George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00(9224) ""

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(11446) George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00(10165)""

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(11451)George McKerrow

2nd " $ 8.00(11139)""

3rd " $ 5.00(11455)""

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00(8938)George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00(7156) ""

3rd " $ 8.00(9191) ""

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(14)Eng.George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00(855) Eng." "

3rd " $ 8.00(869) Eng." "

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(11447)George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00(11152)""

3rd " $ 8.00(11160)""

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(41448)George McKerrow

2nd " $ 8.00(11452)""

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 George McKerrow

ns"$12.00 ""

PEN OF FIVE EWES, TWO YEARS OR OVER, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 George McKerrow

PEN

1st Premium $18.00 George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00 ""

RAM OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(11445)George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00(11446)""

3rd " $ 9.00(8957) ""

EWE OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(11447)George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00(8938) ""

3rd " $ 9.00(14)E""

Class V. SHROPSHIRE.

John A. Craig, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00(93259)George Allen, Allerton, Ill.

2nd " $12.00(78295)C. H. Ballinger, Lexington, Neb.

3rd " $ 8.00(98857)Ed Wineland, Avoca, Ia.

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(10036)C. H. Ballinger, Lexington, Neb.

2nd " $12.00(89999)George Allen, Allerton, Ill.

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(114799) George Allen

2nd " $12.00(114792) ""

3rd " $ 8.00(100045) C. H. Ballinger

4th "(3801)"""

5th "(105195) Ed Wineland, Avoca, Ia.

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(835) George Allen

2nd " $ 8.00(3809)C. H. Ballinger

3rd " $ 5.00(114234) George Allen

4th "(114299) C. H. Ballinger

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

3rd Premium $15.00(993) C. H. Ballinger

4th " $12.00(93259)George Allen

(93268)George Allen

(90533)C. H. Ballinger

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(99274)George Allen

2nd " $12.00(99275)C. H. Ballinger

3rd " $ 8.00(99273)"" "

4th "(90513)Ed Wineland

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(167)EC. H. Ballinger

2nd " $12.00(114802) George Allen

3rd " $ 8.00(114801) ""

4th "(100047) C. H. Ballinger

5th "(111278) Ed Wineland

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(792) George Allen, Allerton, Ill.

2nd " $ 8.00(3814)C. H. Ballinger

3rd " $ 5.00(3813)"" "

5th "(114238) George Allen

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 George Allen

2nd " $12.00 C. H. Ballinger

PEN, TWO RAMS AND THREE EWES, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 C. H. Ballinger

2nd " $12.00 George Allen

3rd " $ 8.00 Ed Wineland

RAM OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 George Allen

2nd " $12.00 ""

3rd " $ 9.00 ""

4th " C. H. Ballinger

EWE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(167) C. H. Ballinger

2nd " $12.00(792) George Allen

3rd " $ 9.00(99274)" "

4th "(661)" "

5th "(993) C. H. Ballinger

Class VI. OXFORD.

John A. Craig, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00(12641)George McKerrow.

2nd " $12.00(9922) ""

3rd " $ 8.00(13626)Ed Wineland

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(14887)R. J. Stone, Stonington, Ill.

2nd " $12.00(15231)George McKerrow

3rd " $ 8.00(14081)""

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(326)ER. J. Stone, Stonington, Ill.

2nd " $12.00(16332)George McKerrow

3rd " $ 8.00(16328)Ed Wineland

4th "(13776)George McKerrow

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(No. 6)R. J. Stone

2nd " $ 8.00(16334)George McKerrow

3rd " $ 5.00(16226)R. J. Stone

4th "(No.99)George McKerrow

5th "(16240)Ed Wineland

EWE THREE YEARS AND OVER.

1st Premium $15.00(188) George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00(9621) ""

3rd " $ 8.00(7161)R. J. Stone

4th "(12508)Ed Wineland

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(63E) R. J. Stone

2nd " $12.00(12564)George McKerrow

3rd " $ 8.00 ""

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(482E)R. J. Stone

2nd " $12.00(15233)George McKerrow

3rd " $ 8.00(16330)Ed Wineland

4th "(104E)R. J. Stone

5th "(16329)Ed Wineland

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(33)R. J. Stone

2nd " $ 8.00(16339)George McKerrow

3rd " $ 5.00(16220)R. J. Stone

4th "(16416)George McKerrow

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00 R. J. Stone

3rd " $ 8.00 George McKerrow

PEN FIVE EWES TWO YEARS OR OVER, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 George McKerrow

PEN TWO RAMS AND THREE EWES, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 George McKerrow

2nd " $12.00 R. J. Stone

3rd " $ 9.00 George McKerrow

RAM OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(329E)R. J. Stone

2nd " $12.00(12641)George McKerrow

3rd " $ 9.00(14887)R. J. Stone

4th "12.00(16332)George McKerrow

5th "(16334)""

EWE OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(482E)R. J. Stone

2nd " $12.00(63E) "" "

3rd " $ 9.00(33E) "" "

4th "(15233)George McKerrow

5th "(12564) ""

Class VII. HAMPSHIRE.

John A. Craig, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $18.00(1367)Robert Taylor, Abbott, Neb.

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(407E)John Milton, Marshall, Mich.

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.1st Premium $15.00(1697)Robert

Taylor, Abbott, Neb.

2nd " $12.00(1698) """"

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(12E) John Milton

2nd " $ 8.00(1872)Robert Taylor

3rd " $ 5.00(1870) " "

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00(411) John Milton

2nd " $12.00(1703)Robert Taylor

3rd " $ 8.00(1706) " "

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $15.00(106,"Milton")John Milton

2nd " $12.00(119,"Milton") ""

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00(4329)Robert Taylor

2nd " $12.00(4307) " "

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(412) John Milton

2nd " $ 8.00(4531)Robert Taylor

3rd " $ 5.00(4532) " "

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $18.00 John Milton

2nd " $12.00 Robert Taylor

PEN TWO RAMS, THREE EWES, UNDER TWO YEARS, BRED BY EXHIBTOR.

1st Premium $18.00 Robert Taylor

2nd " $12.00""

RAM OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(105) John Milton

2nd " $12.00(12)""

3rd " $ 9.00(1872)Robert Taylor

4th "(1697)" "

5th "(1367)" "

EWE OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00(106) John Milton

2nd " $12.00(411) ""

3rd " $ 9.00(4329)Robert Taylor

4th "(412) John Milton

5th "(1703)Robert Taylor

Class VIII. MERINO.

Geo. W. Hervey, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00"Chance" E. D. King, Burlington, Kan.

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00 "All Wool"199E. D. King

2nd " $ 8.00 "Logan""""

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00(712) E. D. King

2nd " $ 8.00(720) """

3rd " $ 5.00(948) Thomas Taylor, Waynesville, Ill.

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(835) E. D. King

2nd " $ 7.00(852) """

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00(444) Thomas Taylor

2nd " $ 8.00(503) E. D. King

3rd " $ 5.00(505) """

EWES, TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00(403) E. D. King

2nd " $ 8.00(1063)"""

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00(601) E. D. King

2nd " $ 8.00(771) """

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(810) E. D. King

2nd " $ 7.00(812) """

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $15.00(900) E. D. King

2nd " $12.00(199) """

PEN FIVE EWES, TWO YEARS OR OVER, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $15.00 E. D. King

PEN TWO RAMS AND THREE EWES, UNDER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $15.00 (710-712) E. D. King

2nd " $12.00 (722-725) """

RAM OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00(900 "Chance") E. D. King

2nd " $12.00(718)"""

3rd " $ 9.00(199 "All Wool") E. D. King

4th "(948)Thomas Taylor

EWE OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00(601) E. D. King

2nd " $12.00(403) """

3rd " $ 9.00(771) """

4th "(446) Thomas Taylor

5th "(503) E. D. King

Class IX. MERINO (B).

G. W. Hervey, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00"Quality" 197 E. D. King

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00"Longfellow" 778 E. D. King

2nd " $ 8.00"Prince" 938Thomas Taylor

3rd " $ 5.00(268)E. D. King

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00(189)E. D. King

2nd " $ 8.00(957)Thomas Taylor

3rd " $ 5.00"Big Bill" 949""

4th ""Dick" 724E. D. King

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(221)E. T. Gamber, Wakeman, Ohio

2nd " $ 7.00(850)E. D. King

3rd " $ 4.00(851)"""

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00(282)E. D. King

2nd " $ 8.00(446)Thomas Taylor

3rd " $ 5.00(528)E. D. King

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00(180)A. T. Gamber

2nd " $ 8.00(654)E. D. King

3rd " $ 5.00(663)"""

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00(220)E. D. King

2nd " $ 8.00(391)"""

3rd " $ 5.00(935)Thomas Taylor

4th "(931)" "

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00(811)E. D. King

2nd " $ 7.00(814)"""

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $15.00"Model"E. D. King

2nd " $12.00"Longfellow""""

PEN OF FIVE EWES, TWO YEARS OR OVER, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $15.00 E. D. King

PEN OF TWO RAMS AND THREE EWES UNDER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $15.00(949-957)Thomas Taylor

2nd " $12.00(716-724)E. D. King

3rd " $ 9.00(731-746)"""

RAM OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00"Longfellow"E. D. King

2nd " $12.00(121)A. T. Gamber

3rd " $ 9.00(938)Thomas Taylor4th "

(189)E. D. King

5th "(957)Thomas Taylor

EWE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00(282)E. D. King

2nd " $12.00(446)Thomas Taylor

3rd " $ 9.00(180)A. T. Gamber

4th "(220)E. D. King

5th "(663)"""

Class X. DELAINE MERINO.

G. W. Hervey, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 A. T. Gamber, Wakeman, Ohio.

RAM TWO YUEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00 J. N. Grau, Asherville, Kan.

2nd " $ 8.00 A. T. Gamber

3rd " $ 5.00 E. D. King, Burlington, Kan.

4th " Blakely & Co., Grinnell, Ia.

5th """" '

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $ 8.00 "" "

3rd " $ 5.00 Blakely & Co.

4th """

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $10.00 "" "

3rd " $ 4.00 Blakely & Co.

4th """

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $ 8.00 "" "

3rd " $ 5.00 Blakely & Co.

4th " ""

5th " E. D. King

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $ 8.00 "" "

3rd " $ 5.00 Blakely & Co.

4th " ""

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $ 8.00 "" "

3rd " $ 5.00 Blakely & Co.

4th " ""

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $ 7.00 "" "

3rd " $ 4.00 J. N. Grau

4th " Blakely & Co.

5th " J. N. Grau

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $15.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $12.00 Blakely & Co.

3rd " $ 9.00 ""

PEN OF FIVE EWES, TWO YEARS OR OVER, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $15.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $12.00 Blakely & Co.

PEN OF TWO RAMS AND THREE EWES.

1st Premium $15.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $12.00 Blakely & Co.

3rd " $ 9.00""

RAM ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $12.00 J. N. Grau

3rd " $ 9.00 """

4th " """

5th " """

EWE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 A. T. Gamber

2nd " $12.00 "" "

3rd " $ 9.00 "" "

4th " "" "

5th " "" "

Class XI. FRENCH MERINO.

G. W. Hervey, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 Dwight Lincoln, Milford Center, Ohio.

2nd " $ 8.00 Charles Cook, Cyrus, Ohio

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00 A. A. Bates, Irwin, Ohio

2nd " $ 8.00 Charles Cook

3rd " $ 5.00 ""

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 A. A. Bates

2nd " $ 8.00 """

3rd " $ 5.00 Dwight Lincoln

4th " ""

5th " E. D. King

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 Dwight Lincoln

2nd " $ 7.00 A. A. Bates

3rd " $ 5.00 """

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 A. A. Bates

2nd " $ 8.00 """

3rd " $ 5.00 Dwight Lincoln

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00 Dwight Lincoln

2nd " $ 8.00 A. A. Bates

3rd " $ 5.00 Dwight Lincoln

4th " A. A. Bates

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 A. A. Bates

2nd " $ 8.00 """

3rd " $ 5.00 Dwight Lincoln

4th " ""

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 Dwight Lincoln

2nd " $ 7.00 A. A. Bates

3rd " $ 4.00 """

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $15.00 Dwight Lincoln

2nd " $12.00 A. A. Bates

PEN OF FIVE EWES 2 YEARS OR OVER, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $15.00 A. A. Bates

2nd " $12.00 Dwight Lincoln

PEN TWO RAMS AND THRE EWES

1st Premium $15.00 A. A. Bates

2nd " $12.00 Dwight Lincoln

3rd " $ 9.00 A. A. Bates

RAM ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 A. A. Bates

2nd " $12.00 Dwight Lincoln

3rd " $ 9.00 ""

4th " C. Cook, Cyrus, Nebr.

EWE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 A. A. Bates

2nd " $12.00 Dwight Lincoln

3rd " $ 9.00 A. A. Bates

4th " Dwight Lincoln

Class XII. DORSET HORN.

John A. Craig, Judge.

RAM THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant, Allamuchy, N.J.

RAM TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

RAM ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

2nd " $ 8.00 " "

RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

2nd " $ 7.00 " "

EWE THREE YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

2nd " $ 8.00 " "

EWE TWO YEARS AND UNDER THREE.

1st Premium $12.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

EWE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

2nd " $ 8.00 " "

EWE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

2nd " $ 7.00 " "

RAM AND THREE EWES, ALL OVER TWO YEARS.

1st Premium $15.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

PEN TWO RAMS AND THREE EWES, UNDER TWO YEARS, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $15.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

RAM ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

2nd " $12.00 " "

EWE ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 Rutherford Stuyvesant

2nd " $12.00 " "

Class XIII. CHEVIOT.

No awards in this Class.

Class XIV. ANGORA GOATS.

BUCK TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 W. G. Hughes & Co., Hastings, Tex.

2nd " $ 8.00 C. Hover & Co., Boelus, Neb.

3rd " $ 5.00 W. G. Hughes & Co.,

BUCK ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 C. Hover & Co.

2nd " $ 8.00 W. G. Hughes & Co.

3rd " $ 5.00 "" ""

BUCK UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 W. G. Hughes & Co.

2nd "$ 7.00 C. Hover

3rd "$ 4.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

DOE TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 C. Hover & Co.

2nd "$ 8.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

3rd "$ 5.00 " " ""

DOE ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

2nd "$ 8.00 C. Hover & Co.

3rd "$ 5.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

DOE UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

2nd "$ 7.00 " " ""

3rd "$ 4.00 C. Hover & Co.

PEN OF TWO BUCKS AND THREE DOES, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $15.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

2nd "$12.00 C. Hover & Co.

3rd "$ 9.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

BUCK OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 C. Hover & Co.

2nd "$12.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

3rd "$ 9.00 C. Hover & Co.

4th "W.G. Hughes & Co.

5th "" " ""

DOE OF ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 C. Hover & Co.

2nd "$12.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

3rd "$ 9.00 W.G. Hughes & Co.

4th "" " ""

5th "C. Hover & Co.

Class XV. CASHMERE GOATS.

No awards in this class.

DIVISION E.--FAT STOCK.

Class I. COTSWOLD.

J.E. Sanders, Judge.

WETHER ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 George Harding & Son.

2nd "$ 8.00 " "

CLASS SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $13.00 George Harding & Son.

2nd "$ 9.00 " "

Class II. LEICESTER.

No awards made on this class.

Class III. LINCOLN.

T.E. Sanders, Judge.

WETHER ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 Gibson & Walker

2nd "$ 8.00""

WETHER UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 Gibson & Walker

2nd "$ 7.00""

WETHER CROSS BRED OR GRADE, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $12.00 Gibson & Walker

2nd "$ 8.l00 ""

CLASS SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $13.00 Gibson & Walker

2nd "$ 9.00 " "

3rd "$ 6.00 " "

SWEEPSTAKES FOR LONG WOOLS.

1st Premium $25.00 Gibson & Walker

2nd "$15.00 George Harding & Son

Class IV. SOUTHDOWN.

T.E. Sanders, Judge.

WETHER TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 George McKerrow

2nd "$ 8.00 George McKerrow, Sussex, Wis.

WETHER ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 George McKerrow

2nd "$ 8.00 ""

WETHER UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 George McKerrow

2nd "$ 7.00 ""

CLASS SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $13.00 George McKerrow

2nd "$ 9.00 ""

3rd "$ 6.00 ""

Class V. SHROPSHIRE.

T.E. Sanders, Judge.

WETHER TWO YEARS OLD OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 George Allen, Allerton, Ill.

2nd "" "

WETHER ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium George Allen.

WETHER UNDER ONE YEAR OLD.

1st Premium $10.00 George Allen.

WETHER, CROSS BRED OR GRADE, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $12.00 George McKerrow.

2nd Premium $ 8.00 " "

CLASS SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $13.00 George Allen.

2nd "$ 9.00 " "

3rd "$ 6.00 George McKerrow

4th "George Allen.

Class VI. HAMPSHIRE.

T.E. Sanders, Judge.

WETHER TWO YEARS OLD OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 John Milton, Marshall ,Mich.

WETHER ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 John Milton

CLASS SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $13.00 John Milton

2nd "$ 9.00 ""

Class VII.OXFORD.

T.E. Sanders, Judge.

WETHER TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $12.00 Richard J. Stone, Stonington, Ill.

2nd "$ 8.00 George McKerrow

WETHER ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $12.00 George McKerrow

2nd "$ 8.00 Richard J. Stone

3rd "$ 5.00""

WETHER UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 Richard J. Stone.

2nd "$ 7.00""

WETHER CROSS BRED OR GRADE.

1st Premium $12.00 George McKerrow.

CLASS SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $13.00 R.J. Stone

2nd "$ 9.00 George McKerrow

3rd "$ 6.00 " "

4th "R.J. Stone

Class VIII. DORSET HORN.

No awards were made in this class.

Class IX. CHEVIOT.

T.E. Sanders, Judge.

SWEEPSTAKES FOR MIDDLE WOOLS.

1st Premium $12.00 George Allen, Allerton, Ill.

2nd "$ 8.00 R.J. Stone, Stonington, Ill.

3rd "$ 6.00 George McKerrow, Sussex, Wis.

Class X. ALL MERINOS.

T.E. Sanders, Judge.

WETHER TWO YEARS OLD OR OVER.

1st Premium $10.00 Thomas Taylor, Waynesville, Ill.

2nd "$ 8.00 A.A. Bates, Irwin, Ohio.

WETHER ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $10.00 Thomas Taylor.

WETHER UNDER ONE YEAR OLD.

1st Premium $10.00 Thomas Taylor.

CLASS SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $12.00 A.A. Bates

2nd "$ 8.00 ""

Class XI. ANIMALS NOT ELIGIBLE TO ANY OF THE FOREGOING CLASSES.

T.E. Sanders, Judge.

WETHER TWO YEAR OLD OR OVER.

1st Premium $10.00 George McKerrow

2nd "$ 8.00""

WETHER ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $10.00 George McKerrow.

WETHER UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 George McKerrow.

CLASS SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $12.00 George McKerrow

2nd "$ 8.00 George McKerrow

3rd "$ 6.00 George McKerrow

Class XII. GRAND SWEEPSTAKES.

T.E. Sanders, Judge.

GRAND SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $30.00 George Allen, Allerton, Ill.

2nd "$20.00 R.J. Stone, Stonington, Ill.

3rd "$15.00 George McKerrow.

SPECIAL PREMIUMS.

Special Premiums were offered by the Union Stock Yards of South Omaha, aggregating $ under which awards were made as follows:

COTSWOLD T.E. SANDERS, Judge.

COTSWOLD.

1st Premium $15.00 A.J. Watson, Castleberg, Ont.

2nd "$10.00 George Harding & Son, Waukesha, Wis.

3rd "$ 5.00 A.J. Watson

LEISTERSHIRDS.

1st Premium $15.00 Robert Taylor, Abbott, Nebr.

2nd "$10.00""

3rd "$ 5.00""

LINCOLN.

1st Premium $15.00 Gibson & Walker, Denfield, Ont.

2nd "$10.00""

3rd "$ 5.00""

SOUTHDOWNS.

1st Premium $12.50 George McKerrow, Sussex, Wis.

2nd "$10.00 " "

3rd "$ 5.00 " "

OXFORD.

1st Premium $12.50 R.J. Stone, Stonington, Ill.

2nd "$10.00 George McKerrow

3rd$ 5.00 R.J. Stone

SHROPSHIRE.

1st Premium $12.50 George Allen, Allerton, Ill.

2nd "$10.00 " "

3rd "$ 5.00 George McKerrow

HAMPSHIRE.

1st Premium $12.50 John Milton, Marshall,Mich.

2nd "$10.00 ""

3rd "$ 5.00 Robert Taylor, Abbott, Nebr.

THE AMERICAN SHROPSHIRE REGISTRY ASSOCIATION, Mortimer Levering, Secretary, offered special prizes, aggregating $525.00 under which awards were made as follows:

JOHN F. THOMPSON, Judge

BEST FLOCK, ONE RAM AND THREE EWES, ONE YEAR OLD OR OVER.

1st Premium $50.00, Ram 10043, Ewe 10048C.H. Ballinger

Ewe 10047Ewe 10052Lexington, Neb.

BEST FLOCK, FOUR LAMBS, ONE RAM, THREE EWE LAMBSM.

1st Premium $50.00, Ram 720(114234) Ewe 722(114236) Geo. Allen

Ewe 792(114247) Ewe 794(114247)

BEST RAM TWO YEARS OLD OR OVER.

1st Premium $25.00 221(9359) George Allen

BEST RAM ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $25.00 827. George Allen.

BEST RAM UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $25.00 835George Allen.

BEST EWE TWO YEARS OLD OR OVER.

1st Premium $25.00 3513A(99274)George Allen.

BEST EWE ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $25.00 667 English George Allen.

BEST EWE UNDER ONE YEAR OLD.

1ST Premium $25.00 (114245)George Allen.

GRAND SWEEPSTAKES, RAM OF SHOW IF SHROPSHIRE.

No award.

BEST WETHER ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 518(100063) George Allen.

2nd "520(100065)""

BEST WETHER UNDER ONE YEAR OLD.

1st Premium $15.00 725(114239) George Allen.

BEST WETHER SIRED BY SHROPSHIRE RAM, UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $10.00 1847 George McKerrow

2nd " $5.001846 " "

THE AMERICAN OXFORD DOWNRECORD ASSOCIATION, W. A. Shafer, Secretary, offered special premiums aggregating $300.00 under which awards were made as follows:

John A. Craig, Judge

RAM TWO YEARS OLD OR OVER.1st Premium $15.00 9922

George McKerrow

2nd " $10.00 13626Ed Wineland, Avoca, Ia.

RAM ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 16213Richard J. Stone

2nd " $10.00 16211""

RAM LAMB.

1st Premium $15.00 15903George McKerrow

2nd " $10.00 16226Richard J. Stone

EWE TWO YEARS OLD OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 12564George McKerrow

2nd "$10.00 9621 " "

EWE ONE YEAR OLD AND UNDER TWO

1stPremium$15.00 15237George McKerrow

2nd "$10.00 15833""

EWE LAMB.

1st Premium $15.00 16220Richard J. Stone

2nd " $10.00 16461George McKerrow

FLOCK, RAM AND THREE EWES, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $15.00 Ram 15903, Ewe 15832 George McKerrow

Ewe 1622, Ewe 16215

2nd " $10.00 Ram 15903, Ewe 15832 Richard J. Stone

Ewe 15237, Ewe 15833

PEN FOUR LAMBS EITHER SEX.

1st Premium $15.00 Ram 16522, Ewe 16452 George McKerrow

Ram 15903, Ewe 16461

2nd " $10.00 Ram 16223, Ewe 16221 Richard J. Stone

Ram 16226, Ewe 16220

BEST OXFORD RAM, ANY AGE.

1st Premium $25.00 329E R. J. Stone

BEST OXFORD EWE, ANY AGE

1st Premium $25.00 482E R. J. Stone

THE HAPSHIRE DOWN BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, John I. Gordon, Mercer, Pa. Secretary and Treasurer, offered special premiums aggregating $150.00 under which awards were made as follows:

JOHN A. CRAIG, JUDGE

RAM ONE YEAR AND NOT TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 1697 Robert Taylor, Abbott Ne.

2nd " $10.00 1698" ""

RAM LAMB.

1st Premium $15.00 1872 Robert Taylor

2nd " $10.00 1870""

EWE ONE YEAR AND NOT TWO.1st Premium $15.00 4329

Robert Taylor

2nd " $10.00 4307 " "

EWE LAMB.

1st Premium $15.00 4531 Robert Taylor

2nd " $10.00 4532 " "

THE AMERICAN COTSWOLD RECORD, Geo. Harding & Son, Secretaries and Treasurers, Waukesha, Wis. offered special premiums aggregating $300.00 but no awards were made in this class.

DIVISION D. - SWINE

A copy of the certificate showing registration in one of the recognized standard record books, signed by the secretary, over the sealof the association publishing the same, must accompany each applicationfor the entry of swine of the following breeds:

Berkshire; Poland China: Chester White; Small Yorkshire; DurocJersey; Essex; Cheshire; Victoria; English Breeds.Other Breeds.

Applications for the entry of swine of breeds other than those mentioned above must be accompanied by the information required by rules8 and 9.

In Division D, swine the following exhibitors were present with exhibits quartered in Exhibit barns as below noted.

BERKSHIRE.

Reuben GentryDanville, Ky.Barn 8

Harris & McMahan La Mine, Mo.7

Ida H. Haworth New Sharon, Iowa 7

Caldwell C. NortonLouisville, Ky.8

John B. Thompson Plattsburg, Mo.7

POLAND CHINA.

A. W. AlbertsonInwood, IowaBarn 14

C. H. Beethe & SonElk Creek, Neb.11

John Blaine Pawnee City, Neb.11

Dawson Bros.Endicott, Neb. 12

Davis & Chrysler Wilber, Neb. 9

M. P. Goode Lenexa, Kan.15

P. J. GossardFriend, Neb.11

C. GloeClinton, Iowa14

A. J. HullNorton, Mo. 16

Hoover & HarrissonOskaloosa, Ia. 13

C. E. Hutcheon Bellaire, Kansas 15

W. P. HaxlettMaitland, Mo.16

Harvey Johnson Logan, Ia.10

Kirkpatrick & SonConner, Kansas 15

J. A. Lytle Oskaloosa, Ia. 13

Jacob Mandelbaum Blue Hill, Neb.Barn9

C. F. Marshall Montoe, Iowa14

Peter MouwOrange City, Iowa13L. Maasdam & Son Pella, Iowa 13

S. McKelvie Fairfield, Neb.10

F. M. McDiarmidCumberland, Iowa 14

John O'Connell Malcolm, Nebr. 12

J. F. PorterGlen Elder, Kan. 15

F. D. RiskWeston, Mo. 16

Risk & Gabbert Weston, Mo. 16

Richey Bros.St. Charles, Iowa14

Jacob SniderEldon, Iowa9

H. C. SimsSmith Center, Kan.15

Thomas StephensonFifield, Iowa13

W. G. Tittsworth Avoca, Ia.14

Wm. S. Uhe & SonsPapillion, Neb.12

J. H. Van BurenQuimby, Iowa14

J. R. Watts Omaha, Nebr.11

W. N. Winn & Son Kansas City, Mo. 15

Wiley & Hoadly Smithton, Mo.16

DUROC JERSEY SWINE.

John Henderson Panora, Ill 19

H. B. Louden & SonClay Center, Neb.17

Jesse McCartyBellevue, Nebr 17

V. M. Richmond Normal, Nebraska 17

Roberts & SonPaton, Iowa 18

C. H. SearleEdgar, Nebraska17

W. C. Shinn Burchard, Nebr.17

Wm. H. Taylor & Son Lincoln, Nebr. 18

Geo. W. GroneRushville, Ill 19

Orrie WalterLebanon, Ohio18

CHESTER WHITE SWINE.

Wm. M. Gilmore Fairbury, Nebr.19

John M. KetchamLove Lake Mo.20

Jas. A. LoughridgeSigourney, Iowa20

Vanderslice Bros.Cheney, Nebr.20

B. W. BarneyBloomingdale, Ind.19

SMALL YORKSHIRES.

Bascom & McMurrayCalifornia, Mich.36

Fred B. StewartEspyville, Penn. 21

Reuben M. WollcottArcher, Nebr.35

ESSEX.

A. C. Green Winchester, Ind. 36

L. E. Maham Malcolm, Nebr. 20

CHESHIRE.

R. D. ButtonCottons, N.Y.Barn 21

OTHER DISTINCT BREEDS.

J. E. Brethour Buford, Ont. Canada 36

A. C. Green & SonWinchester, Ind. 36

Premiums were awarded exhibitors in this Divixion of Exhibits as follows:

Class I. Berkshire.

W. E. Spicer, Judge.

BOAR TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $20.00 Columnbia's Duke Reuben Gentry

2nd " $15.00 Wood Dale Star IIIReuben Gentry

3rd " $12.00 Sunnyside Duke IIHarris & McMahan

4th " FavoriteJ. W. Townley

5th " Commander John B. Thompson

BOAR ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $20.00 Up-to-DateReuben Gentry

2nd " $15.00 Lucile's DukeReuben Gentry

3rd " $12.00 Seven Oaks Baron Mrs. Ida Haworth

4th " SenatorJohn B. Thompson

BOAR 6 MO AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $20.00 Eli ChadwickReuben Gentry

2nd " $15.00 Longfellow's Grandon Mrs. Ida Haworth

3rd " $12.00 Sunnyside Duke IIIHarris & McMahan

4th " Tack John B. Thompson

5th " Jack""

BOAR UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $20.00 Manley John B. Thompson

2nd " $15.00 Sunnyside Model II Harris & McMahan

3rd " $12.00 Sunnyside Model Harris & McMahan

4th " Majestic's Grandson Mrs. Ida Haworth

SOW TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $20.00 Nora C Reuben Gentry

2nd " $15.00 Royal Beauty 86Harris & McMahan

3rd " $12.00 Model Beauty IIJ. W. Townley

4th " Royal Queen J. B. Thompson

5th " Royal Queen's Sister""

SOW ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $20.00 Artful BelleHarris & McMahan

2nd " $15.00 Sallie Lee IV" "

3rd " $12.00 Charmer Reuben Gentry

4th " Oaks Majestic Mrs. Ida Haworth

5th " Romford's Beauty John B. Thompson

SOW SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $20.00 Virginia Lady II Reuben Gentry

2nd " $15.00 Alma John B. Thompson

3rd " $12.00 Virginia Lady III Reuben Gentry

4th " Artfull Belle J. W. Townley

5th " Stumpy Girl Harris & McMahan

SOW UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $20.00 Etta RomfordJohn B. Thompson

2nd " $15.00 Pearl Harcourt Reuben Gentry

3rd " $12.00 Model LadyHarris & McMahan

4th " Barron's Granddaughter Mrs. I. Haworth

5th " Model Beauty J. W. Townely

BOAR AND THREE SOWS OVER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $20.00 Reuben Gentry, Danville, Ky.

2nd " $15.00 Harris & McMahan, La Mine, Mo.

3rd " $12.00 John B. Thompson, Plattsburg, Mo.

4th "Mrs. Ida H. Haworth, New Sharon, Ia.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $20.00 Harris & McMahan

2nd " $15.00 Reuben Gentry

3rd " $12.00 John B. Thompson

4th " J. W. Townley

5th " John B. Thompson

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $20.00 Reuben Gentry

2nd " $15.00 John B. Thompson

3rd " $12.00 Harris & McMahan

4th " Mrs. Ida H. Haworth

5th " John B. Thompson

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR, BRED BY EXHIBITORM.

1st Premium $20.00 Reuben Gentry

2nd " $15.00 John B. Thompson

3rd " $12.00 Harris & McMahan

4th " Mrs. Ida H. Haworth

5th " John B. Thompson

FOUR SWINE GET OF THE SAME BOAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $20.00 J. W. Townley

2nd " $15.00 Harris & McMahan

3rd " $12.00 John B. Thompson

4th " Harris & McMahan

5th " John B. Thompson

FOUR PIGS UNDER SIX MONTHS, PRODUCE OF SAME SOW.

1st Premium $20.00 Harris & McMahan

2nd " $15.00 Mrs. Ida Haworth

3rd " $12.00 John B. Thompson

BOAR ANY AGE.

1st Premium $25.00 Columbia's DukeReuben Gentry

2nd " $20.00 Up-to-DateReuben Gentry

3rd " $12.00 Sunnyside Duke II Harris & McMahan

4th " Favorite J. W. Townley

5th " ManvyJohn B. Thompson

SOW ANY AGE.

1st Premium $25.00 Nora C Reuben Gentry

2nd " $20.00 Artful BelleHarris & McMahan

3rd " $12.00 Royal Beauty 86""

4th " Model Beauty IIJ. W. Townley

5th " Virginia Lady II Reuben Gentry

BOAR ANY AGE, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 Sunnyside Duke IIHarris & McMahan

2nd " $20.00 FavoriteJ. W. Townley

3rd " $12.00 Commander John B. Thompson

4th " Eli ChadwickReuben Gentry

5th " Lucile's DukeReuben Gentry

SOW ANY AGE, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 Sallie Lee IVHarris & McMahan

2nd " $20.00 Sallie Lee V ""

3rd " $12.00 Model Beauty IIJ. W. Townley

4th " Royal Queen John B. Thompson

5th " Model Beauty III J. W. Townley

Class II. Poland China.

F. M. Lail, Judge.

BOAR TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $20.00 Johnson McKelvoe & Son, Fairfield, Ne.

2nd " $15.00 Thomas Stephenson, Fifield, Ia.

3rd " $12.00 Risk & Gabbert, Weston, Mo.

4th " Hoover & Harrison, Oskaloosa, Ia.

5th " A. W. Alberton & Son, inwood, Ia.

BOAR ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $20.00 W. A. Winn & Son, Kansas City, Mo.

2nd " $15.00 Risk & Gabbert, Weston, Mo.

3rd " $12.00 Jacob Mandlebaum, Blue Hill, Neb.

4th " A. J. Lytle, Oskaloosa, Ia.

5th " Dawson Bros & Co., Endicott, Neb.

BOAR SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 D. F. Risk, Weston, Mom.

2nd " $12.00 John Blaine, Pawnee City, Neb.

3rd " $ 8.00 E. H. Andrews, Kearney, Neb.

4th " John Blaine, Pawnee City, Neb.

5th " Rick & Gabbert

BOAR UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $15.00 H. G. Sims, Smith Center, Kan.

2nd " $10.00 Risk & Gabbert, Weston, Mo.

3rd " $ 7.00 Dawson Bros. & Co., Endicott, Neb.

4th " F. M. McDairmied, Cumberland, Ia.

5th " Hoover & Harrison

SOW TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $20.00 Dawson Bros & Co.

2nd " $15.00 Risk & Gabbert

3rd " $12.00 A. J. Lytle, Oskaloosa, Ia.

4th " John O'Connell, Maloom, Ne.

5th " C. H. Beethe, Elk Creek, Neb.

SOW ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $20.00Lady Beauty I Know Risk & Gabbert

2nd " $15.00Chief's Princess D. R. Risk

3rd " $12.00Black Beauty 6Risk & Gabbert

4th "Best QualityD. F. Risk

5th "Lady Corwin W. G. Tittsworth

SOW SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 325Harvey Johnson, Logan, Ia.

2nd " $12.00 Etta TecumsehA. S. Cook, Wichita, Kan.

3rd " $ 8.00 601D. F. Risk

4th " 581Risk & Gabbert

5th " 428A. J. Lytle, Oskaloosa, Ia.

SOW UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $15.00 W.W.: Winn & Son, Kan. City, Mo.

2nd " $10.00 Frilby Jacob Mandellbau, Blue Hill, Neb.

3rd " $ 7.00 5890 Risk & Gabbert

4th " 481Hoover & harrison, Oskaloosa, Ia.

5th " 607D. F. Risk

BOAR AND THREE SOWS OVER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $25.00 Risk & Gabbert

2nd " $20.00 D. F. Risk

3rd " $12.00 Dawson Bros. & Co.

4th " A. J. Irwin, Wichita, Kan.

5th " C. M. Irwin, Wichita, Kan.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 Risk & Gabbert

2nd " $20.00 D. F. Risk

3rd " $12.00 Dawson Bros. & Co.

4th " A. J. Lytle

5th " G. F. Marshall, Monroe, Ia.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $25.00 Risk & Gabbert

2nd " $20.00 A. J. Lytle

3rd " $12.00 G. F. Marshall, Conner, Kan.

4th " Hoover & harrison, Oskaloose, Ia.

5th " A. S. Cook, Wichita, Kan.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS, UNDER ONE YEAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 Risk & Gabbert

2nd " $20.00 A. J. Lytle

3rd " $12.00 G. F. Marshall

4th " Hoover & Harrison

5th " A. S. Cook

FOUR SWINE THE GET OF ONE BOAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 Risk & Gabbert

2nd " $20.00 A. J. Lytle

3rd " $12.00 Hoover & Harrison

4th " G. F. Marshall

5th " F. M. McDiarmied

FOUR PIGS UNDER SIX MONTHS, PRODUCE OF SAME SOW.

1st Premium $20.00 Hoover & Harrison

2nd " $15.00 Harvey Johnson, Logan, Ia.

3rd " $12.00 F. M. McDiarmied

4th " W. N. Winn & Son, Kansas City, Mo.

5th " Dawson Bros. & Co.

BOAR ANY AGE.

1st Premium $20.00 W. N. Winn & Son

2nd " $15.00 Johnson McKelvie & Son

3rd " $12.00 Thomas Stephenson, Fifield, Ia.

4th " Risk & Gabbert

5th " H. G. Sims, Smith Center, Kan.

SOW ANY AGE.

1st Premium $25.00 587Risk & Gabbert

2nd " $15.00 605D. F. Risk

3rd " $12.00 407Dawson Bros. & Co.

4th " 589Risk & Gabbert

5th " 325Harvey Johnson

BOAR ANY AGE, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 Risk & Gabbert

2nd " $20.00 D. F. Risk

3rd " $12.00 John Blaine, Pawnee City, Neb.

SOW ANY AGE BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 587Risk & Gabbert

2nd " $20.00 605D. F. Risk

3rd " $12.00Viola 2ndDawson Bros. & Co.

4th " 589Risk & Gabbert

5th " 325Harvey Johnson

Class III. CHESTER WHITE.

N. H. Gentry, Judge.

BOAR TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 746Geo. W. Trone, Rushville, Ill.

2nd " $12.00 805John Ketcham, Love Lake, Mo.

3rd " $ 8.00 747Geo. W. Trone

BOAR ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 813Vanderslice Brothers, Cheney, Neb.

BOAR SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 784Jas. A. Loughridge, Sigourney, Ia.

2nd " $ 8.00 Wm. M. Gilmore, Fairbury, Neb.

3rd " $ 5.00 818Vanderslice Bros.

BOAR UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 792Jas. A. Loughridge

2nd " $ 7.00 793"""

3rd " $ 4.00 806John W. Ketcham

4th " 807 "" "

5th " 817Vanderslice Bros.

SOW TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 748George W. Trone

2nd " $12.00 827Vanderslice Bros.

3rd " $ 8.00 809John W. Ketcham

4th " 778Jas. A. Loughridge

5th " 810John W. Ketcham

SOW ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 742Geo. W. Trone

2nd " $12.00 744"" "

3rd " $ 8.00 814Vanderslice Bros.

4th " 779Jas. A. Loughridge

SOW SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 783James A. Loughridge

2nd " $ 8.00 780 "" "

3rd " $ 5.00 822Vanderslice Bros.

4th " 823 " "

SOW UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 786Jas. A. Loughridge

2nd " $ 7.00 785"""

3rd " $ 4.00 812John W. Ketcham

4th " 808 "" "

5th " 819Vanderslice Bros.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS OVER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 746Geo. W. Trone

2nd " $12.00 805John W. Ketcham

3rd " $ 9.00 813Vanderslice Bros.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 747Geo. W. Trone

2nd " $12.00 805John W. Ketcham

3rd " $ 9.00 792Jas. A. Loughridge

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 792Jas. A. Loughridge

2nd " $12.00 818Vanderslice Bros.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 793Jas. A. Loughridge

2nd " $12.00 792"""

3rd " $ 9.00 818Vanderslice Bros.

4 SWINE, GET OF SAME BOAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 Vanderslice Bros.

2nd " $12.00 Geo. W. Trone

3rd " $ 9.00 James A. Loughridge

4th " John W. Ketcham

FOUR PIGS UNDER SIX MONTHS, PRODUCE OF SAME SOW.

1st Premium $15.00 James A. Loughridge

2nd " $12.00 """

3rd " $ 8.00 John W. Ketcham

Class IV. DUROC JERSEY.

N. H. Gentry, Judge.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 H. A. Louden, Clay Center, Neb.

2nd " $20.00 C. H. Searle, Edgar, Neb.

3rd " $12.00 W. H. Taylor & Sons, Lincoln, Neb.

4th " Wm. Roberts & Son, Paton, Ia.

5th " John Henderson, Penora, Iowa.

BOAR TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $20.00 Wm. Roberts & Son, Paton, Ia.

2nd " $15.00 John Henderson, Panora, Ia.

3rd " $12.00 W. H. Taylor & Sons, Lincoln, Neb.

4th " Orrie Walter, Lebanen, Ohio.

BOAR ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $20.00Ak Sar BenC. H. Searle, Edgar, Neb.

2nd " $15.00 George W. Trone, Rushville, Ill.

3rd " $12.00 C. H. Searle, Edgar, Neb.

4th " Wm. Roberts & Son, Paton, Ia.

5th " John Henderson, Panora, Ia.

BOAR SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE.

1st Premium $18.00OlympusC. H. Searle, Edgar, Neb.

2nd " $12.00Chancelor"" "

3rd " $ 8.00 Orrie Walter, Lebanon, Ohio

4th " John Henderson, Panora, Ia.

5th " Wm. H. Taylor & Sons, Lincoln

BOAR UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $15.00 Hugh A. Louden & Son, Clay Center

2nd " $10.00 W. Roberts & Son, Paton, Ia.

3rd " $ 7.00 S. D. Roush, Grand Island, Neb.

4th " Wm. H. Taylor & Sons, Lincoln, Ne.

5th " C. H. Searle, Edgar, Neb.

SOW TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $20.00 Dot 3rdWm. Roberts & Son2nd "

$15.00" ""

3rd " $12.00 Geo. W. Trone

4th "Combination C. H. Searle

5th " Wm. H. Taylor & Son

SOW ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $20.00Pansy GirlsGeo. W. Trone, Rushville

2nd " $15.00Our ChoiceC.H. Searl, Edgar, Neb.

3rd " $12.00Hugh B. Louden & Son, Clay Center

4th "Labelle C.H. Searle

5th "Perley 2ndJohn Henderson, Panora, Ia.

SOW SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 William Roberts & Son, Paton, Ia.

2nd " $12.00Ida W.H. Taylor, Lincoln, Neb.

3rd " $ 8.00 C.H. Searle, Edgar, Neb.

4th " Orrie Walter, Lebanon, Ohio.

5th " C.H. Searl.

SOW UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $15.00OmahaC. H. Searle.

2nd " $10.00Mattie John Henderson

3rd " $ 7.00H.B. Louden & Son, Clay Center, Neb.

4th """

5th "Wm. H. Taylor & Sons, Lincoln.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS OVER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $25.00 C.H. Searl.

2nd " $20.00 Geo. W. Trone

3rd " $12.00 Wm. Roberts & Son

4th " John Henderson

5th " Orrie Walter

BOAR AND THREE SOWS BRED BY EXHIBITOR

1st Premium $25.00 C.H. Searle

2nd " $20.00 Geo. W. Trone

3rd " $12.00 Wm. Roberts & Son

4th " John Henderson

5th " Orrie Walter

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $25.00 Hugh B. Louden & Son

2nd " $20.00 C.H. Searle

3rd " $12.00 Wm. H. Taylor & Son

4th " Wm. Robertws & Son

5th " John Henderson

FOUR SWINE, GET OF ONE BOAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 C.H. Searle

2nd " $20.00 ""

3rd " $12.00 Geo. F. Trone

4th " W.H. Taylor & Sons5th "

John Henderson

FOUR PIGS, UNDER SIX MONTHS, PRODUCE OF SAME SOW.

1st Premium $20.00 Hugh B. Louden & Son

2nd " $15.00 John Henderson

3rd " $12.00 C.H. Searle

4th " W.C. Shinn, Burchard, Neb.

5th " Jesse McCarty, Bellevue, Neb.

BOAR ANY AGE.

1st Premium $25.00 C.H. Searle

2nd " $20.00 Wm. Roberts & Son

3rd " $12.00 Geo. F. Trone

4th " C.H. Searle

5th " John Henderson

SOW ANY AGE.

1st Premium $25.00 Geo. F. Trone

2nd " $20.00 Wm. Roberts & Son

3rd " $12.00 C.H. Searle

4th """

5th " Wm. Hm. Taylor & Son

BOAR ANY AGE BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 C.H. Searle

2nd " $20.00 Geo. F. Trone

3rd " $12.00 C.H. Searle

4th " Orrie Walter

5th " Wm. Roberts & Son

SOW ANY AGE, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 C.H. Searle

2nd " $20.00 Geo. W. Trone

3rd " $12.00 C.H. Searle

4th " Orrie Walter

5th " Wm. Roberts & Son

SOW ANY AGE, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $25.00 Geo. W. Trone

2nd " $20.00 Wm. Roberts & Son

3rd " $12.00 C.H. Searle

4th " ""

5th " Wm. H. Taylor

Class V. SMALL YORKSHIRE.

N. H. Gentry, Judge.

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 Ruben M. Wolcott, Archer, Neb.

2nd " $12.00 F.B. Stewart, Espyville, Pa.

BOAR TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 Fred B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 Bascom & McMurray, California

BOAR ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 F.B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 R.M. Wolcott

BOAR SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 R.M. Wolcott

BOAR UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 F.B. Stewart

SOW TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 F.B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 Bascom & McMurray

3rd " $ 8.00""

SOW ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 F.B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 " "

3rd " $ 8.00 Bascom & McMurray

4th " 1309 R.M. Wolcott

SOW SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 1307 R.M. Wolcott

2nd " $ 8.00 1308" "

SOW UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 F.B. Stewart

2nd " $ 7.00 ""

BOAR AND THREE SOWS OVER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 F.B. Stewart

2nd Premium $12.00 Bascom & McMurray

BOAR AND THREE SOWS BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 F.B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 Bascom & McMurray

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR, BRED BY EXHBITORM.

1st Premium $18.00 R.M. Wolcott

2nd " $12.00 F.B. Stewart

4 SWINE THE GET OF SAME BOAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 F.B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 Bascom & McMurray

3rd " $ 9.00 R.M. Wolcott

4th " F.B. Stewart

FOUR PIGS UNDER SIX MONTHS,PRODUCE OF ONE COW.

1st Premium $15.00 Fm.B. Stewart

BOAR ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 860F. B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 1304 R. M. Wolcott

3rd " $ 9.00 F. B. Stewart

4th " Bascom & McMurray5th "

R. M. Wolcott

SOW ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 F. B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 Bascom & McMurray

3rd " $ 9.00 F. B. Stewart

4th " R. M. Wolcott

BOAR OF ANY AGE BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $15.00 F. B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 R. M. Wolcott

3rd " $ 9.00 R. B. Stewart

4th " Bascom & McMurray

5th " R. M. Wolcott

SOW ANY AGE BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 F. B. Stewart

2nd " $12.00 Bascom & McMurray

4th " R. M. Wolcott

5th " """

Class VI. ESSEX.

N. H. Gentry, Judge.

BOAR TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00828 L. E. Mahan & Son, Malcolm, Neb.

2nd " $12.00Victor Thomas Taylor, Waynesville, Ill.

BOAR SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00DeweyThomas Taylor

2nd " $ 8.00837 L. E. Mahan

3rd " $ 5.00833 "" "

4th "Ohio DukeThomas Taylor

SOW TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00Sarah SThomas Taylor

2nd " $12.00829 L. E. Mahan

3rd " $ 8.00830 "" "

4th " Wm. M. Gilmore, Fairbury, Neb.

5th "Queen of the TurfThomas Taylor

SOW ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00832L. E. Mahan

2nd " $12.00 Queen of the Turf II Thomas Taylor

3rd " $ 8.00 Black Beauty ""

4th " 831 L.E. Mahan

SOW SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 Nellie Thomas Taylor

2nd " $ 8.00838 L. E. Mahan

3rd " $ 5.00840 " " "

4th " Fancy Thomas Taylor

SOW UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00Miss RuthThomas Taylor

BOAR AND THREE SOW OVER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 L. E. Mahan

2nd " $12.00 Thomas Taylor

BOAR AND THREE SOWS BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 L. E. Mahan

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 Thos. Taylor

2nd " $12.00 L. E. Mahan

3rd " $ 9.00 """

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00Dewey, Nellie, Miss Ruth, FancyThos. Taylor

2nd " $12.00L. E. Mahan

3rd " $ 9.00L. E. Mahan

4 SWINE, GET OF SAME BOAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00Dewey, Nellie, Q of Turf, Beauty Thos. Taylor

2nd " $12.00L. E. Mahan

3rd " $ 9.00"" "

4th "Thos. Taylor

BOAR ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00828 L. E. Mahan

2nd " $12.00DeweyThos. Taylor

3rd " $ 9.00Victor" "

4th " L. E. Mahan

SOW ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00832 L. E. Mahan

2nd " $12.00 Thos. Taylor

3rd " $ 9.00829 L. E. Mahan

4th " Thos. Taylor

5th " Wm. M. Gilmore, Fairbury, Neb.

BOAR ANY AGE BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00828 L. E. Mahan

2nd " $12.00DeweyThos. Taylor

3rd " $ 9.00 ""

SOW ANY AGE BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00832 L. E. Mahan

2nd " $12.00829 "" "

3rd " $ 9.00Nellie Thos. Taylor

4th " ""

5th " Wm. M. Gilmore, Fairbury, Neb.

Class VII. VICTORIA.

N. H. Gentry, Judge.

BOAR TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co., Dyer, Ind.

2nd " $12.00"" "" " "

BOAR ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" " "

BOAR SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $ 8.00"" " "

BOAR UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

SOW TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" " "

SOW ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " 12.00 "" ""

SOW SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $ 8.00"" " "

SOW UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $12.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $ 7.00"" " "

BOAR AND THREE SOWS OVER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" ""

BOAR AND THREE SOWS BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " 412.00"" " "

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" " "

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" " "

4 SWINE, BET OF ONE BOAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" ""

4 PIGS UNDER SIX MONTHS, PRODUCE OF SAME SOW.

1st Premium $15.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" " "

BOAR ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" " "

SOW ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" " "

BOAR ANY AGE BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" " "

SOW ANY AGE BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $12.00"" " "

Class VIII. CHESHIRE.

N. H. Gentry, Judge.

BOAR TWO YEARS OR MORE.

1st Premium $15.00 R. D. Button

BOAR SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 R. D. Button, Cotton, N.Y.

2nd " $ 8.00 "" "

BOAR UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 R. D. Button

2nd " $ 7.00 "" "

SOW TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 R. D. Button

SOW ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 R. D. Button

2nd " $12.00 "" "

SOW SIX MONTHS AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 R. D. Button

SOW UNDER 6 MO.

1st Premium $10.00 R. D. Button

2nd " $ 7.00 "" "

BOAR AND THREE SOWS OVER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 R. D. Button

2nd " $12.00 "" "

BOAR AND THREE SOWS BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 R. D. Button

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 R. D. Button

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 R. D. Button

4 SWINE GET OF SAME BOAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 R. D. Button

2nd " $12.00 "" "

4 PIGS UNDER SIX MONTHS, PRODUCE OF SAME SOW.

1st Premium $15.00 R. D. Button

BOAR ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 R. D. Button

2nd " $12.00 "" "

SOW ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 R. D. Button

2nd " $12.00 "" "

BOAR, ANY AGE, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 R. D. Button

2nd Premium $12.00 R. D. Button

SOW ANY AGE, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 R. D. Button

2nd " $12.00 "" "

Class IX. OTHER DISTINCT BREEDS.

N. H. Gentry, Judge.

BOAR TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 J. E. Brethour, Buford, Ont.

BOAR ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 R. M. Wolcott, Archer, Neb.

2nd " $12.00 J. E. Brethour

BOAR 6 MO. AND UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $12.00 R. M. Wolcott

2nd " $ 8.00 J. E. Brethour

BOAR UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $ 7.00 "" "

3rd " $ 4.00 R. M. Wolcott

SOW TWO YEARS OR OVER.

1st Premium $15.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 "" "

3rd " $ 8.00 R. M. Wolcott

SOW ONE YEAR AND UNDER TWO.

1st Premium $15.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 "" "

3rd " $ 8.00 R. M. Wolcott

4th " """

5th " Iowa Agricultural College, Ames,Ia

SOW UNDER SIX MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $ 7.00 "" "

3rd " $ 4.00 R. M.Wolcott

4th " "" "

BOAR AND THREE SOWS OVER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 R. M. Wolcott

BOAR AND THREE SOWS, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 R. M. Wolcott

BOAR AND THREE SOWS UNDER ONE YEAR.

1st Premium $18.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 "" "

3rd " $ 9.00 R. M. Wolcott

BOAR AND THREE SOWS, UNDER ONE YEAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 "" "

3rd " $ 9.00 R. M. Wolcott

4 SWINE GET OF SAME BOAR, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 "" "

3rd " $ 9.00 R. M. Wolcott

4 PIGS UNDER SIX MONTHS, PRODUCE OF SAME SOW.

1st Premium $15.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 R. M. Wolcott

3rd " $ 8.00 J. E. Brethour

BOAR ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 R. M. Wolcott

3rd " $ 9.00 J. E. Brethour

4th " R. M. Wolcott

SOW ANY AGE.

1st Premium $18.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 "" "

3rd " $ 9.00 R. M. Wolcott

4th " """

BOAR ANY AGE, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 R. M. Wolcott

2nd " $12.00 J. E. Brethour

3rd " $ 9.00 R. M. Wolcott

4th " J. E. Brethour

SOW ANY AGE, BRED BY EXHIBITOR.

1st Premium $18.00 J. E. Brethour

2nd " $12.00 "" "

3rd " $ 9.00 R. M. Wolcott

4th " """

DIVISION E--FAT STOCK.

Class I. BERKSHIRE.

No awards were made in this class.

Class II. POLAND CHINA.

T. E. Sanders, Judge.

14 AND UNDER 18 MONTHS OLD.

1st Premium $20.00 S. McKelvie, Fairfield, Neb.

2nd Premium $15.00 F. M. McDiarmied, Cumberland, Ia.

3rd " $12.00 S. McKelvie

BARROW 10 AND UNDER 14 MONTHS OLD.

1st Premium $20.00 S. McKelvie

2nd " $15.00 ""

BARROW 6 MONTHS AND UNDER 10 MONTHS.

1st Premium $15.00 F. M. McDiarmied

2nd " $12.00 S. McKelvie

3rd " $ 8.00 John O'Connell, Malcolm, Neb.

PEN OF THREE BARROWS.

1st Premium $25.00 S. McKelvie.

Class III. CHESTER WHITE.

No awards were made in this class.

Class IV. DUROC JERSEY.

No awards were made in this class.

C l a s sV I.VICTORIA.

T. E. Sanders, Judge.

W. B. Wallwork, Judge.

BARROW 14 AND UNDER 18 MONTHS OLD.

1st Premium $12.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co., Dyer, Ind.

2nd " $ 8.00 "" """"

BARROW 10 AND UNDER 14 MONTHS OLD.

1st Premium $12.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

2nd " $ 8.00"" ""

BARROW SIX AND UNDER TEN MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 Geo. F. Davis

2nd " $ 7.00"" "

PEN OF THREE BARROWS.

1st Premium $15.00 Geo. F. Davis

2nd " $12.00"" "

Class VII. ESSEX.

W. B. Wallwork, Judge.

T. E. Sanders, Judge.

BARROW 14 AND UNDER 18 MONTHS OLD.

1st Premium $12.00 Thomas Taylor

2nd " $ 8.00 ""

BARROW TEN AND UNDER 14 MONTHS OLD.

1st Premium $12.00 Thomas Taylor

2nd " $ 8.00 ""

BARROW SIX AND UNDER TEN MONTHS OLD.

1st Premium $10.00 Thomas Taylor

2nd " $ 7.00 ""

PEN OF THREE BARROWS.

1st Premium $15.00 Thomas Taylor

2nd " $12.00 " "

Class VIII. CHESHIRE.

No entries were made in this class.

Class IX. OTHER DISTINCT BREEDS.

W. B. Wallwork, Judge.

T. E. Sanders, Judge.

BARROW TEN AND UNDER FOUR MONTHS OLD.

1st Premium $12.00 Reuben M. Wolcott, Archer, Neb.

BARROW SIX AND UNDER TEN MONTHS OLD.

1st Premium $10.00 J. E. Brethour, Burford, Ont.

Class X. GRADES AND CROSSES.

T. E. Sanders, Judge.

W. B. Wallwork, Judge.

BARROW 14 AND UNDER 18 MONTHS.

1st Premium $12.00 Thomas Taylor

2nd " $ 8.00 ""

BARROW TEN MONTHS AND UNDER FOUR.

1st Premium $12.00 Thomas Taylor

2nd " $ 8.00 ""

BARROW SIX AND UNDER TEN MONTHS.

1st Premium $10.00 Thomas Taylor

PEN OF THREE BARROWS.

1st Premium $15.00 Thomas Taylor

Class XI. PEN SWEEPSTAKES.

T. E. Sanders, Judge.

W. B. Wallwork, Judge.

PEN SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $30.00 S. M. Kelvie, Fairfield, Neb.

2nd " $20.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

3rd " $15.00 Thomas Taylor

Class XII. BREEDERS' SWEEPSTAKES.

T. E. Sanders, Judge.

W. B. Wallwork, Judge.

FIVE BARROWS ANY AGE OR BREED.

1st Premium $30.00 S. McKelvie, Fairfield, Neb.

2nd Premium $20.00 Geo. F. Davis & Co.

3rd " $15.00 Thomas Taylor

SPECIAL---PREMIUMS.

Special premiums were offered by the Union Stock Yards aggregating $450.00 under which awards were made as follows:

W. B. Wallwork, Judge.

BACON HOG.

1st Premium $75.00 Red Hog Iowa Agricultural College

2nd " $50.00 Berkshire J. W. Townley, Octavia, Neb.

3rd " $25.00 Lrg. York J. E. Brethorn, Buford, Ont.

W. B. Wallwork )

T. E. Sanders) Judges

POLAND.

1st Premium $50.00 S. McKelvie, Fairfield, Neb.

2nd " $35.00 F. M. McDiarmied, Cumberland, Ia.

3rd " $15.00 Thomas Taylor, Waynesville, Ill.

W. B. Wallwork )

T. E. Sanders) Judges

BERKSHIRE.

1st Premium $50.00 John B. Thompson, Plattsburg, Mo.

2nd " $35.00 J. W. Townley, Octavia, Neb.

3rd " $15.00 Reuben Gentry, Danville, Ky.

W. B. Wallwork )

T. E. Sanders) Judges

DUROC JERSEY.

1st Premium $50.00 Geo. W. Trone, Rushville, Ind.

2nd " $35.00 " " " " "

3rd " $15.00 C. H. Searle, Edgar, Neb.

POULTRY---EXHIBITS.

C. M. LLEWELLYN,

Beaver City, Nebr.

Superintendent in Charge.

There were about 500 birds on exhibition.The exhibit of poultry was small and unsatisfactory to both exhibitors and the Department of Exhibits.This was believed by the superintendent of the Live Stock Exhibits to have been due to the fact that the superintendent for this branch of exhibits was not appointed earlier that it might be known in time who was to have the actual charge of the Poultry Department and emphasizes the fact that exhibitors must know who is to have charge of the exhibit and care of the birds before they will make entries or forward them for exhibition.

Theodore Hewes of Trenton Missouri, and L. P. Harris of Palmyra, Nebraska are authority for saying that the birds presented for scoring were of the highest merit and would have made a good report in any line of competition.

Mr. C. M. Llewellyn of Beaver City, Nebraska was, at a late day appointed superintendent of this branch of exhibits and did everything in his power to make the exhibit a success.From years of acquaintance with him I know him to be both capable and energetic; that the exhibit should have been so small was not chargeable to him and I desire to tender my thanks for the thorough and systematic manner of his conduct of these exhibits.

The rules under which exhibits of poultry and pigeons were solicited and received and a list of those to whom awards were made is given next below.

POULTRY.

Each exhibitor must forward with his application for entry 50 cents for each bird he proposes to exhibit, to pay for the feeding and care of the same.

All poultry offered for admission under an entry from the United States will be examined by a committee of three, who shall return to the exhibitor any bird which, in their opinion, is inferior, sick, out of condition, or which will not score 85 points in its class, according to the American standard of perfection.

No one exhibitor of poultry will be allowed to enter more than four birds, i.e. one cock, one hen etc., of any one breed and but one breeding pen (one male and four females) of any one breed.(b) One cockrell, one pullet, pen checks i.e. one cockrell and four pullets.(c)

Poultry from foreign countries will be admitted under the rules governing the admission of fowls at competitive displays in said countries.

Birds will be scored according to the American standard of perfection.

Heaviest pair of capons.

Each exhibitor will be required to furnish their own exhibition coops, of standard size, viz:for chickens twenty inches deep, 30 inches long and 30 inches high; for pens 24 inches deep, 30 inches high and 48 inches long; for turkeys 36 inches deep, 36 inches long and 48 inches high; for ducks, 30 inches deep, 30 inches high and 36 inches long; for geese 36 inches deep, 36 inches high and 48 inches long.

Poultry exhibits were classified and designated as follows:

Class I American Class IX Bantams other than Game

Class II Asiatic Class X Turkeys

Class III Mediterranean Class XI Ducks

Class IV PolishClass XII Geese

Class V HamburgsClass XIII Ornamental

Class VI MixedClass XIV Pet Stock

Class VII Miscellaneous Class XV Minor Pets

Class VIII Games and Game Bantams

Awards were made under the findings of Theodore Hewes, Trenton, Missouri and L. P. Harris of Palmyra, Nebraska as follows:

Class I. AMERICAN.

COCK, BARRED PLYMOUTH ROCK.

1st Premium $3.00 Frank Patton, Surprise, Neb.

HEN, B.P. ROCKS.

1st Premium $3.00 Frank Patton, Surprise, Neb.

2nd " $2.00 W. A. Irwin, Tecumseh, Neb.

3rd " $1.00 McKee & Jones, Des Moines, Ia.

COCKRELL B.P.R.

1st Premium $3.00A. A. Anderson, Boone, Ia.

2nd " $2.00 Frank Patton, Surprise, Neb.

3rd " $1.00Southwick & Barclay, Friend, Neb.

PULLETT, B.P.R.

1st Premium $3.00 Edward Irwin, Tecumseh, Neb.

2nd " $2.00A. A. Anderson, Boone, Ia.

3rd " $1.00W. A. Irwin, Tecumseh, Neb.

PEN, P.B.R.

1st Premium $4.00 A. A. Anderson

2nd " $3.00 Frank Patton

3rd " $2.00 Southwick & Barclay

COCK, WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCK.

1st Premium $3.00L. P. Thomas, Warrensburg, Mo.

2nd " $2.00J. W. Gibson, Norfolk, Neb.

HEN, WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCK.

1st Premium $3.00Southwick & Barclay

2nd " $2.00Mrs. S. E. Beckwith, Mt. Pleasant, Ia.

3rd " $1.00L. B. Thomas, Warrensburg, Mo.

4th " J. W. Gibson, Norfolk, Neb.

COCKREL, WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCK.

1st Premium $3.00Mrs. S. E. Beckwith

2nd " $2.00Southwick & Barclay

3rd " $1.00L. B. Thomas

4th " J. W. Gibson

PULLET, WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCK.

1st Premium $3.00Southwick & Barclay

2nd " $2.00Mrs. S. E. Beckwith

3rd " $1.00L. B. Thomas

4th " J. W. Gibson

PEN, WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS.

1st Premium $4.00Southwick & Barclay

2nd " $3.00 Mrs. S. E. Beckwith

3rd " $2.00 L. B. Thomas

4th " J. W. Gibson

COCK, BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCK.

1st Premium $3.00 Oliver C. Link, Lincoln, Neb.

2nd " $2.00 McKee & Jones, Des Moines, Ia.

3rd " $1.00 W. J. Gow, Norfolk, Neb.

4th " L. P. Harris, Palmyra, Neb.

5th " J. A. Steel, Surprise, Neb.

HEN, BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCK.

1st Premium $3.00 L. P. Harris, Palmyra, Neb.

2nd " $2.00 J. A. Steel, Surprise, Neb.

3rd " $1.00 Lindley B. Hanna, Columbus City, Ia.

COCKRELL, BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCK.

1st Premium $3.00 Southwick & Barclay

2nd " $2.00J. A. Steel

PULLETT, BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCK.

1st Premium $3.00 Southwick & Barclay

2nd " $2.00L. P. Harris

3rd " $1.00J. A. Steel

4th " W. J. Gow

5th " Oliver C. Link

PEN, BUFF PLYMOUTH ROCKS.

1st Premium $4.00 Southwick & Barclay

2nd " $3.00 Lindley B. Harma

3rd " $2.00 W. J. Gow

4th " J. A. Steel

COCK, BUFF WYANDOTTES

1st Premium $3.00 H. C. Young, Lincoln, Neb.

HEN, BUFF WYANDOTTES

1st Premium $3.00 H. C. Young, Lincoln, Neb.

COCKRELL, BUFF WYANDOTTES.

1st Premium $3.00 Southwick & Barclay, Friend, Neb.

PULLET, BUFF WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00 Southwick & Barclay

PEN, BUFF WYANDOTTES.

1st Premium $4.00Southwick & Barclay

2nd " $3.00H. C. Young, Lincoln, Neb.

COCK, GOLDEN WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00C. A. Cook, Salem, Neb.

2nd " $2.00Casper Dice, Roca, Neb.

HEN GOLDEN WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00C. A. Cook, Salem, Neb.

2nd " $2.00Caspet Dice, Roca, Neb.

COCKREL GOLDEN WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00 Frank O. Green, Des Moines, Ia.

2nd " $2.00C. A. Cook, Salem, Neb.

PULLET GOLDEN WYANDOTTE.

2nd Premium $3.00C. A. Cook, Salem, Neb.

PEN GOLDEN WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $4.00J. C. Kasper, Clay Center, Neb.

2nd " $3.00C. A. Cook

COCK, WHITE WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00W. A. Irwin, Tecumseh, Neb.

HEN, WHITE WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00W. A. Irwin

COCKREL, WHITE WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00W. A. Irwin

PULLETT, WHTIE WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00W. A. Irwin

2nd " $2.00P. H. Gossard, Mo. Valley, Ia.

COCKREL, SILVER WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00 F. T. Giddings, Mo. Valley, Ia.

2nd " $2.00P. H. Gossard, Mo. Valley, Ia.

PULLETT, SILVER WYANDOTTE.

1st Premium $3.00E. T. Giddings

2nd " $2.00P. H. Gossard

3rd " $1.00David Larson, Wahoo, Neb.

Class II. ASIATIC.

COCK, LIGHT BRAHMA.

1st Premium $3.00Casper Dice, Roca, Neb.

2nd " $2.00O. D. Talbert, Omaha, Neb.

3rd " $1.00A. C. Killian, Wahoo, Neb.

HEN, LIGHT BRAHMA.

1st Premium $3.00 O. D. Talbert, Omaha, Neb.

2nd " $2.00 Mrs. Phil Crockett, Coin, Ia.

3rd " $1.00 Casper Dice, Roca, Neb.

4th " A. C. Killian, Wahoo, Neb.

5th " McKee & JOnes, Des Moines, Ia.

COCKEREL, LIGHT BRAHMA.

1st Premium $3.00 A. D. Talbert, Omaha, Neb.

2nd " $2.00Casper Dice, Roca, Neb.

3rd " $1.00McKee & Jones, Des Moines, Ia.

PULLET, LIGHT BRAHMA.

1st Premium $3.00O. D. Talbert

2nd " $2.00A. C. Killian

3rd " $1.00McKee & Jones

4th " Casper Dice

PEN, LIGHT BRAHMA.

1st Premium $4.00O. D. Talbert

2nd " $3.00Casper Dice

3rd " $1.00A. C. Killian

COCK, BLACK LANGSHAN

1st Premium $3.00W. G. Goodin, Friend, Neb.

HEN, BLACK LANGSHAN.

1st Premium $3.00W. G. Goodin

COCKEREL, BLACK LANGSHAN.

1st Premium $3.00Southwick & Barclay, Friend, Neb.

2nd " $2.00W. G. Goodin

3rd " $1.00Estella S. Vaughn, Council Bluffs, Ia.

PULLETT, BLACK LANGSHAN.

1st Premium $3.00W. G. Goodin

2nd " $2.00Southwick & Barclay

3rd " $1.00Estella S. Vaughn

PEN, BLACK LANGSHAN.

1st Premium $4.00W. G. Goodin

2nd " $3.00Southwick & Barclay

COCKREL, WHITE LANGSHAN.

1st Premium $3.00Southwick & Barclay

PULLETT, WHITE LANGSHAN.

1st Premium $3.00Southwick & Barclay

PEN, WHITE LANGSHAN.

1st Premium $4.00Southwick & Barclay

COCK, DARK BRAHMA.

1st Premium 43.00A. A. Anderson, Boone, Ia.

HEN, DARK BRAHMA.

1st Premium $3.00A. A. Anderson

COCKEREL, DARK BRAHMA.

1st Premium $3.00A. A. Anderson

PULLET, DARK BRAHMA.

1st Premium $3.00A. A. Anderson

PEN, DARK BRAHMA.

1st Premium $4.00A. A. Anderson

PULLET, PARTRIDGE COCHIN.

1st Premium $3.00W. A. Irwin, Tecumseh, Neb.

COCK, BUFF COCHIN.

1st Premium $3.00----------

2nd " $2.00McKee & Jones, Des Moines, Ia.

HEN, BUFF COCHIN.

1st Premium $3.00McKee & Jones

COCKREL, BUFF COCHIN.

1st Premium $3.00William Powers, Clay Center, Neb.

2nd " $2.00McKee & Jones

PULLET, BUFF COCHIN.

1st Premium $3.00 William Powers

2nd " $2.00 McKee & Jones

PEN, BUFF COCHIN.

1st Premium $4.00 William Powers

COCKREL, WHITE COCHIN.

1st Premium $3.00 P. R. Longfellow, Wahoo, Neb.

PULLET, WHITE COCHIN.

1st Premium $3.00 P. R. Longfellow

Class III. MEDITERRANEAN.

COCK S.C. WHITE LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00 E. E. Green, Beatrice, Neb.

2nd " $2.00 Leon C. Hungtington, Omaha, Neb.

3rd " $1.00 J. Cook Johnson, Omaha, Neb.

HEN, S.C. WHITE LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00 Milton C. Furst, Adair, Ia.

2nd " $2.00 E. E. Green, Beatrice, Neb.

3rd " $1.00 J. Cook Johnson, Omaha

4th " Leon C. Huntington, Omaha

COCKEREL, S.C. WHITE LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00 Milton C. Furst

2nd " $2.00E. E. Green

3rd Premium $1.00 J. Cook Johnson

PULLET, S.C. WHITE LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00Milton C. Furst, Adair, Ia.

2nd " $2.00 E. E. Green

3rd " $1.00 J. Cook Johnson

4th " Leon C. Huntington

PEN, S.C. WHITE LEGHORNS.

1st Premium $4.00 Leon C. Huntington

2nd " $3.00J. Cook Johnson

COCK, BLACK MINORCA.

1st Premium $3.00C. A. Cook, Salem, Neb.

2nd " $2.00Chas. Ross, Omaha, Neb.

HEN, BLACK MINORCA.

1st Premium $3.00C. A. Cook

2nd " $2.00 Chas. Ross

COCKREL, BLACK MINORCA.

1st Premium $3.00 Chas. Ross

2nd " $2.00 C. A. Cook

PULLET, BLACK MINORCA.

1st Premium $3.00 Chas. Ross

2nd " $2.00C. A. Cook

PENS, BLACK MINORCA.

1st Premium $3.00 C. A. Cook

2nd " $2.00 Chas. Ross

COCK, BUFF LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00 L. P. Harris, Palmyra, Neb.

HEN, BUFF LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00 L. P. Harris, Palmyra

2nd " $2.00 Southwick & Barclay, Friend

COCKREL, BUFF LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00 L. B. Harma, Columbus City, Ia.

2nd " $2.00Southwick & Barclay

3rd " $1.00L. P. Harris

4th " McKee & Jones, Des Moines, Ia.

5th " A. G. Duncan, Independence, Mo.

PULLET, BUFF LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00 L. P. Harris

2nd " $2.00A. G. Duncan

3rd " $1.00Southwick & Barclay

4th " Lindley Benson Harma

PEN, BUFF LEGHORN.

1st Premium $4.00 L. P. Harris

2nd " $3.00 Southwick & Barclay

COCKEREL, S.C. BROWN LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00 David Larson, Wahoo, Neb.

PULLET, S.C. BROWN LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00 David Larson

PEN, S.C. BROWN LEGHORN.

1st Premium $4.00 David Larson

COCK, WHITE LEGHORN, ROSE COMB.

1st Premium $3.00 A. C. Killian

HEN, WHITE LEGHORN, ROSE COMB.

1st Premium $3.00 A. C. Killian, Wahoo, Neb.

COCKEREL, WHITE LEGHORN, ROSE COMB.

1st Premium $3.00 Casper Dice

2nd " $2.00A. C. Killian

PULLET, WHITE LEGHORN, ROSE COMB.

1st Premium $3.00 Casper Dice

2nd " $2.00A. C. Killian

PENS, WHITE LEGHORN, ROSE COMB.

1st Premium $4.00A. C. Killian

COCK, BLACK LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00David Larson, Wahoo, Neb.

HEN, BLACK LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00David Larson

PULLET, BLACK LEGHORN.

1st Premium $3.00David Larson

Class IV. POLISH.

No entries in this class.

Class V. HAMBURGS.

COCKEREL, S.S. HAMBURG.

1st Premium $2.00A. A. Madson, West Branch, Ia.

PULLET, S.S. HAMBURG.

1st Premium $2.00David Larson, Wahoo.

2nd " $1.00Mrs. D.Larson, Wahoo, Neb.

3rd " $ .75A. A. Madson, West Branch, Ia.

Class VI. MIXED.

No entries in this class.

Class VII. MISCELLANEOUS.

COCK, AMERICAN DOMINIQUES.

1st Premium $3.00C. C. Lazarus, Omaha, Neb.

PULLET AM. DOMINIQUES.

1st Premium $3.00C. C. Lazarus, Omaha,

Class VIII. GAMES AND GAME BANTAMS.

COCK, BLACK BREASTED R.G. BANTAMS.

1st Premium $3.00 Fred Curtus Arthur, Stuart, Ia.

HEN BLACK BREASTED R.C. BANTAM.

1st Premium $3.00McKee & Jones, Des Moines, Ia.

COCKREL BLK BREASTED R.G. BANTAM.

1st Premium $3.00McKee & Jones

PULLET BLACK BREASTED R.G. BANTAM.

1st Premium $3.00McKee & Jones

2nd " $2.00 Fred Curtis Arthur

3rd " $1.00David Larson, Wahoo, Neb.

COCK, CORNISH INDIAN GAME.

1st Premium $3.00John Skinner, Spiker, Neb.

HEN, CORNISH INDIAN GAME.

1st Premium $3.00 John Skinner

COCKEREL, CORNISH INDIAN GAME.

1st Premium $3.00 John Skinner

2nd " $2.00 Edwin Bird, Calloway, Neb.

PULLET, CORNISH INDIAN GAME.

1st Premium $3.00 John Skinner, Spiker, Neb.

PEN, CORNISH INDIAN GAME.

1st Premium $4.00 John Skinner

COCK, BERCHEN GAME BANTAM.

1st Premium $3.00 McKee & Jones

HEN, BERCHEN GAME BANTAM.

1st Premium $3.00 McKee & Jones

COCKEREL, RED PYLE GAME BANTAM.

1st Premium $3.00 E. T. Giddingsn, Mo. Valley, Ia.

PULLET, RED PYLE GAME BANTAM.

1st Premium $3.00 E. T. Giddings

Class IX. BANTAMS OTHER THAN GAME.

COCK, GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAM.

1st Premium $2.00 Leon C. Huntington, Omaha

HEN, GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAMS

1st Premium $2.00 Frank O. Green, Des Moines, Ia.

2nd " $1.00 Leon C. Huntington

COCKEREL, GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAMS.

1st Premium $2.00 Frank O. Green

PULLET, GOLDEN SEABRIGHT BANTAMS.

1st Premium $2.00 Frank O. Green

COCK, BUFF COCHIN BANTAMS.

1st Premium $2.00 Frank O. Green

HEN, BUFF COCHIN BANTAM.

1st Premium $2.00 Frank O. Green

COCKEREL, BUFF COCHIN BANTAM.

1st Premium $1.00 Frank O. Green

PULLET, BUFF COCHIN BANTAM.

1st Premium $2.00 Frank O. Green

HEN, BLACK COCHIN BANTAM.

1st Premium $2.00E. T. Giddings, Mo. Valley, Ia.

COCKEREL, WHITE COCHIN BANTAM.

1st Premium $2.00 E. T. Giddings

PULLET, WHITE COCHIN BANTAM.

1st Premium $2.00 E. T. Giddings

Class X.TURKEYS.

COCK, MAMMOTH BRONZ TURKEYS.

1st Premium $6.00 C. A. Cook, Salem, Neb.

HEN, MAMMOTH BRONZ TURKEYS.

1st Premium $6.00 C. A. Cook

COCK, WHITE HOLLAND.

1st Premium $6.00 C. A. Cook, Salem, Neb.

2nd " $4.00H. A. Cameron, Schuyler, Neb.

HEN, WHITE HOLLAND.

1st Premium $6.00 H. A. Cameron

2nd " $4.00 C. A. Cook

Class IX. DUCKS.

COLORED MUSCOVY DUCKS.

1st Premium $6.00H. A. Cameron, Schuyler,

2nd " $4.00"" ""

CAYUGAS, DUCK.

1st Premium $6.00H. A. Cameron

PEKIN, DUCKS.

1st Premium $6.00A. H. Morrow, Council Bluffs, Ia.

Class XII. GEESE.

No entries in this class.

Class XIII. ORNAMENTAL.

No entries in this class.

Class XIV. PET STOCK.

No entries in this class.

Class XV. MINOR PETS.

No entries in this class.

SWEEPSTAKES.

1st Premium $10.00 W. G. Goodin, Friend, Neb.

2nd " $ 6.00 O. D. Talbert, Omaha

3rd " $ 4.00 David Larson, Wahoo, Neb.

PIGEONS.

Each exhibitor must forward with his application; for entry 50 cents for each bird he proposes to exhibit, to pay for the feeding and care of the same.

Premiums will be withheld where specimens are of inferior quality.

Specimens must be named with what the exhibitor believes to be their correct titles: all known synonyms (provincila or otherwise) may be added. Birds entered in a wrong section will be excluded from competition. All specimens must be exhibited in their natural condition. Quality, beauty of plumage, purity of race and uniformity in markings will be required in each instance.

Entries shall consist of single birds of the following varieties:Pouters, Carriers, Short Faced Tumblers, Barbs, Fan Tails, Jacobins, Turbits, Owls and Russian Trumpeters.All other varieties will be entered in paris, one male and female constituting a pair. Exhibitors will not be allowed to enter more than two specimens in any one section, i.e. two cocks, two hens, etc.

All birds entered for competition must be the property of the exhibitor.

The right is reserved to the Superintendent of the Department of Live Stock to return to an exhibitor any bird that in his judgment is inferior.

The Pigeon exhibits were classified and designated as follows:

Class I Carriers. Class XII Chinese Owls.

Class II Pouters. Class XIII Tail-Marked Owls

Class III Pigmy Pouters.Class XIV Trumpeters.

Class IV Barbs. Class XV Fan Tails.

Class V Short Faced Tumblers Class XVI Orintal Frills.

Class VI Short Faced Bald Heads. Class XVII Turbits

Class VII Long Faced Tumblers. Class XVIII Magpies.

Class VIII Inside or Parlor Class XIX Swallows.

Tumblers. Class XX Priests.

Class IX Jacobins. Class XXI Nuns.

Class X English Owls. Class XXIIDragoons.

Class XI African Owls. Class XXIIIVarious.

Class XXIV Homers (Open Class)

Class XXV Homers (Record Class)

DAIRY AND DAIRY PRODUCTS.

Hon. S. C. Bassett,

Gibbon, Nebraska,

Assistant Superintendent

It was first planned to give cash premiums in the Dairy and Dairy Products branch of the exhibits, but after due and full consideration the plan was modified as to dairy products and medals and diplomas were awarded the same as to general exhibitors in other departments of the Exposition.The dates determined upon for dairy products exhibits contemplated five separate exhibits on each class during the months of June, July, August, September and October. Cheese was to be exhibited in the month of October only.Rules governing the exhibit of dairy products were prepared and sent to prospective exhibitors. The list of those to whom awards were made, under this class of exhibits will be found in the list of diplomas and medals awarded to exhibitors in the report of the Bureau of Awards.

It was planned to have a thorough system of refrigeration, that all the products might be properly kept and cared for.Owing to the difficulties in installing the refrigeration plant in the Dairy Building and the construction and suitable installation of the refrigeration boxes, the first exhibit of butter did not take place until in July.When put to the test the refrigeration boxes were found to be faulty, and owing to repairs and improvements being made upon them the second exhibit did not occur until August.The other three exhibits followed in the months of September and October.The number of exhibits in the first display was not satisfactory owing to the lack of satisfactory and assuring information as to the condition of the refrigeration plant and the boxes prepared for the preservation of the goods.As soon as the improvements and repairs were perfected and the refrigeration plant ran twenty-two hours out of the twenty-four there as no difficulty in maintaining the temperature not to exceed thirty-five degrees, and in fact, the temperature of zero might have been maintained, had it been desired.

Early in July 1898, Hon. S. C. Bassett of Gibbon, Nebraska was selected as Assistant Superintendent of the Dairy Exhibits to assist the superintendent in the care of the work incident to that branch of exhibits.He proved to be a very efficient, painstaking and reliable assistant and I desire at this time to return thanks to him for his unceasing care of all the minutia of the work.

The refrigeration plant used was manufactured by the A. H. Barbour Manufacturing Co. of Chicago, Ill.The motive power was electricity and the plant proved to be entirely satisfactory to the authorities under modified conditions which actual use proved to be necessary.

"Hon. J. B. Dinsmore:

Superintendent of Live Stock, Dairy, Etc. Exhibits

Dear Sir:As Assistant Superintendent of the competitive dairy exhibit of the Trans Mississippi Exposition, I took charge of said department the last week in August, at which time the butter for the second contest had arrived and was ready to be judged.

The refrigerators in the Dairy Building were at that time in a satisfactory condition and so continued until the close of the Exposition. The judging of all butter exhibits was by Mr. W. D. Collyer of Marshalltown, Iowa, whom I believe to be thoroughly competent and whose work as expert judge gave as good satisfaction as could be expected where competition is close and sharp.

Upon entering upon by duties I found that the rules governing dairy exhibits were somewhat conflicting and capable of more thanone interpretation and, with the approval of yourself and the proper Exposition officials the same were changed to provide that any exhibitor in the department whose exhibit scored more than 95 points should be entitled to diploma and bronze medal.Where his exhibit scored 97 or more points he should be entitled to diploma for silver medal and to the exhibitor making highest score (Providing same be above 97) should be awarded diploma for Gold Medal.Five competition butter exhibits were held, one in the month of July, one in August, one in September and two in October. A summary of Exhibitors and exhibits is as follows:

Total number of exhibitors,.................... 205

Total number of packages,...................... 489

Total score of all exhibits,................... 45,604

Average score of all exhibits,.................93.25

Highest score,.................................98

The following is the summary by states.

MINNESOTA.

No. exhibitors,....................74

No. packages,...................... 175

Average score,.....................93.89

KANSAS.

No. exhibitors,....................47

No. Packages,...................... 137

Average score,.....................91.31

IOWA.

No. exhibitors,....................37

No. Packages,......................89

Average score,.....................91.30

NEBRASKA

No. exhibitors,....................29

No. Packages,......................52

Average score,.....................93.58

WISCONSIN

No. Exhibitors,....................8

No. Packages,......................15

Average score,.....................95.18

ILLINOIS

No. exhibitors,....................4

No. packages,......................11

Average score,.....................93.18

SOUTH DAKOTA

No. exhibitors,....................3

No. packages,......................6

Average score,.....................94.70

MISSOURI

No. Exhibitors,...................1

No. Packages,.....................2

Average score,....................92

INDIANA

No. Exhibitors,...................1

No. Packages,.....................1

Average score,....................86

MASSACHUSETTS

No. Exhibits,.....................1

No. Packages,.....................2

Average score,....................93.08

In justice to many exhibitors it should be said that, with the exception of exhibits from Minnesota, which were transported in refrigerator cars and transferred at once on arrival to the refrigerators in the Dairy Building, exhibits from all other states came either by express or freight and were thus exposed to conditions not deemed the most favorable for butter intended for competition.

Mention should be made of the highly instructive and meritorious permanent exhibit made by Supt. B. R. Stoufer of the Nebraska State Commission. This exhibit represented the work in a Nebraska creamery, showing butter in all its various stages, from that in the churn to a large assortment of packages of all kinds ready for the market.Minnesota also had a small but meritorious permanent exhibit during the last months of the Exposition.

One of the most interesting exhibits in the Dairy Building and one that attracted universal attention was that of the noted artist, Mrs. Caroline Shawk Brooks, who busts, modeled in butter, of Admiral Dewey, Abraham Lincoln, President McKinley and others were the admiration of the thousands who beheld them.

CHEESE.

The exhibit of cheese made in the month of October was small and disappointing, there being fifteen exhibitors and thirty-two packages.None of the cheese scored sufficiently high to receive a diploma of the second class.

AWARDS.

The list of awards will be found in the general awards in report of Awards Bureau.

Below please find the report of T. H. Lyon of the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska, reporting the results of tests of Milch Cows.

Hon. J. B. Dinsmore,

Live Stock Commissioner,

Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition

Omaha, Nebraska.

My Dear Sir:

I have the honor to report herewith the result of the "Test of Milch Cows" conducted under my supervision at the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition.

The following is a copy of the rules governing the test, as published by the Department of Exhibits, Bureau of Live Stock, Dairy, Poultry and Pet Animals.

RULE I.The test shall be made for ten days and shall be open to all cows. Heifers with first calf shall be in a class by themselves.

RULE II.All cows entered for competition shall be under control of the committee in charge during the test and for two days prior thereto.They shall be fed and milked under the direction of the committee, the owner of the cow being allowed to name the person who cares for and milks the cow.They may receive at the direction of the owner any amount or proportion of the following foods viz:corn and oats, ground wheat bran, linseed meal, corn silage, clover hay, timothy hay and prairie hay.

All feed used shall be weighed and samples analyzed, and each cow shall be charged with the dry matter therein.But the same feeds and the same proportion of each shall be continued throughout the test in each case.When the ration is adopted, only the amount fed can be carried.Each cow shall be charged with the total amount of food given, no allowance being made for food not consumed.

RULE III.As a basis for comparison, one point shall be allowed for each pound of solids not fat, and ten points for each pound of fat contained in the milk.

The points obtained in this way shall be increased by one per cent for each week of lactation after the first month.In no case, however, shall more than twenty-five per cent increase be allowed for advancing lactation.

The number of points obtained in this way, divided by the number of pounds of dry matter in the food consumed during the test will give a factor which represents the relative food economy of the cows being tested.This factor multiplied by an arbitrary number (five is recommended) shall be added for each day of the test and the sum shall constitute the score.The cow having the largest score, obtained in this way, shall be considered the best.

997.Premium for Cows.

Dip. for Dip. for Dip. for High Com. Com.

Gold Med. Sil. Med. Bronz Med. " " "

998.Premium for Heifers.

Dip. forDip. forDip. forHigh Com. Com.

Gold Med. Sil. Med. Bronz Med. " " "

In case of tie between cows or between heifers, each shall be entitled to the same premium.

These rules were followed strictly in accordance with your interpretation with the exception of the provision under Rule I which specifies that the test shall be for ten days.At the unanimous request of those entering animals for the test, and upon your approval of the same, it was decided to curtail the time to seven days.The following is a list of the entries.

997.PREMIUM FOR COWS.

Henry Stevens & Sons, Lacona, N.Y.

1.-Aggie Grace Second's Pertertje.H-F.R No.26731

Calved, Feb. 1st, 1891Fresh July 14, 1898.

2.-Helen Burke.H.-F.R.No.22916

Calved Dec. 23rd, 1889.Fresh July 20th, 1898

John C. Doubt, University Place, Nebraska.

7.-Sharon Dora.H.-F.R.No. 35,210

Calved Feb. 6th, 1893.Fresh Sept. 13th, 1898.

998.PREMIUM FOR HEIFERS.

Henry Stevens & Sons, Lacona, N.Y.

3.-Duchess of Ormsby 3rd.H.-F.R.No. 40,962.

Calved Sept. 276, 1895.Fresh July 25, 1898.

4.-DeKol Manor Beets.H.-F.R.No. 41,216.

Calved March 10th, 1896. Fresh Apr. 25, 1898.

J. W. Chappell, Normal, Nebraska.

5.-Austral Third's Parthena.H.-F.R. No. 46,240

Calved Nov. 27, 1896. Fresh July 17, 1898.

6.-Artis Tgritonia Netherland.H.-F.R.No. 22,116

Calved April 17, 1896.Fresh Sept. 20, 1898.

The animals entered in the test were placed in a barn by themselves on October 10, and were under the supervision of the judge from that time.The cattle were comfortable throughout the entire test, except one night when melted snow leaked through the roof.There was no complaint on the part of the competitors with the arrangements for housing the stock.The barn was kept locked throughout the entire time of the test so that the animals were not disturbed by visitors.A guard was also stationed outside to prevent anyone from entering.The feed was weighed at the time of feeding.Each competitor was allowed to select his own time for feeding and milking.They all fed three times a day and, with one exception, milked three times a day.

At six o'clock on the evening of October 11th the animals were all milked in the presence of the judge, after which the milk from each animal was weighed at each milking up to and including the milking on the evening of October 18.A sample of about one quart was taken from the milk of each animal, this was taken to the labratory where the per cent of butter fat and solid matters it contained was determined.The labratory was kept locked and no one but those conducting the test admitted.Samples were taken of all of the foods used by the competitors and sent to the University of Nebraska for a determination of dry matter.In this way all of the data was collected that was necessary to a calculation of the relative merits of the animals entered in accordance with the rules of the test.

The following is a statement of the record of each animal entered under 997.

ENTRY NO. 1.

Aggie Grace Second's Peretje Owned by Henry Stevens & Son, Lacona, N.Y.

Dry matter consumed in the food during the test,...154.48 lbs.

Statement of Yield

Butter fat produced during test,.............. 13.21 lbs.

Solids not fat,............................... 33.88"

Increase for stage of lactation,..............8.00%

Calculation of score from above as provided in rules, gives,41.614

ENTRY NO. 2

Helena Burke, Owned by Henry Stevens & Son.

Dry matter consumed in the food during the test,...153.93 lbs.

Statement of Yield,

Butter fat produced during test,.............. 13.47 #

Solids not fat,............................... 38.99 #

Increase for stage of lactation,..............7.00%

Calculation of score from above data, as provided rules gives 42.245

ENTRY NO. 7

Sharon Dora, owned by John C. Doubt.

Dry matter consumed in feed during test,...........301.67 #

Statement of Yield.

Butter fat produced during test,..............9.15 lbs.

Solids not fat,............................... 25.84"

Increase for stage of lactation,..............0%

Calculation of score from above data, as provided rules gives 13.5135

The following are the records for the animals entered under 998.

ENTRY NO. 3

Duchess of Ormsby 3rd owned by Henry Stevens & Sons

Dry matter consumed in feed during the test,.......122.98 #

Statement of Yields, Butter fat produced during test,.............. 11.01 lbs.

Solids not fat,............................... 28.83"

Increase for stage of lactation,..............6.5%

Calculation of score from above data, as provided rules gives 42.1085

ENTRY NO. 4

DeKol Manor Beets, owned by Henry Stevens & Sons

Dry matter consumed in feed during the test,.......109.73 #

Statement of Yields, Butter fat produced during test,..............5.59

Solids not fat,............................... 16.13

Increase for stage of lactation,.............. 20.00%

Calculation of score from above data, as provided rules gives 27.5695

ENTRY NO. 5

Austral 3rd'd Parthenea, owned by I. W. Chappell

Dry matter consumed in feed during the test,....... 99.60 #

Statement of Yield, Butter fat produced during test,..............6.95 lbs.

Solids not fat,............................... 17.77 lbs.

Increase for stage of lactation,..............8.00%

Calculation of score from above data, as provided rules gives 33.1170

ENTRY NO. 6

Artis Tritormia Netherland owned by I. W. Chappell

Dry matter consumed in feed during the test,.......104.27 #

Statement of Yield, Butter fat produced during test,..............8.50 lbs.

Solids not fat,............................... 24.37 lbs.

Increase for stage of lactation,..............0.00%

Calculation of score from above data, as provided rules gives 38.7115

In accordance with the rules governing the test I therefore place the animals entered in the following order, based upon the value of the score, and this shall be the order of award.

997.PREMIUM FOR COWS.

1st. Helena Burke.H.F.R. 26731.

Owned by Henry Stevens & Son, Lacona, N.Y.

2nd. Aggie Grace Second's Pertertje, H.F.R. 22916.

Owned by Henry Stevens & Son, Lacona, N.Y.

3rd. Sharon Dora.H.F.R. 35210

Owned by John C. Doubt, University Place, Neb.

998.PREMIUM FOR HEIFERS.

1st. Duchess of Ormsby 3rd, H.F.R.40,962

Owned by Henry Stevens & Son, Lacona, N.Y.

2nd. Artis Tritomnia, Netherland, H.F.R. 22116.

Owned by I. W. Chappell, Normal, Nebraska

3rd. Austral Third's Partena, H.F.R.46240

Owned by I. W. Chappell, Normal, Nebraska.

4th. DeKol Manor Beets, H.F.R.41216.

Owned by Henry Stevens & Son, Lacona, N.Y.

The above is to the best of my knowledge an accurate test of the animals competing, in accordance with the rules governing the test.

Very respectfully,

T. P. Lyon,

The University of Nebraska.

November 14, 1898.

Thanking you for courtesies and consideration shown to me in my work,

Very respectfully,

S. A. Bassett, Asst. Supt.

NEBRASKA FARMER SPECIAL PREMIUMS.

To commemorate its Twenty-sixth anniversary and to contribute to the success of the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition, the publishers of the Nebraska Farmer, H. F. McIntosh, Editor offered $1,350.00 in special premiums to exhibitors and patrons of the Exposition under the following conditions.

1st.In Live Stock, all animals shall be pure bred and American Bred.

2nd.The winning animal in each class will be the one adjudged best by the regular judge or judges employed by the Exposition Management or the Superintendent of the Live Stock Exhibits.

3rd.In every class where awards are to be made, there must be three or more competitors.

$850.00 of the amount for special premiums was arranged to cover exhibits of cattle, horses, sheep, swine, fat stock, poultry, apiarian goods and supplies, honey, wax, ornamental, etc.These premiums covered all classes of the various exhibits and the length of the list prevents its being included in detail in this report.These premiums were all payable in advertising in the Nebraska Farmer.

Cash premiums aggregating $500 and ranging from $100 to $1.00 were offered by the Nebraska Farmer to subscribers who were first to guess nearest to the total number of paid admissions to the Exposition during its full period, from June 1st to November 1st, 1898, 153 days in all.This offer was made under specific conditions and provided for premiums on the 163 nearest estimates.

--------------end of report from Live Stock Department-----(added for clarificaton 1998)

The foregoing report of proceedings, including report of assistants, together with the list of exhibitors to whom awards were made practically covers the work of this department, stated as briefly as possible for historical purposes. It would be impracticableto give a list of all exhibitors and hence it has been thought wise to confine the information as to exhibitors in this record to those to whom awards were made.

I desire in this connection to return my thanks and those of my assistants to the gentlemen who served as judges and clerks in the various departments, acting with the various superintendents and thus making in each class of exhibits a committee of three, consisting of the judges, superintendents and clerks, in scoring and recording the findings as to the relative values of the various exhibits.

I desire further to extend my thanks to you as manager of the Department of Exhibits and to those of the Exposition management who contributed by their aid and helpful influence toward making the work of your superintendent both pleasant and satisfactory.

With respect, I am Very Truly Yours,

John B. Dinsmore,

Superintendent of Exhibits

Department of Live Stock Dairy and Dairy Products.

BUREAU OF BEE INDUSTRIES

E. Whitcomb, Friend, Nebr., Superintendent

The Busy Bee and the results of its industrious industry afforded the opportunity for exhibits of bee products and appliances used, that were of general interest to all visitors and of special interest to many.The very full report of Superintendent Whitcomb, follows:

Omaha, Nebraska, November 11th, 1898

Mr. E. E. Bruck,

Manager Department of Exhibits, Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha, Nebraska,

June to November, 1898

My Dear Sir:

I beg leave to submit the following report of my doings in the Bureau of Bee Industries.On the 28th of August, 1897, I visited the annual meeting of the United States Bee-Keepers Union, held at Buffalo, New York, with a view to securing the next meeting of that organization to be held at Omaha, some time during the Exposition.I found much of a sentiment in favor of following the reunion of the Grand Army of the Republic, on account of the usually low rates that follow the meetings of that organization, and that by a peculiar wording of the constitution, the location of the place of the next meeting was in the hand of the executive committee, composed of the President, Vice president and secretary, and that the convention was powerless to name the place of its next meeting.We, however, presented the claims of Omaha, in the best manner possible and went to work creating what sentiment possible in favor of holding the meeting at that point, and left the balance of the work to be completed by correspondence, which was carried on until the 10th of August, 1898, when the meeting was located at Omaha for September 13th, 14th and 15th.This meeting was very generally attended, and proved to have been well up to the average in interest, with members present from Washington, D. C., Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado and Utah, winding up the convention with a meeting at the Apiary Building, and at which time not only the full delegation was present, but Major Clarkson, General Manager of the Exposition, and H. B. Hardt, Superintendent of the Exhibits Department were also present together with a corps of Newspaper reporters.

After addresses by Major Clarkson, Rev. Emerson T. Abbott of St. Joseph, Mo. and Hon. G. W. Swink of Rocky Ford, Colorado those present were treated to a splendid layout of Rocky Ford melons and in which Senator Swink did the honors of the occasion.

During January of 1898, I visited the meeting of the Northwestern Bee Keepers Association, held at the New Briggs House, Chicago, Ills. with a view of working up an interest in the Trans-Mississippi Exposition, but found this organization to be more of a local affair than was at first supposed.

Since my appointment and up to the time for installing exhibits, and extensive correspondence was carried on with state commissioners, presidents of bee-keepers' associations in the different states, until twelve hundred letters were written.On the 17th of May, 1898, we came to Omaha and opened up an office in the Apiary Building, with a view of installing exhibits, in time for the opening day, June 1st, 1898.This we found slow work, from the fact that some of the states had none of their crop of 1897, on hand with which to make an exhibit, and those who had feared to put up theirs, lest, those coming later might take advantage of their plans and pattern after them.And while the work of installing went on slowly, it was not fully completed until early September, when the Nebraska State Commission with Mr. L. D. Stilson of York, Nebraska as Superintendent, and Mr. G. M. Whitford of Arlington, Nebr. as assistant, occupied 900 feet of space.Douglas County with August C. Davidson of Omaha as Superintendent and Mrs. F. G. Priess of South Omaha as his assistant occupying 400 feet.The State of Minnesota, E. K. Jaques, Supt. 500 Feet;the Utah Commission with Mrs. S. T. Whitacre of Ogden, Utah, as superintendent, occupying 240 feet of space;Hon. G. W. Swink of Rocky Ford, Colorado, occupying 50 feet; L. G. Clute of Greeley, Iowa, occupying 50 feet and E. Kretchmer of Red Oak, Iowa, occupied 50 feet.In supplies, E. Kretchmer, Red Oak, Iowa, occupied 100 feet, the G. B. Lewis Co. of Watertown, Wis. jointly with Emerson T. Abbot of St. Joseph, Mo. occupied 150 feet; the I. A. Root Co. of Medina, Ohio, 200 feet and the Leahy Manufacturing Co. of Higginsville, Mo. 40 feet.These exhibits, not so much in quantity as those shown at Chicago at the Columbian Exposition, by far exceeded it in display and the number of varieties shown and was the finest exhibit of its class ever opened to the public anywhere and reflected great credit upon the individual exhibitors and states above named.On September 16, Hon. Eugene Secor of Forest City, Ia. was chosen as an Expert Judge on this Bureau and at once began his work.By complete system of score cards, the judge not being allowed to know whose work was before him, and noting down in the cards the points of excellence of each, with a possible total of 100, resulting in award of 86 premium diplomas, and medals to exhibitors, distributed by states as follows:Colorado 3, Iowa 18, Kansas 6, Minnesota 13, Missouri 3, Nebraska 34, Ohio 2, Utah 4, Wisconsin 3. The names of exhibitors taking premiums diplomas and medals will be found in the general list in report of Awards Bureau.

The thanks of the beekeepers and supply dealers participating in this Exposition are due and are extended to the management of the Trans-Mississippi and to Mr. E. E. Bruce and his able assistant H. B. Hardt for the fine building and other facilities furnished them and for making this exhibit and which they feel has not been excelled in the history of exhibits in the world.On the date first above written I turned over the Apiary Building to the Supt. of Buildings & Grounds leaving behind many fond recollections of courtesies shown this department during nearly twelve months which we were connected with it and five of which was in active exhibit work. Respectfully Submitted, (Signed) E. Whitcomb. Supt. Bureau of Bee Industry.

MACHINERY AND ELECTRIC EXHIBITS

Prof. H. B. Owens, Nebraska State University, Superintendent.

MACHINERY AND ELECTRICITY.

Machinery Section

(Owing to the resignation of the Superintendent of this Building, Prof. R. B. Owens, in September, this Bureau reverted to my charge and is therefore reported upon by me as assistant to the Manager of the Department.)

As the West has always been considered and is admittedly an agricultural rather than a manufacturing section of the country it was not anticipated that a large exhibit of manufacturing machinery would be made.More attention was given to that class of machinery which would be of use to the west, than to the intricate and delicate machinery that has become of necessity to the east.For this reason the exhibit was limited to those engines and machines for the transmission of power, together with such tools and appliances as were required by the western artisan, mechanic and farmer.In quality and adaptability, these were unsurpassed.The lesser devices for the minimizing labor in the household and the farm were in evidence, and taken as a whole, the machinery section made a distinctively creditable display from a general standpoint, and from the view that it was made for a separate and distinct class of citizens on a sectional basis, it was unexcelled.

The existence of an international war in which we were one of the belligerents, naturally aroused the public interest in arms and ammunitions of war, from a patriotic sentiment almost to the exclusion of the implements of peace.It is therefore not surprising that the different exhibits in this building which were of a warlike nature, held the majority of sightseers.In times of peace, these exhibits, however, were so instructive and elaborate that they deserve more than a passing notice.Everything in fire arms was shown, from a small vest-pocket pistol to a two-inch breech loading Hotchkiss gun;from the old style single barrel, muzzle loading shot-gun to an automatic rifle with a capacity of four hundred shots per minute;projectiles from the minute 18. calibre, short cartridge to the six inch steel pointed shell cartridge and all complete;shot and shell cartridges for both military and sporting use; ordinarily all smokeless powder;a six pounder shell, taken from the wreck of the ill fated "Maine".Sections of four inch Harveyized steel armour were shown to be absolutely powerless against the ordinary type of six pound steel projectile at present in use in the United States Navy, riddling the armour like a sieve, leaving the projectile apparently unharmed.

Practical illustration was given of the penetrative power of the new jacketed and steel pointed rifle bullets as compared with the old style rifle ball of lead.In fact a complete representation of all the destructive agencies of modern warfare, except the larger armament and naval torpedoes.

Side by side with these grim agents of war, were the implements of peace, the tools of the husbandman, the artisan, the farmer and the tradesman.In close juxtaposition, the great educator of civilization, the printing press in connection with many labor saving devices in the art preservative were given practical object lessons in the arts of peace.

Wrought iron designs of very ornate and beautiful effect, a myriad of sanitary appliances and household articles of the most useful and desirable description also found an honored place.The scale exhibit showed an advancement at once notable and wonderful in showing the great improvements made during the last decade in this particular important article.Endowed with almost a human intelligence some of the scales shown indicated not only weight, but price per pound and amount of purchase.

Among other exhibits, were gasoline engines, purifying pumps, leather belting, automatic boiler cleaners, filters, faucets, builder's heavy and light hardware, mills, etc. etc.

Electricity Section.

There is no field of inventive genius in the capability of mankind that has shown greater advancement, or where the possibilities of future development is so apparently illimitable as that of electricity.It is to be regretted that more space was not available to give this one line greater scope.The exhibit made was entirely creditable, and was the best ever exhibited, small though it was.

Previous to the exposition this bureau was under the superintendency of Prof. R. B. Owens of Lincoln, who labored diligently to secure a large exhibit.The outbreak of the Spanish-American war had the effect of deterring many exhibits that had been arranged for, but notwithstanding the disappointment thus occasioned, the exhibit as a whole has been almost unanimously pronounced as equal if not superior to any heretofore made.Owing to personal reasons, the superintendent Mr. Owens, resigned in September and the work evolved upon this Bureau.From the Excellent nucleus formed by Supt. Owens, it was not a hard matter to complete the section.

The exhibits in this section were comprehensive and instructive.The new power was shown in all its stages from the old glass disk for the generation of frictional electricity, with its necessary adjunct, the Leyden Jar, down to the mammoth dynamo of the present day, through all its various changes and developments; from the old Morse telegraph instrument down to the multiplex in use to day; the electric light from the old original "Hudson light" of 1845 down to the improved arc and incandescent lights.

One exhibitor had a fully equipped experimental electric table, where the mysterious vagaries of the subtle current was hourly illustrated.It showed the formation and exemplified the thunder and lightning, its powers of attraction and repulsion, its power as a substitute for explosives in projecting missiles and many other curious things.It is through just such experiments that the expert electrician evolves the primary principles of great inventions.

Among notable exhibits were the original Edison Electric light dynamo, the "X" Ray, a display of dynamos ranging from 1/16 to 1000 horse power, an historical exhibit of the telephone, showing its development from the first device in use during the experimental stage down to the present efficient appliances, a similar exhibit of telegraphy, a form of deep sea electric communication, the improved system of underground wiring, the application of electric heat and power, devices for controlling and measuring electricity and a host of other paraphernalia.

The exhibit in this section as a whole gave to the visitor a pretty thorough idea of the perfect control under which this great power is held by mankind and how subservient it has been made to his wishes and demands.

Among the curious things on exhibition in the building were two diminutive steam engines.One of these could be placed with ease inside of an ordinary small sized pistol cartridge.It was a complete horizontal engine, in perfect running order and until some of the delicately adjusted connections were broken by an inquisitive visitor, it gave hourly exhibitions.The other was a complete boiler and engine.This made its own steam and would run for nearly twenty minutes with twenty drops of water.

The available space in this building was for machinery, 14,404 feet floor space, gallery 7,500.Electricity 13,620 feet floor space, gallery 7,500 feet, a total of 28,024 feet floor space and 15,000 feet in gallery.

The floor space was all taken with the exception of a very small space near the northwest corner and a similar space in the southwest corner.No exhibits were put in the gallery, that not being a fitting place for that class of exhibits.

POWER HOUSE.

This was the very heart of the Exposition, that sent the life giving power through its veins of copper wire to every portion of the grounds, giving light and life to the enterprise.The great battery of massive tubular boilers, capable of transforming tons of water into steam hourly and furnishing the motive power for the great engines that worked incessantly, day and night.The generation of both power and light in this building was fraught with the greatest interest and was the objective point of nearly every one that passed through the gates.The heavier machinery was exhibited here in active operation.From the beginning of May until the middle of November at no time was the machinery still, the work never ceased.It speaks well for the plant when it can be said that not a single accident occurred during the entire season.

The principal machinery in use was placed as exhibits and consisted of Corliss horizontal and upright engines, powerful dynamos, electric appliances, steam pumps, injector valves, steam traps, steam pipes and coverings, belting, etc. etc.

(Signed) H. B. Hardt.

Assistant.

BUREAU OF MANUFACTURES AND INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITS.

Mr. H. B. Hardt, Superintendent.

The exhibits in Manufactures Building, were not only the best of their kinds but they were grouped and placed to present a most harmonious whole and the benefit to an exposition of a superintendent who possessed not only the general and technical knowledge of the exhibits belonging in his department but also an experience in Exposition work, qualifying him for the greater work from a show point of view of so planning the placing, grouping and ensemble of the completed exhibits as to present the strongest attractions to the visitors and arresting and holding their attention, gaining later the careful and painstaking inquiry and research which alone gives value to an exhibitor.Such a man was the superintendent of this Bureau, and whose report on this branch of the exhibits is as follows:

Mr. E. E. Bruce,

Manager.

Dear Sir.

MANUFACTURES BUILDING.This building was the central feature of the lagoon tract, or Court of Honor, taken from the standpoint of exhibits.The exhibit booths were by far more elaborate and costly than those in any of the other buildings.In this building the wisdom of making a charge for space was made patent to every one.The exhibits were more compact and the display showed greater variety, in a small area than has been the case at previous expositions.

Every bit of available space was taken up to save the extreme niches at the east and west ends of the building, which were in fact not taken into account as exhibit space.

The packing house industries were fully and elaborately represented, all the products of the packing house being shown to far greater advantage than had ever been done previously.The system of refrigeration of meats was shown a novel and attractive manner.An octagonal refrigerator, twenty feet in its smallest diameter with an extreme height of thirty feet, with immense doubled plate glass sides was mounted on a circular track at its inner circumference, and was made to revolved slowly around its axis by a system of powerful cogs impelled by electricity.The interior was most tastefully arranged with tempting meats, lards, hams, bacons, etc. etc. and the general effect was of a most artistic and attractive nature.

Every conceivable product of the packing house was shown in lavish abundance, and while there were not two firms adopted the same style of exhibit, all were in the most excellent taste.One of the noteworthy booths was constructed entirely from canned meats and the effect was not only novel and pleasing but artistic in conception and design.The entire meat and packing house exhibit proved to be a surprise and source of wonder to the visitor, while the instructive feature of the exhibit from an educational point of view was successful beyond all expectation.It taught him the extent of the industry and brought him to the realization of the full extent to which he is dependent upon the packer for many of the necessaries of life.That this industry was also of necessity to the artisan, physician and manufacturer as well.

A very substantial pavilion was erected in the center of the building at which one of the principal manufacturers of chocolate and cocoa gave free samples of his product.From the upper floor of this booth, which represented a sumptuous roof garden, many of the concerts were given by such organization as furnished the music for the exposition.

This building contained a varied and interesting class of exhibits, many of which were in full operation.A fully equipped factory for the making of furnishing goods, turned out an immense amount of work daily.The cutting of the garments was done by the agency of a new device, known as an electric cutter.

Practical cookery was shown to better instruct the visitor the true value of baking powders, yeasts, gelatins, etc. etc., stoves, ranges, furnaces and ovens were fully represented.One enterprising firm, whose stove pipe has attained a world-wide reputation, erected a very handsome booth out of the product of their planished iron.Illuminating, lubricating and painter's oils were abundantly in evidence.Choice cut glass, silver ware, garnet jewelry, magnificent exhibits in ecclesiastical art goods:linen from Belfast, silks from the Orient, furs from the Russias, woolens from Australia and Thibet, embroideries, art lingerie, sewing machines, furnishings for both sexes, young and old, pure foods, leather goods, sadlery and harness in process of manufacture, harness tools, oriental carvings and art work, footwear of all descriptions, ancient and modern, from all parts of the world, toilet and laundry soaps, perfumes, confections, cutlery, etc. etc. made together a display that will never be forgotten.

With all the different interests here represented, and the multiplicity of ideas and tastes in decorative effect, the combination was exceedingly harmonious.There were no obtrusive colors or outer designs that deteriorated in any degree, from the general beauty.

The total available space in this building for exhibition purposes was 49,669 feet, gallery 19,884 feet.All of which was occupied.

INTERNATIONAL HALL.

This building, made a necessity from the great number of applications for space, was devoted to the foreign exhibits and to the concessionaires in foreign goods and souvenirs.Two international government exhibits, Canada and Mexico, were installed in International Hall in their entirety.The French exhibitors, through a commissioner, also made a very fine display.Not a single foot of space was left vacant, and in some places encroachments were made on the aisles.

Early in the Exposition, this building became the Mecca for visitors, for in it were all the beautiful articles of vertu and home and personal adornment of the exposition, as well as all the foreign bonded exhibits.

Mexico's silk, linen and lace, minerals, onyx, turquoise, gems, etc. quaint statuary and figure work, tobacco, cigars, cigarros, cigarettes, etc. etc. Canada's mineral, forestry agricultural and horticultural display.France's exquisite furniture, bisque, bronze, and French clay statues, Sevres vases, carvings in bone and ivory, lorgnettes and opera glasses, perfumes, Limoges ware, French bric-a-brac, exquisite laces, tapestries, draperies, etc. etc. Sweden, with its quaintly designed rugs and tapestries, its punch, etc.Italy with her beautiful cameos, marble statuary, mosaics, marjolica, bas-reliefs, tortoise shell creations.The silver filigree and daintily carved vinaigrettes and chatelaines of the far East, the quaint jewelry and ornaments from the Nile, novelties from Austria, Russia, Germany, Switzerland, China, Japan and nearly every quarter of the Globe, were in bewildering abundance.It was a busy mart at all times and many of the visitors carried away valuable souvenirs of the great Trans-Mississippi from the International Hall.

The available space in this building was 18,583 feet.

H. B. Hardt.

Superintendent.

BUREAU OF LIBERAL ARTS.

Mrs. Frances M. Ford, Superintendent.

Liberal Arts is a broad and comprehensive term, covering a broad scope of exhibits, which are in the case of this exposition, treated separately, therefore, in considering the Liberal Arts Exhibits this should be remembered and Liberal Arts and Bureau of Education should be considered as one unit in the whole system of exhibits.In the original plan of Exhibits Department, Liberal Arts, as such had no place, it came as an after arrangement and hence, had not that general position and importance that would otherwise have attached to it.

The Liberal Arts Building, as heretofore stated, was necessarily an after consideration, but vied with the others in point of exhibits and interest.To the observant visitor, much information of value was obtainable.Unconsciously the mind would revert to the past and wonder how our ancestors managed to exist without the agents of our advanced civilization, which were everywhere apparent.The typewriters, arithmetical machines that would add columns of any length, automatically, without possibility of error; the modern systems of education, as evidenced by the colleges of the present; the improved educational appliances in maps, globes, charts and text books; the photographic exhibits; the records of the human voice, reproduced for the entertainment of thousands through the agency of a bit of thin metal, a little wax and a few revolving wheels,- pianos, organs, small stringed instruments, furs, from far-off Siberia, the extreme north, darkest Africa, and in fact from every part of the known world; stoneware for the more ordinary uses of the household and ornamental porcelains of elaborate finish for the wealthy, furniture of quaint and useful design and exquisite finish, not only for the home, but for the office as well; draperies and laces of exquisite beauty, jewelry and bric-a-brac from all countries of the world, were there in profusion.The triumphs of chemistry and pharmaceutical preparations were well represented as well as, also perfumes and articles for the toilet. Refrigerators, heating and cooking stoves and all the utensils demanded by the art of household economy, formed a pleasing feature.

An exhibit, occupying nearly one-fourth of the central part of the eastern portion of the building, was occupied by one of the principal commercial museums of the country, showing the agrarian products of the world, while the fibre exhibit of the United States Government attracted a large number of visitors.

A number of exhibits of incubators and brooders in active operation, were also much visited, and many of the little chicks were carried away as souvenirs. Altogether the Liberal Arts Building with its varied exhibits and many tastefully decorated booths presented a cheerful aspect and was thronged with visitors throughout the season.

The total available space in this building was 46,128 square feet and was nearly all occupied, but a small portion of the gallery being vacant.

(Signed) Mrs. Frances M. Ford,

Superintendent.

BUREAU OF MACHINERY AND AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS.

D. H. Elliott, Superintendent.

The building for housing these exhibits was situated on what was designated the North Tract, the northern part of the grounds, and with the Dairy and Bee Buildings and live stock pens and shed constituted the exhibit section of that portion of the ground.

Mr. Elliot's report on work of this Bureau was as follows:

Mr. E. E. Bruce,

Manager Exhibits Dept of the T. M. & I. E., Omaha, Nebr.

Dear Sir:

On October 2nd, 1897, I was commissioned as "Special Commissioner Transportation Exhibits" by the Trans-Mississippi & International Exposition. I immediately opened negotiations by correspondence and personal interviews with all the leading Transportation Companies in the United States and Canada, soliciting exhibits; as also, later the manufacturers of agricultural implements, in fact everything on wheels or as appertaining to this department. Also visited the Exposition at Nashville, Tenn. and interviewed all the exhibitors in the Transportation building.

Had promises from the "Field Museum on World's Fair Grounds" Chicago, and others for the use of many articles and models illustrating the progress and development of transportation facilities in the United States, as also from railway companies, articles illustrating ancient methods.

The delay in decision as to size and character of the building to be constructed for transportation and agricultural implements, defeated the idea of making this historical exhibit.

Hence, all the space was utilized for display of modern and practical implements and conveyances.The delay in the plans of the building mitigated somewhat against an early application for space, but as finally decided upon, offered one of the best designs and buildings for the purpose yet constructed. 432 feet long, 300 feet wide, floored, roofed and exceedingly well lighted having no dark spaces within it, enabling the exhibitors to install one of the best displays of agricultural implements ever made.Four railway tracks within the building enabled a delivery of the implements and machinery by cars within this building, and the 1728 feet of track was later filled with a variety of locomotives, rolling stock and railway appliances.Among them the Pullman Palace Car Co.'s "Vestibule Train", through which, it may be interesting to know, there passed during the Exposition 520,000 people.

The hours for opening the Transportation & Agricultural Implement Building was 8 A.M., closing at 6:30 P.M.Visitors expressed the belief that the Transportation & Agricultural Implement Building and contents was second only to the Government Building in interest and popularity with the public.

At the beginning of the Exposition the location of the building was considered to be too far away from the other main buildings, but later on, as the Indian Congress progressed and installation of Dairy, Apiary and Live-stock exhibits were made in that section of the grounds, the exhibitors had no cause of complaint for want of attendance.Within this building 59,158 square feet of space was sold to and occupied by 151 exhibitors.The Exhibit was installed, maintained and removed, without loss, or accident to visitors, exhibitors or exhibits.

Respectfully,

(Signed)D. H. Elliott,

BUREAU OF AWARDS.

James M. Woolworth, Omaha, Chairman.

John E. Utt, Omaha, Assistant Chairman.

E. E. Bruce, Omaha, Mgr. Dept. of Exhibits.

In the organization of the Bureau of Awards it was planned to give the widest latitude to exhibitors in the selection of the jury, and in the matter of adjudication to proceed with the utmost fairness and impartiality.The Committee on Awards was composed of J. M. Woolworth, Chairman, John E. Utt, Esq. Assistant Chairman and E. E. Bruce, manager of the Exhibits Department.

A circular was prepared and sent to all the exhibitors with the request that each should name some man as a juror, who was not only competent but whose decisions would carry weight and credence; these jurors to prepare their findings and deliver same to the Committee on Awards for final action.From the names so suggested the following jurors were selected.

Bell, James, Omaha, Neb.

Blanton, T.P. Moscow, Idaho.

Bruner, T.K. Raleigh, N.C.

Benjamin, Marcus, Washington, D.C.

Beardshear, PRof. William, Ames, Ia.

Baumhoff, George W. St. Louis, Mo.

Mrs. M. Benjamin, Washington, D.C.

Clarke, F. W.U.S. Gov't.Building.

Cox, Mrs. W. V.U.S. Gov't. Building.

J. F. Crawford

Courtney, C. R.Omaha, Neb.

Carter, Henry, Kansas City, Mo.

Cole, Emerson, Minneapolis, Minn.

Cooley, J. E.Duluth, Minn.

Dosch, Henry E.Portland, Ore.

Dodge, Charles R.Washington, D.C.

Egbert, Frank L.Omaha, Neb.

Francis, D. R.St. Louis, Mo.

Furnas, Robt. W., Brownville,Neb.

Fisher, C. G.Omaha, Neb.

Gilmore, Dr. Robert, Omaha, Neb.

Guenther, Arthur, Chicago, Ill.

Guthrie, W. W.Atchinson, Kansas.

Greusel, E. S.Havelock, Neb.

Giesseman, W. F.Des Moines, Ia.

Griffith, A. H.Detroit, Mich.

Hyde, John, Washington, D.C.

Holmes, J. A.Chapel Hill, N.C.

Hackner, E.Lacrosse, Wis.

Junker, A. Lakeview, Chicago, Ill.

King, J. J.West Point, Neb.

Kelley, T. J.Omaha, Neb.

Lovett, Israel, Council Bluffs, Ia.

Logan, Lt. S. J.U.S. Gov't. Building.

Long, Prof. John H., Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill.

Lumbard, Jules, Omaha, Neb.

Magarrell, T. Z.Canada.

Mack, W. S.Chicago, Ill.

Miller, R. H., Nebraska City, Nebr.

Nicholson, J. R.Omaha, Neb.

Plumb, S. C.Lafayette, Ind.

Potter, Warren, Aitken, Minn.

Page, Walter T., Omaha, Neb.

Riley, Ed, Omaha, Nebr.

Simpson, I. N., Chicago, Ill.

Steadman, Lt. Commander E. M.U.S. Government Building.

Schmidt, H.Council Bluffs, Ia.

Schurig, Edward F., Omaha, Neb.

Sommer, O. Omaha, Neb.

Swope, Meier, St. Louis, Ill.

Sparks, Prof. E. E.Chicago University, Chicago, Ill.

Sterrett, J. A. Troy, Ohio.

Thompson, D. E., Lincoln, Nebraska.

Tipton, T. C.Washington, D.C.

Van Clave, J. W.St. Louis, Mo.

Van Dieman, H. E.Virginia.

Wallway, Fred W.Omaha, Neb.

Wernher, A., U.S.A. Subsistence Department, Omaha.

Ward, H. C.U.S. Gov't. Building.

Watkins, J. E., Washington, D.C.

Watson, T. J., Toledo, Ohio.

Harry West, Des Moines, Ia.

Watkins, Mrs. J. E.Washington, D.C.

Ward, Mrs. H. C. Ward, Washington, D.C.

Wiggins, Mrs. Frank, Los Angeles, Cal.

Whitaker, S. T. Ogden, Utah.

Et. al.

The above jurors were divided into juries of three and given different groupings to pass upon.The following rules for the government of the jury work, were approved after carefully taking into full consideration the plans for such work adopted and put in practice at other expositions.Many of the features formerly used were either entirely eliminated or modified to met the exigencies of the present situation, and every precaution was taken to guard against the possibility of fraudulent action on the part of any one, one part of the system checking against the other.The jury worked diligently and faithfully and did their work in a thorough and efficient manner, earning for themselves, as a body the reputation of being one of the ablest juries ever called together at an Exposition.Out of Five thousand one hundred and nineteen separate exhibits, only thirty appeals were made from the jury findings.This is an unprecedented record in jury work, and the ladies and gentlemen who served at the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition as jurors, have every reason to feel a sense of satisfaction at the reception their recommendations met at the hands of the exhibitors.

From the recommendations of the jury there were awarded medals and diplomas as follows:

HighestGold Silver Bronze Honorable

Award. MedalMedalMedalMention.

Manufactures....... 17501296155120

Mines and Mining... 0 38587744

Agriculture........ 1 51327173

Horticulture....... 2 638613672

Apiary............. 0 2 412412

Dairy.............. 0 6 32960

Commemorative Medals and Diplomas,..........464,

Total Medals and Diplomas awarded,.........2580.

JUDGING REGULATIONS.

1.No exhibit will be allowed to compete for awards which has not been placed on exhibition on or before the first of June, 1898, unless the exhibitor is able to prove to the satisfaction of the Committee on Awards, endorsed by the Department of Exhibits, that the delay in its arrival has been caused by good reasons.Perishable articles are alone exempted from this ruling.

2.The classification of articles for competition shall follow the schedule as published in the official catalogue, but the Committee on Awards shall have the power to promulgate or subdivide classes if the necessity should arise.

3.One of the jurors in each section shall be elected by the exhibitors and one by the Exposition authorities.The third juror shall be appointed by the two already elected in conjunction with the Committee on Awards.No person shall be eligible for appointment as a juror in any section in which he exhibits or is interested, unless he withdraws from competition.

4.Exhibitors will be invited to nominate eligible persons to serve as jurors in their separate group.Where there is a majority of votes in favor of one person, he shall be considered duly elected.When an equal number of votes has been given for two or more persons, the committee shall appoint the one they deem best qualified. Where no nominations are received, the Committee on Awards shall themselves make all appointments.

5.Each juror shall receive a pass that will admit him to the Exposition Grounds during the judging of the section he is appointed for.Further railroad transportation and hotel expenses will be furnished.THe appointment is to be an honorary one.

6.In the event of the non attendance of any juror at two meetings in succession, or any juror declining to act, the Committee on Awards shall on the requisition of a majority of the remaining jurors, or of not less than five exhibitors in the section being judged, appoint a substitute.

7.Notice of the time of meeting of the several jurors shall be given by the Superintendent at least twenty-four hours in advance.Every exhibitor may be invited to attend meetings of the juries in their own sections for the purpose of giving information as to their exhibits if deemed necessary by the jurors. If they fail to attend, they must bear the consequences of any want of explanation to the jurors regarding any article.The jurors in each section shall deposit under their signature their recommendation of the award in an envelope which is to be sealed by the superintendent.These recommendations of the jurors will be adjudicated by the Committee on Awards, and every exhibitor notified of the result.

8.Jurors may, if they consider it necessary, subdivide classes into subdivisions and recommend awards on each of the subdivisions so created.

9.Collective exhibits shall as a rule, be judged as one exhibit.Should, however, an exhibitor so desire and supply the Committee on Awards with due notice and necessary information, the exhibit shall be divided and parts judged separately; but no exhibit, to any part or parts of which an award of merit may be recommended, shall be eligible for an award as a collective exhibit.

10.Reports and awards shall be based upon inherent and comparative merit, the elements of merit being held to include considerations relating to the originality, invention, discovery, utility, quality, skill, workmanship, fitness for the purposes intended, adaptation to public wants, economy and cost.Exhibitors shall be at liberty to supply, on official forms, jurors with a statement in writing, of the merits which they claim for the articles exhibited by them.

11.An exhibitor may appeal against any award made in his section, such appeal to be lodged with the superintendent within forty-eight hours after the publication of the award on the award board at the Main office of the Committee on Awards, Manufactures Building Gallery, and such appeal is to be accompanied by the sum of $10.00.These payments shall form a special fund for the remunerating of experts called in to give evidence to the Committee on Awards.

12.A decision of the Committee on Awards on any question connected with awards shall be considered final.

13.If any question shall arise as to the interpretation of any of these regulations, the decision of such question shall rest solely with the Committee on Awards.The Committee on Awards shall have power to amend and add to these regulations should the necessity arise.

J. M. WOOLWORTH,

Chairman of Juries

APPROVED:

GURDON W. WATTLES,

President.

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF EXHIBITORS. to whom Medals and Diplomas were Awarded.

The following abbreviations are used:

G.M. for Gold Medal; S.M. for Silver Medal; B.M. for Bronze Medal; H.M. for Honorable Mention; C.M. for Commemorative Medals; H.C. for Highly Commendatory and C. for Commendatory.

Abbott, Emerson T.B.M. St. Joe Hives adapted to modern methods in agriculature.

Acklin, Mrs. H. G.S.M. White Clover Extracted Honey

" """S.M. White Clover Comb Honey.

Acteson, C.B. Prest., G.M. Artificial Graphite Carborundum Co.

Adams, J.L. B.M. Bartlett Pears; Flemish Pears.

Adams, W. J.S.M. Victor Water Heater.

Adams Co. Neb. G.M. Educational Work.

Adamson, Mrs. J. S.M. Table Linens.

Adler, Max. C.M. Chf. of German Press Bureau, Dept. of Publicity and Promotion.

Aerniotor, C.G.M. Best Pumping Windmill.

Agricultural Coll.

Fargo, N.D. G.M. Soils.

Agricultural Coll.

Oregon. B.M. Soils.

Akenbright, W. J.H.M. Wolf River Apples

Akers & Co. B.M. Draper

Acklin, Mrs. G. H.S.M. White Clover Comb Honey and White Clover Extract Honey.

Albright, H. S.B.M. Display of Shoes.

Allen Tripoli Co.S.M. Tripoli cut in various forms for water filters etc.

Allen & Schneider Co. S.M. Maccaroni & Vermicelli.

Althonse BrothersB.M. Stones Eureka Apples, Winter Pearman apples.

Albors & Schneider Co.S.M. Flakes, Wheat, Oats, Rye; Flour,- Buck Wheat and Wheat Flour

Allen, Geo. L. H.M. Small Fruits

Albien, H. A.S.M. Fuller's Earth.

Albrith, P. H. B.M. Corn and Wheat.

Allen, E. D.G.M. Interior Decoration of Exposition Buildings.

Almquist, A. B.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Albion Milling Co.B.M. Wheat, Bran and very fine Flour.

The Altman Infant

Incubator & Scientific G.M. Infant Incubator Hygenia, nursing bottle

Instrument Co. Ltd Feeding appliance for newly forn infants.

Allen, R. D.G.M. Fresh and Evap. Dosch Plums

Arnold, B. J.H.M. Mechanical Drawings.

Archarena Co.B.M. Game Board.

Armour & Co.G.M. Vigorgl and Beef Extract.

Armour & Co.S.M. Exhibit of Packing House Product.

" " G.M. Laundry Soaps

Armstrong, J. B. S.M. Four varieties of corn.

Arapahoe Co., Colo. S.M. General Collection of Fruits.

Armstrong, H. G. S.M. Butter scoring above 97 points.

Armsburger, W. D.B.M."" "95"

" , E. J. S.M."" "97"

Arnold, Bion J.G.M. Engineering designs shown in Drawings

Asquith, A. H.M. Miniature Steam Engine.

Ashtabula Tool Co.S.M. Agriculatural Hand Tools.

Atwood, H. G.B.M. Pears and Apples.

Atwater, H. P. G.M. Collection of Natural Historic Relics

Atchison CountyH.M. Corn from Atchison Co.

Ataka Coal Mining Co. H.M. Exhibit.

Atchison Pav. Brick Co.B.M. Paving Brick.

Atchison Pub. Schools G.M. Educational Work.

Austin Powder Co.G.M. General Powder Display

" "" B.M. Loaded paper shot Gun Cartridges.

Austien, Tomlinson &

Webster Mfg. Co. S.M. Jackson Farm Wagon.

Avery Planter Co.G.M. Complete Threshing Outfit.

Averhill, T. M. & Co. S.M. Mounted Elk.

Aws, M. O.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Axford Incubator Co.H.M. Incubator.

Azure Turquoise Mining

Co.G.M. Cut Turquoise, in all shapes and sizes

Rough Turquoise in the Matrix.

Baker Walter & Co.G.M. Chocolates.

Baldwin Loco WorksG.M. Genreal Display of Locomotives

Baker, Walter & Co. S.M. Cocoa Butter

"" " G.M. Best Breakfast Cocoa.

Battle Creek Steam PumpG.M. Marsh Steam Pump

Barber, A. H. Bar & Co.G.M. Pasteurizing Mach. Ice Mach. Refrig. Mach.

Bailey, H. H. H. M. Grimes Gold Medal.

Bates, Alanson S.M. Fruit Press.

Bartholomew, Co. The S.M. Peanut Roasters and corn popper.

Barber, A. H. & Co. S.M. Combination churn and Butter Worker.

Bachman, Mrs. Fannie H.M. Ceramics.

Banning Bros. G. M. Specimen of Mounted Fish.

Barton, G. D. H. M. Peaches and Plums in liquid.

Bazee, J. T. B. M. Mounted Pheasants.

Bay Gustave G. M. Triplicate Mirrors.

" " G. M. Cutlery Spoons, etc.

Barrier Dallas Sanitarium, Dr.S.M. Appliances for deformed limbs.

Balduff, W. S. S.M. Chocolates and bonbons.

Bartlett, F. L.S.M. Exhibit of "Bartlett Concentrator"

Barnard, Clyde H.G.M. General assortment of fruits.

Barrett, W. W. H.M. Collection of woods.

Barker, JohnH.M. Specular Iron

Barsum, H. O.H.M. Tripoli.

Banning, H. G.M. Antique Specimens of Yerde Antique.

Barbour, Prof. H.F. G.M. Unique Collection of the soils and other minerals of Nebraska and for the care shown in their installation.

Baker, Clarence E.H.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Barrett, W.W.B.M. Rye.

Barnery, F.L.B.M. Fall and winter apples.

Banker, Wm. Sturgeon. H.M. Collection apples.

Bailey, R.H.H.M. White Corn.

Barrett, W.W.G.M. Pyramid No. 1 Scotch Fife Wheat.

""S.M. Sylostion Collection.

Barthell, Louis Garfield.S.M. Collection of fruits.

Bangs, C.J. S.M. Butter scoring above 97.

Balduff, W.S.G.M. Chocolate Bonbons.

Baird, Getty Soap Co. S.M. Laundry Soap "Wash-a-lone."

Bauer, Herman. G.M. American self toning paper.

Bassett, S.C.G.M. For butter scoring highest.

Baugh, David.G.M. Valuable serivces in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Baum, Helen.H.M. Invalid table.

Bassett, S.C.G.M. Assistant Superintendent Dairy Barn.

Babcock, W.N.C.M. Director, Ex. Com. Mgr. Transportation Department.

Barnes, F.L.B.M. Seedling Apples.

Bandmann, D.E. B.M. Exhibit of apples, fresh and in jars.

Benz, Geom. & Co.S.M. Uncle Sam's Monogram Whiskey.

"" " G.M. Vitaline Grape Brandy.

Bettendorf, Axel Co.S.M. Steel wagons and trunks.

Berry Co. Horticultural Society. G.M. Display of fruits.

Belle City, Mfg. Co.S.M. Thresher & Feed Cutter.

Beveridge & Beveridge.G.M. Cured Figs, "These figs cured by an entirely different process.

Berkhardt, C.G.S.M. Prunes, cherries, plums, etc.

Benson, Mrs. J.S.M. General Display of Ladies Furnishings.

Berger, Wm. M. B.M. Weather Strip.

Benz & Son, Geo. S.M. "Appetine" Bitters.

Benjamin, Marcus.B.M. Display of Pipes.

Beltzer, F.A.H.M. Box of Bullion containing Malachites.

""Azurites, Porphyry, Quartz, Silver Silicates & Iron.

Bell. W.A.B.M. Collection of fruits.

Bennett & Dieshond, B.M. Alfalfa Comb Honey.

" " B.M. Alfalfa Comb and Extracted Honey.

Bell, W.W.S.M. Case of wool.

Benson, Mrs. Della. S.M. Designs in Beeswax.

Bergsgather, K. S.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Bennett, J.R.B.M. " """ "

Block, F.E., Co. S.M. Red Cedar shingles.

Beckwith, P.D. Estate.S.M. Display of Round Oak Stoves.

Bell, Clark E. B.M. Granulated Honey.

Benz & Son, Geo. G.M. Appetine Bitters.

Benjamin, Marcusm.M.Juror.

Beardshear, Wm.M."

Benjamin, Mrs. Marcus.M."

Bennett, W.V.M.Gen. Mgr. Canada Exhibit.

Bentelrock, J. G.M. Dental Instruments.

Bemis Omaha Bag Co. G.M. Bags and twine.

Bemis Omaha Bag Co.(Boston) G.M. Bags and twine.

" " "(St. Louis) " " "

" " " (Minneapolis)" " "

Bishop & Co.S.M. Crystallized Fruit Candied Citron.

" " G.M. Preserved Fruits, Pickled Fruits and Fruit Pulps.

Billings, G.F. B.M. Kavlin and dishes made from Kavlin.

Binder & Co., E. S.M. Wood Carvings.

Bingham & Co.B.M. Corn Flour.

Bingham, D.G.B.M. Plums/ apples and strawberries.

Bishop & Co.G.M. Best display of Fruit pickles.

Bishop, Edw. F.C.M. Vice-President for Colorado.

Bidwell, Geo. F. C.M. Director.

Blicksederfer, H.H.M. Collection of Apples.

Blythe, B.M.H.M. Mangelwortzel Beets.

Blanke Bros. Candy Co.S.M. Cocoa.

Blair HorseCollar Co.H.M. Horse Collars.

Blythe, B.M.B.M. Tobacco.

Blossom, F.A.H.M. Gold, silver and lead ores.

Black Hills S. Dak. S.M. Diversified Collection of Ores, Minerals, Etc.

Blue Earth Roller Mills. S.M. Minnesota Flour.

Baldwin, J.H.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Blanton, Prof. J.B. M.Juror.

Blickensderfer Mfg. Co.G.M. Typewriter.

Bludworth & Root G.M. Bestspiral twist water pipe.

Boone Co. Horticultural Society.B.M. Display of fruits, 75 plates.

Birdsey & Somers.B.M. Corsets.

Bowsher, N.P. Co.B.M. Feed Mills.

Bookwater, Mrs. Jos.B.M. Water color.

Boone Co. Milling Co. B.M. Wheat, Bran, Very Fine Flour.

Boneys Pearl Dentrified Co.H.M. Pearl Dentrified.

Bommer Bros.G.M. Display of Spring Horses.

Bonnedfont, F. B.M. Terra Cotta Majolica and Bisque.

Boyer, G. B.M. Carved Bone Ware.

Bohn Mfg. Co.S.M. Refrigerators.

Bolon, Robert C. S.M. Wire Stretcher.

Bohmann, Joseph. C.M. Stringed Musical Instruments.

Boston & Montana Mining Co.G.M. Copper produced by the Electrolytic process.

Bonelli, Daniel. B.M. Samples of Mica.

Booher & Alberti.H.M. Mineral Soap.

Bonanza Mining Co.H.M. Gold Base Ore.

Bomgardner, Wm.S.M. Collectin of apples.

Boynton, W.J.B.M. Shropshire Wool.

Boone, Co. Neb.S.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

Bohen Mfg. Co. G.M. Refrigerators in Dairy Buildings.

Book S.P. G.M. Butter scoring highest.

Bossnot, J.H.B.M. " " above 95 points.

Bozeman Agricultural

College.G.M. Educational Work of Pupils.

Boone Co. Neb. G.M. " " "

Bookwalter, J.W. G.M. Valuable serivces in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Bohrisch, Richard.S.M. Patent Window Frames.

Borsenlanger, Amea. H.M. Needle Work.

Bommer. Bros.G.M. Display of Spring Hinges.

Bruks, Alsterms. S.M. Artificial Leather.

Brandsville Fruit Co. B.M. Norton's Virginia Grapes.

Brown, Geo. W. S.M. Corn Planters of all descriptions.

Brennan & Co.S.M. Disc Press Mill.

Brown Mfg. Co. S.M. Cultivators of all descriptions.

Briggs, John.H.M. Prunes in Liquid.

Briggs, A.H.M. Gregg Raspberries in Liquid.

Bristow Bros.B.M. Nashville Prunes, Evaporated.

Brimble, Markm.H.M. Kelsey Japan Plums in Liquid.

Briggs Spense Co.G.M. Eureka Lemons.

Brown, Cyrus.B.M. Greening Apples, Bellflower and Winter

" " Nellis Pears.

Brotje, J.T.S.M. Seven varieties of grapes.

Bridgeport Gun Implement Co.S.M. Golf Sticks.

Brandies & Sons, J.L. S.M. General Mercantile Display.

Breteau, H. S.M. Limoges Enamel and Miniatures.

Brown & Sons, Jno. S. S.M. Display of Linens.

Brunswick, Balke, Collender Co.G.M. Billiard and Pool Table Exhibit.

Brolun, Jennie G.M. China Painting.

Brennan, Pat.H. M. Flax.

Brown, Chas. F.S.M. Quartz Crystals.

Brandelmeyer, Joseph. H.M. Building Stone and Ore.

British Columbia, B.M. Gold, Silver, Copper and lead Ores.

Brooks, Mrs. C.S.B.M. Butter Sculpture.

Bridal Veil Lumber Co.G.M. Plank of Noble Firs.

Brown, Mr.H.M. Collection of Apples.

Bryant, C.A.H.M. Hydro Silicon, Silver Polish.

Bruce, C.A.R.S.M. Apples and Pears.

Browne, R.T.G.M. Designs for Interior Decoration of Exposition Buildings.

Brown & Sons, John S. G.M. Dipslay of Linens.

Brown, Jennie. H.M. China Painting.

Brown & Son, John S.G.M. Table Linens, Damask, etc.

Bradish, W.K.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Braun, Mess. Ad. & Cie.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Bright, H.V.H.M. Turnstiles.

Brunswick Balke, Collender Co.G.M. Billiard and Pool Tables & Bar Fixtures.

Brooks, Mrs. N.H.G.M. Embroidery.

Bruner, T.K.M.Juror.

Brandies, J.L. C.M. Director.

Brown, J.J. C.M. "

Bruce, E.E. C.M. Director, Member of Executive Com. and Manager of Department of Exhibits.

Brown, H.M. Collection of apples.

Bruning, F. H.M. Peaches and Pears.

Nuerfield, Mellone. S.M. Ceramics.

Buckingham, Mrs. MaggieB.M. 70 plates of Winesap apples.

Bush, G.C. & Co. H.M. White Dent Corn.

Burkhardt Co. Wm.H.M. Moose & Buffalo Heads.

Buffalo Scale Co.G.M. Recording Railroad Track Scale Beam

"" " S.M. (Combination Beam for hay scales. Columbian Automatic scale. Queen City Grocers scale. Agate bearing counter scale. Physician's scale. Fancy Latch Beam. Platform scales and Cheese Factory Scale.

Burnes, Mrs. J.J.H.M. China Painting.

Buffalo Forge Co.S.M. General Exhibit.

Burlington Vinegar

Pickle Works,S.M. Pickles. Vinegar etc.

Burington & Mo. Riv.

Ry Co. G.M. Beautiful Pictorial Display in Grains.

Burpee, W. Atlee Roses, Cannas and Sweet Peas.

Buskirk, A.M.B.M. Miner's Cnadlesticks.

Bullion Beck Mining & Milling Co.B.M. Gold, silver, copper and lead ores.

Burkem, John,S.M. Collection of Sapphires.

Burke, Wm.H.M. Cinnebar Mercury Silver Flasks, Two Quick.

Butcher, M.D.J.B.H.M. Depilatory.

Buffalo Co. Neb. G.M. Educatinals Work.

Buffalo Co. Reform Schl. G.M. Educational Work, Pen Drawing, sewing Tailoring and Shoe Making.

Burk & Chapman,B.M. Blocks of Paving Stones.

Butler Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Buck, Amos. B.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Burt Co. Neb.B.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

" ""S.M. Educational Work.

Busse, Mr. Geo.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Burlington Basket Co. S.M. Baskets of all descriptions.

Bushane, Mrs.G.M. Honiton Lace.

Bulkey, Mrs. L.G.M. Leather work.

Budd, J.L.S.M. 40 Varieties Cherries.

Bryan, F.C. H.M. Moorpart Apricots in Liquid.

Cary, Mrs. C.H.H.M. CombinationCloak and Overshoe Stand.

Carter & Holmes, S.M. Display of Neckwear.

California FIg Syrup Co. H.M. California Fig Syrup.

Cambell Solon D. S.M. "Up-to-Date" Gate Hangings.

Carpenter Paper Co. B.M. General Display of Paper.

California Fish Co. G.M. Sardines.

Cardenas, Amador.S.M. Mexican Onyx.

Case I.I. Mfg. Co.G.M. Best Threshing Machine.

Caldwell Co.H.M. Corn from Caldwell Co.

Carson, J.T.B.M. 6 Plates of Minkler apples.

Callen, James. H.M. Two plates Kieffer Pears.

Cardwell, J.R. B.M. Yellow Egg Plums and Pears in Liquid.

Cawston & Cockburn. G.M. Ostritch feathers, boas, Parasol & Cape.

California Cream G.M. California Cream of Lemon "Produce of Lemon Co. the lemon.

Cahnenge Lemon Grower's

Association.B.M. Eureka Lemons.

Carter, Mrs. Walter.B.M. Shell Work.

Campbell, W.D. G.M. (Mexican Leather Goods, Mexian Wax Work, Mexican Needlework and California Curios.

Carrigus & Co. G.M. Boiler Cleaner.

Case, Mrs. N.W.H.M. China Painting.

Carter White lead Co. G.M. White Lead.

Cass Co. No. Dakota.B.M. Grains and Grasses.

Capitol City Vitrified

Brick and Paving Co.B.M. Paving Brick.

Cannnon, P.H.B.M. Gold, silver and lead ores.

Campion, John. S.M. Display of native gold from "Little Jonnie."

Carthage Marble & WhiteS.M. Carthage Marble, sawed, cut Lime Co.and dressed to show the qualities of the stone when it is worked.

Carborundum Co.S.M. A large section of a Carborundum furnace.

Case & Son, A.E. B.M. Grains.

Calloway, Thos. C.S.M. Colection of fruits.

Carrie, David. S.M. Three varieties peaches.

Canadian Co.B.M. Oklahoma Flour.

Candy Roller Mills. S.M. Minnesota Flour.

Casper Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Cothier, Henry.B.M. Collection of Apples.

Cave, Alfred.H.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Cartin, Dan. G.M. Wheat.

Cahoun, Ira E. G.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Cawker Creamery Co., The B.M. " " "95"

Carpenter R.H. B.M. " " "95"

Capager, M.M.B.M. " " "95"

Carpenter, W.H.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Cambria Coal Co. S.M. Coal & Coke.

Cartwright. T.P. C.M. Com. Shoe and Leather Section.

Carney, J.U.S.M. Specimen of Crystallised Galena.

Cantalina Conserving Co. S.M. Canned Lobsters.

Cagney Bros.G.M. Miniature Railroad in operation.

Carthage Filter Co. B.M. Tripoli Filter.

Carson, W.M.C.M. Service as General Bookkeeper.

Cartahge Marble & White Lime Co.S.M. Carthage marble sawed, cut and dressed to show the qualities of the stone when it is worked.

Carper, Mrs. Minette S.S.M. Burnt wood and leather.

Campbell, J.N. C.M. Neb. Com. Art Section.

Caldwell, W.H. M.Juror.

Carter, Henry. M."

Carpenter, I.W.C.M. Director.

Carothers, A.A.G.M. Collection of fresh apples.

Case, T-M Co.G.M. Threshing machinery. Complete Threshing outfit.

Cassell, Mrs. J.N.H.M. George Washington Dinner Plate.

Cereal Food Co.S.M. Cupid Brand Hulled Corn.

Central School Supply House. G.M. School Supplies.

Centennial Eureka Milling & Mining Co.B.M. Gold, Silver & Copper Ores.

Cedar C. Neb.S.M. Edcational Work.

Century Pub. Co. G.M. Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Chicago & N.W. Ry Co. G.M. Stand Ticket Office and Railroad map of lines.

Chicago Flexible Shaft G.M. Horse Clipping Machine.

Chicago Edison Co. G.M. General Display Electric appliances.

Chicago Art Institute. S.M. Exhibit of art work of students.

Chisholm & Moore Mfg. Co.G.M. Best chain hoists and door hangers.

Chicago Steel Post and Tie Co.S.M. Triangular steel Fence Post and Metal Gate.

Chicago Corset Co.S.M. Kobo Corsets.

Chicago Scale Co.G.M. Best Stock and Hay Scales.

Chambon Hippolito.B.M. Yellow Raw Silk.

Children & Sons. S.M. New Badger Cultivator.

Chew, E.E.B.M. Mother apples.

Chamber of Commerce.B.M. Silk Cocoon Portiers.

Chase & BissellS.M. Display of Chemicals.

Charles Co. Thos.G.M. Kindergarten Supplies.

Chalmel, Gustave.B.M. Varnishes and dentrifices.

Chicago Artificial Limb.

Company.G.M. Artificial Limbs.

Christian Science Ass'n. H.M. Literature.

Chicago R.I. & Pac. Ry.G.M. Splendid Agricultural Display.

Cherokee-Lanyon SpelterS.M. Metallic Zinc Co.

Christy Fire Clay Co. S.M. Samples of Pot Washed Clay.

Chapin Bros. G. M. Collection of cut Flowers.

Christie, D. S. B.M. General Collection of Fruits.

Chanvin, C. H. M. Minerals and Curios.

Chambers, R.C., Prest.

M. & M. Co. B.M. Silver ore.

Chappel, E.H.B.M. Fall and winter apples.

Cherry Co. Nebr. S.M. Educational Work.

Cheyenne Co. Nebr.S.M. Educational Work.

Christenson, E.L.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

"C.P. S.M. " " "97"

Chappell, W.L. B.M. Cheese.

Chicago R.I. & Pac. Ry.G.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

Chase, Arthur. G.M. Superintendent Bureau of Admissions, Department of Ways & Means, in recognition of honorable services.

Chapman, Mrs. Jos. N. S.M. Embroidery.

Charlton, Paul.C.M. Prest. Western Art Ass'n, Fine Arts Section, valuable serivces.

Chase F.N.G.M. Secretary Iowa Commission.

Childs & Co.G.M. Production of Artistic Medal.

City of Great Falls B.M. Sandstone for Building.

Citizens of Ledwich Co.B.M. Ear Corn, cats in straw, wheat, etc.

Citizens of Summer Co., Ks. H. M. Corn.

Clary, W.B. H.M. Lowell Apples.

Clonbrock Steam Boiler

Co.G.M. Climax Boilers.

Cleveland Twist Drill Co.G.M. Twist Drills.

Clisbe Bros. Mfg. Co. G.M. Tool Grinding Machinery.

Clinton Co. H.M. Corn from Clinton County.

Cleveland Faucet Co.G.M. Display of faucets, beer pumps, etc.

Clayton & Lambert.H.M. Gasoline Soldering Torches.

Clemmer, Mrs. A.D.S.M. Sylvanite.

Clute & Son, L.G.G.M. Large Collection of corn.

Clute, L.G. G.M. Cereals/grains, grases and seeds.

Clute, C.A. B.M. Grains.

Clarenden, Edith A. B.M. Pen work.

Clute, L.G. S.M. White Clover extracted from Honey.

Clute, L.G. B.M. Aslike Comb Honey.

""H.M. Dandelion Comb Honey.

""B.M. Heartsease Comb Honey.

""S.M. Linden extracted Honey.

""B.M. (Linden Comb Honey, recommended for purity, flavor and general excellence.

""S.M. White Clover Comb Honey.

Clay Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Close, George. H.M. Aslike Clover Honey.

Cleveland Faucet Co.G.M. Gen. Display of faucets, beer pumps.

Clatsop Mill Co. G.M. Immense Spruce Plank and finishing Lumber.

Clauss Shlos Co. G.M. Display of fine cutlery.

Clarke, F.W.M.Juror.

Clarkson, W.H. S.M. Butter scoring 96 Points.

" Thaddeus S.C.M. General Manager of the Exposition.

Cotton Belt Route St.

Louis Ry. G.M. Fine Display of products of territory.

Computing Scales of G.M. Computing scales. Dayton, Ohio.

Conrad, John.H.M. Chinese Cling Peaches.

Compania Manufactura de Hute-Orizaba. B.M. "Santa Gerlandis" Jute.

Cornish Curtis and Green G.M. Boyd's ripening vat, milk weigher, Wizard churn and worker vats.

Cochran, N. S.M. Riding cutivator and harrow.

Clumbia Canning Co. S.M. Royal Chinook Salmon.

Courtney, J.F. G.M. Prunes, plums, etc.

Collins, Ben.B.M. Lemon cling peaches, Yellow Botan plums and Burbank plums.

Collingridge, F.R.B.M. Biethiemer apples, Skinners Pippins.

Cole Mfg. Co.S.M. Hot blast heater.

Conley, Carris E.H.M. China Painting.

Covey, Mrs. X.F. H.M. China Painting and water colors.

Coudray, F. B.M. Soaps, perfumes, etc.

Colmont,B.M. Opera, field and marine glasses.

Cornu, H.M. Gluten Capsules.

Crown Milling Co.G.M. Minnesota Flour.

Commercial Club of Birmingham, Ala.H.M. Silk Culture.

Cormely et File. B.M. Embroidery machines.

Colorado Onyx Co.S.M. Polished and dressed onyx.

Commercial Club Birmingham, Ala.S.M. Hard red Limey Iron Ore.Brown iron ore, Dolomite, coke, etc.

Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. G.M. Collective Exhibit of Coal, Coke, & Iron and manufactured iron.

Consolidated Fuel Co. S.M. Diamond Lump Coal.

Consolidated Farmer's

Coal Co.B.M. Bituminous Coal.

Consolidated Fuel Co. B.M. Walnut Block Coal.

Cozzi, O. G.M. Straw hats.

Coburn, W.S.S.M. Display of appples.

Coyle, John.H.M. White corn.

Colson, Victor.H.M. Early Rose corn.

Colfax Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Combination Wrench & Jack Co.G.M. Combination Wrench And Jack.

Cowley, J.H.S.M. Collection apples and peaches, plums, etc.

Colorado State Normal

School,S.M. Lloyd work.

Commercial Club, Birmingham, Ala.C.M. Open Hearth Steel.

Cooper,Elwood. G.M. Olive Oil.

Cortland Howe Ventilating Stove Co. G.M. Ventilating and circulating draft stove.

Cole Wm. O. G.M. Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Cooley, Hon. Thoe.G.M. Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Cook, F.L.H.M. Model Roof.

Corvallis, Oregon,G.M. Grade work in public schools.

Cole, Emerson, M.Juror.

Cox, Mrs. W.V. M."

Courtney, C.R. M."

Cook, B.S.C.M. Vice-President for Oregon.

Cole Mfg. Co.G.M. Cold blast heaters.

Collman, A.F.S.M. 46 Varieties of Apples.

Creamery Package Co.G.M. Disbrow Churn & Works & Neal Milk weigher.

Crane Bros. Highest AwardLedger Papers etc.

Crumbaugh, Mrs. M.C.B.M. Castor Oil Beans.

Crete Mills.H.M. Model of Mills.

Crocker, Wheeler

Electric Co.S.M. Slow Speed Motor.

Crouvezier, Chas.G.M. Linen embroidery.

Cross, Cleveland.B.M. Honey producing plants, pressed & Mounted and Granulated Honey.

Crofts & Montgomery B.M. Harley.

Crawford, J.F. S.M. Moss Agate.

Crawford, J.C. G.M. G.T. Thompson Buggies.

Crawford Co. J.C.S.M. Troy Wagon.

Croil, John.B.M. Yellow corn.

Cross, Cleveland.B.M. Honey Producing plants, pressed and mounted and granulated honey.

Crabtree, N.B.M. Hemp.

Crane, Churchill C. G.M. Brass Goods, Brass & Iron valves. Cast and malleable fittings.

Crosby, S.M.M.Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Cramer, Mrs. J.L.S.M. Lace work.

Crawford, J.T. G.M. Superintendent Wyoming Exhibit. Creighton, John A.C.M. Director.

Cudahy Packing Co.S.M. Rex Beef Extract.

Cudahy Packing Co.G.M. Canned meats,

" " "G.M. General Exhibits.

" " "G.M. Diamond C. Hams.

Culver, C.N.H.M. Collection of peaches.

Cudahy Packing Co.S.M. Small Goods.

" " "S.M. Fluid Beef Extracts.

" " "G.M. Diamond C. Soap.

Cutaway Harrows. S.M. Cutaway Disc Harrow.

Cusick, F.D.B.M. Egg plums in liquid.

Cunningham, W.D. H.M. Kelsey Japan Plums.

" D.W. H.M. Meus Royal Apricots in liquid.

Custer Fire DepartmentB.M. Mineral Cottage.

Cutter & Son, William S.M. Collection of fruits.

Cuming Co. Neb.G.M. Educational Work.

Custer Co. Neb.B.M. Educational Work.

Cuming Co. Neb.S.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

Cutzler, J.H.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Cushman Gladiolus Co. S.M. Assortment Gladiolas.

Curtis & Cameron.G.M. Valuable serivces in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Cushing Buggy Evener Co. B.M. Cushing Buggy Evener.

Cyclone Woven Wire

Fence Co. G.M. Fencing.

Davis Gas Engine Wrks. Co. B. M. Gasoline Engines.

" " " " S.M. Portable Gasoline Engine.

" " " " S.M. Steam Generator.

Davis, J.J. H.M. Display of cabbage.

Dain Mfg. Co.S.M. Feed mill.

Davis Gasoline Engine

Works Co. G.M. Feed Mills.

Davis, J.C. H.M. Royal American cherries in liquid.

Davidson, J.C. B.M. 5 Plates willow twigs, Jonathan apples.

Davis Co. Mo.H.M. Corn from Davis Co.

Dalle, C.H. H.M. Wheat from Cole C.

Daisy, O.C. H.M. Wheat.

Day, K.W. B.M. Fruits.

Davis Mill Co. G.M. Aunt Jemima Pancake Flour.

Darct & Son B.M. Zinc and Lead Ores.

Davis, A.C. B.M. Rare Fossils.

Daniels, J.M.H.M. Yellow Corn.

David Brothers.S.M. Peaches.

Davidson, August C. B.M. Honey in marketable shape.

Davis Mill Co. R.T. S.M. Golden Sheaf Flour.

Davix Mill Co. R.T. G.M. Royal No. 10 Flour.

Davidson, August C. S.M. Samples of Honey.

" " S.M. Linden Extracted Honey.

Dawes C. Nebr. B.M. Educational Work.

Dawson C. Neb. S.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

Davitz, F.F.B.M. Yellow Corn and Calico Corn.

Daly, Marcus.B.M. Exhibit of Alexander apples.

Dawson, C. neb.G.M. Educational Work.

Dakota Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Dahl, John F.Butter scoring above 95 points.

Day, W.W. B.M. Butter scoring avoe 95 points.

Dawson Co. Neb.Working Irrigation Exhibit.

Davidson, August C. B.M. Metheglin.

Davidson Louis.M.Juror. Day, Dr. David T.G.M. Superintendent Mining.

Debe & Reynolds Co. G.M. Paints and varnishes. Des Moines

Incubator Co.Highest Award Hot Air & Hot Water Incubator and Breeder.

Deere & Co. G.M. Sulky Gang Plow.

Deer & Masur Co. S.M. Sulky Lister.

" " "G.M. Corn platners and shellers.

Deer Willis & Co.G.M. Collective Exhibit.

Des Moines Incubator Co. G.M. Hot Air and Hot Water Incubators and Breeders.

De Laval Separator Co.G.M. Cream Sepaator.

Dempster Mill Mfg. Co.G.M. Hydraulic and Cable Drill.

DeLauney, Helen. H.M. Oil Painting.

DeWit, Dr. C.H.H.M. 20 Plates Willow Twig, Jonathan etc.

Detwiler, Samuel.H.M. Wheat.

De Kalb Co. H.M. Corn from De Kalb Co.

Dewar & Sons, John. G.M. Highland Whiskies.

De Snowski, George. G.M. Fine furs.

DeLauney, Ch.G.M. Artistic Furniture.

DeLaes Wood Co. W.G.M. Exhibit of Planished Sheet Iron.

Deidesheimer, Philip. H.M. Model of Timering and Drawing used in deep minson the Comstock Lode.

Delamar, Captain.B.M. Gold ores.

Denver Onyx & Marble Co. S.M. Marble and Onyx.

Denver Fire Clay Co.G.M. Fire Clay products.

De Caro, A. G.M. Tortoise Shell work.

Dexter Folder Co.G.M. Folding Machine.

Delta Co. Colo.G.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Delevan Gate Co. H.M. Farm Gate.

De Soto Agricultural Implement Co.G.M. Corn Stalk shredder.

Delaney, John. H.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Duel, C. Neb.B.M. Educational Work.

Dempster Mill Mfg. Co.G.M. Press Grain Drill.

Dr. C.H. De Groot.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Denver & Rio Grande Ry.S.M. Photographs.

Diesem, J.L.H.M. Alfalfa.

Dicksinson, S.S. B.M. Collection of Apples.

Dixon Co. Neb. S.M. Educational Work.

Diesem, J.L.B.M. Alfalfa Extracted honey.

Diesem, J.L.B.M. Aflalfa Comb Honey.

""H.M. Alfalfa.

Dinsmore, Jno. B.G.M. Supt. Live Stock, Dairy Products, etc.

Dickinson, Edw'd.C.M. Director.

Dowden Mfg. Co.S.M. Potato Digger and sorters.

Dosch, Henry F.S.M. Processing & Ex. 1st Fruits in jar?

" "B.M. Pears, peach, plums, prunes, vosch prunes in liquid.

" "G.M. French Walnuts, Filberts & 4 Jars of Walnuts.

" "S.M. Evaporated Fruits etc. etc.

Doubt, Mrs. E.A. H.M. Paintings.

Dodd, C.J.C.M. Grains and Grasses.

Douglas Co. Neb. G.M. Grain in sheaf, in ear and wild and ""G.M. Figures of King Corn & Queen of Grasses.

Doniphan Vinegar & Wine Co. S.M. Wines and Brandies of various kinds.

Douglas, Jas.G.M. Azurite, malachite, metallic Copper, etc.

Downing, J.M.B.M. Wire silver.

Douglas Co. Neb. Highest AwardAgricultural Exhibit.

""G.M. Educational Work, drawing and designing.

""G.M. Continuous display of all kinds of fruit.

Douglas Co. Neb. S.M. linden extracted honey recomended for purity, color, and general excellence.

"" S.M. Linden Comb Honey.

"" B.M. Improved Langstroth Hive.

"" S.M. Sweet Clover extracted honey.

"" S.M. Designs in beeswax.

"" S.M. Fine Granulated Honey.

Douglas Co. Neb. S.M. Heartsease, Extracted honey, recommended for purity, quality and flavor.

Douglas Co. Institute for Deaf and DumbG.M. Manual Training, plain and fancy needle work.

Boesch, Henry F. G.M. Evaporated Fruits, Etc. Etc.

Dodge Co. Neb. G.M. Educational Work.

Dockarty, Anthony Jas.G.M. Execution of designs of diploma for the T-M & I Exposition.

Douglas Co. Neb. S.M. Experimental Test Full colonies of Bees.

""H.M. Honey Vinegar.

""H.M. Unrefined Beeswax.

Dole, Wm. N.V. Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Dodge, Chas. F.M.Juror.

Dougghen, Jr. Jr. A.B.M. Palms.

Dosch, Henry E. Highest Award, Treatise on Bees.

Doniphan, John.G.M. Vice-President for Missouri.

Dosch, H.E.

Draper, T.M.G.M. Superintendent of Exhibit.

Drake Co. G.M. Polished specimens. Silicified wood.

Dragon Iron Mining Co.H.M. Limonite Iron.

Drew Selby & Co. S.M. Ladies Shoes.

Drake, C.E. B.M. Pyramid of Grains and collection of forage plants.

Drees, Henry H.G.M. Vic Regias and other aquatic plants.

Drake, Chas. R.C.M. Vice President for Arizona.

Dunklin Co. H.M. Cotton from Dunklin Co.

Due Fireworks Co.S.M. Fireworks and designs.

Duek, Francis. B.M. Yellow Corn.

Dundy Co. Neb. G.M. Educational Work.

Duke Brothers. B.M. Collection of apples.

Duderstadt, Robert. S.M. Artisitic Woodenware.

Due Fireworks Co. A.L.G.M. Superiority of design, marvelous effects and general excellence fireworks displays.

Dubenech, E.G.M. Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Durand-Renl, W.M.G.M. Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Durrin, P.H.M. Marble statuary

Due John (Chief Pyrotechnist)

C.M. In recognition of honorable Services.

Duggan, Mrs. L.C.G.M. Embroidery.

Duke, Mrs. Mary. S.M."

Dupont, Agustus. C.M. Vice President for Georgia.

Duluth Imperial Mill C.B.M. High Grade Minnesota Flour.

Dwights Flour Mills.G.M. Minnesota Flour.

Dwight, D.V.H.M. Ores from Contract Camp.

Dysthe, M.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Eagle Mills.G.M. Soft Wheat, Oklahoma Flour.

""G.M. Hard Wheat " "

Fairhurst, Guy.S.M. Sylvanite, specimen from Graphic Mine.

Eaton, Helen M.C.M. Chief Clerk Exhibits Department, in recognition of honorable services.

Eames Nursery Co.H.M. Bartlett Pears in Liquid Satsuma Plums.

Eby, M.F. B.M. Crab apples and prunes.

Edgren, Adolph.G.M. kitolin.

Edmunds, J.L.H.M. White Corn.

Egbert, F.L.M.Juror.

El Buen Tono, S.A.G.M. Cigarettes.

Electric Storage Battery

Co.G.M. Storage Batteries.

Elson Co. H.W. S.M. Photogravures.

Eldredge, Mrs. W. H.B.M. Hand Painted Lamp.

El Reno Milling & Elevator Co. S.M. Oklahoma Flour.

Elling, HenryG.M. Gold nuggets.

Elsuer, Dr. John S.M. Colorado minerals.

Elkton Golf Mining Co.S.M. Gold & Silver Telluride from the Elkton Mine.

Ellinghouser, J.D.H.M. Mammoth Plymouth White Corn.

Elliott, D.H.G.M. Supt. Bureau of Transportation.

Elmendorf, C.H.G.M. Asst. Supt. Dairy Barn.

Ely, Geo. H.H.M. White Dent Corn.

Ely, David H.M. Corn from Adair Co., 3 types shown.

Emery, C.B. H.M. Apples, crab apples and peaches.

" " H.M. Collection of cucumbers.

Emmons, and Lovelocks H.M. Iron ores.

Emerick, L. H.M. Gold silver and copper.

Empire Zinc Co.S.M. Spelter.

Emerson, James H.S.M. Butter scoring above 97 points.

Emily, K. R.B.M."" "95"

Enterprise Clay Co. S.M. Slat Lake Pressed Brick.

England, A.G.H.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Engelhardt Davidson

Merchantile Co.S.M. Millinery.

Erb, LouisB.M. Collection of fruits.

" C.B. Ertel, George Mfg. Co.G.M. Brooders and Incubators.

Etinger, S. H.M. Whittled clock.

Eureka Tempered Copper

Co. G.M. Tempered Copper Products.

Eustis, G. T.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Evans, J.C. G.M. Collection of fruits, 145 plates.

Evans, P.S. H.M. English Rambo Apples.

Evans, H.C. Hmg. Co.S.M. Potato planters, corn planters and corn drills.

Everson, K.R.H.M. Corn.

Evenham, Henry H.M. 26 plates of Northern Spy and Golden Russett apples.

Everson, K.B.H.M. Corn

Evans, Wm. C.G.M. Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Evans, John H. C.M. Director.

Excelsior Shoe Co.S.M. Boys and Youths Shoes.

Experimental Farm of the North Carolina

Horticultural Society G.M. Experiments in soils and vegetable growth.

Excelsior Shoe Co.S.M. Shoes.

Experimental StationS.M. Display of plums.

Exposition Transfer Co.B.M. Prompt Delivery of Goods.

Fargo, F.K. & Co.G.M. Butter Printer Milk Pump Butter works and combination churn.

Fausher, Geo.H.M. Flemish Beauty Pears.

Failing, Ida C.S.M. China Painting.

Farrell & Co.G.M. General Exhibits.

"" G.M. Household Tinware.

"" S.M. Mince meat, maple syrup and preserves.

"" S.M. Fire Extinguishersd

Farnham, C.T.B.M. Seven headed wheat hullers Barley and winter rye.

Farmer's Co-operative

CreameryB.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Favor Ruhl & Co. H.M. Huge Lead Pencil.

Fairfield, Edward M.C.M. Chief Clerk Dept. Cone & Pin

Fairhurst, Guy S.M. Sylvanite specimens. Graphic mine.

Fisher, C.G.M.Juror.

Fellows & JobH.M. Mineral specimens including marble croppings.

Federshon, Peter H.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Felton, W.B.S.M. Varieties of Pears.

Fellows, C.H.C.M. Vice President for Kansas

Fitch, H.C. B.M. Collection of fruits.

Finborough, H. H.M. Pacific Prunes in liquid.

Finch, Mrs. P.F. H.M. Two pastels.

Fisher Typewriter Co. G.M. Book typewriter.

Fisher, H.F.S.M. Wheat Flour, Corn Meal.

Fillmore Co. Neb S.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

"" "S.M. Educational Work.

Fishell, JohnB.M. White Corn

Fish Bros.G.M. Wagons and Farm Wagons.

Fisher, Sidney G.M. Superintendent Agriculture, Ottawa Canada

Field, C.W. G.M. Commissioner Minnesota.

Fisher, H.D.G.M. In Charge Wisconsin Building for valuable services rendered.

Flaviana Munguia, Mexico.S.M. Chocolate.

Florsheim & Co.B.M. Men's shoes.

Fleischmann & Co.G.M. Compound Yeast.

Flanagan & BiedenwegS.M. Display of stained glass.

Flemish Tapestry Co.S.M. Tapestry

Forman, Gen. Chas.S.M. Burbank Plums, Golden Plums, Satsuma Plums and Foster Peaches.

Forrester, M.L.H.M. Tragedy Plums and Republican Cherries in liquid.

Foshay, J.H.H.M. Kelsey Plums

Ford, Mrs. H.S.B.M. Ceramics

Forrest Oil Co.B.M. Crude and refined Petroleum

Foster, SampsonB.M. Corn.

Forney, A.G.B.M. Alfalfa Extracted Honey.

Fox, Wm.S.M. Collection of Grapes.

Foster, A.C.C.M. Gen. Supt. Buildings & Ground Dept.

Foss Mfg. Co.S.M. Foos Feed Grinder and Sweep Grinder.

Ford, Mrs. Frances M. C.M. Supt. Bureau of Education.

Fort Street Government School, Honolulu G.M. Primary Educational Work, maps and wood carving.

Freemen & Sons Mfg. Co.S.M. End Gate Seeder, and Broad Cart End Gate Seeder.

Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Ry Co.G.M. Model Ticket Office.

Franklin Publishing Co.G.M. Maps, Charts, Globes and Desks.

Freeman, E.C.H.M. Sculpture.

Frick Coke Co. H.C. B.M. Blast Furnace, cocke and the coal from which it is made.

Frontier Co. Neb.S.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

Freeman, D.A.S.M. White Clover Extracted Honey.

Freeborough, H.S.M. Pacific Prunes in Liquid.

Freebora, C.C. B.M. Fall and winter apples, Russet pears.

" S.I. S.M. Fall and winter apples, Russet pears.

Fremont Co. Canon CityG.M. General Collection of Apples.

Freeman, D.A.S.M. White Clover Comb Honey.

Freisinger, VictorG.M. Beheminan Glass ware.

Frees, H. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Fridner, JohnS.M."" "97"

Frontier Co. Neb.G.M. Educational Work.

Freer, C.L. G.M. Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Freuch, W.M. R.G.M. Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Fuller, Lee Mfg. Co.G.M. Disc Press Drill.

Fuller, Mrs. H. B.H.M. Ceramics.

Furnas, Robt. W. G.M. Collection of plums and grapes.

Fuller, F. W.B.M. Breccia containing Ruby and Briule silver.

Fuller-Warren Co.B.M. Stoves.

Furnas Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Furnas, R.W.M.Juror.

Gardner, W.H.B.M. Collection of apples.

Gassell, Mrs. I. N. H.M.

Gardner Bros.S.M. Wheat Flour.

Galena Commercial Club.G.M. Com. Exhibit of Lead and Zinc Ores.

Garfield Co.G.M. General Collection of fruits.

Gardiner Wheel Co.B.M. Irrigating Wheel.

Gage Co. Neb. Institute for Feeble Minded.

G.M. Brush Making, Plain and Fancy Needlework.

Gasper Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Gaiser, H.S.M. Colelction of Grapes.

Gans, Samuel M.Valuable services in connection with Fine Arts Exhibit.

Gardner Governor G.M. Gardner Duplex Steam Pump.

Gabelman Photogravure Co.G.M. Photogravures.

Gaskill, Wm.S.M. Portable Fence.

George, HenryS.M. Collection of Fruits.

Gem City Business CollegeS.M. Penmanship Course of study, Student's Bookkeeping Books and Commercial Text Books.

Getchell, J.G. B.M. Barlett Pears.

Gentzke, Margaret H.M. Pen Work.

Geisler, MaxH.M. Birds, Fishes and Fish Food

Gearkley, Thos.H.M. Long Yellow Eared Corn.

Genesee Salt Co. G.M. Salt.

Gehrls, Wm. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Geisermann, W.F. M.Juror.

German Society for Importation of German Song Birgs. B.M. 17 pairs Imported, acclimated Insectiverous Song Birds.

Gibson, A.A.G.M. Switch Stand Head.

Gibbs & Son, H.H.M. Pipes made from cobs.

Gibbs, T. H.M. Hungarian Prunes in Liquid and Foster peaches in liquid.

""H.M. Burbank Plums and Orange Cling Peaches.

Globe Mfg. Co. H.M. Globe Hair Restorative.

Gilsonite Asphaltum Co.S.M. Gilsonite and Products Laquered therefrom.

Gibbons, Felix H.M. Three varieties of Corn.

Gulbert, F.W.H.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Gibson, Mrs. A.J.H.M."" "

Glasscock Bros. Mfg. Co. H.M. Baby Jumpers.

Gilmore, Dr. Robt.M.Juror.

Gloege, Adolph B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Glasgow Evaporation Co.H.M. Copper ores.

Glick, F.H. B.M. Pop Corn and Wheat.

Glick, Fred H. B.M. Alfalfa Extracted Honey.

Glick, G.W. B.M. Wheat.

Goodner, Chritton & Adams G.M. Rotary Steam Engine.

Gold Coin Mining Co.S.M. Gold, Silver Tellurides from "Gold Coin Mine".

Goodchild & Co.B.M. Collection of Anatimony ore.

Government of CanadaG.M. General Exhibit.

Goeldner, Gus. S.M. Peaches, Pears Nectarines.

Gold Eagle Mining Co. H.M. Gold ore.

Goodnow, M.J.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Goldman, Henry G.M. The Arithmachine.

Galabic, JohnG.M. Superintendent Oklahoma Exhibit.

Goff, E.S.S.M. Fall and Winter Apples, Russett Apples.

Green Co. Horticultural Society S.M. Display of Fruits.

Greenleaf Baker Co. B.M. Wheat.

Griffith, H.P. B.M. Valencia Late Oranges.

Grow, W.N.H.M. Cling Peaches in liquid.

Gross Sad. Iron Co. S.M. Gross Patent Gas Sad Iron

Green-Wheeler Co.S.M. Ladies Fine Shoes.

Goodell, A. S.M. Bonanza Apple Parer, Cherry Stoner and Seed Sower General Electric Co.G.M. Arc Lamp, Constant Potential "Watt", Meters and General Exhibit.

Graves, F.P.S.M. Mineral Collection.

Green, D.W. H.M. Model Stamp Mill.

Grahman & Dove.H.M. Iron Pyrites, silver ore Free Gold ore and specimens.

Great Falls Fire Brick

Company B.M. Superior Fire Clay Brick.

Graphic Mining Co.B.M. Smelting ores.

Grau, J.N.B.M. Wool.

Greeley Co. Neb. H.M. Educational Work.

Grand Junction Colo.

SchoolsS.M. Educational Exhibit.

Grande Porde Lumber Co.G.M. Yellow Pine and Tamarack Lumber

Griffith, J.L. G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Greusel, E.S.M.Juror.

Graves, Frank P. C.M. Vice President of Wyoming.

Greet, A.H. G.M. Secretary Kansas Commission.

Griffith, A.H. G.M. Superintendent Fine Arts Bureau.

Graham, M.J.B.M. 15 varieties of Peaches and Pears.

Guthrie, R.D.S.M. Liquid Measure.

Guker, Ike. S.M. Native Gold Wire, Gold Thread, Gold with Gold Bearing.

Guthrie, W.W.H.M. Polled Angus Cattle.

Gulf Bag Co., Ltd.G.M. Bags and Twine. (San Francisco)

Gulf Bag Co., Ltd.G.M. Bags and Twine. (New Orleans)

Guthrie, W.W.M.Juror. Hammond Packing Co.Highest AwardMeats of all Descriptions.

General Exhibit Packing House Products.

"""G.M. Lards.

"""G.M. Hammonds Beef Wine & Iron.

"""S.M. Canned Meats.

"""S.M. Sausages, Etc.

"""B.M. Beef Extracts.

Hawks, H.D. H.M. "Stump the World " Peaches.

Hayback,C.C. Carriage Co.G.M. Collective Exhibit of Carriages.

Harper, H.C.S.M. Ben Davis Apples, Fall Pippin, Bellflower Apples.

Hammond Packing Co. G.M. Calumet, Coin Special & White and Star Lards.

Harris, Jas. A.H.M. Grasses.

Hamacher, J.R. & O.N. H.M. Wheat from Ray Co.

Hanthorn, J.O. G.M. Chinook salmon.

Hayden Bros.G.M. Furniture, Clothing, etc.

Hanselt, Chas. S.M. Glazed and colored Kid.

Haney & Co., J.H.G.M. Saddlery and Harness.

Harrison, GraceB.M. China Painting.

Hay-Budden Mfg. Co. G.M. Display of Anvils.

Harris, W.K.S.M. Collection of grapes.

Hanauer, M.S.H.M. Silver, lead and gold bullion.

Habert Lapidary & Jewelry Co. B.M. Cut and polished gems.

Haynes, Wm. H.B. Free Milling Gold Ores.

Harkens, Chas. G.H.M. Carved cross of gray sandstone and monument of block marble.

Haarman Vinegar Co. G.M. Collective exhibit of pickles and vinegar.

Hansen, H.B.M. Broom Corn.

Harlan, W.B.H.M. Exhibit of apples.

Hall Co. Neb.G.M. Educational Work.

Haynes Co. Neb. Educational Work.

Hardin, Fred.B.M. Seedling and named apples.

Harris, G.H.B.M. Collection of fruits.

Hanson, P.A." " "

Harlan Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Hamilton Co. Neb.B.M. Educational Work.

Hall, J.H.B.M. Apples.

Hanson, H.B.M. Broom Corn.

Hall, D.J.H.M. Exhibit of apples, pears, prunes, etc.

Hastings, H.M. E.M. Minnesota Flour.

Hangdahl, Saml.G.M. Butter scoring highest.

Hansen, Christ.G.M.""above 95 points.

Hanson, J.A.B.M."""95"

Harvley Mfg. Co. G.M. Curlene.

Hazeltine, T.L.B.M. Ingrahm apples.

Harvest Home Ass'nB.M. Pears and apples.

Haire, JamesB.M. Butter scoring above 95 points

Hackner, F. S.M. Church carvings and statues.

Haskins Bros. & Co. Highest Award "Beat-em-All" Soap and Newton's pure white soap.

Hawaii G.M. Green coffees.

Hardt, H.B. G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Haseltine, Chas. F. G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Haines & Co., Wm. S.G.M. Hinty Steam Traps.

Haynes, James B. C.M. Supt. Press Bureau, Dept. Publicity & Promotion, for honorable services.

Hadkinson, J.H.C.M. In recognition of honorable services as Supt. Bureau of Landscaping, Dept. Ways & Means.

Hardt, H.B. C.M. In recognition of honorable services as Asst. Mgr, Dept. of Exhibits.

Hawaii G.M. Educational Work.

" G.M. Tobacco, Leaf.

" S.M. Preserves, jams and jellies.

" G.M. General Exhibit.

Hambleton, C.E.G.M. Sec. Illinois Commission.

Hawaii S.M. Rice and Pea Starch

Haviding, W.C. B.M. 29 varieties of Russian apples.

Hearford, J.H. B.M. Wheat from Livingston Co.

"E.H.B.M. Alfalfa Clover

Hedgeport, J.H.B.M. White, solid, compact corn.

Hearn, FrankB.M. Corn from Jackson Co. Mo.

Heinshemer, D.L. & A. B.M. 20 Plates Alberta Peaches.

Henderson, C.M.B.M. Boots and Shoes.

Henry, L. B.M. French Porcelain in (and) Bronze

Heyn, The PhotographerS.M. Collective display of Photographs.

Herrick Refrigerator & Cold Storage Co. S.M. Refrigerators.

Hesser, W.J.S.M. Specimens of Plams, cacti, etc.

Herrington, J.A. H.M. Sulphuric pyrites, copper ores, lead ores.

Hennessey Roller MillsG.M. Perfection Oklahoma Flour.

Heatherstraw, James B.M. Red Corn.

" Fred H.M. White Oats.

Herman, G.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points

Henneman, P.J. & Sons G.M. Dessicated Potatoes and Onions

Henderson, Lewis S.M. Floral Display on Exposition Grounds.

Henford, C.O.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Hess, P.P.B.M. 20 varieties, grapes, currants, gooseberries.

Hinnman Improved Can Co. G.M. Milk can.

Hill & Sons Co., Jas. G.M. California Pickled Olives, ripe & green

Hinlan, John E.B.M. Corn from Boone Co.

Hinman, John E.B.M. English Rye.

Hinkley, M.E.H.M. China Painting.

Hicstand, J.G. S.M. Polished Malachites and Azurites

Highland Electro Chemical Co.G.M. Soldering Paste.

Higgins, Mrs. C.P.B.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Hinslie, Geo.S.M. Cedar Doors, sash and moulding.

Hitchcock Co. Neb.B.M. Educational Work.

Hill, JackB.M. Infusorial Earth

Hitchcock, Gilbert M. C.M. Director.

Howell Co. Kansas

Agriculatural Society G.M. Display of Fruit, 704 plates.

Holt Co. Nebr. Horticultural Society G.M. Display of Fruits, 891 plates.

Hoover, Prout & co. G.M. Potato Digger.

Howard Fruit FarmB.M. Collection of Fruits.

Howard, H.B.M. Pride of Salien, yellow corn.

Howard, Rev. J.B.M. Winesap, Ben Davis, Jonathan, etc.

Holmes, Sam H.M. 4 Plates of ben Davis Apples.

Home Embroidery Mach. Co.S.M. Embroidery Machine and embroidery.

Horn Silver Mining Co.H.M. Copper, Silver & Lead ores.

Holden, M.E. Albert B.M. Gold, silver and lead ores.

Home Riverside Coal Mining Co.B.M. Bituminous Coal.

Home Acme Cement Plaster Co.G.M. Acme Cement Plaster.

Horner & RossB.M. Corn

Hoyt, WilliamH.M. White Rye.

Howard Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Holt Co. Neb.G.M. Educational Work.

Howlett, Mrs.H.M. Collection of Apples.

Hoischinger, Chas.S.M. Fall and Winter Apples.

Hozie, B.S. B.M. Collection of Apples.

Houtz, H.A. H.M. Corn in ear.

Hoyt & Caswell B.M. Apples.

Hoffman, H.G.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points

Hopewell & Streblow B.M. Cheese

Holmes, Wm. F. C.M. In recognition of honorable services as cashier.

Hoxie, Mrs. A. V.G.M. Embroidery.

Holmes, O.C.S.M. Installation.

Holmes, I.A.M.Juror.

Hobron & Co., T.W.G.M. Tarocna, Gen. Merit.

Hutton, D.S.H.M. Car Coupler.

Humphrey & Sons. G.M. Broadcast seeder.

Hughes, Lee H.M. Seedling Crab apples in liquid.

Hunt, Geo. F.B.M. Fresh Fruits, Haskins Royal Am. Cherries

Hurlbut, Mrs. E.L.B.M. China Painting.

Harford, Alice M.S.M. Portrait on China.

Hussey & Son.G.M. Cabinets.

Hubbard Portable Oven Co.B.M. Baker's Ovens.

Hurd, Mrs. Carrie R.H.M. China Painting.

Hub Gore Co.G.M. Hub Gores.

Hubbard, D.K.B.M. Minnesota Flour.

Hurlburt, Wm.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Hurlburt, J.B. S.M. Collection of fruits.

Hydraulic Press Brick Co.G.M. Exhibit of 42 panels of brick.

Hymer, J.P. C.M. Commissioner Black Hills.

Hyde, John M.Juror.

Iowa Farming Tool Co. G.M. Collective Exhibit of Agricultural Hand Tools.

Indiana Wagon Co.S.M. Farm Wagon.

Indiana Rubber and Isolating Wire Co.S.M. Wire and Cables.

Iler & Co.G.M. Gen. Exhibit of Distilled liquor and Spirits.

International Nickel Co. B.M. Nickel ores and metallic nickel.

Ingram Clock Co. B.M. Clocks.

Ideal Mfg. Co. G.M. Water Closet.

Imperial Mill B.M. Flour.

Idaho State Board of HorticultureG.M. General Collection of fruits, fresh, dried, and in liquid.

Iler & Co.G.M. Eagle Gin.

""G.M. Proof Spirits.

""S.M. Pure Malt Whiskies.

""S.M. East India Bitters.

""S.M. Buck Bourbon Blend Whiskey.

""S.M. Willow Springs Sour Mash Whiskies.

""G.M. Golden Sheaf Rye Whiskey.

Iler, P.E.G.M. Apparatus for aging and purifying liquors.

Ives, Halsey C.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Art Exhibit.

Imes, Prof. F.N. C.M. "Famous Fifty" Band.

Indianapolis Bleaching Co.G.M.Bags and twine.

Ingraham Co., E. B.M. Clocks.

Iowa Plaster Ass'nG.M. "Flint" hard wall plaster and "Flint" firm finish.

James, G.G. H.M. Heath Cling Peaches.

" J.W. B.M. Crawford late peaches.

Jasper Co. Horticultural Society S.M. Collection of fruits.

Jackson Co. Horticultural Society G.M. Display of fruits, 2091 plates.

James, G.G. B.M. Collection of fruits.

Jarshows, J.F.H. G.M. Valencia Late Oranges.

Jackson & SmithS.M. Water colored photographs.

Jaques Mfg. Co.G.M. K.CK. Baking Powder.

Jardine, J.B.S.M. White Clover Extracted Honey.

Jaques, Dr. E.K. S.M.""""

" ""S.M. White Clover Comb Honey, purity of products and beauty of package.

James, F.J. H.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Jackson, W.R.C.M. Neb. State Supt of Public Instruction

Jackson, J.P.B.M. 15 Varieties peaches and small fruits

Jevene, H.G.M. Sauterne wines and Reishing Wines.

""S.M. Cabernet Wine.

Jenkins, W.J.S.M. Dewey Cling Peaches.

Jewett, W.O.B.M. Timothy Seed.

Jenkins Bros.S.M. Valves.

Jenkins, W.I.S.M. Collection of cherries.

Jegglin Pottery Co. H.M. Pottery Ware.

Jefferson Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

""Colo. Collection of fruits.

Jeone, H. G.M. Olive Oil, purity.

Jepson, PeterH.M. Model of Full Rigged Ship.

Johnston Harvester Co.S.M. Disc Harrow.

Joliet Mfg. Co.G.M. Dustless Cylinder Sheller.

""" S.M. Corn Sheller.

Jones, Joseph H. B.M. Blue Stem Wheat.

Johnson, Mrs. M.A.H.M. China Painting.

Johnson, A.J.B.M. Mineral Palace.

Johnson Co. Neb. S.M. Educational Work.

Jones, NathanB.M. Linden Extracted Honey.

Johnson & Field Mfg. Co. G.M. Separator and Warehouse Mill.

Johnson & Co., J.F. G.M. Anti-dirt milk pail.

Johnson, FranklinB.M. Fall and winter apples.

Johnson, NelsB.M. 14 varieties of potatoes, golden corn and yellow Bonanza corn.

Jorgenson, Louis B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Johnson, HarveyB.M."" "95"

" F.O. B.M."" "95"

Johnson, H.T.G.M. Botanical Collection of Pacific Coast Coniferous woods and cones.

Johns, H.W. Mfg. Co.S.M. Collective Educational Exhibit of all products from crude Asbestoes.

Johnson & Field Mfg. Co. G.M. Farm Fanning Mill.

Mrs. R. Jones G.M. Lace Curtains.

Johnson, Theo. H.B.M. Installation of Photo Appliances.

Johnson, S.T.C.C.M. Vice-President for Texas.

Joplin Club S.M. Galena and Calcite.

Joplin Paint Co. H.M. Paint.

Jones, Nathan H.M. Raspberry and Linden Extracts Honey.

Justituto Madico Nacional de Mexico S.M. Books, Science

Justituto Geologico de Mexico B.M. Minerals

Jury, C.J.B.M. Collection of peaches.

Julian, T.J.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Junker, A.M. Juror.

Kaupp, Geo. B.M. Etta Grapes.

Kansas Salt Co.G.M. Table Salt.

Kansas State PenitentiaryB.M. Limestone.

Kansas & Texas Coal Co.B.M. Bituminous Coal.

Kansas State CommissionS.M. Minerals stone brick coal, etc.

Kansas State Agricultural College S.M. Collection of Grapes.

Kansas State CommissionB.M. Cocoons, Field and Garden Seed.

Kansas Creamery Co. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Kanmakaili SchoolG.M. General excellence of Exhibits.

Kanluurla School G.M. General Excellence of Exhibits.

Kellar, H.S.B.M. Flemish Beauty Peas (Pears?)

Keystone Mfg. Co.G.M. Keystone Power sheller

Kernan Furnace Co.B.M. Hot Air Furnace.

Kemmerer, W.S. G.M. Anthracite Coal.

Kemmerer Coal Co.S.M. Exhibit of Coal.

Kearns, Thomas, Mgr.

Silver King Mining Co.B.M. Silver Lead ores.

Kemp Koniar Copper

Mining Co.B.M. Base copper ore.

Kelly Bros. H.M. Collection apples.

Kearney Co. Neb. S.M. Educational Work.

Kretchmer, L.E.H.M. Bees and Queens in cages.

Kelly, Prof. Thos. J. C.M. Superintendent of Bureau of Music.

Keystone Watchcase Co.G.M. Watch Cases.

Kellogg, Geo. J. S.M. Fall and Winter apples.

Kitzelman Bros.G.M. Or. & Woven Wire Fence and Fence Mach.

Kickbush, John B.M. Collection Cantaloupes.

Kingman Plow Co. S.M. Plows, harrows, planters and cultivators

" " "G.M. Stubble Plows.

"Implement Co. S.M. Anchor vehicles, Fifth Wheels, etc.

"""G.M. Triple Gear Mills and Wind Mills.

"""G.M. Disc and Beet Drills.

"""S.M. Foos Feed Grinders and Sweep Grinders.

Kimball, W.W. & Co. S.M. Collective Display of organs & Pianos.

"""S.M. Reed and Automatic organs

"""G.M. Kimball Pianos, excellence of quality.

Killin, N.K.B.M. Wheat, barley and oats.

Kiewit, Andrew G.M. Standard water filter.

King Corset Co.H.M. Corsets.

Killen, A.R.S.M. Flax.

King, E.D.B.M. Wool.

Kimball Co. Neb. H.M. Educational Work.

King Fisher Milling Co.G.M. Oklahoma Flour.

Kingman Implement Co. S.M. Jackson Farm Wagons.

"""S.M. Weber Wagon and Weber One Horse Wagon.

Kingman Co. IdahoB.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

Killen, A.R.G.M. Wheat, Barley and oats.

King, NathanB.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Kiesel, Shilling & Danielson B.M. Collection of fruits.

Klork, J.E. G.M. Educational Work of pupils.

Kleckner, F.J. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Knox, Roger C. G.M. Wire Gold ore.

Knox Co. Neb.B.M. Educational Work.

Knox, Chas. B. G.M. Gelatine.

King. J.J.M.Juror.

Kolshaven, Jules G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Kochs Co., Thoe A.G.M. Barber's chairs and cases.

Krug, Fred, Brewing Co.G.M. Purity and strength of bottled Cabinet Beer.

Ktetchmer, F.S.M. Alfalfa Comb Honey.

Kretchmer, E.S.M. White Clover Comb Honey.

""S.M. White Clover Comb Honey

""G.M. Best and most practical collection of modern apiarian supplies and implements.

Kretchmer, E.B.M. Alfalfa Extracted Honey.

""H.M. Bee Books and Bee Literature.

""S.M. White Clover Extracted Honey

""H.M. Exhibit of educational value showing honey in all kinds of crystallization.

""S.M. Linden Comb Honey.

Kruse & GerlandB.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Krohn, Fectheimer & Co.S.M. Ladies Fine Shoes, original designs

Kretchmer, F.H.M. Bees and Queens in cages.

""S.M. Unrefined Beeswax.

"E. S.M. Wood and Galvanized Steel tanks.

Kunz, Geo. F.S.M. Gems of the Trans-Mississippi States.

Kurtz, Chas. M.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Kuehl, Geo. G.M. Cuckoo Clock

Kellogg, Geo. J. B.M. Fall and Winter apples.

Kiles, Mrs. Sarah L.S.M. Collection of apples, common use

Laclede Horticultural Society G.M. Collection of fruits, 515 plates.

Last, C.F.H.G.M. Port wine.

Lansing, Mrs. F.H.B.M. Raw Silk and silk cocoons.

Laraway, W.F.B.M. Fine varieties of pears.

Laing, Laura.S.M. Hand painted china.

""S.M. Water Color Drawing.

Larson Canning Co., Wm.G.M. Canned Peas and beans.

Larkins Soap Co. G.M. Toilet and Laundry Soaps.

Ladd, W.N.B.M. Wool

La Grange MillsG.M. Minnesota Flour.

Ladd, Chas. B.M. Wool

Laird, AbramH.M. Eureka District Ores.

Labbe Bros. H.M. Nat'l Mineal Water Wilhoit Springs.

Latham Machinery Co.G.M. Wire Stretchers.

Lambe, Chas. B.B.M. Wheat and Grasses.

Lancaster Co. Neb.G.M. Educational Work.

Lamont, Scott B.M. White Clover Extracted honey, recommended for purity of product and excellence of flavor.

Laramie Co."Ft. Collins" S.M. Collection of Fruits.

Lane, Chas. S. B.M. Peaches, apples, plums, etc.

LaRosh, Geo. W.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Lawson, W.S.S.M."" "97"

Lawrence, LouisB.M."" "95"

Larson, HenryB.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Lake Superior Bag Co. G.M. Bags and Twine.

Larnelle, Victor G.M. Installation of French Section.

Lane Co. OregonS.M. Grasses and Grains in straw

Langworthy, Mrs. J.N. S.M. Ecclesiastical Embroidery.

Leal, Manuel FrenamdezG.M. Cigars.

Lewis, Miles K.S.M. Farm gate.

Lewis Bros. B.M. Paricots, plums, cherries, prunes etc.

Leeson, J.J.G.M. Historic Relics.

Lemon Growers Ass'n,

H.C.G. S.M. Eureka Lemons.

Lee & Co., Geo. H.S.M. Antiseptic Bug Killer.

Lemmon Gold Mining Co.,

of British Columbia B.M. Free and Concentrated Gold ores.

Lesson, J.J.S.M. Collection of Minerals and ores.

Lee, Mrs. H.A. S.M. Wire Silver and Ruby Silver.

Lee, Harry A.B.M. Fossils.

Leshan, J.C.H.M. Exhibit of apples.

Leavenworth Pub. Schools H.M. Educational Work, maps, drawings, etc.

Leete, B.F. B.M. Dairy Salt.

Lewis & Co. G.M. Best and most practical collection of modern beehives.

Leahy Mfg. Co. S.M. Thorough workmanship and practical designs in beehives.

Lewis Co., G.B.G.M. Apiarian Supplies and implements.

Leahy Mfg. Co. S.M. Apiarian Supplies and implements.

Lewis, F.M. B.M. Apples.

Leader, Mrs. August B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Leach, H.H. B.M."" "95"

Lee Co., Geo. H. S.M. Insect destroyers

Levi, M. Michael G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit

Lee, Ambrose H.C.M. In recognition of honorable services as Superintendent Department Transportation.

Levy, Mrs. BerniceG.M. Embroidery.

Lemon Gold Mining Co. B.M. Gold ores.

Lipton, T.E.C. C.M. Juror.

Lee, H.A. C.M. Superintendent Colorado Exhibit.

Leeson, J.J.G.M. Superintendent New Mexico Exhibit.

Lewis, R.M. M.Juror.

Lean Mfg. Co., RoderickG.M. Lever Harrows.

Lindgren, C.H. Co.S.M. Dunch.

Lieno Mfg. Co. H.M. Lieno Wall Finish

Lincoln Co. Neb. B.M. Educational Work.

Libby, McNeil & Libby B.M. Canned Pork and Beans.

"" " G.M." Ox Tingine.

"" " G.M." Brisket & Veal Loaf.

"" " G.M." "Peerless" Sliced Dried Beef.

"" " S.M." Corned Beef

"" " S.M." Whole Ox Tongue

Lincoln University G.M. General Exhibit.

Liggett & Meyers Tobacco

Co.G.M. Star Tobacco (plug) & General Exhibit.

Lipton, Thos. J. G.M. Ceylon, India Tea.

Llewelly, C.E. C.M. In recognition of honorable services as Commandant of Guards.

Loomis, Mrs. LuluB.M. Egg Plants.

Louden Machinery Co.G.M. Door hangers ice tongs, hay carriers, grapple and harpoon, Horse hay forks.

Lossing, S.E.S.M. Muscat grapes for Raisins.

Los Angeles Co. Calif.High Award for General Display of Horticultural Products and installation of same

"" "" Spec. H.M. General Display of Horticulture and Installation of same.

Loud & Gerling G.M. Dried Fruits, raisins, peaches, prunes

Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce S.M. Wax Fruits.

Los Nietos Ranchito Walnut Growers' Ass'n G.M. English Walnuts.

Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce G.M. Fruit in liquid, Citrons, fruits assorted.

Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce S.M. Ornamental Dried Fruit Work.

Lohmeier, A.C. B.M. Hand made Horse Shoes.

Long, JohnB.M. Device for thawing dynamite.

Lang & Co., J. B.M. Switch Boards and Line Material.

Locke, Fred M. S.M. Insulators.

Lovesy & BourkeB.M. Alfalfa Extracted Honey.

"" B.M. White Clover extracted Honey.

"" B.M. Alfalfa Comb Honey

Los Angeles Co. Calif.S.M. Educational Work.

Los Animas Co. S.M. Winter Apples.

Londegaard, H.F. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Longelin, Geo. B.M."" "95"

Longers, MatthiasG.M. Architectural Drawings.

Lovett, Isteal M.Juror.

Logan, Lieut. S.T.M."

Long, Prof. J.H. M."

Lounsberry, C.H. C.M. Vice-President for North Dakota.

Lund, Mrs. S.G.B.M. Ceramics.

Lumbard, Miss Nina. B.M."

Lunkenheimier Co.G.M. Safety Valve Automatic Injector.Regrinding valves.

Lund, N.G.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Ludlow, Abert G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Lyons, J.F. B.M. Articificial Limbs.

Lyons Rock Salt Co. S.M. Rock Salt.

Lyman, D.B. B.M. Gold and Silver Ores.

Majestic Mfg. Co.G.M. Collective Exhibit of stoves and ranges.

Mason, Alexander G.M. Automatic Farm Gate.

Marshall, H.C. H.M. Plums in liquid.

Maddock, F.H.G.M. Maddock Oranges.

"" S.M. Improved Navel Oranges, Washington Navel Orange, Mediterranean Sweet and S. Michaels.

Mansana Colony.S.M. Almonds, 22 varieties.

Mausur, M.H.B.M. Spring Oats.

Mausur, W.H.B.M. Red Clover.

Madird Co.H.M. Cotton from Madrid County.

Mason Ahrman & Co.S.M. Evaporated Fruits.

Maberry, T.H.H.M. 20 plates Ben Davis and Jonathan apples.

Maitland, MaxB.M. Black Spring Oats.

Marshall, Mrs. F.E. S.M. Water Color Pastel, Etc.

Marion, Cole W.B.M. Diamond and Moore's early grapes.

Martin, Mrs. Euclid H.M. Ceramics.

Martin, Frank G.M. Hides, Fur overcoats, etc.a

Mason, Miss N.G. S.M. China Painting.

Mathers, Wm.B.M. Taxidermy

Martin, FernaudG.M. Mechanical Toys.

Mason, Ehrman & Co. G.M. Granulated Potatoes and evaporated onions.

Marion Geyser Gold Mining & Milling Co.S.M. Gold and Cinnebar ores.

Mathewson, Wm. B.M. Corn in the ear.

Marble Head Lime Co.G.M. Springfield Mo. Lime

"" "" H.M. Marble Head White Lime Co

Marmal Marble Co.S.M. Variegated Marble

Martin, F.A.H.M. Collection of grapes.

Marshall Bros. B.M. Statuary

Matthews, S.S. B.M. Collection of grapes

Marysville Normal School B.M. Educational Work

Marshall, J.C. H.M. Plums and apples

Majectis Mfg. Co.G.M. Exhibit of steel and malleable Iron Ranges.

Madison Co. Neb. S.M. Educational Work.

Marsh, D.J. H.M. Winter Rye.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology G.M. School of Applied Sciences.

May Bros. H.M. Exhibit of apples.

Mangel, John A.G.M. 171 Products from 25 acre farm in Georgia.

Matthews, E.J. S.M. Apples.

Manson Cycle Co. S.M. Bicycles.

Madison Milling Co. S.M. Minnesota Flour.

Mayo, Wm. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Martin, J.M.B.M."" "95"

Marble Head Lime Co.B.M. Sarcoxies Mo. Lime.

Mannion, J.J.S.M. Lens Grinding Machine.

Manual Training SchoolG.M. Zither Workmanship and Design.

"""S.M." Sound and Tone.

"""G.M. Wood work and general exhibit.

Mayer, M. Frederick G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Mast, Foos & Co. G.M. Interior Internal Gear Windmill.

Mattice, Mrs. R.B.S.M. Embroidery

Marks, A.A. G.M. Rubber Foot and ankle for artificial limbs.

Marson, H.B.C.M. Vice President for Nevada.

Mayer, F. G.M. Commissioner from Paris France.

Magsrett, T.Z. M.Juror.

Maxson, H.B.G.M. Vice President Nevada Commission

Manual Training School, Honolulu, Hawaii G.M. General Exhibit.

Mears, Chas. F.G.M. Best Miniature Steam Engine & Boiler.

Merritt, B.C.B.M. Ky Red Streak Apples, Kelsey Japan plums and Bartlett Pears.

Myers & Driggs G.M. Window Sash.

Meyers & Bros., F.C.G.M. Force Pumps.

Mexican ExhibitS.M. Books on Science.

Metzel, PeterH.M. Specimens of Jasper.

Mercur Gold Mining Co.S.M. Gold Ores Bullion and Cyanide process.

Merrick Co. Neb. S.M. Educational Work.

Meza Co. Horticultural Society G.M. Grand Junction general collection of fruits.

Merchant Creamery Co. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points. (Boyle, Kan.)

Meridian Creamery Co. B.M."" "95" (Osawkie, Kan.)

Merrit, S.S.B.M."" "95"

The Meridian Creamery Co.

Meriden, Kan.S.M."" "97"

" "" " S.M.Butter second highest average score, 5 exhibits.

Meriden Creamery Co.

Valley Falls, Kan.S.M. Butter scoring above 97 points.

Meriden Creamery Co.

McLouth, Kan.S.M."" "97"

Meriden, Brittania Co.G.M. Silver Plated Ware

Meriden Creamery Co.S.M. Cheese scoring above 95 points.

Megeath, Geo. W. "M.Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Metz Hotel Register Co.G.M. Reversible Desk.

Mees, Prof. ArthurC.M. Conductor Theo. Thomas Orchestra.

Mercer, Capt. W.H.C.M. In Command U.S. Indian Congress.

Meeker & Co., E.J.B.M. Four varieties of apples.

Missouri Experimental Station G.M. Nuts in jars.

Missouri Agriculatural College G.M. Fruits in jars.

Missouri Agriculatural College S.M. Fungus Diseases.

Missouri State Horticultural Society G.M. Display of Fruits.

Missouri State Commission,G.M. Twenty-three varieties of wheat.

"" " G.M. Fourteen varieties of wool.

"" " G.M. Eighty varieties of corn.

"" " G.M. Collection of Tobacco.

"" " G.M. Fifty-four varieties of cow peas.

"" " G.M. Twenty-three varieties of oats.

"" " G.M. Forty-four varieties of polished Missouri wood.

"" " G.M. Fifty bushels of corn.

Miluem, J.K.H.M. Kieffer Pears.

Missouri Experimental Station B.M. Collection of grapes.

Missouri Agricultural CollegeS.M. Preserved fruit in jars.

Missouri State Horticultural SocietyB.M. Collection of Grapes.

"""S.M. "of Pears.

""" "of berries.

"""S.M. Peaches

Missouri State Commission,H.M. Melons

Missouri State Horticultural Society H.M. Onions

Missouri State Commission,H.M. Sweet Potatoes.

Millsap, Oscar S.M. Sterling Washer.

Miller, Hugh L.B.M. Wheat.

Miller, JacobB.M. Chermoya or Custard apples in liquid.

Minor, B.H. H.M. Wheat from Lawrence Co.

Missouri State Agri. Col. Experimental Station G.M. Collection grain and seeds

" " B.M. Collection Forage Plants and Tobacco.

" " B.M. "of Wool.

" " H.M. Twenty-one varieties of wheat.

" " B.M. Woods grown in Missouri.

Missouri State Commission,H.M. Pearl Millet from La Clede Co.

" " " H.M. Corn from Polk Co.

" " " H.M. Corn from Randolph Co.

Missouri State Commission,B.M. Winter wheat, No. 2

" " " B.M. Collection of Fertilizers.

" " " H.M. Country Soap.

" " " S.M. Yellow Pine.

" " " B.M. Spring Wheat #2

Mills County, Iowa Horticultural

Society G.M. Display of fruits.

Missouri State Horti, Socy.S.M. Collection of Apples, Old and New.

Missouri State Commission,H.M. Cotton Seed.

"""H.M. Cow Peas from La Clede Co.

Milner, Mrs. H.C.B.M. Cina Painting

Missouri Lum. & Land

Exchange Co.G.M. Lumber and timbers of yellow pine.

Mitchell Lewis & Co.G.M. Wagons

Minnesota State Commission,H.M. Krell Piano.

" "" S.M. Model of Whaleback, "Chris Columbus"

" "" S.M. Model of Steamer "City of Superior"

" "" G.M. Model of Ore care U.M. & N.R.R.

" "" G.M." of Chandler mine.

", State of G.M. General Dairy Exhibit.

Milnurn Wagon Co.S.M. Vehicles

Miami Powder Co. B.M. Powder.

Minneapolis Furniture Co.H.M. Furniture.

" Flour Mfg Co.S.M. Minnesota Flour.

Minnesota Fish Commission,H.M. General Exhibit.

" Sand Stone Co. G.M. Parlor Mantel

"" "" B.M. Mantel

Miller, Miss Ida A. H. M. China Painting.

Miller, Mrs. C. J. H. M. Painted Panels.

Mickle Printing Press Co. G.M. Printing Press.

Missouri State Commission, G.M. Flour

"" " G.M. St. Louis Graded Schools.

"" " G.M. Normal School work.

"" " G.M. St. Louis High School

"" " G.M. Primary Schools of Moberly, Carthage, Jefferson City, and Hannibal.

"" " G.M. Model High School Building Joplin, Mo.

"" " G.M. Taxidermy, Kansas City High School

"" " G.M. Model Country School House.

Missouri State Commission,G.M. St. Louis Kindergartens.

"" " G.M. Girl's Reform School.

"" " G.M. Boy's Reform School.

"" " G.M. Negro Educational Exhibit, Manual training.

"" " G.M. Negro Educational Exhibit.

Miller, Hugh L.H.M. Wheat

Mine LaMotte Mining Co.B.M. Nickle Cobalt Matte and Cobalt.

Miller, A.W.B.M. Collective exhibit of agate, polished and rough opal Quartzite, Onyx, Quartz crystal, Cornelian, Mica, Jasper, obsidian,Fossil, Beeswax and foliated talc.

Miller, A.W.S.M. Variegated marble Dressed and Polished

Miller Locke Co. B.M. General Exhibit.

" A.W. S.M. Exhibit of marble

" Mrs. AnnieH.M. Polished pebbles, cornelians, agates and Quartz pebbles.

Miller Lock Co.G.M. Cabinet Lock, padlock, Safety deposit lock

"" " Special MeritSafe Deposit Vault Lock.

Miller, R.H.M.Juror.

Missouri Malleable Iron

Co.G.M. Malleable Wagon Skeins.

Miles City SchoolsG.M. Educational Work.

Mills, John S.M. Collection of Grasses, Grains and Indian Corn.

Missouri State Commission,G.M. Education of Negros, Artistic Handiwork

Mickelwait, W.W. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Milton, Thos.B.M."" "95 "

Mitchell, J.L. G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Mizutany, T. Representative

Japan Central Tea Ass'nG.M. For excellence of architecture, arrangement and conduct of Japanese Tea garden

Menneola SeminaryS.M. Needlework and Art Embroidery.

Moyer, Edward B.M. Quinces and Pears.

Moline Wagon Co. G.M. Farm Wagon

Moses, T.C. H.M. Plums in liquid.

Mound City Canning Co.H.M. Canned Corn, Tomatoes and Pickles.

Model Mill Co. H.M. Wheat from Chariton, Ia.

Montrose Milling Co.H.M. Wheat form Henry Co.

Molholland, Wm.H.M. Corn of our growth.

Moline Plow Co.G.M. Corn planters, Listers, Rotary Disc, Silky Gang Plows, Beet Seeders, Stalk Cutters, Riding and Walking Cultivators.

Moffatt, AlbertS.M. Computing scales.

Moeller, M.P.G.M. Pipe organ

Moore Mfg. Co. H.M. Root Soap.

Morrison, David B.G.M. Gravity Filter

Morrill, Mrs. C.E.H.M. Ceramics.

Morrow, F.C.B.M. Ceramics.

Model School Room G.M. Collective exhibit of modern school room equipments.

Molaronin Bros.S.M. Majolica Vases.

Moyles, W.T.B.M. Peaches, Seedling Pears.

Montezuma Co.G.M. General Collection of fruits.

Morgan, W. & Wm. BoutonB.M. Eagle carved from cedar.

Moffatt, Chas. H.M. Nat'l Mineral Water from Cascades Springs, Columbia River.

Montgomery Ward & Co. G.M. General Exhibit.

Mt. Carmel Coal Co. B.M. Butuminous Coal.

Mollie Gibson Mining Co. S.M. Native silver, silver nugget from "Mollie Gibson" mine.

Montgomery, W.M. H.M. Gypsum

Monarch Elevator Co.G.M. No. 1,2, and 3Hard wheat.

Moore, E.A. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Moores, Frank E. B.M."" "95"

Monarch Mfg. Co. G.M. Axle Greases

Moeller, M.P.G.M. Excellence of three manual pipe organs.

Morris, Thos. F. G.M. Morrins Packingless valves & automatic regulators, perfect in design construction & operation.

Moore, Mrs. Geo. P. H.M. Rug.

Morgan, S.J.G.M. Adjustable Dress Patterns.

Monk, John J. (Marine Arch) G.M. Swan Boat Unique Design

Morgan, E.N.S.M. General Agriculatural Decorations.

Murray, E.N.G.M. 697 plates of fruits

Murphy, J.W.B.M. 17 varieties of apples.

"R.H.M. Hyslop Crab Apples in liquid.

Munson Bros.G.M. Little Giant Water Wheel, Robinson corn wheel and under running stone wheel.

Mulhouser Co., The F. S.M. Shoddy or re-claimed wool fiber

Murray Iron WorksG.M. Corlis Engine

Mueller, H.O.G.M. Fuel Feding Apparatus

Murphy, J.W.B.M. Squaw corn.

Murphy, C.A.G.M. General School exhibit.

Myers, M.F. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

McEwan, H.G.M. Olive oil.

McElenery, J.H.H.M. Blue Damson plums in liquid.

McClune, Helen H.M. Carved Rosewood Easel.

McCord Brady Co. G.M. Collective exhibit of roasted coffees in packages.

McCune, Miss Laura H.M. China Painting.

McCann, J.P.S.M. Large specimen of lead ore.

McBride, A.C.B.M. Calcite Crystals.

McCann, J.P.S.M. Specimen of crystallized Galena

McGinchey, JohnS.M. Apples, pears, peaches.

McGirity, J.B. B.M. Collection of apples.

McClay, Mrs. G.H.M. Exhibit of apples.

McCall, R.T.S.M. Butter scoring above 97 points.

McFadden, W.B. B.M."" "95 "

McCord Brady Co. G.M. Tulip Chop Japan Tea and Maravilla chop Ceylon Tea.

McCormick, Hon. R. HallG.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

McLean, Geo. E.C.M. Chancellor Nebraska State University

McCormick, R. HallC.M. Vice President for Illinois.

McCord Brady Co. G.M"Stone Idol" chop flavor in roasted coffee.

McSherry Mfg. Co.G.M. Drills and Harrows.

McKnight, G.H. B.M. Prizetaker onions.

McMillen, F.S. H.M. Livingstone Co. Oats.

McRoberts, H.F.B.M. Lewis Co. Wheat.

McRoberts, W.B.B.M. Canadian Field Pea.

McMurphy, Mrs. Harriett S.,G.M. Model Kitchen.

McDonald D. B.M. Collection of vegetables.

McMillon, H.H.M. Red and yellow ochre

McQuarrie, RobertH.M. Silver Bearing sandstone from Silfer Reef,Utah.

McLain, F.J.H.M. Exhibit of apples.

McLeod & Smith G.M. Leather and Mahogany furniture.

McKillip, H.W. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

McRostie, Mrs. J.H. B.M."" "95"

National Lead Co.G.M. General Exhibit.

" ""Highest AwardWhite Lead.

" ""G.M. "Warranted Half & Half Solder" Phoenix Babbitt metal traps and bends.

" Tonic Co. H.M. Nutrix

" Gramophone Co. S.M. Gramophone talking machine.

" Artificial Limb

Co.G.M. Adjustable lacing leather socket

Nature's Study Publishing Company G.M. Colored photographs of birds, animals and flowers

New Process Mfg. Co.G.M. Clipper Fire Extinguisher.

""""B.M. Metal car and House roof.

Nelson, H.B.M. Collection of fruits.

Nebraska Telephone Co.G.M. Practical Telephone office.

Neimeyer, A.B.M. Table grapes in liquid.

N.Y. Wool ExchangeS.M. Exhibit of wool.

Nelson & Sons, Thomas G.M. Bibles and Hymn Books.

Nepera Chemical Co. G.M. Velox Print paper.

Neb State Miller's Ass'n,G.M. Flour of all descriptions.

Nephi Plaster Co.B.M. Gypsum and plaster made from it.

Nez Perces Co. IdahoG.M. Collection of fruits in jars.

Nebraska State Horticultural Society G.M. Collection of fruits.

Nelson, N.G.M. "" "

Nebraska Commission B.M. Honey shwon in packages adapted to the requirements of the trade.

"" B.M. Sweet Clover Extracted Honey.

"" York, Neb.S.M. White Clover Comb Honey.

Nebraska State Commission,S.M. Linden Comb Honey

"" " H.M. Alfalfa Extracted Honey

"" " S.M. Linden extracted Honey.

"" " S.M. Queen & Bees in observatory hives.

" Seed Company G.M. Seed Exhibit.

" Cereal Co.H.M. Cereal and nut productions.

Newberg Brick & Clay Co. B.M. Building Brick

Neligh & Co., J.P.S.S.M. Aquatic plants.

Nemeha County, Nebr.S.M. Educational Work.

Nez Perces Co. IdahoG.M. Collection of fresh fruits.

Nelson, Magnus H.M. Apples from Michigan.

Newton Public Schools G.M. Educational Work, maps, etc.

New Germany Creamery Co. B.M. Butter scoring abover 95 points.

Neale, David S.M. Riprap system

Neville, Wm. C.M. Vice President for Nebraska.

Nichols, Darwin H.M. Barlett Pears.

Nichols, J. F. B.M. Two large watermelons, 122 lbs.

Niagra Paper Co. S.M. Cover paper.

Nicholson File Co. G.M. Exhibit of files rasps, etc.

Nixon, Geo. S. B.M. Crude Sulphur

Nims Bros. B.M. Yellow Corn.

Nielsen, J. P. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Niebert, H. J. B.M."" "95"

Nicholson, J. W. M.Juror.

Northrup King & Co. B.M. Grains and Grass seed.

Norris, R. E. B.M. Apples and Bartlett Pears.

Nodaway County, Mo. B.M. Collection of fruits.

Norfolk Beet Sugar Co. G.M. Beet Sugar

Northwestern Grass Twine G.M. Grass twine and matting.

Northern Electric Co. H.M. Electric Motor

Northwestern Railway Co. G.M. Standard R.R. Ticket Office & relief map North American Transportation and Grading Co.S.M. Gold nuggets.

No. Dak. Millers' Ass'nB.M. Minnesotat Flour.

Novelty Mfg. Co. G.M. Novelty Disc Sharpener

North Star Woolen MillsG.M. Wool Blankets.

Normal School, Marysville Kansas B.M. Educational Work.

Northrup King & Co. G.M. Grains and grass seed.

Noyes, W.J. S.M. Butter scoring above 97 points.

No. Western Fair Ass'n

State of Washington G.M. Collection of apples.

Norton Bros.G.M. Tin cans and metal signs.

No. Pacific Ry. Co. S.M. Railway car containing exhibit of Agricultural producers.

Nova Scotia Fruit Growers' Ass'n G.M. Apples.

Northern, W.J. G.M. Vice President for Georgia

Nutting Truck Co.G.M. Best Display of platform trucks.

Nuckolls Co. Neb.G.M. Educational Work.

Oberst, JohnH.M. Blue Grass.

O'Brien, R.T.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Ocander, JohnH.M. Spring Wheat.

O'Donnell, J.D.H.M. Exhibit of apples.

Ohio Rake Co.S.M. Lister, Disc Cultivator and "BullsEye" Corn Planter.

" Cultivator Co.S.M. Belleville Anti friction Harrow and Ohio Cultivator.

" Falls Car Co.B.M. Buckeye Car Truck.

Ohlenberg, S.S.M. Large collection of fresh apples.

Oklahoma Territory S.M. Cotton

" Mill Co. G.M. Oklahoma Flour.

Oliman, Manuel S.M. Mexican Onyx

Olden Fruit Co.G.M. 446 Plates.

Oliphant, F.H. S.M. Crude oils.

Olds Gasoline Engine Co. H.M. Gasoline Engine

Olson, H.P. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Olander, H.E.S.M."" "97 "

Oltrogge, F.C. B.M."" "95 "

Oldham, Geo. B.H.M. Services as official weighmaster, valuable services.

Omaha Brewing Ass'n HIGHEST AWARD, Draught Beer.

Omaha Brewing Ass'n G.M. Blue Ribbon Bottled Beer.

" Shot and Lead Wrks.G.M. Drop and chilled shot.

" Anchor Fence Co.G.M. Fence.

" Glove Mfg. Co.G.M. Green Lamb Glace

" & Grant Smelter WrksG.M. Column of 48 pure silver ingots.

Oneida Community, Ltd.G.M. Game Traps.

Omro Horticultural Soc'y.S.M. Fall and Winter apples.

Oregon Co. OregonB.M. Peaches.

Orr, Mrs. T.M. S.M. Ceramics

Orchard & Wilhelm Carpet

Co.S.M. Strickley' Bros. Co.'s Artistic tables and chairs.

Oriental Powder Mills S.M. Powder.

Oregon State ExhibitH.M. Building Stones.

Orr, Robert A. B.M. Six varieties of apples.

Oxborn & Co., C.S.G.M. Harness Tools.

Otis, SpencerG.M. Covering for Steam Pipes.

Otero Co. Hort. Soc'y G.M. Display of fruits.

Otto Gas EngineG.M. Gasoline engines.

Otoe Co. Neb.G.M. Educational Work.

" " " G.M. Broom making, carpet weaving chrochet and bead work.

Owens, R.B. G.M. Supt. Machinery & Electricity.

Oxnard Beet Sugar Co. G.M. Beet sugar.

Parker, H.C.H.M. Bellflower apples.

" E.W. H.M. Silver Prunes, Burbank plums and Satsuma plums.

Patton, Geo.S.M. Loquats

Pan American Acetylene

Gas Co.G.M. Acetylene Gas Machine.

Park, Mrs. Vina M.S.M. Ceramics

Parks, Miss AliceB.M. China Painting.

Parker & Russell M.&M.Co.S.M. Gas Retort and various forms of material with the clay from which it is made.

Pacific Coast Borax Co.B.M. Crude Borax, Etc.

Patten, Horace, B.S.M. Zeolites.

Payette, EzraS.M. 11 varieties Seedling Apples.

Parks, W.S. B.M. 17 varieties of apples.

Patton, Frank C. H.M. Barrel cart, Chain Harrow and Cider mill.

"" S.M. Bobbsled, swing table and drag saws.

Parlin Orendorf & Martin G.M. Bain Wagon.

"" " S.M. Olds wagon.

Pawnee Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Pacific Pottery Co. B.M. Draintile Hollow brick terra cotta Chimney pipe and sewer pipe.

Pacific Coast Marble Co. B.M. Polished marble.

Page Woven Wire Fence Co.G.M. Wire Fencing.

Parlin Orandorf & Martin G.M. Riding lister, Diamond Riding plow, Buckeye Disc, Grain Drill and Disc Plows

Parkhurst, R.B.M. Exhibit Alexander apples.

Parlin Orandorf & Martin S.M. Sechler Diamond Buggy.

Paola Creamery Co.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Parks, George B. B.M."" "95"

Palmer, H.L.B.M."" "95"

Patrick, Robt. W.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Pacheco, Capt. RicardoC.M. First Artillery Band of Mexico.

Page, Walter T.M.Juror.

Parsons, Geo. W. C.M. Vice-President for California.

Parker, C. Harrison C.M."""Louisiana.

Pague, B.S. G.M. Literature on climatic conditions.

Peterson, AlvinB.M. 11 plates of apples.

" FrankB.M. Animal heads in grain and grasses.

Perfecto Hygenic Mfg. Co.B.M. Pipes.

Pelonze scale Mfg. Co.S.M. Scales.

Pennsylvania Salt Co. G.M. Chemicals.

Peterson, LouisG.M. Horse Shoes.

Perfect, Mrs. E.R.H.M. Ceramics.

Pennsylvanie Electric Co.B.M. General Exhibit.

Penrod, E.H.M. Free Milling Gold ore.

Pecos Valley Irrigation & Improvement Co. HIGHEST AWARD. Collection of fruits and vegetables.

Perrine, L.B.G.M. Collection of fruits.

Peck, Stowe & WilcoxS.M. Food Cutters.

Perry Mill Co. S.M. Oklahoma Flour.

Pearson, Howard Fm. S.M. Exhibit of photograph finished in oil.

Perfection Orange Blend Co. G.M. Perfection Orange Blend.

Pears, M.H. B.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Peterman, Wm.D.M. Butter scoring above 97 points.

Peacock, W. B.M. Two varieties of cherries in liquid.

Peebles, T.F.B.M. Late Duke cherries.

Peoria Cordage Co.G.M. Rope and twine exhibit.

Pearoy, Frank H. C.M. Vice President for Minnesota.

Pflander, W.H. B.M. 10 plates of white Heath Peaches.

Pfeiffer, Mrs. W.G. H.M. Smoke Painting.

Phillips, Mrs. L.V. S.M. Ceramics.

Phillips, Emily E.H.M. Skirt Supporter.

Phelps Co. Neb.G.M. Educational Work.

Phillips, H.J. S.M. Winter apples.

Photo-Colortype Co. G.M. Reproducing natural objects in color three impressions.

"""G.M. Impressions, etc.

Phinney, Frederick C.M. In recognition Hon. Services, Phinney's Band. Pilot, Madam S.M. Bronze Jewel Cases.

Pilcher, J.F.S.M. Commercial Mica, Fine quality, free cleavage, superior quality for stove and electrical purposes.

Pinkney, Miss J.R.B.M. China Painting.

Pitney Shutter Works G.M. Shutter attachment.

Pingree & Smith S.M. Shoes.

Pierce Co. Neb.B.M. Educational Work.

Pioneer Stone Co.H.M. Monuments, Column and bases of dressed grey sandstone.

Pittsburg Kansas Public School G.M. Educational Work, relief maps etc.

Picotte, Henry H.M. Squaw Corn.

Pittsburg Ks Vitrified Paving Brick Co. S.M. Building and Paving Brick.

Pilcher, Miss Annie B.G.M. Art Curios.

Plummer, OPS.H.M. Yellow Egg Plums.

Pleasant Valley Coal Co. S.M. Bituminous Coal.

Plummer, A.L.H.M. White Oats.

Platte Co. Neb.G.M. Educational Work.

Plonty, Joseph S.M. Butter scoring above 97 points.

Plumb, C.S. M.Juror.

Pozzi, H.H. B.M. Rag and wax figures.

Powell, F.N.H.M. 7 varieties of apples.

Parter, L.S.H.M. Green Almonds in Glass.

Pomona Exp. College H.M. Ogon plums.

Porfit, Mrs. C.E.H.M. China Painting.

Powers, Edward H.M. Hog Pen.

Ponca CityS.M. Oklahoma Flour.

Porter's SouvenitB.M. Minnesota Flour.

Porter, John A.S.M. Free gold in quartz form "Smuggler Union" Mine.

Porterfield, M.W.B.M. Turquoise

Powell, F.F.G.M. Colelctive Exhibit of relief maps.

Porver Sir John & Son G.M. Dublin Whiskeys.

Polk Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Pope Mfg. Co.G.M. Chainless Bicycles

Porrell, J.C.H.M. Kentish cherries in liquid.

Porter Bros.S.M. Hops.

Pohukaua School, Hawaii G.M. Industrial School Work.

Pottawatamie Co. Iowa B.M. 23 varieties of grapes.

Prang Educational Co. G.M. Pictures Drawing Books and decorations for Schools.

Province of Alberta G.M. General Exhibit of Products.

Province of ManitobaG.M. General Exhibit of Products.

Prague, H.C.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Preiss, Mrs. Frank J. S.M. Honey cakes and cookies.

President and Trustees Museum of Art, Detroit, Mich.G.M. Valuable service in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

President & Trustees Art Institute, ChicagoG.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

President & Trustees Museum of Fine Arts, St. LouisG.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Praeger, O.A.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Prince, L.B.C.M. Vice President for New Mexico.

Pracht, May B.M. Solway Peaches in liquid.

Pullman, F.J.H.M. Hungarian Prunes.

Pucks Soap Co. B.M. Mechanic's Soap and Kitcholine Public Schools of Newton, Kansas G.M. Maps, etc.

Pub. Schools of Pittsberg, Kansas G.M. Relief maps.

Public Schools of Atchison, Kansas G.M. Maps, Drawings, etc.

Pueblo, Colorado S.M. Lloyd Work.

Pullman Palace Car Co.G.M. World's Fair Train.

Public Schools of Clay Center, Kansas S.M. Maps, Drawings, etc.

Pulliam Bros.H.M. Exhibit of Apples.

Public Schools of Seneca,KansasS.M. Maps, Drawings, etc.

Pub. Schools of Leavenworth, Kansas H.M."" "

Pub. Schools of Portland, Oregon G.M. High School and Grade Work.

Public Schools of Baker City, OregonG.M. Grade Work.

Public Schools of Omaha, Nebraska G.M. Manual Training School, Exhibit in operation.

Queen Butter MakerB.M. Churn.

Quivold, E.O.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Q C Co., TheG.M. Servis Tie plates.

"""B.M. Railway appliances.

Q & C. Co.B.M. General exhibit of Railway specialties. Ranche, Nellie DotG.M. Practical illustrations in the art of cookery. Rapp, J.B.H.M. Apples in liquid.

Rathbone Lard & Co. G.M. Collective Stove Exhibits.

Rand McNally & Co.G.M. Maps, gloves atlases and books

Rash, Mrs. D.H.M. Apples.

Rans, ToyekaS.M. Maps of Kansas made of grain.

Ramcacciotti, H.L.C.M. In recognition of honorable services as Veterinary Surgeon.

Racine Boat Mfg. Co.G.M. Electro Vapor Launch.

Reld, Homer H.M. Keiffer Pears.

Record, A.B.M. 10 plates Pippins Grindes and golden apples.

"J.F.B.M. 55 plates of Stalk apples.

Revolution Harness Co.G.M. Harness and Harness hardware.

Resser, LillianB.M. Water colors.

Reichenberg Smith Co. S.M. General Exhibit.

Reauteau, L.B.M. Imitation Pearls.

Remington Arms Co.G.M. Shot guns, rifles and pistols.

Reichenbach Morey & Will Co.S.M. Photo Printing Co.

Republic of HawaiiG.M. Leaf Tobacco.

Reem, W.A.H.M. Corn.

Republic Gold Mining Co. B.M. Free Gold ore.

Reeves, James A. S.M. Zinc Crystals.

Reco Mining Co.B.M. Argentiferous Lead Ores.

Regard FilsM.S.M. Imitation precious stones.

Red Willow Co. Neb. B.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

Renn, W.A.H.M. Corn.

Red Willow County, Nebr. G.M. Educational Exhibit.

Republic of HawaiiG.M. Educational Exhibit.

Red Lake Falls Milling Co., S.M. Minnesota Flour.

Reliable Incubator & Brooder Company G.M. Combination incubator and Brooder.

Republic of HawaiiS.M. Prepared sauces, Chuetneys, jams and jellies.

Reliable Incubator & Brooder Co. S.M. Hot air Incubator.

Retch, FrankB.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Reynolds, Mrs. Lizzie W. H.M. Quilt.

Redell, John J.C.M. Chief of Fire Dept. Recognition of valuable services.

Richardson, C.H. B.M. Strawberry Guavo

Rich Hll Mining Co.B.M. Picco of bituminous Coal weighing 3400#

Richland Co. No. Dak. S.M. Collection of apples grown by R.H. Hankinson.

Richland No. Dak.

Richardson County Nebr.G.M. Educational Work.

Ripley Hardware Co. S.M. Van Culin Incubator.

"""S.M. Feed Cooker.

Richardson, Mrs. W.D. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Ridgely, F.L.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhbit.

Riley, Edward C.M. Juror.

Rockport Fair Ass'n S.M. Collection of apples and pears.

Roby, O.K.H.M. Peaches.

Ross Mfg. Co.S.M. Hand and power feed cutters.

Roderick Lean Mfg. Co.S.M. Zig Zag Harrows.

Roberts, O.E.B.M. Bananas.

Ross & Son, W.H. G.M. Ginger Ale lemonade and soda water.

Ross & Brother G.M. Jamacia Rum.

Robinson & Co. S.M. Maple Syrup and sugar.

Ross & Bros.B.M. Line juice.

""S.M. Orange Bitters and Raspberry Vinegar

" "S.M. Bass Pale Ale and Extra Stout.

Rohrbough Bros.S.M. General Exhibit.

Rose Patent Grate Co. S.M. Grates.

Rolph & Co., W.T.S.M. Sofa Beds.

Robert Dempster & Co. G.M. General Display Photo Material Rounds, B.J.S.M. Artificial Limbs

Rose & Bros.H.M. Musk Ox Head.

Routtman, C.M. H.M. Collection of Pears.

Rocky Mountain Stucco Plaster Mfg. Co. B.M. Stucco Plaster.

Roessler & Hasslacher Chemical Co.G.M. Chemicals.

Root Co., A.J. G.M. Apiarian supplies and implements.

Robnis & SonH.M. Gold base ore.

Rogers Locomotive Co. G.M. Passenger Engine.

Roberts, H.C.B.M. Collection of fruits.

Rockafellow, B.T.S.M. 50 varieties of apples.

Rock County, Nebr.H.M. Educational Work.

Ross, O.B.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Robbins, Mrs. C.H.B.M."" "95"

Rosenan, H.J.B.M."" "95"

Ross, W.H. & Bro.G.M. Wm. Yomeger's Pale Ale.

Robinson Thermal Bath

Cabinet Co. S.M. Bath Cabinet

Root Co., The A.I.G.M. Collection of Bee Hives.

Rosewater, Dr. Victor M.Juror.

Ross & Sons, W.A.G.M. Belfast Ginger Ale.

Roberts, C.W.H.M. Cow Peas from Lewis County.

Runbaugh, J.N. G.M. one plate Duchess Pears.

Rumsey Mfg. Co.G.M. Coil Lead Pipe.

Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co. G.M. Builders Hardware

Rumpp, C.F. S.M. Hand Carved Leather Goods.

Russell, Geo.H.M. Ores from Contract Camp.

Russey, H.C.B.M. Apples, Pears, Plums, etc.

Russell & Co., J.M. G.M. Continuous display of peaches.

Rustin, HenryC.M. In recognition of honorable services as Supt.

Bureau of Light and Power, Buildings & Grounds Department.

Rudebeck, N.C.M. Superintendent Washington Exhibit.

Ryder, Merrill B.M. Skins & Heads.

Rylander, C.M. H.M. Nelson Car Coupler

Ryan, Geo. W.S.M. Cut Glass, Jewelry, Souvenirs.

Ryner, H.P. B.M. Gen'l Superintendent Am. Dist. Tel. Co.

Sandwich Mfg. Co.S.M. Sandwich Hay Press

" " " G.M. Clean Sweep Hay Loader.

" " " G.M. Sandwich Corn Sheller.

Sapp, Jasper H.M. Wheat grown in Boone County.

Sanborn Co., The F. E. G.M. The Exhibit of Stock Food.

" George F. G.M. Star Paper Cutter.

Sarpy County S.M. Continuous display of Fruits.

Saline County, NebraskaS.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

Saunders, Prof. J.E.G.M. Educational Work of Pupils

Sarpy County, Nebr. S.M. Educational Work.

Saline County, Nebr. Educational Work.

Saunders County, Nebr. G.M. Educational Work.

Salsbury & SatterleeG.M. Wool Mattresses.

Sabine Lard & Improvement Co. B.M. Instructive Adversiting Exhibit.

Santleman, Prof. Wm. H.C.M. Hon. Service U.S. Marine Band.

Schnectady Locomotive Co.G.M. "Locomotive"

Scott, John G.M. Michael Oranges and Mexican Limes.

" " B.M. Mediterranean Sweet Oranges and Valencia Late Oranges.

Scherp Ignace H.M. Lemons in liquid, Oranges in liquid and olives in liquid.

Schults, Aug.B.M. Corn from Schuyler Co.

Scott & Co. H.M. White corn from Scott Co.

Schuyler, Miss H.M. Two Pastels.

Schieren & Co., Chas A.G.M. Perforated Electric Leather Belting.

" " S.M. Collective display of leather belting sole and lace leather.

Scott, Richard S.M. Wool.

Scio Mineral Paint Co.H.M. Mineral Paint "Oride of Iron" crude and in oil.

School of Mines & Metallurgy of the State of Missouri G.M. Exhibit of the Mining and Metallurgical School.

Scharnhurst, C.J.B.M. Collection of fruits.

Schofield, Shurmer & Teagle, G.M. Artistic Installation of exhibits.

Schumacher, F. S.M. Collection of small fruits.

Schleinher, R. S.M. Peaches and Grapes.

Schultz, Aug. B.M. Cob Pip Corn from Aus S. Commision.

Schack, Louis S.M. Butter scoring above 97 points.

Schnoeder, Louis L. B.M. " " "95"

Schultz, Alfred B.M. " " "95"

Scheiber, E. L. B.M. " " "95"

Scully, W. W. H.M. Hyslop crab apples Translucent in liquid.

Schofield Surmer & Teagle, G.M. "Ideal" Valve oil.

" " " G.M. Pala cine oil.

Schlitz Brewing Co. G.M. Artistic Installation.

Scribner's Sons, Chas.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Schmidt, H. M.Juror.

Schurig, Ed L. M.Juror.

Secondo, GuastiB.M. Port Wine.

" " G.M. Sherry Wine

" " S.M. Zinfandal Wine.

Sedwick, R.C.H.M. Gandy Strawberries.

Secretaria de FormentoS.M. Mexican Saddle.

"""G.M. Agave and other fibers

"""G.M. Agricultural Products.

Self Lifting Elevator Co.G.M. Self Lifting Elevator.

Seveitzer Booyer H.M. Nickle and Cobalt ores.

Seegor, Mrs. MaryS.M. Designs in beeswax

Senaca Public Schools S.M. Educational Work, maps, drawings, etc.

Sechler Carriage Co.G.M. Buggies and Surries, corn planters and corn drills.

Seamna, F.W.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Searles, John F. H.M. Chalcopyrite and Bainite.

Seissors, Wm.B.M. Bramen Plums and Bradshaw Plums, in liquid.

Seibrecht & SonG.M. Ornamental trees and shrubs and decorating plants.

Stewart, C.W.G.M. Artistic installation of Nebraska State Educational Exhibit.

Search, Mrs. L.H.B.M. Pillow shams.

Secor, E. H.M. Apples.

Shutts, S.B.M. Collection of apples.

Sharples Company, The G.M. Cream Separator and Dairy Supplies.

Short, Mrs. ElizaH.M. Corn from Nodoway Co. Mo.

Sharp Co., Chris.B.M. White Wheat, river cotton, prize cotton

Shultz Belting Co.B.M. Collective Exhibit of Belting.

Sharple Co., The G.M. No Tnie Babcock Tester.

Shields, Mrs. M. H.M. China Painting.

Shimerhorn M & M Co, C.H. H.M. Silver, Lead and Gold ores.

Stieringer, Luther HIGHEST AWARD. Artistic effect of the electric illumination of the Grand Court and the "Nautilus" Fountain.

Shorty Hope M. & M. Co.H.M. Gold ore.

Sheldon, E.P.S.M. Flax

Sheffield Milling Co. S.M. Minnesota Flour.

Shannon, M.B.H.M. Royal Ann Cherries.

Shickley Bros. Co.S.M. Artistic tables and chairs.

Shingle, Robt. W.C.M. Superintendent Hawaiian Exhibit.

Shurtliff, Lewis W. C.M. Vice President for Utah.

Shawhan, R.P.C.M. Vice President for Idaho.

Shanks, Clinton B.G.M. Accurate and Artistic Engrossing Sieb & HolsteinB.M. Potato Bug Destroyer.

Svers, Ted. B.M. 18 plates of Northern Spy apples.

Sintz Gas Engine Co.H.M. Gasoline Engine.

Silver City Reduction Works B.M. Collection of copper ores.

Siskiyon Copping Mining Co. H.M. Copper ores.

Simpson, I.N.M.Juror.

Skinner, P.B.G.M. Minnesota Flour.

Slanson, James G.M. Two varieties

Slair, Ida M.B.M. Plaster Heads

Slaughter, J.C.H.M. Exhibit of apples.

Sloan, C.A. B.M. Apples.

Slater, H.M.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Sluman, C.V.H.M. Pacific prunes and fresh fruits.

Smouse, F.S.B.M. 6 plates apples, 5 varieties.

Smith, Lilly H.M. Oil Paintings in still life.

" Lillian H.M. China Painting.

" A. J. S.M. Siliceous gold ores.

Smith, Syl J.S.M. Sylvanite specimen showing cross of goldraised on surface with blow pipe.

" B.F. B.M. Collection of pears

" Geo. B.B.M. Fall and winter apples.

" & Co., M.E. G.M. Textiles and Factory in operation.

" & Son, M.H. S.M. Golden Row Dent Nebr. White Prize and Mammoth White Corn.

" W.H. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

" H.R. S.M."" "97"

" T.S. B.M. Royal Ann Cherries in liquid.

" Premier Typewriter>

Co. HIGHEST AWARD Artistic Intallation of Exhibit.

Smith, DudleyC.M. Commisioner to England.

Snodgrass, J.T.B.M. 143 plates.

Snyder, O.H.C.M. In recognition honorable services as Storekeeper.

So. Calif. Packing Co.G.M. Canned Fruits.

Sormano, G. B.M. Sherry and Port Wine.

" " G.M. Grape Brandy.

Southern Calif. Wine Co. G.M. Zinfandel, Muscat and other wines and brandies.

" " " " G.M. Burganda Orange wine and Johannisberger wine.

" " Deciduous

Fruit Exchange S.M. Dried apricots and dried peaches.

Souck, G. B.M. Silk and fancy Tapestry.

Sonora Lace Co.G.M. Linen Drawn work.

Solway Process Co., TheG.M. Chemicals.

Southern Cypress Lumber Association G.M. Cypress Lumber rough and manufactured plain and ornamental.

South Platte Creamery B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Sorensen, Andrew S.M."" "97"

"S.S.S.M."" "97"

Sorentzen, James J. B.M."" "95"

Somano, G.B.M. Grape Brandy.

Sommer, E.M.Juror.

Sprague, A.K.S.M. Antelope Valley almonds from Fairmont.

I.H.L. ne plus ultra nonpariel.

Spangler, J.W. H.M. Millet from Lewis County.

Spear, G.S. B.M. Grapes in liquid for table use.

Spaulding, Miss LizzieH.M. Water color painting.

Springfield Gas Engine Co.H.M. Gas Engine.

Spaulding, J.H.B.M. Sylvanite from Lady Franklin mine.

Speigl & LevyS.M. Fresh fruits Bing Cherries and Lamberts

Spaulding, RussellG.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Speer, R.P. H.M. 10 varieties of apples.

Starbuck, E.B.M. 8 varieties of apples.

Strong, Mrs. W.H.K. G.M. Pampas plumes

Steele, W.K.S.M. Falming Tokay grapes

Stone, John H. B.M. 25 plates of apples.

State of MissouriG.M. Continued display of fruits from June 1st to Nov. 1st, 1898.

Striker, H. H.M. Sections of stalks bearing corn.

State of IowaG.M. Artistic installation of fruits.

""OregonS.M. Wines of various sorts

""" S.M. Grains, grasses and potatoes

""" G.M. General exhibit of minerals and ores

""" B.M. Kavlin and products made therefrom

""" B.M. Mineral Soap.

""Minnesota G.M. Lace making Exhibit.

""" S.M. Collective exhibit from ore resources of Minnesota together with methods of mining and transportation of iron ore. State of NebraskaG.M. Floral desings, palms, ferns, etc.

""WashingtonS.M. Exhibit of ores.

""Wyoming G.M. Consolidated Exhibit of ores and minerals.

""Utah G.M. Collective Exhibit of minerals, ores etc.

""Wyoming S.M. Crude petroleum

""NevadaH.M. State Museum Collection

State of NevadaS.M. Grain grasses and flour.

""Montana G.M. Collective Exhibit of minerals & ores.

""Georgia B.M. Gold ores.

""" G.M. Building stone, marble, granite, etc.

""" C.M. Aluminum ores and products.

Standeford, Miss M.K. B.M. Tea Set.

Starrett, C.L.S. G.M. Fine machinists Tools.

Standard Mfg. Co.G.M. Enameled Sanitary appliances.

" Tool Co.S.M. Twist Drills, Etc.

Stinemetz, S.P.G.M. Personal electric exhibit.

Steiner & KollinerG.M. Garnet jewelry.

Standard Sewing Machine Co., G.M. Mfg. Sewing machines.

"" " G.M. Family Sewing machines.

Star Shoe Co.B.M. Misses and children's shoes.

Standard Oil Co. S.M. Exhibit of Oils.

Stetson, John B. G.M. Men's Hats.

Strup, Wm.G.M. Terra cotta art.

Steckel, GeorgeG.M. Photographs.

Stanley Rule & Level Co. G.M. Improved carpenter's tools.

Stone, W.H. H.M. Red Astrachan apples.

Stratton, W.S. S.M. Calaverite, Telluride of gold from Independence mine.

Stanton, Frank McM. G.M. Minerals and rocks, copper, etc.

Stabler, JohnB.M. Exhibit Calcite crystals.

Studebaker Bros. Mfg. Co.H.M. Abraham Lincoln Carriage.

"" " "G.M. Buggies etc.

"" " "S.M. Platform wagons.

"" " "G.M. General exhibit of wagons.

Sterling Boiler Comp. Co.G.M. Liquid Boiler compound.

"" " " S.M. Dustless floor oils.

Stickley Bros. S.M. Tables and chairs.

Standard paint Co.G.M. Rubberoid Roofing.

St. John's Lutheran Church, Council Bluffs H.M. Quilt.

Stedman, L.M.M.Juror.

Sterret, Dr. J.A.M.Juror.

State of Texas M.Collection of Nat. Hist. Specimens.

Sterrett, F.M. G.M. President Missouri Commission.

Stieringer, LutherG.M. Artistic effect of the electric illuminations of the Grand Court and the "Nautilus" fountain.

Starrett, S.B. H.M. Fresh oranges and quinces.

Stuart, B.B.M. Apples, plums, pears.

Stephens, DavidS.M. Collection of fruits.

Sawyer, W.J.S.M. Collection of fruits.

Stanton Mgr. J.W.G.M. Illinois State Fruit Exhibit.

Sterling Cycle WorksS.M. Chainless bicycles and safeties.

Stoddard Mfg. Co.S.M. "Tiger" Hay rakes and Corn planters.

"" " B.M. Disc Harrow "Tiger"

"" " B.M. Disc Plow "Tiger"

Stroebel, Conrad B.M. Reversible plow.

Stime, F.M. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Stewart, F.L.B.M."" "95"

Stenberg, S.B.M."" "95"

Stewart, Paul P. B.M."" "95"

Struehmeier, H.B.M. Lawton blackberries in liquid.

Strooshauser, C. S.M. Center piece evaporated fruits and prunes.

St. Helen's Hall G.M. Kindergarten & Primary Work.

G.M. Standard Tool Co.G.M. Twist Drills.

Standard Oil Co. G.M. Capital Cylinder Oil.

"""G.M. Perfection oil.

Stewart, C.W.B.M. Services as Supt. of Educational Exhibit

Stilson, L.D.B.M. Unrefined Beeswax.

Stoecker, W.F. S.M. Smoker's Articles.

State of ColoradoG.M. General Collection of fruits.

""" S.M. General Educational Exhibit.

""Georgia B.M. Indian corn factory, cheese & Timber Sp

"" "G.M. Ornamental Lmbr. & Timber Specimens.

"" "G.M. Collective Exhibit.

"" "B.M. Clays, Kavlins, etc.

"" "B.M. Iron and Manganese ores.

"" "S.M. Curindum, mica, graphite and Asbestos.

"" "B.M. Sugar cane and Syrup, superior quality.

"" "G.M. Display of cotton seed and wool products

"" "G.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

"" "G.M. Collection of fruits in glass.

State of KansasS.M. General Agricultural Exhibit.

""" S.M. Collection of fruits.

""" S.M. Mineral Stone

""" S.M. Educational Work, maps of grain, etc.

""" B.M. Field and Garden Seeds. Silk Cocoons.

""" S.M. Collection of fruits.

""" S.M. Exhibit of agriculatural products.

""Montana G.M. General Agricultural Display.

"" "S.M. Exhibit of fruits in jars and fresh.

""MissouriG.M. General Agricultural Exhibit.

""Iowa G.M. General Exhibit of Agricultural Products.

State of OregonG.M. Fresh fruits grown in Oregon

"" "G.M. Lumber and timber specimens

State of OregonG.M. Agricultural and Forestry exhibit.

"" "G.M. Forestry specimens scientifically prepared and arranged.

"" "B.M. Geological specimens

""Nebraska HIGHEST AWARDDisplay of the fruits of the state.

"" "G.M. Collection of Agricultural exhibits.

""Minnesota G.M. Minnesota Building.

"" "S.M. Large and interesting collection of foreign and domestic honey and also Exhibit of honey from the state.

""" S.M. Agricultural Exhibit.

""Utah S.M. General Agricultural Exhibit.

""TexasG.M. General Exhibit.

""North Dakota G.M. General exhibit of Agriculture.

""NevadaB.M. Collection of Agricultural Exhibits.

State Bureau of Mines Colorado G.M. Collective display of minerals and ores and excellence of installation.

Sterritt, S.D. H.M. Fresh oranges and quinces.

Stewart, S.B.G.M. Display of bulbs of various kinds

Sterling Mfg. Co.G.M. Disc Harrows seeders and corn stalk cutters.

Stilson, L.D.H.M. Honey in different stages of granulation.

Stilson, L.D.S.M. Honey sugar.

" Winnie L. G.M. Very fine granulated honey, dry with distinct honey flavor.Honey producing plants, pressed and mounted.

Stahman, W.J.B.M. White clover extracted honey.

Stilson, L.D.G.M. Samples of honey.

" "S.M. Heartsease comb honey

" "S.M. Heartsease extracted honey.

Stolley, Wm.B.M. Sweet clvoer extracted honey

" "S.M. Sweet clover comb honey.

Stover Mfg. Co.S.M. Crushers, grinders and elevators.

Stable Carriage Co. G.M. Buggies

Stoddard Mfg. Co.S.M. Havanna Press Drill.

Stoughton Wagon Co. G.M. Stoughton Farm Wagons.

Standard Paint Co.H.M. Paints and car linings.

Stanton County, Nebraska B.M. Educational Work.

Stevenson, J.W.S.M. Collection of strawberries.

Sutton, Capt. Alophus B.M. Kelsey Japan plums.

Sugar City Ceral MillsS.M. Wheatling.

Sunset Seed & Plant Co.G.M. Assortment named sweet peas in the ground and out.

Sutton, M.L.S.M. Native mossess.

Superior Drill Co.G.M. Superior Beet Disc Drills.

Sutherlin, W.D.C.M. Pres. Montana Comission.

" W.H.C.M. Vice President for Montana.

Swift & Co. G.M. Bacon

"" "S.M. Hams

"" "H.M. Beef extract.

"" "S.M. Exhibit.

"" "G.M. Cotsuet

"" "H.M. Wool Soap

Swift & Co. G.M. Refrigerator Car

Swift, R.B. M.Juror.

Swain, Mrs. SarahB.M. Accouchment chair.

Swink, G.W. S.M. Alfalfa Extracted Honey.

" " S.M. Alfalfa Comb Honey.

Swartz, Joseph C.M. Chief Flagman, Dept. Build's & Grnds.

Swope, Milt.M.Juror.

St. Louis Co. Hort. Soc. S.M. Display of fruits, 187 plates.

"" S.W. Ry Cotton

Belt RouteG.M. Collective Ex. of Agricm. & Forestry

St. Charles Condensing Co., S.M. Evaporated Cream.

St. Joseph Pump Co. G.M. Perfection Elevator pumps.

St. Joe Lead Co. S.M. 50 pigs of lead.

St. Helen's Mining Co.H.M. Free Golding Milling ore.

Sharples Co., TheG.M. Tubular & Standar Cream Separators Milk Testers and combined churns.

Tarchow, T.H.F.G.M. Oranges and Pomelo.

Taft, Dr. O.H. G.M. Dental Work.

Tanner, A.W.B.M. Superior collection of Garnets.

Taylor, B.F.B.M. Broom corn Dent corn and potatoes.

"C.R.H.M. White corn.

"Olney B.M. Collection of apples and peaches.

"F.W.C.M. Suptm. Bureau of Agric. Hort. Forest. Etc.

"& Son, Wm. B.M. Fresh & pears.

Tapager, Jens M. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Talmage, Dr. J.E.B.M. Display of Selenite.

Tarrant, Henry S.M. Collection of apples

Territory of Oklahoma S.M. Territorial Ex. of Agricultural Products

""New Mexico S.M. General Agricultural Exhibit

Texas State Exhibit S.M. Agricultural Horticultural & Farm Products

" "" S.M. Tobacco in Leaf

" "" S.M. Cotton in lint & seed

" "" S.M. Flax, hemp, jute and Ranne

Teeter, F. H.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points

Teilman & Co. M.H.B.M."" """

Templetom, Jno. A.C.M. Chief Clerk Dept. Buildings & Grounds

Terry, A.H. B.M. 12 varieties apples and small fruits

Thompson, H. H.S.M. Malta Blood oranges

""S.M. Improved Naval oranges

""S.M. Valencia Late Oranges

" C.C. H.M. Hungarian Prunes

""H.M. Dries Peaches

"& Sons Mfg. Co. S.M. Lewis Gasoline Engine

"Elihu G.M. Personal Electric Exhibit

"Lewis C. Butter scoring above 97 points

"D.E.M.Juror

"George W.C.M. Vice President for Washington

Thorpe, S.R.H.M. Dried Apricots

Thom, Capt. C.E. B.M. Pomelo and Tangarine Oranges

Thomas, S.A.H.M. White Corn

Thayer, Co. Neb. S.M. Educational Work

Thorpe As.B.M. Peaches, plums, apples, grapes

Throckmorton & Griffith H.M. Potatoes

Thatcher, Mrs. H.G.M. Drawn Work

Thaine, D.H.M. Wheat from Newton Co., Kansas

Tollotson, Gov.B.M. Minnesota Flour

Tirrell & SonS.M. Pine neddle wood

Tobacco Wrhsing & Trading

Co.H.M. Shoys Dipping Powder "Swinebath"

Toole, Wm.S.M. Fall and winter apples

Tosta, AntonH.M. Corn

Tourney, A.G.H.M. Alfalfa Extracted Honey

Tonganozie Creamery Assn.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points

Treat, Mrs. HannaB.M. Orange cling Peaches

Trenton Pottery Co. B.M. Bathroom appliances

Trail Co., North DakotaB.M. Yellow Corn

Translucent Fabric Co.G.M. Translucent Fabric Co.

Tuttle, G.S.H.M. Inlaid table and wall pocket

Turnbull, Jno. H.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points

" " " G.M."Highest ave. Scor, Five Exhibits

" " " S.M."scoring above 97 points

Union Club of Tecos Valle, New Mexico G.M. Wheat

Union Fruit Co.B.M. Fruits

" Stoneware Co.S.M. Stoneware

Union Metallic Cartridge Co. G.M. Ammunition of all descriptions

" Pacific Coal Co. S.M. Coal

Union Pacific Ry. Co. G.M. President Abraham Lincoln's Car constructed at the U.S. Military car shops, Alexandria, Virginia, in 1864

University of Missouri S.M. Automatic Gas Generator

" " G.M. Studies in Bacteriology & Pathology

" " G.M. Entomology

" " G.M. Study of Color on heat rays of the sun

" " G.M. Department of Mechanics

" " G.M. Department of Engineering

" " G.M. Photographs and charts

" " G.M. General Exhibits

" " G.M. Food and Fuel values

" " G.M. Department of Physics

" " H.M. Phonetic Tracings

" " G.M. Department of Agriculture

" NebraskaG.M. Timber Exhibit

" ColoradoG.M. General Educational Exhibit

U.S. Supply Co.B.M. General Exhibit

" " " C.M. U.S. Syphon Jet

" " " S.M. Plumbers Supplies

" " " S.M. Automatic Stock Waterer.

"GovernmentG.M. Indian Student Farm Wagon

Utah Silk ExhibitS.M. Silk

"Onyx Co. S.M. Display of Utah Onyx.

Ulrich, Rudolph HIGHEST AWARD Symmetry and Artistic effect of the landscape architecture of the Exposition Grounds.

U.P. Railway System B.M. Transportation Exhibit.

G.M. Furniture car, box car & stock car modern equipment, latest improved appliances forsafety and convenience and increased storage capacity.

G.M. Modern locomotive, 1600 class designed and constructed at the Omaha shops.

G.M. First Locomotive in service west of the Missouri River used by the first constructed transcontinental Ry.

" Unknown " Minnesota B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points

Usher, Wm. G.M. Collection of fruits from Eagle Valley County.

United Typewriter & Supplies Co. S.M. Artistic Installation of exhibits

Utt, J.E. C.M. Assistant Chairman Bureau of Awards.

Val Blatz G.M. Export Beer

""G.M. Malt, "Virine"

""S.M. General exhibit

Vache, T. & Co.S.M. Port and Angelica Wine

Van Orsdel, W.N. B.M. 28 plates of grapes

"Solen, Mrs.H.M. Corn grown by the Sioux Indians

"Brunt, Henry A. S.M. The Old Hickory Wagon

" ""B.M. The Muller Buggy

" ""G.M. Hull & Skinner Trap

Van Brunt, Henry A. B.M. Patterson Buggies

" ""G.M. Forbes Buggy Cover

" ""S.M. Webster Vehicles

Van Brunt, Henry A. G.M. Columbia Buggies

"Vleck Winter Chemical Co.G.M. Medicines and remedies

Van Vleck Minter Co., Cleve, G.M. Medicines and remedies, Thyroin, V.V. Cleve, St. Louis

Vicht, G. S.M. Mechanical Tory

Vincent & Schofield H.M. Corn

Vilmorin Andrieux & Co.G.M. Exhibit of Sugar Beets seeds & chart

Vind, H.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points

Vinsonhaller, W.G.C.M. Vice President for Arkansas

Vorris, W.W.B.M. Collection of Fruits

Vritton, Louis S.M. Traveling Trunks

Waters, G.H.S.M. Canned Fruits

"H.J.H.M. Broom corn in brush dressed

"E.W.S.M. Corn from Lewis Co.

""S.M. Grasses"""

"" H.M. Ky. Blue Grass

"G.W.S.M. Oats from Lewis Co.

"H.F.H.M. Dwarf Soy Beans

Wallace, Henry S.M. Colleciton of Hicks Grapes & other grapes

Warner, J.M.H.M. 8 plates Bellflower apples

Wagoner, Charles H.M. Persimmons

Watkins, Mrs. C.F.H.M. Crayon

" T.E.C.M. Juror

Waterman Pen Co. G.M. Ideal Fountain Pen

"Mrs. R. H.M. Quilt

Waclark Wire Co. G.M. Copper wire

Walker & Sons, Ltd. G.M. Canadian Club Whiskey

Washburn Crosby Co. S.M. Minnestoa Flour

Walberg Hans G.S.M. Hops

Walker & Clark H.M. Graphite

Wagner, JohnB.M. Infusorial Earth

Washington Co. Neb. S.M. Agricultural Exhibit

" " S.M. Educational Work

Wayne Co., Neb.B.M. Educational Work

Wash. Co. Neb. Agri. Society H.M. Spring Red Wheat

Watson, John W.H.M. Corn

Wahoo Creamery Co.S.M. Butter scoring above 97 points

Watts, C.W. B.M. Seedling Cherries & Kentish Cherries in liquid.

Walsh, Jas. G.M. Artistic Installation of Douglas Agricul. Exhibit.

Walker, C.B.G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Wakefield, J.A.C.M. General Secretary, in recognition of honorable services.

Wadley, S.B.C.M. In recognition of honorable services as Supt. Dept. Concessions & Privi.

Wallweg, F.W.C.M. Juror.

Ward, Maj. H.C.C.M."

Watson, S.T.C.M."

Ward, Mrs. H.C.C.M. Juror

Wallace, John A. C.M."

Wallace, Eugene, C.M. VC.M. Vice President for Oklahoma

Warren Electric Specialty Co.B.M. Incandescent Lamps.

Waterman, L.E. G.M. Ideal Fountain Pen

Wands, Mrs. E. S.M. Fruits and vegetables preserved in water for table use.

Wedge, Austin H.M. Globe Peaches

Westenhouse Machine Co.G.M. Westenhouse Compound Engines.

Weston Engine Co.

"Electric Co. G.M. Electric Exhibit.

"Electrical Instrument Co.G.M. Meter for measuring Electro-motive force.

Weston Byron G.M. Ledger papers.

Western Telephone Construction

Co.B.M. Telephone apparatus, equipments and appliances.

Western Union Telegraph Co.,G.M. Historical Exhibit.

" Coal Mining Co. B.M. Bituminous Coal

" " " " H.M. Eureka Coal

"" " " S.M. Jenny Linda Coal

"" " " H.M. Lexington Coal

" Rock Salt S.M. Rock Salt

" Laundry Co. G.M. A fir log 62 ft. long & 30" square

" Coal & Mining Co.S.M. Denning Coal

" Electric Co.G.M. General Exhibit

" Clay Mfg. Co.B.M. Darintile, Hollow Brick, Terra Cotta, Chimney pipes and sewer pipe.

Werkheimer Swatts Shoe Co.,G.M. Men's heavy Shoe wear

Wells & Co., M.D.G.M. Farmer's Miners & Mechanics heavy boots & Shoes.

Welding Compound Co.G.M. Welding Compound

Westinghouse Electric Co.G.M. General Electric Exhibit.

Wear Coal Co.B.M. Bituminous Coal.

Werherill, W.C.B.M. Zinc Ores.

Webb City Club S.M. Zinc and Lead ores.

Weilage Mfg. Co., H.G.S.M. Compressed Air washer

Webster Co. Nebr.H.M. Educational Work

Wells Richardson & Co.G.M. Diamond Dyes

"" " G.M. Butter Color

Wessels, M.J.S.M. Collection of Fruits.

"" S.M. Collection of fruits in jars.

Webb, G.A.S.M. Fresh Fruits, Cherries Raspberries, etc.

Wesley Mfg. Co.B.M. Collection of fruits

Webb, A.W.S.M. Fresh fruits, Cherries, apples, pears, peaches, plums, etc.

Wernicko, H.S.M. Still

Weber Wagon Co.G.M. Weber wagon and Weber one horse wagon

Wells, Mrs. W.H. S.M. Lace and embroidery

Westphalen, Mrs. C. H.M. Quilt and rug

Wernter, A. C.M. Juror.

West, H. C.M. "

West, Oliver C.M. Chf. Insp. Dept. Concessions & Priv.

Western Coal Mining Co.S.M. McAllister Coal

" "" " B.M. McAllister 72 hour coke

" "" " B.M. Rich hill coal

" "" " S.M. Fleming Coal

White Sewing MachineG.M. Family sewing machine

"Rock Mineral Spring Co. G.M. High class effervescent mineral water.

" """ "G.M. Ginger ale.

"H. H.M. Sandstone

White & Co., F. & S.C.S.M. Sulphur

White Sewing machine Co. B.M. Bicycles

"Wm. R.G.M. Automatic Drive Gate & Frame Gate.

"F.S.H.M. Apples

Whittier Fruit Exc. B.M. Eureka Lemons

Whipp, J.C. B.M. Carved Sandstone Mantel

Whitford, G.M. S.M. White clover extracted honey

Whitcomb, Mrs. E.G.M. Designs in Beeswax

Whitman Agricultural Co. G.M. Baling Press.

Whitford, C.A. B.M. General Collection of Fruits.

Whittier, C.B.M. Apples and crab apples.

Whitford, G.M. H.M. Honey vinegar.

Whitcomb, Mrs. L.S.M. Sweets in which honey is made to take the place of sugar.

Whitmore, H.P. G.M. Valuable services in connection with the Fine Arts Exhibit.

Whitcomb, E.C.M. Supt. Apiary

Wheeler, A.M.G.M. Sec'y N.Y. Commission.

Whitaker, S.T. G.M. Supt. Utah Exhibits.

"" G.M. Design & Decoration Utah Booth in Mines & Mining Bldg.

Wilde, Jas. B. B.M. Dewberries and Cuthbert red raspberries.

Winkley Artificial Limb Co.HIGHEST AWARD. For artificial limb, the slip socket is especially recommended.

Williams, Mrs. J.T. B.M. 21 plates of apples.

"M.J.B.M. 7 varieties apples, fine.

"Typewriter Co.B.M. Typewriter

"C.E.H.M. Exhibit of apples.

"Mate S.M. Raspberry extracted honey recommended for purity quality and excellence of flavor.

" Hayward Shoe Co.,H.M. Exhibit of Shoes.

" Theo. G.M. Plums

Wilson, C.L.B.M. Peanuts.

" W.P.G.M. Director Phila. Museum

" S.H.M. 12 varieties grapes.

Winner, Mrs. B.M. Pound pears.

Widell & Co. B.M. Mantel

Wichert & Gardiner G.M. Ladies fine shoes.

Winslow Bros. & Co. G.M. Wrought iron work.

Wiltzins, M.H. G.M. Collective Exhibit of Ecclesiastical goods.

Will, Oscar H.M. Yellow corn and oats.

Winkle Terra Cotta Co.S.M. Mfg's material made from terra cotta

Withycombe, JamesB.M. Wool

Witte, H.L.F.S.M. White Clvoer Extracted honey

Winchester repeating Arms Company G.M. Repeating rifles & Shot guns, single shot rifles and reloading tools, metallic cartridges, paper shot, shells, etc.

Wisconsin State Horticultural Society G.M. Exhibit pears, peaches, plums, etc.

Williamson, M.A. H.M. Williamson car coupler.

Withington & Cooley G.M. Agricultural Implements & Tools.

Wild, JosephB.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Wigginton, W.W.B.M.""" 95"

Wills, T. B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Wigginton, W.R.S.M.""" 97"

"J.M.B.M.""" 95"

Wis. St. Hort. Soc. S.M. Exhibit of apples grown in state

Wilmore, W.W.G.M. Display of dahlias

Wirt & Kuax Mfg. Co.S.M. Hose Reels

Wiggins, Frank G.M. Commissioner, Los Angeles, Exhibit.

" Mrs. FrankG.M. Services as Juror.

Wilcox, J.F.G.M. 200 varieties plants and flowers.

Woollacott, H.F. G.M. Chayeau Royal wine and Chayeau

""S.M. General Exhibit of wines, Zinfandels & Reishings

Wornalk, B. B.M. Collection of apples.

Woollacott, H.F. S.M. Educational Exhibit.

Worcester Corset Co.G.M. Corsets.

Women's Board of Trade Sante Fe, New MexicoG.M. Gold and silver filagree table

Woodman Linseed oil Co.G.M. New and Boiled Linseed oil, and Lindseed coke.

Woman's Flax Growers Ass'n.,S.M. Scutched Flax

Wolfs Roller MillB.M. Minnesota Flour.

Worden, F.H.B.M. Minnesota Flour.

Wood, John T.B.M. Collection of apples.

Wortman, H. H.M. Corn

Walcott, W.C.B.M. Butter scoring above 95 points.

Woodward, Clarke & Co.B.M. Medicinal Books & Preparations.

World's Supply Co.S.M. Metal polish

Wyman, T.E. C.M. Supt. Manual Training.

Woolworth, Jas. M.C.M. Chairman Bureau of Awards.

Wright Co. Hort. Soc. G.M. Display of fruits, 727 plates.

" Mrs. S.G. H.M. Ceramics.

" & Co., F.H. H.M. Condenseed Smoke.

" J.M. B.M. Cultivators.

" Bust Form Co.H.M. Bust form.

" Geo. F.C.M. Vice President for Iowam.

Wragg, M.J. B.M. Apples and plums.

Wright, J.B.M. Apples, plums & Pears.

Wigman, T.E.C.M.Supt. Manual Training Exhibit.

Wycoff, Seamans & Benedict, G.M. Artistic Installation of Exhibit.

Yucca Mfg. Co. S.M. Surgical bandages & Splints manufactured of Yucca.

Yale, Madam H.M. Face Bleaches and Toilet preparations.

Younger & Co.G.M. Continuous display of apples.

York Co. Neb.S.M. Educational Work.

Yeaman, F.S.B.M. Collection of fruits.

Younger Co. Ltd. Wm.G.M. Sparkling Scotch Ale.

Yager, J.H. B.M. Plums

Yocum, F.W. B.M. Snow peaches

Zastro, Wm. H.M. Philatilics

Zettled, JoeS.M. Seedling Apples

Zimmerman, AugustB.M. Butter scoring above 95 points

DEPARTMENT OF EXHIBITS.

EDWARD E. BRUCE, Manager.

H. B. Hardt, Assistant.

The Exhibits, of all form, nature and character, are calculated to be the main attraction of an Exposition, and hence much thought, care and attention is necessary that the exhibits, whether considered singly or as a whole, shall be of such character as to not only compel the attention of the visitors but to enlist their interest in the qualities, nature and operation of them, so it follows that the most successful exhibits are those which most generally attracts the sympathy and inquiry of the exposition patrons.

It is a matter of much pride to the exposition management, that the exhibits as secured, arranged and grouped, excited so much favorable commendation from those whose long and varied experience in exposition work, qualified them as competent judges in such matters.

It is but fair to state that the general high quality of the exhibits in this exposition is due mainly to Manager Bruce of the department, and to his able assistant, Mr. Hardt; and is also due to the general high character and efficiency of the superintendents of the various branches of this department, selected by Manager Bruce for their special qualifications and fitness for the work placed in their charge.

To the fine business ability and the excellent judgment evidenced by the manager of this department is attributed, mainly the results obtained.

The operations and results of this department, in so far as they can be given at this late day, may be stated in the following way.

The first thought of the department management was given to its organization and to preparation of rules governing exhibits and exhibitors.To this end Manager Bruce, Manager Reed and the general secretary, as a committee carefully considered the subject of rules and form of application etc., noting the action of similar projects and considering their fitness in this case.As a result of the committee's consideration and conclusions on the subject the following Rules were recommended and were by them adopted.

(Insert General Rules and Regulations 7 pages typewritten, next attached.)

Manager Bruce divided the work of the Exhibits Department into branches, designated Bureaus, as follows:

Bureau of Education.

Bureau of Fine Arts.

Bureau of Mines and Mining.

Bureau of Agriculture, Horticulture, Forestry and Irrigation.

Bureau of Live Stock.

Bureau of Diary Products.

Bureau of Poultry.

Bureau of Bee Industries.

Bureau of Machinery and Electricity.

Bureau of Manufactures and International Exhibits.

Bureau of Liberal Arts

Bureau of Transportation and Agricultural Implements.

The operations under these various bureaus, as gathered from reports of chief of bureaus, from observation and from the general records are outlined in the following divisions.

GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE TRANS-MISSISSIPPI AND INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION 1898, OMAHA, NEB. U.S.A.AUTHORIZED BY ACT OF THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS.

Rule 1.In accordance with an Act of Congress of the United States of America, approved by the President, June 10th, 1896, the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition will be held at the City of Omaha, in the state of Nebraska, U.S.A. from June to November, in the year of eighteen hundred and ninety eight, for the exhibition of resources of the United States of America, the progress and civilization of the western region and for a display and friendly competition of arts, industries, manufactures and products of the soil, mine and sea, comprising the whole range ofhuman progress, and exemplifying the growth of the United States, the foreign countries and the South and Central American countries, making same universal in its nature.The Exposition will be held under the joint auspices of the United States Government and the Trans-Mississippi states, under the control and government of fifty directors.

Rule 2.Governments of foreigncountries , states and others intending to participate in this Exposition are requested to intimate the same as soon as possible.Applications for space from countries officially represented, should be made through the commissioners of the respective countries or states where the article is produced or manufactured.From countries not officially represented, applications should be addressed directly to the Chief of Department of Exhibits, Omaha, Nebraska.Applications forspace cannot be received after March 1st, 1898, and are invited as early as possible, as in the allotment of space precedence will be given to priority of applications.

Rule 3.All wishing to participate in the Exposition will be charged for space as follows:for each square foot of wall space, 50 cents; for special positions on central aisle, isolated space or corner lots, an increase of 25 per cent will be charged above the quoted rates.In grounds:for each square foot a rate of 50 cents will be charged.The minimum application for space acceptable will be for twenty square feet.Any fraction of a foot to be computed as a whole foot.Governments and barge exhibitors will be granted liberal allowances, provided their applications are completed within the year 1897.To encourage exhibits in operation which are especially attractive to the public those making live exhibits will be given advantages.The nominal charges for space are not made for purposes of gain, but to exclude uninteresting, paltry features, to insure the illustration of the vast resources of the United States and to bring foreign and American progress into friendly competition in as compact a manner as possible.

Rule 4.All applications for space should be accompanied by a drawing to a scale of one-quarter inch to the foot of the plan and distribution of objects intended for exhibition,Dimensions of space desired should be given in feet and inches, without including any allowance for passageways; and should state whether the applicant is the manufacturer or producer of the article described, or a proposed concessionaire.Upon receipt of the notification of acceptance of the application by the Chief of Department of Exhibits a remittance of one-fourth of the total amount due for the space must be made, the balance will be payable upon receipt of notification of the allotment of space. Permits to occupy space will be issued only on production of receipt in full for payment of space charges.

Rule 5.All remittances must be made payable to the Trans- Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha, Nebraska.

Rule 6.Articles that are in any way dangerous, or nostrums, and empirical preparations whose ingredients are secret or concealed, can not be admitted to the Exposition.

Rule 7.Any single piece or section of any exhibit of greater weight than 20,000 pounds will be accepted only if the exhibitor provides at his own cost the required machinery for its installation; the ground flooring of the buildings will be calculated to bear a weight of 1,000 pounds to square ten feet, and when ever alterations and foundations to the floor are required, the consent of the Chief of the Department must be obtained, and the work to be done at the expense of the exhibitor.The same rule applies to any extra partitions which exhibitors may require.

Rule 8.Exhibitors will be strictly confined to such exhibits as are specified in their application, no transfer of space will be permitted; spaces not occupied one month previous to the opening day and spaces not fully occupied, or misused spaces, will revert to the exhibition authorities for reassignment, and payments made thereon forfeited.When allotment of space is made, exhibitors will be notified and will be furnished with permits to occupy the same, subject to the general rules and regulations adopted for the government of the Exposition, the special rules of the Department in which their exhibit will be located, as well as the laws of the United States Government, the laws of the state of Nebraska and the city of Omaha: permits will not be transferable.

Rule 9.Packages for the Exposition must be marked with diamond shaped device as a distinctive mark, and be addressed to the President, Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition, Omaha, Nebraska, U.S.A. and in additions the following informationwritten on the outside packages, wrappers or covering.

a, The name and address of exhibitor,

b, The country, state or territory from which package comes

c, Department in which exhibit is installed.

d, The number of the permit for space.

e, Total number of packages sent, with serial numbers marked on each package.Official labels will be obtainable.A list of the contents should be enclosed in each package.Freight and terminal charges must be prepaid.

Rule 10.The expenses of freight, insurance, placing on the allotted space, receiving, unpacking and arranging exhibits, aswell as their removal at the close of the Exposition, must be defrayed by the exhibitor.

Rule 11.Exhibitors will have to provide, at their own expense all showcases, stands, fittings, etc.All platforms and counters, partitions, showcases, stands, appurtences of approved designs shall not exceed, measuring from the floor the following dimensions, without special permissionof the Chief of Department of Exhibits,-

Showcases and stands 15 feet high.

Partitions 15 feet high.

Counters 2 feet 10 inches high.

Platforms 1 foot high.

Rule 12.The general reception of goods at the Exposition Grounds will commence January 1898, and no article will be admitted after May 1st, 1898. Space not taken possession of by May 1st, 1898, will revert to the Exposition Authorities for reassignment.The installation of heavy articles should begin by special arrangements as soon as progress on the grounds and buildings will permit.

Rule 13.If no authorized person is at hand to take charge of exhibits at least 14 days before the opening day, they will be removed and stored at the cost and risk of whomsoever it may concern.

Rule 14.No exhibitor will be permitted to erect or arrange his exhibit in any way so as to obstruct the light, or occasion any inconvenience or disadvantageously affect the display of other exhibitors.

Rule 15.Decorations,signs, etc. must be in conformity with the general plan adopted by the Exposition authorities.No muslin signs will be permitted.

Rule 16.Duly approved exhibitor's business cards and circulars may be placed with the exhibitor's space for distribution.The right is reserved by the Exposition authorities to restrict or discontinue the distribution of such,if the contents are objectionable or if it is carried to excess or becomes an annoyance to visitors.

Rule 17.Exhibitors will be held responsible for the cleanliness of their exhibits and the space surrounding same.All exhibits must be in complete order each day at least thirty minutes before the hour of opening.Work of this character cannot be permitted during the hours when the Exposition is open to the public.In case of failure on the part of the exhibitor to observe this rule, the Chief of Department will have the work performed at the cost of the exhibitor.

Rule 18.Sketches, drawings, photographs or other reproductions of the articles exhibited will only be allowed upon joint consent of the exhibitor and the Chief of the Department; but general views of portions of the interior of the buildings may be made by special permit of the exposition authorities.

Rule 19.The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition authorities will take all reasonable precautions for the safe preservation of all objects in the exposition, but will not be responsible for damage, depredation or loss of any kind, or for accidents by fire, the elements otherwise, however originating.A thoroughly equipped fire department will protect the buildings and exhibits, and a large police guard force will maintain order.

Rule 20.Neither open fire nor naked lights will be allowed in the buildings or grounds without special permissions in writing.

Rule 21. Favorable terms will be arranged by which exhibitors may insure their own goods.Exhibitors may employ watchmen of their own choice to guard their goods during the hours the Exposition is open to the public.Such watchmen will have to be approved by the Chief of the Department and be subject to the rules and regulations governing employees of the Exposition.

Rule 22.Arrangement with transportation lines will be made to obtain concessions in regard to the carriage of exhibits to and from the Exposition.

Rule 23.The Exposition buildings and grounds will be constituted a bonded store for articles exhibited from foreign countries, without payment of duty, but on all goods offered for sale duty must be paid.

Rule 24.An International Jury of Awards will be formed and the awards will consist of:

Special Diploma of Honor.

Diploma for Gold Medal.

Diploma for Silver Medal.

Diploma for Bronze Medal.

Diploma for Honorable Mention.

Every diploma for medal will be accompanied by an official medal of bronze, prepared by Act of Congress at the United States mint.In addition to the above awards, special prizes consisting of six Gold Trophies, Six Silver Cups and Six Gold Medals, will be offered to the competitors in each of the following classes:

1 Gold Trophy, 1 Silver Cup and 1 Gold Medal as 1st, 2nd and 3rd prize for best display of an Irrigating System in operation. 1 Gold Trophy, 1 Silver Cup and 1 Gold Medal as 1st, 2nd and 3rd prize for best electric light service and display. 1 Gold Trophy, 1 Silver Cup and 1 Gold Medal as 1st, 2nd and 3rd prize for the best display illustrating the process of the manufacture of Beet Root Sugar. 1 Gold Trophy, 1 Silver Cup and 1 Gold Medal, as 1st, 2nd and 3rd prize for the best display of Manufacturing Plant in Operation, as well as two more lots of similar prizes for other high class exhibits, to be designated by the Exposition authorities hereafter.

In giving these special prizes, preference will be given to those inventions proving the most suitable to the requirements of the west.All awards will be apportioned on the reports of the International Juries, to every exhibitor whose contributions are pronounced to be of incontestable superiority.The jury work will be completed at least one month prior to the close of the Exposition, so as to give successful exhibitors the opportunity to advertise their awards in the Exposition.The full list of awards will receive the greatest official publicity.Rules will be prescribed for the guidance of the International Juries on awards in the discharge of their duties.Separate exhibitors' entries will be required for each class.

Rule 25.It should be stated in the application for space whether exhibits are intended for competition or not.Only bona fide exhibitors can compete for awards.Every intending privilege holder must make a creditable exhibit.

Rule 26.Any exhibitor may sell any part or the whole of his exhibit, but with express condition that the same is not deliverable until the close of the Exposition.An exhibitor desiring to sell any portion of his exhibit for immediate delivery must obtain the privilege and agree to replace immediately article sold.Privileges and Concessions.Privileges refer to the sale of such goods as are manufactured in order to illustrate a machine or process exhibited.Privileges will be granted to bona fide exhibitors. Concessions refer to the sale of all goods and operations of attractions from which the securing of revenue is the sole object of the applicant and will be allotted space only in the "Plaisance" Grounds, not in the Exposition buildings or grounds proper.Applications to see goods of any kind not manufactured on the grounds as the products of a machine or process exhibited or lessees of concession for restaurants, guide books, rolling chairs, messenger service, telegraph service, amusements, etc., and all other concessions must make arrangements with the Chief of the Department of Concessions.Applicants should set forth the size of the building, if special building is required, in the column headed, "Size of Building".If to be located in any of the Exposition buildings or grounds proper, under the head of "Space required." All applications for space must be made to the Chief or Department of Exhibits who will/after granting space, hand the same to the Chief of Department of COncessions for adjustment of percentages payable.Any person wishing to participate in the Exposition/must secure and arrange payment for space to be occupied, before he can obtain privileges or concessions to do business in the Exposition Grounds.The Exposition Authorities reserve to themselves the right to accept or reject any or all applications for exhibits, concessions or privileges.

Rule 27.Applicants for space desiring to exhibit machinery in motion, will be required to furnish, besides a drawing, the following information:

Actual Horse power required for each machine.

Cubic feet of steam per hour at a pressure of 70 pounds.

Diameter of steam, water or gas pipes.

Diameter of discharge or drain pipes.

Diameter of, width of faces and number of revolutions of Driving pulleys.

The main shafts will make 120 and 240 revolutions per minute.All shafting, pulleys, belting, machines, etc., for the transmission of power from the main shafting must be provided by and at the cost of the Exhibitor.Requisition for motive power, water, steam, gas, electric service, extra lights, etc., should be made at the same time.Same will be supplied to exhibitors at fixed cost prices, to encourage the display of machinery in motion.Demands for such must be settled at the time when the allotment of space ismade.Exhibitors may erect decorativerailings around their exhibits and provide canopies subject to approval, but they must be in every instance within the area of the allotted space; in cases of machinery in motion, it is imperative that it be well guarded.The Exposition authorities reserve to themselves the right of examining or testing any exhibit?If any damage or injury shall be occasioned in the exposition by any exhibited machine, implement, or article whatever to any visitor or other person, or to any officer, servant, or others there and then, the exhibitors to whom such machine, implement or article may belong shall indemnify, and hold harmless the Exposition authorities from and against all actions, suits, expenses and claims, on account of, or in respect to any such damage, or injury, which may be so caused or occasioned.Shaftingand motors will have to be under the care of exhibitors requiring same.

Rule 28.An official catalogue will be published in English.The Exposition authorities reserve to themselves the sole right of compiling and printing the same.Every exhibitor will have the right of one entry for each space, for the name, address and description of exhibit, consisting of twenty words, free of charge, and as at least 100,000 copies of the official catalogue will be issued, exhibitors will derive from this alone great benefits.All descriptive matter beyond the twenty words will be charged at fixed rates as an advertisement.The Exposition authorities will provide uniform cards with the name of the exhibitor and the catalogue number printed thereon, which are to be affixed to the exhibits.

Rule 29.The classification is not exhaustive.Where there appears no heading, the Department of the Juries on Awards will classify the exhibits satisfactorily.The six headings of the classification are:

A.Agricultural, food and its accessories, forestry and forest products, irrigation, its modern system and appliances; agricultural machinery, horticulture, viticulture, apiaryproducts, pomology, fish and fisheries, fish products apparatuses for fishing.Beet root industry of all description.

B.Mechanical arts, mines, mining, metallurgy, transportations, railways, vessels cycles, vehicles, electricity and electrical appliances. C.Manufactures in general, liberal arts, education, engineering, public works, constructive architecture, music and drama, ethnology, archaeology, progress of labor and inventions.

D.Fine Arts, paintings, sculpture, architecture, decoration.

E.Women's work.

F.Isolated and collective exhibits.

Rule 30.The representatives of foreign countries states and of sanctioned collective exhibits will be allowed to group exhibits as they may consider proper, subject always to the approval of the Exposition Authorities, except machinery, which should be located in the machinery section.For every exhibit a separate application form and entry must be made.The aisles and passage ways are absolutely reserved for public convenience under the sole control of the Exposition authorities, no decorations, trophies, fountains or any exhibit whatever will be allowed to project into, or to be placed therein.The Exposition authorities shall have the right to cause the removal of any article from whatever quarter it may come if on account of its nature or appearance it be detrimental to or incompatible with the object of decorum of the Exposition, all goods must be exhibited in the name of the individual or firm signing the application from and no exhibitor will be allowed to transfer any portion of the space allotted to him, or to allow any other than his own exhibit to be placed thereon.No concessions or privileges will be allowed in the foreign section, State Buildings or Collective Sections of the Exposition except upon special terms and conditions as may be arranged with the Exposition authorities.All representatives must observe the general rules and regulations strictly.

Rule 31.Storage will be provided for empty cases, crates and packages at a rate not exceeding 25 cents for minimum single pieces, but it is understood that the Exposition authorities shall not be subject to any liability or damage resulting from loss of such empties by depredations or fire, or any cause whatever.

Rule 32.The removal of any exhibit will not be permitted prior to the close of the Exposition.Everybody shall keep exhibits uncovered and in best of order for inspection during all hours when the Exposition is open to the public.

Rule 33.To each bona fide exhibitor or his representative, one free pass to the Exposition grounds will be issued free of charge and the necessary workman's passes will be supplied.Special rules will regulate the terms and conditions of admission.

Rule 34.Upon arrival at Exposition grounds, prepaid consignments will be delivered by the Department of Transportation on or as near as practicable to the exhibitor's allotted space, at the fixed priceof six cents per hundred pounds or twenty cubic feet measurement.Transportation charges, together with terminal charges of six cents per hundred pounds on all consignments shipped destined to the Exposition must be fully prepaid at the initial point, as under no circumstances will these charges be advanced by the Exposition authorities. The terminal charge will apply to all consignments except those entering the grounds on their own wheels, small consignments, minimum car lots, an single pieces of an exhibit, weighingover 2,000 pounds.The charge on cars and coaches on their own wheelswill be $5 each and locomotives with tenders, $10 each.The minimum charge of 50 cents for any single shipment will be exacted by the Exposition authorities, and the minimum carload weight as established by the initial road will be the basis on which the Exposition charge is made for such car load shipments, and exhibits weighing more than 2,000 pounds, each piece will be subject to special arrangements.Such goods as are received at the Exposition with transportation and terminal charges unpaid or only partially paid will be stored at the expense and risk of the owner.

Rule 35.The buildings and grounds will be illuminated generally. Should any exhibitor require extra light, he can obtain same upon application and on payment of fixed rates.

Rule 36.Before March 1st, 1898, Representatives of Commissions should furnish the Chief of Department of Exhibits with approximate plans showing the manner they intend to group their display and furnish a list of exhibitors together with the individual application forms for spaces for the preparation of the general plans and official catalogue.

Rule 37.Such Representatives of Commissions, as may be designated shall be permitted to act as such representatives, provided they are duly accredited and produce to the Exposition authorities written evidence of having been authorized to act by the Proper.

Rule 38.Immediately after the close of the Exposition, exhibitors must remove their effects and complete such removal within 30 days from the closing.Goods then remaining will be chargedstorage.

Rule 39.Loan exhibits accepted by the Chief of the Department of Exhibits will be cared for without expense to the owner.Special arrangements will be madein each case for exhibits which are non-commercial in character, but designed to add to the completeness and educational value of the exposition.

Rule 41.Exhibitors furnishing machinery such as engines, boilers, etc. for use of the Exposition, may select their own men to operate them.Their wages will be fixed and paid by the Exposition authorities.

Rule 42.The Exposition authorities will defray the necessary expenses of exhibitors who loan their machine tools, etc. for the use of the Exposition, beyond the outlay they would have incurred as exhibitors, simple wear and tear expected.

Rule 43.Permits will be issued by the Chief of the Department of Exhibits to bring in such material as may be required for the successful operation of certain exhibits and such articles as may be required by concessionaires and privilege holders fifteen minutes before the opening of the expositionin the morning, also for the removal of such articles and products as come within the general rules and regulations.

Rule 44.The escape of steam into the atmosphere will not be permitted in any of the buildings and the exhibitor must provide care of its condensation.

Rule 45.It is not intended that machinery shall be installed in any other building outside of the Machinery Hall.But in order to encourage pleasing and attractive effects and to add life to the various exhibits where motion is required, a limited amount of noiseless motive power may b applied, subject to the approval of the Chief of the Department of Exhibits.

Rule 46.Works of art will be admitted to the fine arts section, whether previously exhibited or not.All works of art must be of highest order or merit and will be admitted on approval of the Committee of Selection.The installation of the works of art admitted will be under the supervision of the Superintendent of the Bureau of Fine Arts.All pictures round or oval, should be placed in square frames.Excessive breadths in frames or projecting moldings should be avoided.Shadow boxes must not project more than one inch beyond the frame.Works of art for sale will be so designated in the official catalogue and will be subject to special rules.

Rule 47.Each person who becomes an exhibitor thereby agrees to conform strictly to all the rules and regulations established for the government of the Exposition.

Rule 48.The Exposition authorities of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition reserve to themselves the right to construe, amend or add to these rules and regulations whenever it may be deemed necessary for the interest of the Exposition.

The Exposition authorities hope to secure such perfection of detail in the presentation of each separate exhibit and such logical, consistent and harmonious combination in the arrangement of the several classes and groups as will secure a display which will be both instructive and artistic.To this end they desire to aid exhibitors and to secure their hearty co-operation and assistance.Regulations are intended not to annoy exhibitors but to aid them in making the most effective display.

GURDON W. WATTLES,

President.

E.E. BRUCE,

Mgr. and Chief Dept. Exhibits

A.L. REED,

Mgr. and Chief Dept. of Concessions.

CONCESSIONS & PRIVILEGES DEPARTMENT

Abraham L. Reed, Manager

S.B. Wadley, Superintendent

E.M. Fairfield, Chief Clerk

Olin West, Chief of Inspectors

"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy."

The best Expositions are places of instruction, interest and amusement.As no school of instruction and training is complete without its play grounds and its games, so no Exposition school of learning is complete without its play grounds, its places of amusements, recreation and frolic.It only remains, as with other schools of instruction, to so surround the features provided for the play grounds with such rules and regulations as will be calculated to restrain the fun and frolic within proper and reasonable limits.It also follows that, as with other schools of learning, the operators of amusement features and the frolicsome visitors will sometimes set all rules and regulations at naught and have for their guidance this only- "On with the dance, let Joy be unconfined." It is true, however, that it is but seldom that the authorities of the amusement section fail to maintain a firm and even control over the operations of features and the conduct of the patrons.The fun and frolic of an Exposition is not, however, the chief element of the Concessions Department. The matter of providing food and drink for Exposition visitors and its small army of employees, the privilege to sell all sorts of articles and to pursue all sorts of avocations.The very many pursuits in which money passes, are all the subjects of negotiation with and are operated under rights granted by the Concessions Department.

The applications for these many concessions and Privileges are generally somewhat plentiful and the management of the Department is called upon to very carefully consider the proposals, their purposes, their proposed manner of operation and the multitude of detail involved in their presentation, so that the Exposition shall not be imposed upon, nor the patrons of the Exposition have just cause for complaint upon any legitimate cause or basis.

It will thus be seen that the management of concessions department is not simple.Also, that in spite of careful consideration, constant watchfulness and unceasing surveillance, there will creep in things that should not be, and which are not highly creditable.The stringent regulations and constant oversight, however, minimizes the opportunity for unseemly and indecorous operations and actions.

A large Exposition is not only full of instruction for the onlookers but is a most liberal education for all who have to do with its management and daily routine.In no other department is this education more diverse and comprehensive than in that of concessions.When one considers that 90 out every 100 concessioners are regular followers of Expositions, who not only represent the native craft and cunning of twenty different peoples, but come with wits sharpened against other, perhaps many other, Concessions Departments, the mere making of the hundreds of contracts, whose terms shall not conflict, is seen to be a task calling for the aptest of pupil.

So also in the daily and hourly enforcement of the contracts, particularly those governing the operation of amusement concessions of the "Midway", are those lessons to be read and digested, and that instantly.No long hours of study can here be permitted;it is not a place for the student but for the man of discriminating insight and quick decision.When dispute arise, when collections of deferred payments or daily percentages are sought to be evaded, when a Babel of tongues engulfs the officers of the department, when the guards are met with a show of armed resistance at the Indian camp or threats to unleash the lions in the "Animal Show", then it is that one wishes his "education" were not all crowded into a few short months.

The T.M. & I.E. was fortunate in having the experienced assistance of a superintendent and a chief Inspector in the Concessions Department, who had served apprenticeship at the Nashville Exposition the year before and who therefore had personal knowledge of most of the concessionaires and their peculiarities.This knowledge was invaluable, and it is all but essential to the success of any Concessions Department that its executive officer should have had previous experience.

One of the rocks which dot the course of this department is the grant of "exclusive" privileges, and the navigator who would avoid wreck thereon must be well up in the psychologic ethnologic and diabolic branches of Exposition knowledge.Whether a certain costume is Syrian or Greek, whether a "wedding procession" is Egyptian of Maltese, whether camels are permanently attached to the land of the Pyramids, or may safely be assumed to have use in other countries, whether Algiers is any more "Oriental" than Italy or whether "oriental" has a technical, specialized, Expositionized meaning, from these International problems down to the question of how long it takes to transform a "hot roast sandwich" into a cold one and thereby change its contractual habitat, for the proper determination of these and innumerable other vexatious questions, the department needs nothing less than Omniscience.

Happy the manager who can see the light often enough to correct his reckoning and steer safely between the Scylla of lost revenue and the Charydbis of legal complication.He must assume infallibility if he have it not; and if some of his judgment are reversed by the courts, he is always to be congratulated that the reversals are no more numerous.

It is with confidence that the assertion is made that the amusement section of the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition was more free from anything objectionable or indecorous than any previous American Exposition of magnitude. And that this is so is attributable manly to the care, study, investigation and manly decision of the Manager of this Department, whose every aim was toward a successful and a credible operation of the department placed under his care and management.

It is always expected that the Concessions Department shall be productive of large revenues to the Exposition, and sometimes it is revenue only that is planned to result.In this Exposition it was planned to have a successful and credible operation of this department, with as large net revenue as would there by result.

In the consideration of rights for sale of beer and wines in connection with restaurants, etc. it was decided that while it was clear such rights must be granted, yet it should be within proper regulations and the sale of such goods by the use of open bars or otherwise should not be offensively thrust on the notice of Exposition patrons.This decision was duly carried out.The sale of whiskey and liquors was not allowed under any concession granted, and the troubles of the management by reason of the sale of intoxicants were slight.

The revenues of the Exposition, coming to it from the Concessions Department, were of most material advantage.Those receipts prior to the opening of the Exposition and during its first months, having special value, owing to demands of creditors, whose clamor could only be satisfied with cash, and some concessions perhaps, were granted for a less consideration than could otherwise have been secured because of the crying need for funds.

The receipts of the Concessions department show that for each admission to the Exposition, paid and free, the Concessions Department received 14-7/10 cents. And for each Paid admission to the Exposition grounds the Concessions Department received 16-53/100 cents, a record that stands unmatched by any previous American Exposition of magnitude.

To show fully the concessions granted, their character receipts, the revenue to the Exposition from each, the receipts daily from each class of concessions, together with a summary of the financial transactions of the department, the subjoined statements are given.

Next follows classified abstract showing gross receipts of the various concessions, etc.Said abstract is too long and too complex for typewriting.

Mr. John A. Wakefield,

821 New York Life Bldg.

Omaha, Neb.

My dear Wakefield:

I return with this the copy for the Trans-Mississippi History enclosed with yours of the 5th.You will note I have made a few corrections that will eliminate giving the Mo. Pacific prominent notice as against the other Omaha terminal roads.

Also note what you say about the medals.I cannot help but think that your proposition is very nice and Mr. Wattles who was just in and I mentioned the matter to him, and will add that if the meeting can be held the fore part of next week I will take pleasure in being there, in fact will make a special effort to be there at any subsequent date if advised.

Yours truly,

G.W.F.A.

TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT

Mr. William N. Babcock, Manager

Ambrose H. Lee, Superintendent

The duties pertaining to this department are well set forth in the Executive Committee rules as to transportation.The most important of these were the securing and promulgating of special and highly favorable rates on all the railroad and steamship lines, for exhibits, etc., destined for and to the Exposition, and the negotiations for and publication of special railway rates for Exposition visitors.

Railway companies viewed the exposition with favor, and it may be said that no reasonable requests upon the railways for assistance were ever declined. Through their courtesy, the Exposition management was enabled to send its agents and representatives to various parts of this country, often in special cars and trains, promoting the advantages of the exposition and traveling in its interests.

Foreign railroads and steamship companies also assisted materially.Exhibits from the Orient, European, South American and other countries were transported to and from the Exposition at greatly reduced rates.Foreign exhibits, by Act of Congress, were admitted to out ports free of payment of duties.Import brokers at ports of entry assumed the duty of clearing the exhibit shipments free of expense to the exhibitor.These courtesies were much appreciated.

Domestic exhibits were transported, to and from the exposition on reduced rated, full rates to the Exposition and return rates free on certificate that goods had been exhibited and had not changed ownership.In many instances exhibits from Nebraska and adjourning states were carried free.

Through a contract made by the Exposition with one of the Omaha Terminal Railway companies, that company laid a system of railway tracks within the grounds, which tracks were available to all Terminal Railways, which permitted the placing of cars at the doors of all of the principal buildings.These tracks were covered during the period the exposition was held, then uncovered and used again for the removal of the exhibits.Under this contract a charge of $4.00 per car load was made upon all car loads of exhibits or other goods going into the exposition grounds in railway cars.Main lines of Terminal Railways ran alongside the grounds on the north and with side tracks at that point, in conjunction with some tracks just inside the grounds, afforded excellent positions for placing and holding the special cars and trains of visiting persons and parties.

During the period of the exposition the railway companies made and put in effect special excursion rates that were generally very liberal.And this fact, together with the extensive advertising of the Exposition by the various railway lines, contributed largely to the success which resulted.

The Omaha Street Railway Co. gave a car service which was generally ample and very satisfactory.Better than a one-minute service was given, and on three of the big days an average of 242,617 passengers were carried.

The matter of caring for and storing the empty packages used for exhibits etc. was awarded under contract to the Exposition Transfer Co., to remove all packing boxes, crated, etc., from the grounds, store them, return them to the exhibit spaces at close of the exposition for the compensation of four and one-half (4-1/2) cents per cubic foot; they to care for and store the packages of the Exposition itself, including those pertaining to the Fine Arts Exhibits, free of cost to the Exposition.

Handling of freight pertaining to exhibits was done by the Exposition Transfer Co. under a contract with the Exposition providing for charges of six cents per cwt. from cars and from freight house on the grounds, and twelve per cwt. from down depots and terminals to the designated exhibit spaces in the buildings with a minimum charge or 50 cents per single package, they agreeing to establish and maintain, without expense to the Exposition, an office and forces for the keeping of all goods received and shipped.These important services were so well performed that not a single loss or damage claim against the Exposition resulted.These were handled in this way 5,417 consignments, consisting of 127,749 packages, weighing 21,205,457 pounds, or 10,603 tons, or 1,000 car loads of ten tons each.

The same regulations and charges governed the removal of exhibits, etc. as obtained for their receipt.

THE PRESIDENT

DAILY PROGRAMMES - SPECIAL DAYS

Official Entertainment

Under the original organization of the Exposition, the president performed the duties which, under the reorganization, we assigned to the several members of the executive committee. During the period of exploitation, he visited with delegations of prominent citizens many of the Trans-Mississippi states, promoting appropriations from legislatures and arousing pubic interest.This work was continued after the re-organization an until the gates were opened.

The most notable of these journeys was taken in February 1897, with a delegation composed of President Wattles, G.M. Hitchcock, John L. Webster, W.S. Poppleton, Clement Chase and H.E. Palmer, who, with their wives, were tendered a private car by the Pullman Company, and transported without cost by the Union Pacific and other railroads to the capitals of nine different western states. In nearly every one of these states, this delegation was given a hearing before a joint session of the legislature, and while on account of the hard times then prevailing some of these states did not make appropriations, there is no doubt but the interest aroused did much to advertise the Exposition and later on to increase its attendance.

In addition to this work numerous delegations were invited to Omaha and entertained during the period of building the Exposition.In the winter of 1897-1898 these visitors came thick and fast.In January the entire Iowa legislature were invited and transported from Des Moines free of expense. After a visit to the Exposition grounds they were entertained at a dinner at the Millard Hotel at which many toasts were given and much good will prevailed.

On July 28, 1897, the executive committee defined the duties of the president as follows:The president of the Exposition with such assistants as he may deem necessary shall have charge of the official entertainment of distinguished visitors, the reception and welcoming of visiting commissions and delegations, the arrangements in connection with special days and arrangement and publicity of the daily programme of events and features of the Exposition.

LAYING OF THE CORNER STONE of the ARCH OF STATES - ARBOR DAY

April 22, 1897.

The first occasion for a ceremonial was the laying of the corner-stone of the Arch of States Entrance, which was at that time planned to be a permanent structure built of stone from each of the Trans-Mississippi states and territories.The corner-stonewas laid on Arbor Day, the tree-planting state holiday in Nebraska, with appropriate Masonic ceremonies.The day was fine and warm, a bright sun following the rain of the previous night, regarded as a good omen. A parade was formed on Farnam Street, and moved shortly after one o'clock p.m. in the following order:

FIRST DIVISION.

Platoon of Police.

Grand Marshal - R.S. Wilcox.

Board of Governors, Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben as Aides.

Seventh Ward Military Band.

Transmissippi Directory.

Mayor and City Council.

Board of Fire & Police Commissioners.

Continental Drum Corps.

Patriotic Sons of America.

Elks.

SECOND DIVISION.

R.M. Stone, Marshal.

Omaha Military Band.

Omaha Guards.

Commercial Club.

Board of Education.

Board of Park Commissioners.

Board of Trade.

A.O.U.W. Band.

High School Cadets.

Gate City Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen.

Letter Carriers.

THIRD DIVISION.

W.R. Bennett, Marshal.

Y.M.C.A. Band.

Thurston Rifles.

Advertising Men's Club.

Builders' and Traders' Exchange.

Woodmen of the World.

Oakleaf Circle, Woodmen of the World.

Gate City Band.

Council Bluffs Cadets.

Council Bluffs Knights of Pythias.

Knights of St. George.

Ancient order of Hibernians.

FOURTH DIVISION.

H.E. Wheelock, Marshal.

Steinhauser's Band.

Dodge Light Guards.

Ak-Sar-Ben Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen.

Union Pacific Lodge, Ancient Order of United Workmen.

Maple Camp, Modern Woodmen of America.

FIFTH DIVISION.

Twenty Second Infantry Band.

Freemasons.

SIXTH DIVISION.

Private Citizens in Carriages.

Reaching the site of the Arch of States at 20th & Pinckney streets at 2:30 P.M. the Masonic Grand Lodge of Nebraska marched between the long lines of the paraders to the platform where the exercises were to take place.A great concourse of people had assembled, it was a city holiday. Masonic Grand master Chas. J. Phelps conducted the ceremonies, assisted by Deputy Grand master J.B. Dinsmore, Grand Secretary W. R. Bowen, Grand Treasurer Christian Hartman, Grand Senior Warden F. H. Young, Acting Grand Junior Warden, George W. Lininger.The wine and oil used for the ceremony was brought personally from Jerusalem by past Grand Master G. W. Lininger of Omaha. The stone was inscribed "Laid by the Masonic Fraternity, April 22, 1897, N.W. Charles J. Phelps, G.M."At the conclusion of the services the Grand Master delivered the implement of the profession of builders to Architect in-chief, Thomas R. Kimball, exhorting him to supervise well the construction of the buildings, and then announced that the cornerstone had been well laid and in all due form.

The president of the Exposition then formally introduced the various speakers of the day.Addresses were delivered by Hon. William J. Broatch, Mayor of the City of Omaha, Lieut. Governor __ __ __ Harris of Nebraska, and the Honorable J. Sterling Morton of Nebraska City, Nebraska, ex-Secretary of Agriculture of the United States.Mr. Morton's address was as follows:

In the wisdom of His creative majesty the great Mysteriarch of the universe surrounded man with mysteries.Without such environment there would have been no incentive to thought, no inducement to investigation.The life and growth of a blade of grass, the development of a rose, or the evolution of a great oak from an acorn alike suggests the unknown, the miraculous and the unsolved.

In 1854 the pioneers of Nebraska made the first lodgment of modern civilization upon the vast, undulating ocean of fertile lands which stretched in solitude from the west bank of the Missouri River toward the Rocky Mountains.

At the point of the plow they have compelled the prairies of Nebraska to deliver up, during the last forty-one years, thirty-six abundant crops, some of them almost miraculous in yield.During that period of time, in remote frontier portions of the commonwealth, there have been some failures or partial failures, of crops from drouth and from grasshoppers.But in the eastern portion of Nebraska, there may be found hundreds of farms which, since 1855 have never once failed to remunerate intelligent tillage with substantial rewards.The men who legitimately, steadfastly and discreetly have trusted to the plow and intelligent farming in the first settled sections of Nebraska since 1885 are, as a rule, successful men, not mortgaged nor in financial straits.There is no part of the United States which can exhibit from its first cultivation a crop record equal in annual yield to that which eastern Nebraska is proud to exhibit from the day when agriculture first put its autograph upon the prairie with the point of the plow, down to the autumn of 1896 when the sun shone and the winds played among the cornfields in this commonwealth, which produced more than 200,000,000 of bushels.Nebraska is prepared with statistics, figures and facts to prove that during the last forty years no state in the union has surpassed it in the regularity and abundance of its crops.Thus far, however, we have only demonstrated that the elements of plant life and growth, which were primarily absorbed by the wild grasses and flowers, are not appropriated and utilized by corn, oats, barley, rye, wheat and a variety of root and other food crops.The summer and autumn sunlight which formerly only bronzed prairie grass now gilds the grain fields, burnishes ripening fruit and matures ample rewards in varied products for intelligent toil.

HISTORY OF ARBOR DAY.

But after the demonstration of the plow as to the fertility of Nebraska another problem demanded solution.The home builders in this new country desired the embellishment of the plains by woodlands and forests, and the question as to how it should be accomplished and as to whether forests would thrive in these soils compelled earnest and analytical investigation.Consequently, after much experimentation, much of individual exhortation and effort, there was evolved out of the shadeless plains and from the utter desolation of treelessness, a plan for unanimous tree planting on a given day by all the people in all the counties of all the commonwealth.And the plan took root like a strong and valuable tree.Its growth today reaches out into all the states of the American republic.It has been grafted upon the school system of the entire country.It has been transported to European countries which are carefully cherishing it.In Mexico, Australia, and in some of the far-a-way islands of the oceans and seas it is permanently established as an anniversary and everywhere it is recognized and welcomed as a child of Nebraska.

In all the timbered states of the east, and in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio, in fact in each of the heavily wooded sections of the United States, vast areas of trees were unneccesarily cut down and the logs even of valuable oaks, walnuts and other cabinet woods, thoughtlessly, uselessly transmitted to smoke and ashes.How few of the axmen, the tree-slayers, who kindled those disastrous conflagrations realized that the flames which they evolved were merely stolen sunlight set free, enfranchised.the mystery of the life of a great and aged tree is a majesty compared to which that of human royalty is tame, puerile and insignificant.From our earliest childhood we are taught that fire and water will not mix, but in the tree they mingle as friends and co-laborers.With its foliage, which are its lungs, the tree breathes in the rain and the light. Every sunbeam which it inhales is imprisoned only to be freed by combustion. The water and the fire are married and dwell inter-dependently in all the vegetable kingdom.

DESTRUCTION OF FORESTS.

Like vast, disciplined armies the forests of the American continent stood guard over the fertility of the lands and the health and lives of all the animal creation which they protected.With their foliage of emerald and the whispering winds, those great stretches of wooded land lured the light of the sun, the moisture of the clouds to their hearts and made them hostages, pledges against flood, drouth and the disease which those calamities create.But man's wanton wastefulness of the superb woods of the United States has dried up thousands of springs of delicious drinking water, parched out beautiful brooks and useful mill streams, destroyed the pliant and absorbing leaf-mould of the forest, which was the arrester and custodian of torrential rain-falls and the mother of rills and streams.

Is it possible that each stratum of rocks and minerals is a grave a great tomb, wherein myriads of centuries ago were buried the remnants of animal and vegetable kind?When woodlands, forest trees shall have all been destroyed, together with subsidiary vegetation, every living thing will have perished from the face of the earth.Has this globe at some time in the unknowable, pre-historic past subsisted a race which destroyed its forests, and then, as a penalty perished?Is the present tenantry of this earth destined to destroy all its forests and trees and thus commit universal suicide?The intermission of the foliage, flower and fruit of a single summer would bring upon every human being, upon all animal, organisms, an overwhelming avalanche of death. This is a stupendous truth.It admonishes mankind that their physical sanitary protection is in the trees and forests, which conserve the rainfall, mitigate the heat of the sun and make it possible the continuation of animal life and the perpetuation of that civilization which exalts and ennobles the human race.

A truth and a tree outlive generations of men.That this admirably planned Trans-Mississippi Exposition may plant truths as to the economic and materials resources of its vast and opulent empire in the minds of the tens of thousands of intelligent visitors and sojourners who may attend it, with as cheerful a certainty and as serene a satisfaction as we experience in planting these trees in the never-deceiving, never-disappointing soil of the fertile Nebraska, is my earnest hope and my sincere and intense desire.

OPENING DAY, JUNE 1ST, 1898.

Some time before the day set for the formal opening of the Exposition, the principal officials and many prominent citizens of the nation were formally invited to attend.The invitation sent out read as follows:

(S E A L) "To_____________________________ _______________________________

Although commemorating no single event in the history of the region lying west of the Mississippi River, the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition has been projected as a demonstration of the marvelous resources of the great West.In grateful recognition of that spirit of progress, which, in the brief period of a half century has transformed a wilderness into twenty-four states and territories, embracing more than two-thirds the area, nearly one-half of the wealth and one-third of the population of our country, the whole world has been invited to participate with us in a display of the arts, industries, manufactures and products of the soil, mine and sea.

The attention of civilization has been called to this display, not merely in the spirit of emulation but in gratitude to those intrepid pioneers who bravely faced dangers and overcame obstacles that the source of empire might not be impeded in its westward march.It is a memorial to the indomitable courage and perseverance of that sturdy van-guard no less than as an illustration of the achievements of their successors, that the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition will open its gates from June 1st until November 1st, 1898.In the name of the entire west, I most cordially invite your cooperation and request the honor of your presence.

With profound respect, I am

Your obedient servant,

Gurdon W. Wattles,

President."

Special invitations were sent to many to attend the opening exercises.

The day dawned bright and clear and the beautiful sunshine and balmy air were regarded as good omens for future success.This was the day to which the officials of the Exposition had looked with hope and courage for many weary months, and now as they gazed at the gathering throngs and the beautiful buildings, practically complete, and fully realized the magnitude of their undertaking and at what sacrifices this day with all its triumphs had been, a feeling of thankfulness and satisfaction came to one and all.With glad hearts and smiling faces the officials entered upon the duties of the day strong in the belief that financial success must follow the artistic success now so clearly in evidence.

The opening ceremonies were planned to occur at 12 o'clock noon when the president of the United States would by electric current set the machinery in motion and formally declare the Exposition open to the world.At 10:30 A.M. a parade was formed in the city, the right of the column resting on 16th & Douglas streets, and moved in the following order:

FIRST DIVISION.

Mounted Police.

Platoon of Police.

The Transmississippi Troopers as Escort to the Parade.

Grand Marshal, T.S. Clarkson.

Aides: T.C. Shelley, George W. Holbrook, and Will H. Thomas.

State University Cadet Band.

State University Cadets, Major Charles H. True, Commanding.

Council Bluffs High School Cadets, Captain

E.A. Beardsley, Commanding.

The Colombian Band.

Omaha High School Cadets, Lieutenant Campbell, U.S.A., Commanding.

Webster Zouaves, Captin G.W. Sues, Commanding.

Clarkson Camp, Sons of Veterans of South Omaha, Captain J.F. Etter, Commanding.

SECOND DIVISION.

Assistant Marshal, W. G. Shriver

Aides: J.A. Kuhn, A.B. Smith, R.W. Richardson, and D.M. Haverly.

Randolph (Iowa) Band, F. Greene, Leader.

Officers of the Exposition.

Speakers and invited guests in carriages.

THIRD DIVISION.

Assistant Marshal, Dudley Smith.

Aide: George S. Wright.

Cosmopolitan Band, George W. Greene, leader.

The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks Escorting.

The Travelers' Protective Association of America, Joseph Wallenstein, President.

Bechtold's Band.

Camp 120 Modern Woodmen of America, Captain Martin.

Camp 1454, Modern Woomen of America, Captain Page.

Camp 2722, Modern Woodmen of America, Captain Ferris.

Camp 4944, Modern Woodmen of America, Captain Rosenberg.

Other Uniformed Civic Societies not yet Reported.

FOURTH DIVISION.

Major R.S. Wilcox, Assistant Marshal, and Aides.

Pawnee City Band.

The Board of Governors and Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben, Mounted.

The South Omaha Equestrian Club.

The parade, nearly two miles in length, reached the grounds at about 11 o'clock A.M., and swelled the thousands already gathered about the speaker's stand which had been erected temporarily at the extreme eastern end of the grand court.The following program had been arranged for the day:

Music - Jubilee Overture, ---Weber.

U.S. Marine Band, William F. Santleman, Leader.

Prayer-By Rev. Samuel J. Nichols of St. Louis.

Address-Gurdon W. Wattles, President of Exposition.

Music- Song of Welcome Words by Henry M. Blossom, Jr., of St. Louis;music by Mrs. H.A.A. Beech of Boston; sung by Transmississippi Ex- position chorus, 150 voices; Willard Kimball, Director; Accompanied by United States Marine Band.

Address-Hon. Wm. V. Allan, U.S. Senator from Nebraska.

Address-Hon. John. N. Baldwin, Council Bluffs.

Music Fantasia, The Voice of our Nation U.S. Marine Band.

Telephonic Message from the President of the United States will be received and read to the audience by Governor Silas A. Holcomb, who will make a short address on behalf of the state of Nebraska.

Starting of the machinery of the Exposition By President McKinley.

Music - National Hymn - America. By Transmississippi Exposition Chorus, U.S. Marine Band and audience

At 12:15 Director Santelman of the United States Marine Band raised his baton and the first notes of the Jubilee Overture were wafted out upon the breeze. The music of this famous organization was much appreciated and applauded.

Rev. Samuel J. Nichols of St. Louis, Mo., then followed, invocating as follows:

O, God, uncreated and eternal in Thy being, Creator and Lord of all, who dost uphold and govern all in infinite power, wisdom, righteousness and goodness, we lift up our hearts to Thee in adoration and praise.There is none perfect as Thou art.We rejoice in thy sovereignty; Thy greatness is unsearchable.The Heavens declare the glory, and the earth is full of the tokens of Thy goodness. Thou art the bounteous giver of all good, the fountain of all wisdom, the spirit of all knowledge, the source of all life and happiness.We are Thy creatures, utterly dependent upon Thee; without Thee we have no wisdom or strength or life of our own.We are also Thy children, made in Thy image and capable of sharing Thy life.This honor Thou hast given us and hast crowned us with sovereignty over the earth.It is our privilege to call Thee our Father in Heaven, unworthy and sinful as we have made ourselves, Thou has not forsaken us, but hast by Thy Holy Spirit, given us wisdom and understanding and power. Thou dost inspire men with high purposes and lead them to execute good and great designs, so, today, in this hour of finished labor, we would not glory in ourselves, or in the work of our hands, but only in Thee, from whom came the wisdom to devise and the power to execute.This glory of human achievement which surrounds us in this place, and which speaks of man's skills and industry, of progress in knowledge and increase in power over the land which Thou hast given us for our inheritance is only a witness and a memorial of Thy great favor toward us.When we remember the way by which Thou hast led us, and from what to what we have come, we are moved to cry in adoring gratitude, "Thou hast not dealt so with any nation", Thou art the God of our fathers, who didst lead them to this western world, Thou didst keep a continent hidden until the fullness of time came, when Thou didst throw open its gates that the people prepared for it, and of Thy own choice, might enter in and possess the land. In it Thou hast lifted up the people and established a nation of freemen. Thine hand hast led us, marvelously in the past, and through Thy favor we are crowned with riches and honor and might.Our eyes have seen the wonders which Thou hast wrought in our midst, so that this day the aged among us stand amazed when they recall the past.For all this Exposition represents, for the transfiguration of a wilderness into fruitful fields, and an uninhabited land into populous states, for progress in arts and manufactures, for the fruits of the field, the riches of the vines and the abundance of the forests, for growth in education, refinement, wealth and the comforts of life, for the supremacy of law, the continuance of our free institutions and the bright hopes for the future, we give Thee, O God, our most hearty and grateful thanks. Oh, Gracious Father, whose bounty is infinite, grant now Thy blessing, we entreat Thee, upon all who have labored for the establishment and completion of this enterprise.May what they have done be owned by Thee in advancing and stimulating all the arts of peace, and in promoting the progress and well being of society.Bless the city within whose gates we have come.May peace abide within its walls, and prosperity within its palaces.Bless the commonwealth of Nebraska, and let Thy favor descend upon its homes, even as the rain and dews upon its fields.Bless the governor, even as the rain and dews upon its fields.Bless the governor of this state and all associated with him in authority and counsel.We pray Thee also, in behalf of our common country. Remember Thy servant, the president of the United States, his cabinet, Thy servants in congress assembled, and all who bear rule in the several states of this nation, grant unto them the spirit of wisdom and counsel, strengthen them for any good work and make them faithful in all things to Thy holy law, so that they may lead the people in righteousness.While we pray for the land we love, we would remember before Thee all nations and rulers, especially those who are represented in this Exposition.Grant Thy blessing to Queen Victoria and all her subjects, to the president of the republic of Mexico and all whom he represents.May they be led by Thy good spirit in all things, and may peace and good will abide and grow deeper and stronger between them and us.Oh, God of our fathers, Ruler of nations, while we celebrate the triumph of peace, we remember that the shadow of war is upon our land, and that the sound of conflict smites our ears.We earnestly pray that it may please Thee speedily to restore peace, and to hasten the day when under the reign of righteousness and love all wars shall cease.But if, as we believe, Thou hast called us to take the sword to avenge the wrongs of the helpless and oppressed, and to set free our brothers from their bondage, then make us strong to serve Thee and defend us in the day of battle.Bless the army and the navy; shield them from all perils by land or by sea, and grant them victory, which is in Thy hand. Oh, gracious God, most bountiful benefactor, our hearts are this day lifted up in hope, and Thou dost make us bold to ask the continuance of Thy favors and larger blessings for the future.Thou hast redeemed the region in which we dwell from savage rule, and hast given its abundance into our hands.The wilderness, where once Thy image was defiled by ignorance and superstition, has been filled with happy homes purified by Thy word; Thy temples stand on every side and Thy people sing Thy praise.But surely Thou hast not brought us so far on our way only to leave us.Abide with us; grant us more of Thy light and truth, and make us faithful in all things to Thy holy law, so that through our obedience to Thee, we may be known as that people where God is the Lord. Multiply peace and prosperity among us.Lift up the poor an cast down the proud.Rebuke vice and oppression, cast down the wicked and defeat their plans.Make righteousness to flourish, truth to be established, and brotherly love to prevail in all our burdens.All this we humbly ask in the name of Him, who has taught us to pray, saying; 'Our Father which art in Heaven; hallowed by Thy name; Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in Heaven; give us this day our daily bread, and forgive our debts as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil; for Thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever.Amen.' President Wattles' Address.

Prayer was followed by the address of President Wattles as follows:

The Transmississippi and International Exposition is a reality today only by virtue of the pluck and energy and enterprise of the people of the country it represents.Amid the financial depression of the greatest panic of recent years, amid the gloom of doubt and distress which followed this panic, the first steps were taken in this great enterprise.

Against the advice of many of our most conservative citizens, and the prophecy of failure by some, the work was begun.During its early stages there were many discouragements, but when the congress of the United States recognized the Exposition as worthy of its encouragement and support, all doubts were dispelled, and the people of this community, and of the entire west, rose above the calamities of the hour and united in the work with an energy which assured success.

But these beautiful grounds and buildings have not been prepared and filled with the choicest specimens of the products of the world by chance. This work represents many weary months of toil, many discouragements and vicissitudes, but a final triumph worthy of the men who have given it their best thought and energy. This, the opening day, crowns their work with an adequate reward. We see the results of their efforts in this magnificent spectacle of architectural beauty and grandeur, commanding the admiration and attention of the world.

This Exposition celebrated no single event in the history of the Transmississippi country.This history for the periods of a single generation past reveals a succession of achievements, any one of which might properly be the subject of a great demonstration of this character.

Fifty years ago the larger part of the country west of the Mississippi River was unorganized territory, and was indicated on the map as the Great American desert.Its arid plains and unexplored mountains were occupied by savage tribes, and there herds of antelope and buffalo roamed unmolested by the white man, in solitude unbroken by the implements of civilization.

There were no railroads

No railroad had been constructed west of the Missouri river.But one city of more than 50,000 population had been built west of the Mississippi.The total population of this vast domain, comprising more than two-thirds of the area of the United States, was less than 2,000,000 and more than three-fourths of this population was in three states on its southeastern border.

The city of Omaha had not been founded.The resources on which this city depends for its great commerce today were undeveloped. Gold had just been discovered in California, and the march of civilization toward the west had hardly begun.

Fifty years is within the memory of many here present, but what a change has been wrought in this region.Within its borders are now twenty states and four territories with a population of more than 20,000,000, wealth double that of Spain and Portugal combined, and an internal commerce greater than the foreign commerce of Germany, France and Great Britain.

The Great American Desert is no more.Its eastern part is covered with fertile farms, which produced last year more than 1,000,000,000 bushels of corn and 500,000,000 bushels of wheat which, with the other agricultural products of this section were sold for more than $1,100,000,000.The western part of this desert now forms the pasture of the nation.On its nutritious grasses feed the herds which supplythe meat to the markets of the world.

In 1850, the buffalo which roamed over this region outnumbered the cattle in the United States.In 1895 it is estimated that there were 30,000,000 cattle and 50,000,000 hogs and sheep west of the Mississippi river and the value of the yearly product of these herds is $400,000,000, or nearly equal in value to the annual output of the gold and silver mines throughout the world.

Nor does the grain and stock of this country comprise its only products.The fruit and wine of California and Oregon, the forests of Washington, Minnesota and Arkansas, the sugar of Louisiana, Utah and Nebraska, and the cotton of the southeastern states, furnish no small part of its yearly commerce.But its mines must not be overlooked.From them has been taken in paying quantities every known mineral.The copper, iron and coal already discovered would supply the markets of the world for a century to come.The surface of the mountains and hills has hardly been prospected, but the richest and most extensive gold and silver mines in the world have been discovered.From them has been produced in the past fifty years more than sufficient to pay the government debt at the close of the rebellion, and their annual output now amounts to more than $100,000,000.

Prairie Schooner is Obsolete.

The caravan of prairie schooners, requiring six months of hardship and danger to travel from the Mississippi to the Pacific coast, has been displaced by the overland express, with palace cars provided with all the conveniences of home, which travel the distance in thirty-three hours.No less than 80,000 miles of railroad have been constructed in the transmississippi country during the last fifty years at the fabulous cost of more than $2,000,000,000.Towns and villages have sprung into existence along these roads as by magic.Great cities have been built, commercial relations established with all parts of the world, and manufacturing has assumed enormous proportions.

Surely with all these achievements during the short space of half a century we might well celebrate a growth and development unparalleled in history.But looking to the future rather than to the past, the commercial congress which authorized this exposition, wisely conceived its objects to the the advancement of the commercial interests of the west rather than the celebration of any of its past achievements.

We have gathered here in these beautiful buildings and on these grounds some of the resources of this vast country, and have invited out eastern neighbors and foreign friends to bring their products, and come with their citizens to be our guests and here study with is the lessons of the future which these evidence of our past progress teach.If the exhibition here made of the resources of this new country should demonstrate that greater prosperity and happiness could be found within its borders for many who now live in less favored climes, the purposes of this exposition would be accomplished.

With a history that has hardly been written, but which records greater growth and more important changes than has been made in any other country on earth in 500 years of its life; with natural resources unequaled in value, variety and extent; with a climate which inspires the greatest mental and physical activity; with a people composed of the best elements of all nations who have broken the ties which bound them to the homes of their fathers, and have wrested this country from savage life; with all these advantages and achievements, what can we prophesy for the future generation, and who will attempt to limit the possibilities of a people who have accomplished such wonders in the past?

Will Pale Into Insignificance.

This magnificent exposition, illustrating the products of our soil and mines and factories, made possible by the interventions of the last century, will pale into insignificance at the close of the twentieth century.When the agricultural resources of this rich country are fully developed by the use of its rivers and streams for irrigation; when the sugar, as well as the bread and meat for the markets of the world shall be produced here and carried to these markets by the electric forces of nature; when the minerals in our mountains and the gold and silver in our mines, shall be extracted and utilized by this same force; when our natural products shall be manufactured here, then this transmississippi country will support a population in peace and plenty greater than the present population of any other nation in the world.

When we consider that the British empire, exclusive of its colonies, embraces only 121,000 square miles, that the civilization of Egypt was supported on less than 10,000 square miles, and that with the same density of population as the state of Ohio this country would provide homes for 300,000,000 people, we can appreciate the possibilities which the future has in store in this, the richest part of the world's domain.

Standing at the close of a century teaming with great discoveries and inventions which have elevated the civilization of the world to a higher plane than ever before, surrounded with such evidences of the past progress and future possibilities of this country, who can prophesy its future greatness, and who can estimate the influence of this exposition in accelerating its development. Like a great beacon light it sends its rays throughout the land and challenges the attention of the world.To the homeless millions of less favored lands it is a messenger of promise.To the weary mariner whose fortunes have been wrecked on the seas of adversity it is a harbinger of hope. It opens new fields to the investor, inspires the ambition of the genius, incites the emulation of states, and stands the crowning glory in the history of the west.

U.S. SENATOR W.V. ALLEN.

At the conclusion of the president's address, Hon. G.M. Hitchcock read the following letter from Senator Allen:

"Washington, D.C. May 28, 1898.

Hon. Gurdon W. Wattles, Omaha:

My Dear Sir:

It has become apparent that it will be impractical for me to be at the opening of the exposition.I regret this extremely, as it has been my desire to be present, if possible, on that occasion.Having had intimate connection with the promotion of the enterprise from its inception, I have taken a deep interest in its success, believing that it will furnish our people a desirable and peculiar means of education, and that it will be highly valuable in attracting attention to Nebraska in a way that could not be done otherwise.I do not doubt the exposition will be successful, and that hundreds of thousands of people will, by it be attracted to Omaha and the state at large, who would otherwise know little of the state and city, and that every one who may visit Nebraska during the exposition will be amply well satisfied.With our great natural resources, beautiful summer scenery, and the health-giving qualities of our climate, Nebraska could not be otherwise than attractive to visitors, apart from what may be seen at the Exposition.Our possibilities as a state are almost boundless and at present inconceivable.The Nebraska fifty years from now will present one of the greatest and richest agricultural communities of the world.

But much as I would like to be with you, and much as I have desired and intended if possible to be, I feel that I could not excuse myself for leaving my post of duty at this time when congress is engaged in discussing ways and means of raising money with which to successfully prosecute the present war against Spain.We were altogether too long derelict in our duty to Cuba. Within less than one hundred miles from our shores the extermination of 1,500,000 people by starvation, of old men, boys, women and children, including sucklings, went on unchecked until one-third of the population of Cuba have died by that means.We could no longer justify ourselves in the eyes of the Christian and civilized by declining to take immediate cognizance of the conditions there prevailing and live up to our high professions of humanity by intervening in the war between Spain and her Cuban subjects.We, of all nations of the western hemisphere have the power to say to Spain that she will not depopulate Spain by starvation for aspiring to gain the liberty we ourselves enjoy and hold to be the rightful heritage of all.

From the start I have avocated Cuban liberty, even at a time when it was not popular in the senate to do so, and having been a pioneer in the cause I could not feel that my duty was discharged unless I remained at my desk in the senate until the ways and means of raising the necessary money to prosecute the war successfully have been fully determined.

I trust that I may be permitted to spend a portion of my summer vacation at the exposition, and contribute my full share to its success, and if at any time it shall be deemed desirable by the management for me to deliver an address, I will gladly do so.I trust that you will do me the honor of announcing during the exercises the fact that I am detained by my duties at Washington.

Expressing the hope and the full confidence that the exposition will be preeminently successful, and that ere the summer is gone the war with Spain will have been successfully terminated, and Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines made free, and Spain forever driven from her last foot of territory on this continent, I remain

Very respectfully,

Your obedient servant,

William V. Allen."

ADDRESS OF JOHN L. WEBSTER.

President Wattles announced that in the absence of Senator Allen, he had on short notice asked Hon. John L. Webster to fill his place.Mr. Webster spoke as follows:

We meet today amid surroundings that excite the most lively imagination and rouse the dullest sensibilities.Entrancing and bewitching scenes are all about us.The best that architecture could plan and that skill could construct and that art could decorate and adorn, make up the exterior of this, the most unique exposition ever witnessed on the American continent.

These mighty structures stand where fifty years ago were clustered tepees of the Omaha Indians.Then the silence of this place was disturbed only by the Indian war-sound, by the revelry of the Indian dance, and the prairies rang with no sound but the war-whoop of the aborigine.Today it is surrounded by twenty-thousand buildings, the homes of 150,000 people, who are the members of the rich commercial city of Omaha.

But this is not an exposition for our city, or for our state.We are part and parcel of the great transmississippi country, a country extending from the river east, which De Soto discovered, westward to the Pacific Ocean, and from the Mexican republic on the south to the British possessions on the north, a country with more than 15,000,000 of the Anglo-Saxon people.It is a country now divided into states and territories, each large enough for an empire, with resources unparalleled, with soil unexcelled, and with capabilities immeasurable.It is the granary and market-house of the world.To borrow a thought from Edmund Burke:"The scarcity which the empires and kingdoms have many times felt would have been a desolating famine if this child of their old age, with a true filial pity, with a Roman charity, had not put the breast of its youthful exuberance to the mouth of its exhausted parents."

On this spot the vast resources and mighty wealth of this extensive transmississippi territory are today put on exhibition, not so much for our own instruction and entertainment as that the rest of mankind may come and see for themselves, look on with a startled amazement and depart with astonishment and wonder.

But we are not a selfish nor a sectional people.We are a part of a rich, commercial nation.We know but one constitution, but one country, but one flag. We have opened the doors of the exposition to all our fellow-citizens and received the products and exhibits of all the states, which gives it a truly national character.

World wide in scope

We are cosmopolitan people and extend the scope of the enterprise until it became international in character.Canada upon the north, and the republics of South America, are here mingling with us.Exhibitors from various countries in Europe are here, vying with each other in their efforts to sell.Here may be seen the Italian, who walks the streets where Caesar's legions once trod; the Greeks from the classic land where Athens was, and where the Spartans won an unfading historic fame.Here are a dusky people, with their camels, from the deserts of Arabia.Here are Turks from that land whose people bow in prayer at the voice of the priest from the minaret.

Then, too, we welcome the Asiatics from the western shores of the Pacific. Here is the Mongolian race from the Chinese Empire, which traces its dynasty back through the fabulous ages.Here are exhibitors from Japan- that country which in our day has taken a mighty leap in advance, and is now recognized as one of the commercial and naval powers of the world.It is this exposition, so grand in conception, so broad in purpose and so comprehensive in character, that is this day thrown upon the throng here present, and which extends a hearty welcome to the millions who shall visit it.

To build these immense palaces of beauty we have drawn from the past as well as the present.We have studied the artistic among all people and in all countries.In architecture we have drawn from whatever was the most beautiful in Gothic, whatever was most refined in classic, whatever was most desirable in Grecian and whatever was most noble in Roman, and supplemented and improved them with the most artistic conceptions of the present age, and the result we see before us is a realistic picture of a fairy scene.

This decorative statuary is not the fruit of a day, the birth of an hour.It is the present imprint of an art which had its supreme revival in the Moses of Michael Angelo, and Titian's Tomb by Canova.The figures which these sculptors chiseled from the marble were the letters of the alphabet of art and have left an impression on the centuries which have come after them.out of the fulfillment of that art American skill has decorated these buildings with forms of grace and of beauty, which express the taste and refinement of this age.

Within the walls of these beautiful buildings, one may wander in a bewildering maze of exhibits.There will be found the best and richest productions of American soil; cotton from the vast plantations of Louisiana and Mississippi, ripened grain from the wheat-fields of Minnesota, Washington and Oregon; and the golden king corn from Kansas and Nebraska.There may be seen the woods and finished lumber culled from the pine forests of Michigan, and the high towering trees of the Columbia river.There may be seen minerals, copper from the Anaconda, and silver and gold which the energy of our mountain pioneers have delved from beneath the Rockies and Sierras.There will be seen the skilled handiwork of the mechanic and artisan, and in machinery hall the perfected result of what was once an inventor's dream.Within this circle is gathered evidences of the toil, of the prosperity, and of the refinement of 70,000,000 of industrial people who have brought America to its present high standard of national supremacy.

Emblem of Republican Majesty.

The government building at the west end of the lagoon, with its long colonnades and high shining dome, supporting the Goddess of Liberty, stands as the emblem of power and strength and majesty of this republic.It speaks for the greatness of our nation, the realization of what John Bright once said: "I see one vast confederation stretching from the frozen north in unbroken line to the glowing south, and from the wild billows of the Atlantic westward to the calmer waters of the Pacific main, and I see one people and one law and one language and one faith, and over all that wide continent the home of freedom, and a refuge for the oppressed of every race and of every clime."

We have reached the condition pictured by John Bright, and we have passed beyond it.Our commerce envelops the seas, and our navy is in the flush of victory.Our grasp is on the Sandwich Islands and our gallant Dewey holds the Philippines.

The nation's future which John Bright saw fails short of the future we see today.We are amazed at our own growth since the days of Washington and Jefferson to our present invincible power.We are now on the high vantage ground where we can look forward to the fulfillment of American destiny.The present is already a realized dream and the brightness of the future is stronger than a vision.

To know the present let me draw a contrast from the past.Marcus Aurelius ruled over Rome at the closing of its golden period.His victories in war and achievements in peace classed him, in the minds of Romans, with Caesar and Augustus.In a plaza at Rome there was erected a high, towering monument to his memory.Circling around the column from the base to the capitol the historic scenes and incidents of his career were carved and chiseled in solid marble.

That column still stands, browned by the centuries that have rolled by since its construction.It stands not alone as a relic of antiquity, but as an historic monument of an age when civilization, linked with all that makes a nation great and powerful, was in eastern Europe, and when one man ruled the farthest known portions of the world to the confines of the western sea.At the side of the square close by is a high and gray colored building, and along in front in blazoned letters is the name of an American insurance company.

There is a singular linking together by way of contrasts of the changed conditions of seventeen hundred years.If Marcus Aurelius could come forth from his long slumber his eye would rest on that monument on which is recorded the deeds of Rome's greatness and grandeur, and he would see that Imperial City mouldy with age and its magnificent structures crumbling into ruins.When he looked on the assembled multitudes he would not see the legions of old that marched under his command.He would see a new people and hear a new language. If he inquired what had wrought this great change, he would find that civilization in its onward course and westward march, had discovered a new continent beyond the sea.that a new race of people with a new language had built up a mighty republic of seventy millions of people, where industry had an open field, where science had made new discoveries, where literature and art and refinement were the common property of all her citizens.That this new people with characteristic energy and enterprise were insuring the lives of the lazaroni.

Triumph of Fifty Years.

The scene thus presented to Marcus Aurelius would be more astonishing to him than were the lines upon the wall which were interpreted to Nebuchadnezzar. Yet, this transmississippi country has developed more and accomplished more in the last fifty years than was worked out in the seventeen centuries that marked the space of time between the age of Marcus Aurelius and the planting of this western civilization which this exposition is builded to commemorate.

To judge of the future, let us draw another lesson from the past:The earliest civilization had its habitation in western Asia, in Palestine and Assyria.It joined hands with trade and commerce as time rolled by and left Babylon and Ninevah in ruins, and took up its abode in Egypt and northern Africa.Later on it left the land of the sphynx and pyramids and took up its abode in Greece, the land that became famous by the sculpture of Praxiteles, by the matchless oratory of Demosthenes, by the wisdom and philosophy of Socrates and Plato and by the statesmanship of Pericles and Phocian; the land whose patriotism made the names Thermopylae and Marathon synonymous with all that is daring and brave and glorious in war.

Time rolled on and civilization, with its companions, trade and commerce, left this land of charming scenes and bewitching history and passed westward across the Adriatic to imperial Rome.From the age of Caesar and Augustus to the time of Constantine, Rome ruled the old world, but civilization traveled westward until it reached the confines of Europe, where the ocean seemed a barrier, and stayed its progress forfourteen long centuries.Rome crumbled into ruins, Brussels, and Antwerp and Paris and London became the commercial centers. Italy broke into dukedoms and provinces and England, France and Germany became the ruling nations or Europe.Civilization, urged on by its companions, trade and commerce, like a man of nervous energy and restless ambition, found a way to cross the ocean and the new continent of America was discovered.They crossed the stormy waters of the sea and made their new home in this western hemisphere.Here our nation has grown up and the scepter of supremacy has passed from the old world to the new.In the fulfillment of our destiny, and to hold trade and commerce within our grasp, we have to work out the problem of universal civilization.We may have to join hands with the great powers of Europe to compass the trade of western Asia, and bring it across the Pacific into the harbor of Puget Sound, and through the Golden Gate.

Destiny of the Anglo-Saxon.

We are an international nation; Europe is on the east of us, and Asia is on the west of us.It is no longer a question of the far East, it is a question of the West.In the southern waters of the Pacific is Australia, practically a newly discovered country.The Anglo-Saxon people are already there.It is like a newly risen sun in the southwestern waters, whose foreign commercial trade of more than $600,000,000 per year demands our most considerate attention.

There, too, at our western door is Japan, already a great commercial nation, and with a navy that takes first rank with the modern sphynxes of war which float in Pacific waters.There, too, is China.Russia has crossed that territory with a line of railroad whose depot stands fronting the surf-line of the western ocean, and her flag floats over Port Arthur.England, Germany and France have their navies floating in their waters and their flags floating in her fortified harbors.China is about to awake from hibernating sleep of four thousand years.Her four hundred millions of people are to become the consumers of American products and the patrons of American commerce.Who can say that within the next fifty years the commercial trade of the Pacific shall not take supremacy over the commercial trade of the Atlantic?May not this exposition mark the beginning of a new era of prosperity, when the commerce of Europe and of Asia shall find their race course across this mid-continent and pour out their wealth to overflowing in this transmississippi country.

A month ago it was a serious question whether the war with Spain would not injure this exposition, but within a month it has become an accentuation of the expansive power of the American nation.A month ago the American people were disposed to cling to the traditional policy of isolation; today they receive with patriotic enthusiasm the doctrine of annexation and of conquest.A month ago the Philippines were in the far east; today they are in the nearer west.

Emilio Castelar said to the Spanish Cortez twenty-seven years ago, words which in these days of rapid change breathe the spirit of prophecy; America, and especially Saxon America, with its immense virgin territories, with its republic, with its equilibrium between stability and progress, with its harmonies between liberty and democracy, is the continent of the future, the immense continent stretched by God between the Atlantic and the Pacific, where mankind may essay and resolve all social problems.Europe is to decide whether she will confound herself with Asia, placing upon her lands old altars and upon the altars old idols, and upon the idols plutocracies and upon the plutocracies, empires, or whether she will collaborate with America in the grand work of human civilization.

Spain's Great Mistake

Spain heeded not his voice.She has not taken part with America in the grand work of civilization.She has clung to her old idols and her despotic empire. In this, the close of the nineteenth century, she carried to the beautiful island of Cuba the cruel and relentless warfare of the fourteenth century.

Our Saxon civilization of which Castelar spoke entered its protest against the barbarism of the middle ages being transplanted to this island of the western hemisphere, and determined to eradicate it by severe arbitrament of war.It is our high standard of civilization, our love of liberty, our sympathy with suffering humanity, our regard for national honor, that has brought us to the initial point where we must solve questions of national policy and which we are to settle for future ages before the present century shall close.

A month ago the Sandwich Islands seemed too remote an object for the grasp of national ambition.They have now become a resting place for the American army in its race across the Pacific to give aid and assistance to our navy in the Philippines and to make complete the conquest of Admiral Dewey, whose victory at Manila is the wonder of the age and the marvel of the seas.

Yonder administration building is supported by four open arches, looking toward the four points of the compass.They are emblematic of the thought that this exposition stands in the center of the American republic, and that the people of the transmississippi country, through those gateways, are ready to welcome to us the commerce and trade from the four corners of the earth, which shall make use the greatest, the happiest, and the most prosperous people in the world.

Music, Song of Welcome

The song of Welcome, and ode to the exposition, written by Henry M. Blossom, Jr., of St. Louis, and set to music by Mrs. H.A.A. Beech, of Boston, Mass, was then sung by the exposition chorus of one hundred and fifty voices, under director of music, Professor Willard Kimball, of Lincoln, Nebraska, accompanied by the United States Marine Band. The words of the Exposition Ode were as follows:

Welcome, thrice welcome, to the people of our land;
Welcome to the people, the people of the world;
Here north and south and east and west, united hand in hand
Have reared a city and their flag unfurled.
Welcome, welcome, welcome to the people of the world!
Here science weaves her wonders, her wonders for the mind
Here stands arrayed the golden pride, the golden pride of art,
And commerce hath searched the world to find
The treasures rare of many, of many a far-off mart.
Welcome, welcome, welcome to the people of the world!
Welcome, thrice welcome to the people of our land,
And to the people of the world all hail!
And so forever may this splendor in their memories stand
Undimm'd, although its builded fabric fail.
Welcome, welcome, welcome to the people of our land,
Welcome, and to the people of the world, All hail!

Address of Hon. John M. Baldwin. of Council Bluffs, Iowa.

Mr. John N. Baldwin was then introduced by President Wattles and spoke as follows:

Man delights in retrospection and indulges in anticipation .The faithful historian never lacks appreciative audiences, for the dullest eye must lighten and the most sluggish pulse quicken at the recital of the trials and triumphs of the past.Neither is a prophesy without honor even in his own country, when to listeners, whose hopes and aims are one with his, he predicts a glorious future.

But the critic of existent institutions treads no primrose path.Unless carefully guarded in expression he will damn with faint praise, disgust with fulsome flattery, or awaken jealousy by unfavorable comparison.In all ages there are those who insist that the present time is sick and out of joint; that there is nothing in the present like unto the past; and that whatever is, is not comparable with what is to be.

Fortunately for the progress of the world, those who revel in rehearsals and venture so much in prophecy have not been in the majority; only sufficient in number to disturb and impede.It is sad to say, but it must be said, that in our own time there are so many individuals who insist that there is no progress today except in mechanics.

They croak and cry.It is simply the time of steam, steel and starvation. Like puny whispers they pull their pencils to write, "the state in danger". They declare and resolve that governments are so drawn and trussed that for the few there is plethoric plenty while the many starve.They philosophize that this is an age of machinery, not an heroical, devotional, philosophical or moral age.

These contentions and opinions imposed upon the thoughtful, intelligent and progressive men of the time, who believe that the present is better than the past and promises more for the future, the task of denial of assertion and of proof.To deny and assert is easy.To prove requires organization and labor. In their efforts to arouse men to more glorious triumphs, they met with many difficulties."Happy men are full of the present, for its bounty suffices them; and wise men also, for its duties engage them."The busy man would say, "with me it is what I eat, where shall I drink, my body, what shall it put on?" The iconoclastic man, "Do not talk about our achievements.It is better to listen forever than to brag."Among these and many others the opinion prevails that there are two classes of lies, common lies and statistics."Give us proofs", they say, "outward signs and tokens."

In vain did they plead, as did the wise men of old, "Say not thou, 'what is the cause that the former days were better than these?'For thou dost not require concerning this."

From out these discussions, controversies and opinions revolved the idea of an exposition.Tested, it has been found to be practical and promotive.The exposition is an item of evidence.It goes to prove not only what has been done, but what may be accomplished.It is an eye-witness and an expert.It lays in your hand the record of the past.It makes, while you look, the exhibits of the present.It paints before your eyes the splendor of still greater achievements on the cloud curtain for the future.It shows itself, wherever there is a spirit of commercialism, a sense of pride, and an impulse for improvement.

The exposition has become the instrument of civilization, being a concomitant to empire, westward it takes its way.The crystal palace, the centennial, the world's fair, the transmississippi exposition!

We celebrate at this hour the opening of the transmississippi and international exposition, and this day marks an important era in our development.

Object of the exposition

The purpose of this exposition is to display the products, manufacturers and industries of the states and territories west of the Mississippi river.The territory embraced is two-thirds of the area of the Union and contains nineteen states and five territories.Part of this territory was acquired by purchase from France in 1805 and part by treaties, negotiations and cessions.

I refer to these facts because from 1802 to 1850 this purchase, these treaties and these cessions were the subject of public discussions and much that was said and written fittingly illustrates the thought I have heretofore endeavored to express.

During these times some there were who deal too much in prophesy, and what they then foretold is of surpassing interest in view of what has since happened.

Referring to the standard histories and the leading reviews of this period, I find that the opponents of the acquisition of this territory would rend the public apart; that no common ties in interest would ever bind together under one government men who fought Indians, trapped bears and hunted buffaloes, and men who build ships and caught fish in the harbors of the Atlantic ocean.It would enormously increase the public debt.Two millions for an island and possibly as much ground on the main land as is now covered by the state of New York was enough in all conscience, but to pay fifteen million dollars for lands containing over one million square miles was revolutionary and unconstitutional.The limits of the federation could not be safely extended beyond the stony (Rocky) mountains."As late as 1825 one United States senator boldly proclaimed in the senate: "A member of congress traveling from his home to Washington and return would cover a distance of 9,200 miles.At the rate of thirty miles per day, and allowing him forty-four days for Sundays, three hundred and fifty days would be consumed, and the member would have fourteen days in Washington before he started home.It would be quicker to go around Cape Horn or by Behring's Strait, Baffin Bay and David Strait to the Atlantic, and so to Washington."

Moans of Early Croakers.

They also said," All settlers who go beyond the Mississippi river will be forever lost to the United States."Pike, whose name is attached to the giant peak of the rockies, condemned these plains to everlasting sterility.He officially reported to the war department as follows:"From these immense prairies will be derived one great advantage to the United States, namely, the restriction of our population to some certain limits, and thereby a continuation of the Union.They will be constrained to limit themselves to the border of the Missouri and the Mississippi, while they leave the prairies incapable of cultivation to the wandering and uncivilized aborigines of the country."

In 1858 the North American Review declared: "The people of the United States have reached their inland western frontier and the banks of the Missouri are the shores at the termination of a vast ocean desert for one thousand miles in breadth which it is proposed to travel, if at all, with caravans of camels and which interpose a final barrier to the establishment of large communities, agricultural, commercial or even pastoral."

In all authorized publications and on all school maps, the strip of land lying west of the Missouri rover and east of the Rocky Mountains south to the Mexican frontier and north to British America was called "an unknown land " and designated as "The Great American Desert."

I have the honor today of being the official spokesman of the Transmississippi and International Exposition.In the discharge of the duty imposed upon me I now and here assert, realizing full well the breadth and depth and meaning of every work I utter, that in fertility and productiveness of soil, in mountains and meadows, rivers and lakes, metals and minerals, forests and farms, sea-coast and harbors, cereals, fruits and flowers, cattle, horses and hogs, healthful climate, grandeur of scenery and intelligence and industry of inhabitants, there is not on this globe a body or tract of land of the same area equal to that region of country covered by the states and territories of the Union west of the Mississippi river.

READY TO SHOW THEM.

In proof whereof we welcome you to these grounds. Come through these gates and enter these buildings.We will give you "ocular proof", or

At the least shall so prove it, That the probation bears no hinge nor loop To hang a doubt on.

With samples and exhibits, records and reports, with representatives credentialed and accredited, we will prove to the thoughtful, intelligent and unprejudiced people of the world, that "The Great American Desert" must have deserted, for it cannot be found.Where fifty years ago they said it was, we will show a farm of 67,000,000 acres under cultivation, producing annually products of the value of $1,000,000,000.

The prairies which were considered "incapable of cultivation", produce annually, 1,200,000,000 bushels of corn, 350,000,000 bushels of wheat and 30,000,000 tons of hay, of the aggregate value of $600,000,000 making no accounting of the other cereals, the fruits and the vegetables. Instead of "trapping bear and hunting buffaloes" 9,000,000 horses and mules work in the valleys; 32,000,000 cattle feed on the hills; 51,000,000 of sheep and hogs fleece and fatten, and this livestock alone is of the aggregate value of $1,200,000,000.

They thought $15,000,000 was an extortionate price to pay for this wilderness. Today the annual output of gold and silver is $100,000,000; of copper and other minerals, $100,000,000; and of coal, #30,000,000.With the precious metals alone from our mines we could pay the purchase price in sixty days.

The "barrier to the establishment of commercial enterprise" stormed by the sturdy frontiersmen, gave way and on the other side hum and whirl the wheels of factories, turning out annually $1,400,000,000 worth of the best and cheapest manufactured goods in the world.

The "caravan of camels" not coming from their Egyptian midnight, the people of this country constructed 80,000 miles of railway as a means of travel and transportation.

Homes of Millions.

In the land where only fifty years ago "wandering and uncivilized aborigines" sought shelter in wigwams and leaf tents now live 22,000,000 of intelligent people, with 121 universities and colleges, 62,000 school houses, 5,700,000 children, 6,000 newspapers and 45,000 religious organizations, having a membership of 3,500,000, and worshipping in 44,000 church edifices.

The aggregate wealth of this region of country is $22,000,000,000, or more than one-half the entire capital of Great Britain.

These are not figures of speech, but the arithmetic of facts.I have given the numbers round but always under.

For one of these territories the government paid $7,000,000, yet in a few more years, it received from the seal islands embraced therein, also, the purchase price, and there is now in sight in its gold mines enough to pay the national debt.

Another has the greatest onyx mines in the world, yet its shipments of fruit amount to 10,000,000 pounds a year.

One of these transmississippi states has the greatest deposits of marble of any state in the Union, and yet this same state took the prize at the Columbian Exposition for the best apples in the world.

Another leads the Union not only in gold or silver production, but in the production of wool as well, and it has more sea-coast than the states of Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and North Carolina combined.

Still another produces annually an amount equal to four hundred dollars for each of its inhabitants, man, woman or child, and no other country in the world can show an equal product per capita.

Another state has already taken from its mines silver to an amount equal to the present circulation of silver coin in the United States.One thousand miles from the place where stand the greatest flour mills in the world, and all in this same territory, is a land where cotton, corn and olives grow in adjoining fields.

In one state there is a greater variety of minerals than in any other section of country of like size in the world.Another has a region of country in the hills a hundred miles square, which is the richest in the world, containing the largest and most easily worked mass of low grade ore yet discovered.Another has an area equal to the German Empire, with 62,000 miles to spare, and could sustain upon its surface with ease and prosperity the entire population of the United States.

Wealthy in other ways.

Here we find "literature and the elegant arts growing up side by side with the grosser plants of daily interest".In almost every city are academics of painting, sculpture, music and literature.The development in the fine arts has not been as conspicuous as in the industrial pursuits.I do not think that I would be superfluously explanatory if I assigned the reason. These people have imagination and taste, and long to hold communion with the visible forms of all that is beautiful and refined, but for the last fifty years they have been using their brain and brawn in a war with rude nature. They have been employing their genius to find reason and glory in matter.With them it has been an age of utility and utensil.Egyptian and Indian architecture, Phidian sculpture, Gothic minsters, Italian paintings, Grecian epics and Scottish ballads are not produced by a people whose time is consumed in constructing railways, building cities, disembowling mountains, draining lakes into irrigating canals, "bottling up the forces of gravity and selling it by retail," yoking electricity and steam, and directing them both as unwearied and obedient servants.

The results which this exposition will show have been attained are largely due to the character of the people who took possession of this land.They were of the best blood of the union; men of depth and range; of aplomb and reserve; of judgment and common sense.Men who would spare nothing and wanted everything. Men who believed in action and knew the value of every moment of time.Men who realized "that the poorest day that passes over us is the conflux of two eternities.It is made up of currents that issue from the remotest past and flow onward into the remotest future."Men who soon found that agriculture was just beginning when they felled the forest, and that driving from the streams the Indian and his canoe was not the end of commerce.Men who were willing to give their lifework to the making of the alphabet of the language of development, leaving the word forming and phrase making to those who would succeed them.Men who, actuated by the impulse to better themselves and also their descendants, co-operating with the organic effort of nature "to mount and ameliorate," overcame the "wilderness" and converted the "desert" into a garden of benefits. Man of this People.

I do not believe I shall have adequately discharged the duty of this office unless I speak of one other factor in the glorious development of this great country.We today should bow our heads in reverence and speak the name of Abraham Lincoln.The greatest single factor or agency in the development of this country and in the bringing of this people together in a spirit of union and brotherhood was the construction of the Pacific Railways and Abraham Lincoln was the leading public man who had sufficient prescience of the necessity of the construction of these railways.

And Abraham Lincoln was of this people.He was born about 100 miles from the east line of the Louisiana purchase.For fifty-two of the fifty-six years of his life on earth he labored in his territory with the pioneers for the development of this country, the organization of its society and the establishment and preservation of this government.He was a frontiersman, and yet of all the greatest, the best and the mightiest men of the past nineteen centuries, he was the only man of whom we can say, "Some there are who doubt the divinity of Christ, but no one the godliness of Lincoln."

When the cornerstone of this great enterprise was laid, many were the things which we promised you would see and hear on Opening day.And now into these magnificent buildings and on these beautiful grounds we ask the people of the earth to come and judge their fulfillment.While your eyes are enraptured with the glories of these scenes, your ears will be enchanted with our promised song.

"Uplift a thousand voices full and sweet
In this wide hall, with earth's inventions stored,
And praise the invisible, universal Lord,
Who lets once more in peace the nations meet
Where science, art and labor have outpoured,
Their myriad horns of plenty at our feet."

MUSIC.

Fantasia - The Voice of Our Nation, was then rendered by the United States Marine Band.

The President of the United States.

The plan to receive the message from President McKinley over the long distance telephone was changed at the last moment and the message was transmitted by telegraph by direct wire from Washington to the Exposition grounds, and was received on the speaker's platform by Mr. W.W. Umstead of the Western Union Telegraph Co. and read by Governor Silas A. Holcomb, governor of Nebraska, as follows:

The cordiality of the invitation extended to me to be present at the opening of your great exposition is deeply appreciated and I more deeply regret that public duties prevent me from leaving the capital at this time.

The events of the memorable half century which the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition commemorates are interwoven with the history of the whole nation, and are of surpassing importance.The mighty west affords most striking evidences of the splendid achievements and possibilities of our people.It is a matchless tribute to the energy and endurance of the pioneer, while its vast agricultural development, its progress in manufactures it advancement in the arts and sciences and in all departments of education and endeavor have been inestimable contributions to the civilization and wealth of the world.

Nowhere have the unconquerable determination, self-reliant strength and sturdy manhood of our American citizenship been more forcibly illustrated.In peace or war the men and women of the west have ever been in the vanguard.I congratulate the management upon its magnificent enterprise and assure all who participate in this undertaking of the deep interest which the government has in its success.

William McKinley.

Governor Holcomb then addressed the multitude as follows:

This occasion, the day and the hour, will ever remain memorable in the history of the transmississippi country.It marks a most interesting event in the history of this commonwealth and measures a step forward in the progress of our great republic.To the people of Nebraska, the ceremonies attending the opening of the Transmississippi and International Exposition are freighted with special personal interests of the most impressive character.

This day has been anxiously awaited by every patriotic citizen of the state. The inception and successful inauguration of an enterprise, so grand in its scope and fraught, as we believe it is, with so much good to the present and future generations, is gratifying alike to all.An exposition denoting the ever advancing civilization of the present age, and by a people inhabiting over one-half of the area of the United States and comprising over one-third of its population, held within the boundaries of our great commonwealth, is an honor and distinction gratifying to our state pride, and for which all Nebraskans are duly appreciative.For five months it will be the great pleasure, as well as a high privilege, for our people to extend with welcome hands and warm hearts a hospitable greeting to the people of all portions of our common country, and to those from other lands who may participate in or visit this magnificent display.We cordially invite all to visit us and view the evidences of the marvelous progress made by the people of the great west in the material advancement in the industries, arts and sciences; to learn of the wonderful and inexhaustible resources of a country which in extent forms an empire and whose unparalleled resources when utilized can be made to bless and make happy millions of mankind who may in this vast domain find innumerable opportunities for the establishment of prosperous homes.

Here, gathered by the energy, industry and ingenuity of man, will be found the products of land and sea, of farm and field, of factory and mine, all giving evidence of the wonderful richness of a country yet only partially developed, and displaying the marvelous progress made by its citizens in keeping step with the grand march of civilization throughout the world.The spirit of progress and philanthropy in the upbuilding of an industrial empire in our midst, displayed upon every hand, must challenge the admiration and solicit unstinted praise from all who shall visit us and behold what has been accomplished by these people in scarce one-half century of labor.These are the evidences of the intelligent and well directed efforts of a people who, with a courage that is undaunted and a faith that is undismayed, have wrested from nature's primeval conditions this beautiful land, and established a civilization that will forever bless mankind.

This great exposition celebrates and commemorates no important epoch in the history of the country.It is an epoch in itself.It has grown and assumed shape and form as an expression of the desires of a people to celebrate the development of the resources of a country, the result of their own struggles, labors and final triumphs.It is grander and far more reaching in its scope than the celebration of some anniversary in our country's history. It emphasizes and makes comprehensive the accomplishments of an intelligent, progressive people toward a higher civilization.It is a composite picture of the growth of a people made during the early years of settlement in a new and untried country.It is befitting that as the nineteenth century is drawing to a close, with its fruitage of the manifold blessings which have been showered upon the people of the earth during its reign, that we of the western and newer half, of the American republic, should take an inventory of the stock of great riches of which we are possessed in order that we may thereby be the better enabled to assume the duties and responsibilities and to solve the problems of the advancement of the human race that come crowding upon us with the dawning of the twentieth century.

With the force of a proverb it has been said of man "Know Thyself"; and with greater emphasis may it be declared, "Know they country."Study its structure as formed by divine hands.Know its rivers and mountains, its forests and prairies, its valleys and plains, its climate and soil.Learn of its hidden treasures of gold and silver, of coal and iron; its productive fields of grain and grasses, of vegetables and fruits, its plains of rich grazing for horses, cattle and sheep.Inform yourself of the cities and towns, of telegraphs and telephones, of railroads and steamboats, of the ever pulsing arteries of commerce, the facilities for exchange of the products of man's ingenuity and industry, and a faint conception will be gained of the present greatness and future possibilities of this magnificent transmississippi country.

As this beautiful exposition city, with its thousands of exhibits representing every branch of industry, pleasing to the eye and inspiring to the mind, has sprung into existence in so short a period as if by magic, so has the transmississippi country developed during the last half century with marvelous rapidity.This has been accomplished by the courage and untiring energy of those who have peopled its broad domains.The evidences here witnessed of the advancement of the people and the development of the country's resources inspire within us a spirit of thankfulness that God has given us so goodly a land, to be made beautiful and to fructify for the enjoyment and benefit of mankind.

Though young in years, we of the west ask no allowance on the score of age, but challenge investigation and comparison with improvements made by countries of maturer years, confident that no unfavorable impression of us will result therefrom.In this hour of festivity and rejoicing we are not unmindful that it is also a time of trial for the nation.Loyal citizens from every section of the country have sprung to arms in defense of national honor, in the cause of humanity.Sectional lines have been obliterated in the face of threatened danger from foreign foes.A reunited people are fighting side by side under the stars and stripes, the banner of liberty and progress.

Amidst these marvelous collections of our triumphs in the peaceful pursuits of life we hope it may again be demonstrated that "peace hath her victories no less renowned than war" and that our countrymen of the east may meet us here in this midway city of the continent, learn of our progress in the past, our aspirations and high aims, our hopes for the future and the integrity of our purpose and determination to contribute to a better civilization in developing this great country and to attain the high destiny designed for us by the Maker of the Universe.

President Wattles then announced that the machinery of the Exposition would be set in motion by President McKinley, and the exercise closed by the singing of the National Hymn, "America", by the Exposition Chorus and the audience, accompanied by the U.S. Marine Band.

The entire audience joined in the singing, and amid the blowing of whistles, ringing of bells, and the song of the enthusiastic thousands, the Transmississippi and International Exposition was formally declared open to the world.

Scene in Washington

The following excerpt from one of the wires from Washington, pictures the scene at the White House at the hour of official opening.

"Conditions were well nigh perfect when, at 1:30 o'clock today, Washington time, corresponding to 12:30 Omaha, time, President McKinley pushed the button, formally opening the Transmississippi and International Exposition.Around the chief executive were grouped many of the foremost men in public life, men who have been moulding public opinion for a quarter of a century.It was an inspiring scene, this culmination of many anxious moments, of personal sacrifice on the part of those who have given time and money to so gigantic an undertaking that out of it all might come a better appreciation of the forces dominating that vast territory which extends from the Mississippi river to the Pacific Ocean, from the frigid north to the Gulf of Mexico.In his short term in the presidential chair Major McKinley has shown patriotic devotion to the whole country and wherever possible in his active, busy life has lent his presence and his help to enterprises of both local and national character.

It has been the intention of officials connected with the Transmississippi Exposition, to have the president deliver his address through the long distance telephone, but being fearful that some slip might occur, the president decided to rely on the telegraph and especially as he was not accustomed to use the telephone since his term as president began.In order to conform to the arrangements, the hour of formally recognizing the Transmississippi and International Exposition as open, was deferred until 1:30 o'clock, at which time there was assembled in the president's reception room the following distinguished party:Senators Allen and Thurston, Representatives Mercer, Stark, Sutherland, Maxwell and Greene, Mrs. Sutherland and daughter, Mrs. Greene and daughters, Mr. Bert Wheeler, Representative Fleming of Georgia, Representative Johns of North Dakota, and Senator W.B. Allison of Iowa.

Considerable delay was experienced by Captain Montgomery in getting a wire out of Chicago and direct to the Exposition grounds, but finally the welcome sound "Omaha" came to the alert telegrapher and there were flashed these words by Montgomery:

This is the White House, Washington.When this key closes, the President will close it.

"Everything is ready, Mr. President," said Captain Montgomery, and the chief executive, gracious in manner, stepped to the key of the instrument, and depressing it with his right hand, closed the circuit.Those in the room stood during this ceremony, of little interest to laymen, but of greater interest to those gathered in the cool reception room - and at 1:53 o'clock, Washington time, the president announced that his part of the ceremony was over, and the exposition was formally opened.

There was clapping of hands and congratulations and thanks showered upon the executive for his patience and affability and taking so much time from the affairs of the nation to give the Transmississippi Exposition the benefit of his benediction and good wishes.Immediately after the pressure upon the button, the president's message of congratulation was sent, which was followed by congratulatory telegrams of the Nebraska delegation, terminating a most auspicious occasion for Omaha and the west.

Immediately after the congratulatory wire of the president had been sent, and indication given from Omaha that so far as the president was concerned, his work had been done, executive clerk Montgomery sent the following wire to President Wattles:

The members of the Nebraska delegation assembled in the executive mansion, beg leave to extend their congratulations upon this auspicious beginning of so vast an enterprise as the Transmississippi and International Exposition, and regret their inability to be present, and to personally participate in its accomplishment.

William V. Allen Samuel Maxwell

J.M. ThurstonW.A. Stark

D.H. Mercer R.D. Sutherland

W.L. Greene

Following the exercises of formal opening, the official guests were entertained at luncheon in the Markel Cafe.

At four o'clock an official public reception was held in the United States Government building at the west end of the main porch.

At eight o'clock P.M. a concert was given in the auditorium by the Theodore Thomas Orchestra, assisted by the Exposition chorus.

At nine o'clock P.M. a grand illumination of fire works was given in the north tract, east of the agricultural implement building, and thus the first day of the Exposition passed into history.

The Transmississippi and International Exposition was the first of American expositions to open its gates on the day originally set for opening and the first to have its main buildings completed and its exhibits practically installed on opening day.But it early became evident that something besides the attractions of the beautiful grounds and buildings and exhibits, was necessary to insure a large attendance.Splendid instrumental music by the United States Marine band and other bands of national repute had been secured. The Theodore Thomas Orchestra had been engaged for daily concerts during the month of June, but besides these some special attractions were early planned by the president to arouse and hold constant attendance and interest.Special days were set aside for states, cities and societies, and every possible occasion was used as an excuse for special rates from the railroads.

NEBRASKA DEDICATION DAY

June 14, 1898.

This was the day selected by the Nebraska State Commission for the formal dedication of the Nebraska building.

This building occupied a most commanding position.Standing near the edge of the bluff, overlooking the broad valley of the Missouri, its imposing appearance made it an object of attention.The building was 90 x 142 feet on the ground, and about 90 ft. high to the top of the dome.It cost about $25,000 and was furnished at cost of about $5000.It was admirably adapted to the purpose for which it was intended; official headquarters for the Nebraska Commission, and a home for visiting Nebraskans.

The day was fine and great interest was manifested in the proceedings. Special trains on all the Nebraska railroads brought in thousands from interior and remote parts of the state.

As the hour of 11 o'clock A.M. approached, a procession of carriages arrived, halted at the west entrance to the building, and the distinguished guests of the day alighted.The party compromised the Governor, the Honorable Silas A. Holcomb, accompanied by his entire staff in full regimentals; the President of the Exposition and the Honorable William J. Bryan.The party was under the escort of Chairman Neville, and Secretary Caspar of the Nebraska Commission. The speakers of the occasion occupied a raised dais at the nroth end of the large assembly room, which was beautifully and profusely decorated for the occasion.

At 11:45 A.M. Commissioner Boydson, acting as master of ceremonies, led the way to the speaker's platform, followed by Governor Holcomb and staff, President Wattles, United States Senator W.V. Allen, Chancellor McLean of the University of Nebraska, ex-Governors Alvin Saunders, Lorenzo Crounse and James E. Boyd; Honorable William F. Gurley; Members of the Nebraska Exposition Commission, and Attorney-General C.J. Smyth.

Chancellor McLean delivered the invocation.he was in good voice and his prayer that the Divine blessing might rest on the building, the commissioners, the state and its inhabitants, was a literary gem.

The York Glee Club under the direction of Dr. B.F. Lang then sang - The Union of States we Hail.

The formal dedication of the building was in charge of Judge William Neville. He spoke briefly without notes.Refering to the Nebraska Building, the chairman said it offered headquarters for the secret societies, and all other societies, for the people of all politics and creeds, and hoped that they all would make the building their home while at the Exposition and in closing he introduced the governor.

Governor Holcomb.

The governor spoke briefly of the progress of the Great West, particularly of the state of Nebraska, referring to the period when the section of which Nebraska is the center, was regarded as a barren spot, and sketched some of the hardships experienced by some of the early settlers of the state, the primitive habitations used, and directed attention to the typical sod house exhibited east of the Nebraska building, illustrative of the fertility of resource of the early settlers.

Nebraska Poem.

A poem entitled Nebraska was then recited by Mrs. McKeerer of Stromsberg, Nebraska.

President Wattles.

President Wattles was then introduced to accept the building in behalf of the Exposition.He said:

In behalf of the management of the Transmississippi and International Exposition I accept this beautiful building dedicated here today for the comfort and convenience of the citizens of Nebraska.I commend the wisdom of its conception, the care and economy in its erection and the beauty and convenience of its design.The management of the Exposition appreciates the broad and liberal hospitality of the state board of directors in providing a home on these grounds, not only for our own citizens, societies and institutions, but for the representatives of other states and territories.The comforts of this building will afford to thousands of strangers who will accept its hospitality, and will do much to accomplish one of the great objects of this exposition which is to cement the ties of friendship and good feeling and bind together with pleasant memories and common interests the citizens from all parts of this great country.The east has misunderstood the west and has not appreciated its resources, its citizens and its magnificent opportunities.To the state of Nebraska, the future historian will give the credit of erecting in times of adversity a great exposition destined to break down prejudices, build up commerce and promote peace and good will throughout the land.

When our excellent governor recommended in his last biennial message to this legislature of this state a liberal appropriation in aid of this exposition, a discussion on the merits of this enterprise was precipitated throughout the state, which, for several months grew in intensity until a bill was finally passed and became a law providing for a state building and a state exhibit. Many of the speeches in opposition to this measure would be amusing if reproduced here today.But when we consider the conditions which prevailed three years ago in this state we cannot wonder that many questioned the advisability of the enterprise.A great panic had paralyzed our business interests; two crop failures had discouraged our farming communities; many of our citizens in the western parts of the state had but recently received public charity and many had abandoned their lands to seek homes in southern climes or to go back to eastern friends and relatives.Conditions never seemed more discouraging and to many who live only in the present an exposition of our resources in 1898 meant failure and disgrace.

But adverse conditions make heroes.The richest inheritance of this generation is the courage and energy of the pioneers of the west.These pioneers subdued the savage tribes which occupied this territory, drove back the buffalo and antelope and made productive farms of the desert they occupied.They built railroads, school-houses, churches and colleges; they bravely met and surmounted every emergency; they were the best blood and brain of the east and of all parts of the world.From them and their descendants came words of encouragement and support to the managers of this enterprise.Those men who had seen the state of Nebraska in times of temporary adversity before, knew that the natural conditions of this state justified the expectation of a speedy return of good crops and prosperity in business, and so from all parts of the state came a demand by petition and through the press in favor of the exposition which our legislators could not resist.

That the appropriation of state and national funds for this exposition was wise, cannot be doubted by any who believe in public schools and other public institutions of learning.From an educational standpoint; what could impart more information and better education than an exposition of this character? Who can stand at either end of the grand court and look at the magnificent spectacle of architectural grandeur there displayed without receiving impressions and inspiration which will last through life.To the farmer whose days are spent in honest toil in the quiet and peaceful pursuits of country life, what must be the sensations of wonder and delight in seeing for the first time the electrical effects of these grounds and buildings at night.To the great majority of our citizens who have never seen the capital of the nation and the departments of our government, what could be more interesting and educating than the illustrations of the workings of these departments made in the beautiful government building here?To one and all the display of art from the masters of the Old World and the best painters of modern times, the statuary, the machinery, the products of farm and factory, and the highest and best results of genius and invention cannot fail to be a school of learning that could not be equaled in any other way.

But the financial benefits of this exposition to the state of Nebraska and to the entire west will amply repay the expense and effort in its promotion. Already the attention of the world has been attracted by the magnificent display of our resources here made, and during the next four months, thousands of homeseekers and investors will visit the exposition and investigate the opportunities of the west.That this state will secure its full share of this tide of immigration we cannot doubt when we consider that the growing crops this year in many counties promise to exceed the value of the farms on which they are produced, that the livestock interests of the state have doubled in the last four years and that thousands of acres of the richest and best lands in the world for the production of corn and sugar beets are today unoccupied. New life and energy will be infused in all branches of industry throughout the state by the men and money that will be attracted here by the exposition and the improved conditions which now prevail.The investment of this state will be returned many fold by the increase in value of its taxable property and by the higher and better civilizations of its citizens.

In view of the many benefits of this Exposition to the state of Nebraska, I most heartily congratulate his excellency, the governor, the lawmakers of this state and the state board of directors fo the exposition on the wisdom and statesmanship displayed in making an appropriation for a state building and an exhibit here.I congratulate them on this magnificent building which does honor to the state it represents and credit to the exposition of which it forms a partm. In the name of the Exposition, I accept this building for the purposes for which it is this day dedicated.

Honorable W. J. Bryan.

After music by the Glee Club Mr. Bryan reviewed the progress of the state and touched upon the Cuban War in the following language:

Nebraska is ready to do her part in time of war as well as in time of peace. Her citizens were among the first to give expression to their sympathy with the Cuban patriots, and her representatives in the senate and house took a prominent part in the advocacy of armed intervention by the United States.

When the president issued a call for volunteers, Nebraska's quota was promptly furnished, and she is prepared to respond to the second and subsequent calls.

Nebraska's attitude upon this subject does not, however, indicate that the state is inhabited by a contentious or warlike people; it simply proves that our people understand both the rights conferred, and the obligations imposed, by a proximity to Cuba.Understanding these rights and obligations, they do not shrink form any consequences which may follow the performance of a national duty. War is harsh; it is attended by hardship and suffering; it means a vast expenditure of men and money.We may well pray for the coming of the time, promised in Holy Writ when the spears shall be beaten into pruning-hooks, and the swords into plough-shares; but the universal peace cannot come until justice is enthroned throughout the world.Jehovah deals with nations as He deals with men, and for both decrees that the wages of sin is death.Until the right has triumphed in every land and love reigns in every heart, governments must, as a last resource appeal to force.As long as the oppressor is deaf to the advice of reason, so long must the citizen accustom his shoulder to the musket and his hand to the saber.

Our nation exhausted diplomacy in its efforts to secure a peaceable solution of the Cuban question; and only took up arms when it was compelled to choose between war and servile acquiescence and cruelties which would have been a disgrace to barbarism.

History will vindicate the position taken by the United States in the war with Spain.In saying this, I assume that the principles which were invoked in the inauguration of the war will be observed in its prosecution and conclusion.If a contest undertaken for the sake of humanity degenerates into a war of conquest, we shall find it difficult to meet the charge of having added hypocrisy to greed.

Is our national character so weak that we cannot withstand the temptation to appropriate the first piece of land that comes within our reach?To inflict upon the enemy all possible harm is legitimate warfare, but shall we contemplate a scheme for the colonization of the Orient merely because our fleet won a remarkable victory in the harbor of Manila?

Our guns destroyed a Spanish fleet, but can they destroy that self-evident truth, that governments derive their just powers - not form superior force, but from the consent of governed?

Shall we abandon a just resistance to European encroachment upon the western hemisphere in order to mingle in the controversies of Europe and Asia?

The next item in the program was a vocal solo by Professor Morte Parsons of Omaha, - words and music composed by him, and entitled

The Little Old Sod Shanty on the Plains.

Honorable W.F. Hurley was the next speaker, and his remarks were as follows:

Fellow Citizens:The dedication of the Nebraska building is in reality the inauguration of the transmississippi exposition.The orators of this occasion, speaking with authority, voice the welcome of a most gracious host, the commonwealth of Nebraska.The ceremonials of this hour convey formal notice to the civilized world that the hospitality of our state is boundless and that every guest within out gates shall find a royal welcome.

The American exposition of the broadest scope has heretofore been not only commemorative, but has been the chronicle of some great national anniversary, or the celebration of an epoch in history.The transmississippi exposition has no place in this majestic series of formal festivals.No memory which duty enjoins to embalm in marble sits enthroned among the palaces of this triumphal city.It rears today its domes of gold and minarets of alabaster as an inspiration born of the passionate impulse of a proud people; not a memory, but a radiant dream - a dream which is also a prophecy!

For more than a hundred years the traditions of the republic have found lodgment among the granite hills of New England and in the pine groves and cotton fields of the balmy south.To New England and the south we turn with pride to read the annals of American ancestry; but in the magnificent prairie and mountain states, those colossal principalities which comprise the "seat of empire" of the new west, enthroned between the mountains and the Mississippi, we behold the fulfillment of the hope of American posterity.

The Centennial and the World's Fair were superb monuments to the glittering pageantry of completed history.The exposition, to which we bid you welcome, is unique in character, and in its promise of future grandeur more wonderful than the crystallization of centuries of matured development which characterized the national pageants at Philadelphia and Chicago.The perfected products of a matured civilization may well incite the admiration of observant men.But it has remained for the progressive population of this royal region, rich in resources beyond the flight of the most exuberant fancy, to present for the delectation of mankind the inexhaustible treasures of an incomparable territory, comprising the most princely provinces of our national domain.

This exposition is representative not of what we have been, but rather of what we may be, and under the providence of God what we are to be, Nebraska rejoices that the time has come when as the official representative of the great west she may extend a welcome to the denizen of the East; hopeful and confident that by contact and association those errors and misconceptions which have arisen as to the character and purpose of her citizenship may be forever swept away.

Conservative and radical are much abused terms.In recent years they have been employed to emphasize a demarkation line between the so-called eastern and western halves of the republic.The accumulated wealth of the east, by virtue of the logic of human nature, has impressed its timidity and conservative quality upon the citizenship of that portion of the republic.In the east dwell the sentinels of wealth.In the west, pioneers of fortune.He who has is ever conservative, while he who hopes is ever radical.I do not hesitate to affirm that the radicalism of the west, born of honest tumult and patriotic commotion, is the sure sign of that superb progression which blazes the pathway of civilization, and builds the roadways for the onward march of humanity toward the final and triumphant destiny of the race.

To be radical is to agitate, and in agitation lies the safety of the republic. Some one has defined agitation to be "marshaling the conscience of a nation to mould its laws," and since John Brown trod the soil of Kansas, we of the west, have been agitators.Popular government can only exist through a continual process of fermentation.Free speech is at the basis of free institutions, and out of the clamor and heat of partisan discussion arises the best thought, the highest purpose of a patriotic people.

My fellow-citizens:I can conceive of no more appropriate occasion than the present, on this day, and at this hour, to protest against the misconception of our status as a commonwealth, or our purpose as a people.WIth seventeen years of personal knowledge and an intimate acquaintance with the history of Nebraska since its admission to the sisterhood of states; as a loyal son of this glorious commonwealth, I challenge the assertion, whenever or wherever made, that any branch of our state government in any period of its history, has ever made an assault upon the rights of citizenship, real or personal, or endeavored to wield an arbitrary authority in defiance of law or constitution.

Agitation is one thing - lawlessness another.The west is turbulent, but not lawless; and out of that turbulency and commotion, there arises the spirit of the genius of liberty.

Today Nebraska throws open wide her golden gates, and summons to her portals the myriads of mankind.To this enchanted city of the plains she lures with wizard wand the unnumbered host of other lands and climes.Superb sponsor of a regal hospitality, broad as the prairies, rich and varied as the mountain range which rear their snow-crowned crests in salutation to the sky; robed in the glittering garments which nature weaves alone in token of man's toil; imperial in her pride, her sovereign brow tinged with the glow of the approaching dawn, she bids the nations hail.

HONORABLE C.J. SMYTH.

After a further musical selection by the Glee Club, Attorney General C.J. Smyth was introduced, and his address was as follows:

Mr. President, ladies and gentlement:This is Nebraska's day.It is on this day that we may sound the praises of our great commonwealth.She bids her sond to do this, not in the spirit of vanity, but that she may be known as she is. Not one jot nor tittle would she take from the glory of her sister states who have come here to display in these buildings and on these grounds the evidences of their growth, their wealth and their enterprise.With delight will she listen when they tell of their resources and their triumphs.To them she extends that welcome which becomes a generous, broad-minded and truly American commonwealth; and to none will she yield in admiration of their greatness.

If we would understand Nebraska as she is, the work of her sons in bringing her to her present condition and the probabilities of her future, we mut look back and contemplate, if only for a moment, the "small beginnings" from which she sprang.

In 1834 the congress of the United States denominated the territory of which she was then a part, as "The Indian Country".It was, in fact, at that time the country of the savage.The white man had no dominion therein, and the sweet word "home" was without a meaning on all its broad prairies.Less than fifty years ago the Omaha Indians held title to the land on which we stand, and the entire white population at that time in this vast territory did not exceed five thousand souls.

Not many years after the Omahas ceded their title to this territory to the United States, Nebraska's pioneers came and commenced the work of home building and state building.The days of the freighters followed; the Union Pacific was projected and finished; the ox-team gave way to the freight train; the prairie schooner to the upholstered car, and thus the evolution went on until within the short span of forty-five years it has culminated in the palaces of art that lift their classic outlines within the walls of this exposition.Marvelous has been the progress.

The surplus products of her farms last year- that is, the products she was able to send to market,- were worth over $55,000,000.She has over three thousand factories, with a capital invested of $40,000,000.These factories pay yearly more than $12,000,000 in wages, and the value of their output is $95,000,000 annually.Here on the border of her chief city are located packing-houses which bring Nebraska near to the second packing center of the world.Fourteen lines of railway have a mileage of four thousand seven hundred and thirty miles, carrying Nebraska's commerce.

This is but a glimpse of Nebraska, as she is materially; how is she in those departments of activity which develop the higher nature of man which refines his thoughts and makes him a force in the dominion of taste and intellect? Six universities, twenty-nine colleges, seventeen academies, 6,690 common schools and seventy-five private schools educate 360,000 of her sons and daughters. This is Nebraska's day, and this exposition is her palace.As she steps to the main entrance thereof to welcome her guests of the transmississippi region, notice the inscription on her shield.It illustrates the fact that she has the lowest rate of illiteracy of all the states of all this Union.The national government has placed her percentage at 3.11.

How appropriate, then, that the representatives of this transmississippi region should select this state as the place wherein to exhibit to the world their best specimens of the triumph of the mind over matter, and what specimens they are!If you would see a picture as beautiful as ever man created, contemplate the grand court when illuminated at night.Go into the buildings, look at the evidence there of what man has done, and then say, if you will, that his achievements in the transmississippi country have not been surpassingly great. But do not be surprised, for in this region we possess the best blood and brains of our country.From the east, and from every nation under the sun, have come to us energy, independence of character and irresistible progressiveness that knows no halt until it reaches its goal or the grave. From what race has sprung those men?The Anglo-Saxon?Those who weep because we have not lords, and castles and crests and other evidences of barbarism, answer "Yes".Men who deal in facts, and not in fancies answer, "No".Read the names of those who perished with the Maine, who supported the immortal Dewey, or who went into the jaws of death with the heroic Hobson.Were they all Anglo-Saxon?Who will say so?Truth declares that many races were represented there, The Dane and the Swedish; the German and the Irish. Shoulder to shoulder they stood behind the guns of their adopted country, offered their lives on her altar, and thanked God that they were Americans, the best race that ever blessed the earth, the combination of all that is good in all the races of the world.

Today Nebraska sends greetings to the oppressed of every race and of every clime.To all, no matter of what race they come, who have energy, intelligence and industry, couples with a love of freedom, she opens wide her gates and bids them welcome.Here under the blessings of our free institutions, and breathing the air of the most healthful climate in the world they will have their energy stimulated, their industry rewarded, and their liberty protected.

Thus the exercises were concluded and the Commissioners and guests proceeded to the Markel Cafe, where luncheon was served.

The program of exercises for Nebraska Dedication Day has been given in full practically as reported by one of the Omaha papers.Other celebrations in the dedication of buildings which were held during the months of June and July were similar and only the programs in a few of the most interesting will be given in full.

WISCONSIN DEDICATION DAY.

June 18, 1898.

The Wisconsin building was a handsome structure facing the Illinois building on one of the best locations on that part of the grounds set aside for State Buildings.It was classic in style and excellently planned to meet the purposes for which it was erected.A.C. Clas of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a member of the Wisconsin Commission, was the architect of the building, and it was erected at a cost of about $10,000.

The Wisconsin Exposition Commissioners present, were John C. Koch of Milwaukee, president; E.C. Clas of Milwaukee, treasurer; J.E. Hansen of Milwaukee, C.H. Baxter of Lancaster, G.H. Grenback of Madison, H.D. Fisher of Florence, Fred Kickhefer of Milwaukee; Mrs. Angus Cameron of LaCrosse; General John Hicks of Oshkosh; Mrs. Leonard Lottredge of La Crosse.The commissioners and guests gathered at the building at 11 o'clock A.M. and the following program of exercises constituted the celebration of the dedication of this building:

Music - By the U.S. Marine Band.

Address - By President J.C. Koch

Response - By President G.W. Wattles

Music - The Bismark March - By Mr. Wm. A. Haas

Oration - By Hon. Wm. C. Quarles of Milwaukee

Original Poem - By Mr. John Goodby.

At 2 o'clock in the Auditorium, exercises were held by the women of the NATIONAL FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS. Many of the delegates to the National Federation of Women's Clubs which was held at Denver on June 20-21-22, stopped at Omaha en route, and the Omaha Woman's Club took this occasion to celebrate their visit to the Exposition Grounds.The exercises were held in the Auditorium building, and in many respects the meeting was one of the most notable ever assembled in Omaha.It included many of the most talented and progressive women of the nation.The large Auditorium was comfortably filled when the hour arrived for the commencing of the exercises.Mrs. Winona S. Sawyer of Lincoln, Nebraska President of the Board of Lady Managers of the Exposition, presided, and introduced the exercises by some well chosen remarks.The program was as follows:

Prayer

By Miss Margaret J. Evans, of Minnesota, Dean of Carlton College.

Music By the Lorelei Quartette, of Omaha

Address of Welcome Mrs. Draper Smith, President of the Omaha Woman's Club.

Address By President G.W. Wattles

Response Mrs. Ellen Henrotin of Chicago, President of the G.F.W.C.

Music Love in Springtime, by Arditi, rendered by Master Horace Simms, the boy soprano of Milwaukee.

Address A Phase of Education - By Mrs. Mary E. Mumford, of Philadelphia.

Address Art in the Home, the School and the Country - By Mrs. Herman Hall, of Chicago.

Music A Summer Midnight - By Mrs. Thomas Kelly, of Omaha.

Address Club Courtesies - By Mrs. Kate Tannatt Woods, of Salem, Massachusetts.

Music Stay With Me - By the Lorelei Club.

Address The Keystone of the Education Arch - By Mrs. Ellen A. Richardson, of Boston.

In the evening at 8 o'clock, further exercises were held in the Auditorium, at which numerous addresses were given.

ILLINOIS DEDICATION DAY.

June 20, 1898.

Illinois, next to Nebraska, appropriated the largest sum for participation in the Exposition.The appropriation of the state of Illinois was $45,000.Of this sum $20,000 was set aside for a state building.The Illinois building attracted much attention, and was one of the favorites of the group of state buildings.Its location was at the extreme north end of the tract set aside for state buildings near the Music Pavilion, and overlooking the broad Missouri Valley.An annex to the building was erected and maintained as an art gallery for the Columbian Exposition pictures painted by John R. Key.

The celebration of the dedication of the Illinois building was participated in by many Illinoisans who came in regular and special trains.Among others, about 100 members of the famous Apollo Club were present and their concerts in the main court were of great interest to all exposition visitors.Delegates were present representing the following organizations:The Union League Club; Stock Exchange; Board of Trade; National Business league, and Chicago World's Fair Directors of Chicago.

The exercises were held in the Auditorium at 11 o'clock A.M., and were of such unusual interest as to be given extended mention.

Gathered on the speaker's stand were Governor John M. Tanner and wife of Illinois; Governor Silas A. Holcomb of Nebraska; Honorable Clarke E. Carr, president of the Illinois Commission; Honorable W.H. Harper, chairman of the Executive Committee, and the other members of the Illinois Commission, several members of the Nebraska Commission, members of the Executive Committee of the Exposition, members of the Bureau of Entertainment, and many prominent men of the West.The Apollo Club occupied seats on the back of the stage and the U.S. Marine Band immediately in front.The program was as follows:

Music: The Stars and Stripes Forever,

U.S. Marine Band

Prayer:Chancellor MacLean, of the University of Nebraska.

Address:Hon. W.H. Harper, Chairman of the Executive Committee.

Chairman Harper, in well chosen words, complimented the Exposition on its auspicious inauguration, and spoke at length regarding the work done by the Illinois Commission.

Address: Colonel Clarke E. Carr, President

of the Illinois Commission.

Address: Gov. John M. Tanner, of Illinois.

Music: By the Apollo Club.

Address: President G.W. Wattles, of the Exposition.

Remarks: Governor Silas A. Holcomb.

Address: Ex-Governor Joseph L. Beveridge.

Colonel Carr's Address was as follows:

When LaSalle was, with his heroic followers, exploring western wilds, soon after leaving Lake Michigan he came to the headwaters of a river upon which he launched his canoes and floated down with the current.The river broadened and deepened as he advanced, and he soon became convinced that it belonged to the great system which drained all the vast region of the northwest.He made excursions upon either side and found himself in the midst of vast meadows of waving grass which seemed illimitable.One day the party came upon an Indian village and found it to be the home of a people who called themselves Illini. He called the region the land of the Illini, and he called the river upon which he was floating the river of the Illini.When he asked the significance of this name, he found it to be men, full grown, complete, or as we would say, stalwart men.From this dusky race not only that river but our great state takes its name.

There is scarcely an attribute of mankind so universal as that of affection for the region in which our lot is cast; the land which has given birth, or which in maturer years has received us to her bosom.The heart of the Esquimaux, alike with the inhabitants of more favored regions, swells with the liveliest emotions in contemplating what seem to him the beauties and excellencies of his own country.If this emotion be an universal attribute to mankind, it cannot fail to be more profound and intense in proportion as those beauties and excellencies are real.There is no true son of Illinois "Whose heart has ne'er within him burned " in contemplating the sublime glories of his own state.

No other commonwealth can boast of more enterprising and prosperous cities and towns and villages or of more delightful rural homes.Our great metropolis with her magnificent buildings towering into the skies with her vast libraries already provided for, with her university and institutes and schools, with her charities and eleemosynary institutions, with her parks and great avenues, is destined with the growth of architecture and the development of art to be the most respondent city on the face of the earth.Millions of revolving wheels are forever rolling to her great storehouses treasures "Which far outshine the wealth of Ormus and of Ind ", and she must very soon become the most opulent and popular city of the western hemisphere, and finally of the world.

But it is of our complete, stalwart men that we are proud.They have shown themselves worthy of the name they bear.Men "whose wrestling thews can throw the world ".Scarcely had the people of Illinois begun to enjoy the privileges and appreciate the glories of full citizenship of the republic when almost immediately after the state was admitted into the union the demon of human slavery tried to fasten itself upon them.Though most of them were from slave states, they met and overcame the monster, and hurled it from them, banishing it forever.A few years later, when borne down and overwhelmed with debt and taxation, and the last hope of being able to extricate themselves seemed gone, the siren of repudiation, as she has successfully done elsewhere beckoned them to follow here for relief.They indignantly repelled here and deliberately, in their fundamental law, put upon themselves a burden of taxation and, after years of self-denial, paid the debt in full, dollar for dollar.When the Mexican war came, Illinois carried the banner of the republic on many a victorious battlefield, and finally assisted in dictating terms to the enemy in his own capital.When human slavery sought to fasten itself upon California and Kansas, Illinois men helped to drive it out.In the war of the rebellion Illinois men "hewed their way down the Mississippi valley with their good swords", as their greatest volunteer leader, whose achievements have been commerated in bronze, said they would do, and teh great river flowed "unvexed to the sea."

The names of the stalwart sons of Illinois who have won imperishable renown would fill volumes.One of them conquered the sword of rebellion, and, with magnanimity and generosity unequaled in history, declined to receive it, and another is recognized throughout the world as the sublimest character of the age.

While there is a tendency to exalt military genius above all other there have been intellectual conflicts in which the laurels have been as resplendent as those which deck the soldier's brow.In the great debates before the people of Athens, Demosthenes gained renown which has brought his name down through all the ages.

Just preceding the war of the rebellion, on the prairies of Illinois, we witnessed a campaign of public discussion, continuing for several months.As it progressed from day to day it attracted more and more attention until finally all the people of the nation became interested.The great prairies were the audience room, the American people the audience, the constitution of the United States the platform, the greatest American statesman the champion, and the fate of a continent the issue.

The original fabric of government was composed of states bordering upon the Atlantic, of which the great state of Pennsylvania was appropriately designated as the keystone.Soon the adventurous and hardy pioneer subdued the western wilds, new states were formed and the republic expanded.By the Louisiana purchase, the conquest of Mexico and the settlement of the Oregon boundary the domains of the republic have extended until our boundaries are the oceans.Her adamantine foundations, laid broad and deep, support the most majestic edifice that has ever been projected.

In the midst of this mighty structure so amplified and extended from its original boundaries Illinois appeared.Through the achievements and great names of Abraham Lincoln and Ulysses S. Grant and the deeds of our other statesmen and heroes Illinois has so risen in her central position that from every quarter of the union men and women instinctively lift their eyes to her and so carry out the now clearly discerned will of the divine architect.She unites and cements and canopies with grace and symmetry and beauty the majestic Pennsylvania was appropriately called the keystone, so Illinois may be appropriately designated as the dome of the republic of the United States.

In the midst of this most splendid exposition of the world's progress that has ever been attempted and carried out in the transmississippi region, equal, in so far as designed, to the World's Columbian exposition and superior in many of its details, Illinois has erected a building.In the work of laying out and erecting this building the Illinois commissioners, representing every part of the state, have taken a lively interest.It has been their desire to, without unnecessary outlay, have a building that would be worthy of the state which has honored them by placing the important trust in their hands.It has been a labor of love, and they will feel amply compensated if their work is approved. For them and in their behalf, I now turn the building over to his excellency, the governor of Illinois, whom I have the honor to present to you.

In introducing Governor Tanner, it is unnecessary for me to add more than a word.Some of us have known him from the time when a mere lad he wore the blue uniform of his country.We do not always agree with him, but we recognize his sterling qualities.He learned from Abraham Lincoln to be just and kind and considerate, and he learned from General Grant to keep steadily on in the line of duty, unmoved by denunciation on the one hand, or by flattery on the other, and he learned form John A. Logan, whose faithful and trusted companion he was, to never desert a friend.He is one of the Illini.

The address of Governor John M. Tanner was as follows:

Mr. President of the Illinois Commission and officers of the Transmississippi Exposition:It affords me sincere pleasure on behalf of the state of Illinois as its governor and executive head, to receive from the distinguished and genial president of the Illinois Commission this commodious and elegant building, which is not surpassed, I believe in point of beauty or convenience, by any similar structure upon these capacious grounds.It is a building of which the great state I have the honor here to represent may be justly proud and I trust that many Illinoisans may see it, rest beneath its hospitable roof, and share the sentiment of admiration and approval with which I view it for the first time.

The people of Illinois have the most cordial and sympathetic feeling for the state of Nebraska, and its citizens.They are largely the same people, since Illinois has contributed so largely to populate these virgin and fertile plains.I see in this audience of brave men and fair women many a spectator and listenerwho was born in Illinois, but for one reason or another has cast his or her lot with a younger community.To no other state in the union, I think we have given so many of our sons and daughters.We cherish the belief that even Nebraska can show none better.They are gone from us, but they are still of us.Their memories are cherished by those whom they have left behind, many of whom will take this opportunity to renew old ties of affection and friendship.It is this common blood flowing through all our veins, much of it inherited from early settlers of New England and Virginia and the Carolinas, but all of it, whether its original source was in England, Ireland, Germany or elsewhere, now thoroughly and forever American, which is the promise and pledge of perpetual union of every portion of our common country.

The mention of our country at this moment of national peril and anxiety thrills every patriotic heart.It is hard for us, far removed as we are from the island shores in two hemispheres, where our destiny is even now being shaped to some unseen end, by the thunderbolts of war, to command our thoughts and hold them to the peaceful scenes which at home greet our view.In imagination and sympathy we are only partly here.Our hearts are with our bravest and dearest in camp or at sea, where the children of Illinois and the children of Nebraska have joined hands to purchase, at the cost of their own lives, if so great a sacrifice is required of them, the liberty and prosperity for an alien race which we ourselves enjoy, and of which this magnificent exposition is the latest and highest symbol.What a contrast!May we not derive from it the lesson that greater are the triumphs of peace than of war?War is destructive but peace is a creative force.

As I look around me I pray for the restoration of peace, a just and honorable peace, a lasting peace, which shall usher in for all mankind a brighter era of humanity and universal brotherhood.We can never be again what we have been - an isolated nation, selfishly enjoying our immunity from international responsibilities.We have a duty to discharge to the world as well as to ourselves, and the destruction of the Maine with its gallant crew was the rude voice which awakened us from our dream of perpetual exemption from entanglement with the affairs of other nations, and aroused us to a higher conception of our duty as to the pioneers of the new Christian civilization which is to characterize the coming century.

But I have led away from the matter in hand.As governor of the state of Illinois I congratulate the commission which has so well performed the task assigned to it, of preparing and presenting a fit testimonial of our friendly regard for a sister state, and our cordial sympathy with its noble ambitions.

I thank you for what you have done and now, in the name of this commission, and on behalf of the people of Illinois, I tender to the officials in charge of the transmississippi exposition, this edifice for the use of all who may enjoy its hospitality, whether they be Nebraskans, Illinoisans, or from whatever state or land they may come.Let Illinois and Nebraska vie with each other which of the two shall give them the warmer welcome.

At the close of Governor Tanner's address, Colonel Carr introduced Melville E. Stone, manager of the Associated Press, who announced the receipt of a telegram stating that General Shafter and his army had arrived off Santiago.This was the signal for great cheering and enthusiasm.The band played "The Star-Spangled Banner", and men and women mounted the seats and waived their arms in the air.The Apollo Club sang "Illinois" and at its conclusion "America", the audience joining in the national anthem.The Marine Band rendered several selections and after the excitement had somewhat subsided, President Wattles was introduced and spoke as follows:

When the Transmississippi Commercial Congress designated the city of Omaha as the place at which the country beyond the Mississippi should display to the world its resources in the year 1898, and when the officers of this exposition had been designated we naturally turned to our neighbors of Illinois for assistance and advice.We recognized as all must acknowledge, that Chicago had furnished the ideal of all future expositions; that none could excel and few could ever equal that grand achievement of human skill and genius, the "World Columbian Fair".In architecture, arrangement and installation as well as in the excellence variety and magnitude of the exhibits, we realize we could only produce a shadow of that which had reached so near perfection at Chicago.

It gives me great pleasure in the presence of His Excellency, the governor of Illinois, and in the presence of these distinguished guests to acknowledge the hearty cooperation we have received from the officers of the World's Fair Commission and the valuable assistance of the state of Illinois to this enterprise.Our invitation to your state to participate in this exposition was promptly accepted, an appropriation was made by your legislature and a beautiful and appropriate building has been erected on these grounds.I cannot refrain from commending the efficient work done by your commissioners.Their building is one of which the state may well be proud; they have furnished it with comforts and conveniences, and have embellished with an artist's dream of the "White City" in a manner which cannot fail to meet the approval of every loyal citizen.This building is an honor to the state, Illinois, and a credit to the exposition, and for the management I accept it and dedicate it to the comfort and happiness of the citizens and all former residents of your great state.

We of the vast Transmississippi region renew this day our allegiance and good will to the state of Illinois and acknowledge our appreciation of the presence of her governor and distinguished citizens here on this occasion.We are proud of her history, her wealth, and of her great men, we are proud of her great metropolis, the growth and development of which has been an index to the progress of the entire west.The prosperity of Illinois and of her metropolis is intimately associated with the prosperity of the transmississippi country. Chicago is the great clearing-house for the larger part of the surplus grain and stock produced in the west.The value of her yearly commerce in the necessities of life can hardly be compared.It exceeds the foreign exports of the United States.It exceeds the entire annual gold and silver product of the world.It exceeds the enormous sum of $1,000,000,000.For the product of the west which yearly finds a market in the state of Illinois, her lines of railroad which radiate to all parts of this country, return annually agricultural implements to the value of $25,000,000, clothing to the value of $50,000,000, boots and shoes to the value of $10,000,000,and the products of her other factories in proportion.So active have become the demands of this rapidly developing, pushing, thriving new territory, that the delay incident to the purchase of factories in New England, cannot longer be tolerated and the time is not far distant when the older states of the west will supply themselves and their sister states with all their needs.The state of Illinois is rapidly becoming a manufacturing center for the west.The census of 1890 showed an increase of 119% in her manufacturing interests in ten years. 312,198 hands were then employed and the value of the annual product of her factories was $908,640,000.I have no doubt that the next census will show a corresponding increase.

But bound together as we are by the ties of commercial interest, there are other cords that will forever hold us as brothers.The richest heritage of the past century is the man which Illinois has given to history.They belong to this and all other western states.They were the product of western environment.Only the boundless prairies, the free air and the blue skies of the west could have developed them.We have perpetuated their names in our counties, cities and towns, and for the greatest and best of them all we have named our capital city.They have made the state of Illinois renowned in eloquence, learning, statesmanship and jurisprudence.Douglas the great tribune, Baker the sweet-toned orator, Cartwright the rugged divine, Trumbull the constitutional lawyer, Shields the hero of two wars, Drummond the eminent judge, Logan, the "Black Eagle", who carried victory in his firy train, Oglesby the unconquerable soldier and wise statesman, Grant the invincible leader of armies, the peerless hero and the greatest general of the century, Lincoln, who stood at the helm of the nation during the darkest hour of its peril and sealed its triumph with his blood.We claim an interest in them all and their memory must forever bind the state of Illinois with bonds of steel to the younger states of the west.

We appreciate beyond expression this visit of your Governor and these distinguished Illinois Citizens at this particular time.When war was first declared with Spain the managers of this exposition had some fears that it might detract from the success of our enterprise but we have come to realize that blessings are often given in disguise.We now know that while war destroys it also gives new life and that every citizen is energized by the new and patriotic influences that are revived by conflict and strife.No better illustration of the greatness and power of our country can be found than in the fact that thousands of citizens from eastern states daily visit this exposition and that while our antagonist - one of the oldest kingdoms in the world - is straining every resource to meet in unequal combat our magnificent forces at Manila and Santiago, that while the bonds of Spain are begging a market at thirty cents on the dollar, our nation's war loan will be three times over-subscribed by our own citizens and that we will not only defeat at arms this dying relic of barbarism but at the same time will hold here in the center of our territory a great exposition illustrating the arts of peace and promoting good will throughout the land.

Illinois is bound to the west by ties of consanguinity and common interest. Thousands of her former citizens are now residents of this and other western states, they are among our most progressive and prominent men in all departments of business and professional life.Her beautiful home here will renew old friendships and form new ones.I commend the wisdom of its erection, the beauty of its design and the friendly interest which prompted its conception.For the management of the exposition I receive and dedicate it for the purpose for which it was designed.

Governor Holcomb was then introduced and spoke briefly of the appreciation of Nebraska for the substantial manner in which Illinois has assisted in making the exposition a success.

Letters of regret were read from Senator W.E. Mason of Illinois, Alice Bradford Willis, president of Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs, Robert T. Lincoln, Carles G. Dawes, Joseph W. Pfeiffer and Adlai E. Stevenson.

The exercises were concluded by the address of former Governor Joseph L. Beveridge, who spoke on the subject "Past and Present".His opening sentence was "I lived for fifty years on the prairies of Illinois".He pictured with much feeling and eloquence the changes that had been wrought in the west during his lifetime.He told of the early privations and trials of the pioneers and of their final triumphs and present prosperous conditions.With trembling voice and prophetic language he pierced the future and described what might be expected in the coming generations, and as he closed by chanting the Doxology, the audience broke forth in cheer after cheer, and the exercises were concluded amid great enthusiasm.

In the evening a public reception was tendered to Mrs. Tanner and the visiting ladies at the Illinois building from eight to ten o'clock, which was attended by many pronounced a most successful function.

At 9 o'clock in the evening a musicale was given in the assembly room, in which Mrs. Katherine Bloodgood, contralto, of New York, Mr. Justin M. Thatcher, tenor, and Mr. Allan Spencer, pianist, of Chicago, took part.

A banquet was tendered by former Illinoisans now residing in Nebraska, at the Markel Cafe, to the visitors in the evening, and was one of the most successful social functions of the entire exposition.

KANSAS DEDICATION DAY.

June 22, 1898.

The Kansas Building was located in the southern part of the space set aside for state buildings.It was a commodious and well planned structure, and was erected by the Kansas Commission from funds raised by private subscriptions.

The exercises incident to dedicating the building were held at 11 o'clock A.M. at the Kansas Building.A trumpet corps of the Boys' First Regiment of Topeka played several selections, after which a male quartette from Topeka sang "The Flag without a Stain".The following program of exercises was then given:

Address: President George W. Glick, former governor of Kansas.

Address: James E. Frost, vice-president of the Kansas Commission.

Address: President G.W. Wattles.

Music Song - Nature's Adoration - Sung by James W. Moore of Topeka, Kansas.

Address: Hon. Silas Porter, of Wyandotte.

Music: By Quartette.

IOWA DEDICATION DAY.

June 23, 1898.

The Iowa Building occupied one of the most central locations in the tract set aside for state buildings.The building faced east and its most prominent feature was a large and commodious porch which afforded an inviting place for visitors during the hot summer days.

The exercises were held at the Iowa Building at 2 o'clock P.M.The speakers occupied the wide verandah in front of the center of the building, on which was seated also the Dubuque Choral Club, Governor Leslie M. Shaw, Governor Silas A. Holcomb of Nebraska, former Governor Alvin Saunders, the Members of the Iowa Commission, and several members of the Exposition Executive Committee occupied seats of honor.

The large concourse of people gathered in and about the building to hear the exercises, which were of unusual interest.The program was as follows:

Overture. . . . Atlantic City Band.
Invocation. . . . Rev. L.P. McDonald, Rector St. Paul's
Church, Council Bluffs
Voluntary . . . . Paul E. Cerutti-Pipe Organ
Chorus . . . . The Land We Love
Dubuque Oratorio Society.
Address. . . . By Governor S.B. Packard
Dedication. . . . By Governor Leslie M. Shaw
Acceptance. . . . By President Gurdon W. Wattles
Music. . . . . MedleyPipe Organ and Band
Exposition Ode . . . Composed and read by Major S.H.M. Byers
Quartette and Chorus. . IowaDubuque Oratorio Society
Address. . . . Hon. John N. Baldwin
Chorus . . . . Battle Hymn of the Republic Dubuque Oratorio Society
Music. . . . . National AirsBand and Organ

The address of the Hon. John N. Baldwin, the orator of the day, was in part as follows:

As I wandered through the exposition buildings and strolled over these grounds I heard orators proclaiming from the exedra, the plaza and rostrums in state buildings the glories and triumphs of their respective states.One evening after a storm I stood on the bridge of the lagoon but a few feet distant from the spot where only a year ago we laid the cornerstone of this great enterprise, and beholding this might monument to the skills, courage and enterprise of the men of Nebraska, I thought what has Iowa, or what has Iowa done to compare with this.

I came Nebraska Day and heard that distinguished citizen of the republic, whose heart in love and tongue tipped with silver eloquently presented the record of the resources and progress of Nebraska; I came Illinois Day and heard the representatives of that great commonwealth give their report of the work and worth of Illinois, concluding with the claim to the undisputed title to the possession of the third greatest commercial center of the world; I imagined that on New York Day Bourke Cochran would so portray the history and glories of the great state of New York that we should all seem to hear the sybils chanting the springtime of the greatest empire on earth.Again I thought, what has Iowa, or what has Iowa done, to compare with all these? Reflecting on all that I had seen and heard and imagined, I venerated my office and would have despaired of my performance had not the power of my subject made me bold in such a presence to plead my thoughts.It would be the drivel of idiocy, unbecoming a gentleman and unworthy of the states, should I on this occasion make any statement not based upon careful investigation and not founded upon incontrovertible facts.I now and here assert, my heart beating with pride at the utterance, that, measured by the standard of religion, education, prosperity, patriotism, liberty, or any great principle or idea that makes men better, nobler, and happier, Iowa, in the union of states, is the peer of all, superior to many and excelled by none.

We dedicated today this beautiful building to the uses and purposes of the Transmississippi and International Exposition.It is merely a type of the habitations of our people at the present time.A few feet from here and within your vision stands a wigwam, which has just been opened.It, too, is a type -a type of the habitations of our people fifty-two years ago.You cannot but recognize the significance of the change.The advancement, improvement, and progress of the people of the state of Iowa in education, religion and material interests has been as striking as that in their habitations.

This great state with its wondrous destinies is now in the hands of the younger and present generation? It belongs to us to protect, preserve and improve. We must take up the work where the pioneers were compelled to let it go. They placed high the standard.Let us never lower it.Let us look up and listen; look forward and move. Let our every notion be prompted and performed in accordance with that design created by one of the greatest philosophers and poets,

"Build thou more stately mansions, Oh my soul,
As the swift seasons roll.
Let each now temple, nobler than the last,
Shut thy view from heaven with a dome more vast,
Until at last thou art free,
Leaving thy outgrown shell by life's unresting sea."

I propose this sentiment: The state of Iowa, with a people possessing affections deeper even than her soil; actuated by purposes broader even than her prairies, and inspired by aims loftier even than her hills, she stands today first in the union of states in general contentment, in more evenly distributed wealth, and in universal prosperity."

The exercises were closed by a short address by Governor Silas A. Holcomb, of Nebraska. At the conclusion of the formal program, luncheon was served to the speakers and distinguished guests by the Iowa Commission at the Markel Cafe.

At 5:30 P.M. a reception was given in honor of Governor and Mrs. Shaw, at the Iowa building.

DEDICATION OF POTTAWATTAMIE COUNTY WIGWAM, erected by the city of Council Bluffs.

At one o'clock P.M. many citizens of Council Bluffs and other points in Iowa, gathered at the building known as the Pottawattamie County Wigwam, which was a peculiar structure patterned after an immense Indian wigwam.It was dedicated with formal ceremony, which included prayer by Rev. G.W. Snyder of Council Bluffs, and an address by Mayor Victor Jennings of Council Bluffs; an address by Spencer Smith of Council Bluffs; an address by Judge Walter I. Smith of Council Bluffs and music by the Apollo Mandolin Club of Council Bluffs.

SWEDISH-AMERICAN DAY.

June 24, 1898.

For the celebration of Swedish-American Day was planned a great meeting in the Auditorium in the evening. A song festival of music by famous Swedish voices in their native tongue. During the day preceding the evening which had been set aside for this celebration, the grounds and buildings were noticeably filled with men and women who had gathered from Minnesota, Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska, to take part in this celebration.The formal program was given in the Auditorium, at 8 o'clock P.M.The exercises were opened by President C.O. Lobeck, who introduced President Gurdon W. Wattles, who in a few remarks welcomed the visitors to the White City. An address in the Swedish language was made by Rev. A.J. Lofgren, of Lincoln, presiding elder of the Swedish-American Church, after which the musical program was rendered, as follows:

David's 150th Psalm . . . By the Chorus, led by Professer Adolph Edgren.
Soprano Solo. . . . By Miss Emma Moeller of Omaha
Hear Us, Svea. . . . By a Male Chorus.
Baritone Solo. . . . By Rev. J.A. Hultman, who also sang for an encore, "Jerusalem".
His singing was received with great applause Original Poem. . . . By Dr. J.A. Enander, of Chicago
The Singers March. . . By the Jubilee Chorus.
Oration. . . . . By Rev. Carl Swensson of Bethan College of Lindsboro, Kansas.
Jubilee Cantata. . . By Adolph Edgren, introducing solos, duets, and mixed choruses

ROYAL ARCANUM DAY.

June 25, 1898.

This was the first special day set aside for the celebration of secret societies, and while no exercises in the way of speech making or music marked the celebration of the members of this organization who gathered in large numbers on the exposition grounds and were in evidence during the afternoon and evening concerts.The local Councils as also the Councils of South Omaha and Council Bluffs were well represented.Arlington and numerous other towns adjacent to Omaha were also represented, and the day proved a decided success.

MONTANA DEDICATION DAY.

June 29, 1898.

The location of the Montana building gave it prominence, being on the main avenue leading south from the esplanade, and near the entrance to the Bluff Tract from Sherman Avenue.The building was well arranged, and under the able supervision of Mr. W.H. Sutherlin, Exposition vice-president for Montana.The Montana building and exhibit, both of which reflected great credit on the state, were made possible by the liberal donation of Mr. Marcus Dailey, who pledged the delegation that visited Montana to promote the exposition in the winter of 1897, a donation of $15,000; the legislature afterwards appropriated a like amount, and the exhibits from that state and the building erected by the Commission were placed in charge of vice-president Sutherlin.

The exercises dedicating the building to the uses for which it had been erected, were held at 4 o'clock P.M., and while simple, were impressive.The program consisted of a short address by Vice-president Sutherlin, several musical selections, and an address by President Gurdon W. Wattles, and were concluded by a luncheon served by the Montana Commission.

TURNERS DAY AND MUSICAL CONGRESS DAY.

June 30, 1898.

For many weeks the Tuners of Omaha and many other cities throughout the west, had looked forward to this celebration and the drills for prizes that were to take place on the exposition grounds, with much interest.They gathered early and in large numbers.The principal drill was at 6 o'clock in the evening on the plaza.In this drill about 400 Turners participated.Other exercises were had and withal the day proved a great success.

THE MUSICAL CONGRESS.

The principal sessions of the Musical congress were held in the First Congregational Church of Omaha, but the principal musical feature of the Congress was the Oratorio of Isaiah, written and rendered by American singers in the Auditorium building in the evening.Mr. Willard Patten, the composer, and his Minneapolis choral organization of 250 voices came by special train for this rendition.The orchestral features were rendered by the entire Theodore Thomas Orchestra, and the following soloists participated:Mrs. Genevieve Clark Wilson, Chicago, soprano; Miss Katharine Fiske, New York, contralto; Mr. Frederick Carberry, Chicago, tenor; Mr. Charles Clarke, Chicago, baritone.The audience taxed the capacity of the large auditorium and the enthusiasm was strong and spontaneous.

The interest in all the meetings of the Musical Congress was great and the results were most satisfactory to all musicians.

Mrs. Winona S. Sawyer of the bureau of education, speaking of the aims and purposes of the bureau in arranging a musical congress in connection with the exposition, said, among other things:

"With the first month of the Exposition as a prelude to a grand symphony, the beauty of the architecture and the arrangement of the buildings, suggestive of the allegro movement; the labor of patience and anxiety requisite to secure these results, typical of the andante; the entertainment, amusement and pleasure intimating the scherzo movement; we prize this Congress coming at this time.It stands out like a fugue subject, with strong marked features of lofty inspiration and high ideals, which once introduced, will be again and again taken up and repeated successively in various keys and various harmonies throughout the exposition."

TEXAS MELON DAY.

July 1, 1898.

The Texas Exposition Commission, supplementing their general exhibit at the exposition, set apart this day to show to the world the beauty and demonstrate the good quality of their product of water melons.Twelve hundred melons were provided for the feast, which occurred at 5 o'clock P.M.The distribution was made the occasion for brief ceremonies at the horticultural building.

S.J.T. Johnson, exposition vice-president for Texas, and Superintendent Atwater, in charge of the Texas exhibits, made short addresses, which were responded to on behalf of the exposition by General Manager T.S. Clarkson. This concluded the formalities of the occasion.

Long tables had been provided, upon which to carve and serve the luscious fruit, and a force under the direction of Arthur Nelson, superintendent of the Missouri horticultural exhibit, was kept busy until the last melon had vanished from sight.Some of the melons weighed nearly 40 pounds and it was estimated that 10000 persons were served during the feast.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF CONGREGATIONAL CHURCHES.

July 2, 1898.

A large number of delegates en route to the meeting of the national council of Congregational Churches to be held at Portland, Oregon, stopped at Omaha to visit the exposition and the local society made their visit the occasion of a special gathering and demonstration at the Boys' and Girls' Building on the Exposition Grounds.

There were about 150 prominent clergymen from eastern cities, besides many of their friends and laymen and the auditorium of the Boys' and Girls' building was well filled when they gathered at 4 o'clock for the brief exercises and exchange of formalities.

Reverend S. Wright Butler presided and by his many witticisms kept the audience in good humor.He introduced President Wattles, who extended a hearty welcome to the distinguished guests.

Ex-Governor Coffin, of Connecticut, responded briefly.A vote of thanks was then moved by Dr. Hazen to the people of Omaha and to the exposition management for the generous entertainment which had been accorded.Dr. Lamson of Hartford closed the speaking.The music of the day was rendered by Mrs. G.W. Johnson, Miss Kellogg and Mrs. A.G. Edwards, all of Omaha.

INDEPENDENCE DAY.

July 4, 1898.

Great preparations had been made for a fitting celebration of the National Holiday, and the early morning found all means of transportation to the exposition grounds crowded by the anxious throngs which came early, many of them from adjoining states, to see for the first time the exposition, and it soon became evident that this was to be the day of largest attendance on the exposition grounds.

The program planned included a paraade of the Midway features under the command of General Manager Clarkson.At 10 o'clock the parade marched through the avenues on the bluff tract headed by the Exposition Guards and the Exposition Band; Frank C. Bostock, with numerous aides commanded no less than five divisions, including nearly all of the Exposition Midway attractions and many novelty features, and was reviewed by the Exposition Officials, the distinguished guests and speakers of the day, from the Music Pavillion.

After the parade the exercises of the day were held from the Music Pavilion, and consisted of the following program:

Music by Fourth Regiment Band of Sioux City, Iowa,after which an interesting innovation occurred by the announcement by President Wattles of the receipt of a telegam stating that General Shafter had demanded unconditional surrender of the Spanish troops of Santiago. Prayer was then offered by Rev. T.J. Mackey.The Exposition Chorus sang "America".The Declaration of Independence was read by Hon. John C. Wharton, and the orator of the day, Hon. James M. Beck, was then introduced and spoke as follows:

"AS AN EAGLE STIRRETH UP HER NEST".

My Fellow Countrymen:

From the city of the Declaration of Independence where Henry spoke, Jefferson wrote, Franklin counseled, Adams debated, Morris administered, and Washington unsheathed his sword, within whose walls is Germantown, and near to whose gates are Brandywine and Valley Forge, I bring you a fraternal greeting. Philadelphia felicitates Omaha.Pennsylvania salutes Nebraska and her sisters of the Great West.They congratulate you on this imposing pageant of art and industry, representing the resources of a section, over which, when the great Declaration was given to the world, the banner of Spain floated in triumph. Its marvelous growth, under free institutions is a vindication beyond the power of mere words, of those sublime truths, to which our fathers gave undying expression one hundred and twenty-two years ago to-day.

In the contrasts of history can be often seen the divine purpose, which runs through the ages.When La Salle, in 1682, traversed the Mississippi, and, standing at its mouth, claimed the vast territory which it drained for his royal master, and named it in his honor "Louisiana", the grand monarque was even then constructing in the insolence of his unbridled power, and on a scale of imperial magnificence, the palace of Versailles.Its splashing fountains, endless chambers of crystal, flowery parterres, and gorgeous frescoes proclaimed the power of the so-called "Sun King", whose "l'Etat c'est Moi", was the extreme of regal despotism. Later, this Trans-Mississippi region, after languishing beneath the yoke of the Spanish Bourbons, became part of Napoleon's dream of universal empire.It is an inspiring reflection that the hand, which drafted the Declaration of Independence, rescued this vast empire form the iron grasp of the modern Caesar, and dedicated it to free institutions forever more. Vanished is the power of the "Sun King," Spanish Bourbon, and the granite-souled Emperor.The tyranny which created that wonderful apotheosis of personal absolutism, the palace of Versailles, has been swept away by the dynamic force of democratic ideas, and today in this region, once believed to be a desert, but now the home of twenty-two millions of freemen, the people have erected these splendid palaces of triumphant democracy.

We can reverently thank the Ruler of Nations, by Whose ordinanace the Republic came into being and to serve Whose wise purposes it continues to exist, that upon no preceding anniversary has our country exercised so wide an influence among the nations of the earth, or used it for any loftier or nobler purpose. The Republic is in arms today, not because it loves peace less, but because it loves justice more.Never did nation make war with a less selfish purpose. The American people, until patience had ceased to be a virtue, sympathized with their noble President in the wish that this cup of bitterness might be spared our lips.No lust of military glory or territorial aggrandizement inspired our action.We had been slow to believe the oft-repeated stories of mediaeval barbarities in Cuba, and our traditional policy was opposed to intervention in the domestic affairs of another Power.A certain spirit of noblesse oblige restrained us from striking a weaker foe even in a just cause.It was not until a daughter of Nebraska had died in Cuban waters, and her husband, its honored Senator, had, in a speech of great eloquence and yet greater pathos, given us "the true and sensible avouch of his own eyes", that our pacific purposes gave place to the passionate indignation of freemen, that the spirit of the Crusaders swept through our veins, and the cry "God wills it", was heard on every hand.We then took a high resolve in the spirit of our fathers, that our blood should be as dust and our treasure as water to stop this barbarity forever.We have thus disproved the libel against the American character, that our aims are purely material, and that our unequaled growth in wealth has choked the finer sensibilities of the soul.Let those who heard unheeded the moan of Cretan and the death rattle of the Armenian, and yet taunted us with the blind worship of wealth, forever hold their peace.We have vindicated the rights of humanity and shown that there is one nation, whose conscience is not dead, and of whom it cannot be truly said that the "age of chivalry is gone and one of calculators and economists has succeeded.We are moved by his spirit, who a generation ago believed that the elemental demands of justice rose higher than mere form, precedent, or convention.Though dead, John Brown yet speaketh, and "his soul is marching on."The old bell, which more than a century ago rang out our freedom, though mute to the ear of flesh, is still grandly proclaiming, even to the islands of the sea, "liberty throughout all the land and unto all the inhabitants thereof."

As we meet this morning, we can give especial thanks for the swift and triumphant vindication of our cause.With the proud fleet of Cervera annihilated and Santiago doomed, the vulture of Spanish oppression lies prostrate under the talons of the eagle.Again the great Declaration, whose basic principle is the political equality of the individual, has been justified in the splendid manhood and invincible bravery of our soldiers and sailors. With fear and trembling many awaited the dawn of this day, lest our brave sons at Santiago, facing a hidden and powerful foe under conditions of unparalleled difficulty, should be betrayed into disaster by their very confidence.But fear is past and only the songs of triumph are now heard throughout the land. The citizen soldiery of the Republic, at whose martial prowess supercilious foreign critics sneered, have again given immortal proof to the world that "our flag is still there."

Our rejoicing, however, may well be tempered today by the appreciation of the tremendous responsibilities, which by no wish or purpose of ours are suddenly devolved upon us.Dewey's genius and valor not unworthy of a land which gave Paul Jones, Greble, Bainbridge, Decatur, Porter, and Farragut to history - have blazed the path to victory and have confronted the American people with a responsibility more momentous and pregnant with future consequences than has ever weighed upon our nation on any national anniversary since the Civil War. That involved our existence, this may define our position and relations to the rest of the world.To give back the conquered territory to Spain may be to subject a weak and helpless people to its vindictive revenge; to give these various possessions in two hemispheres to their own people may be to make them the prey for the powers of Europe, whose selfish greed for territory is now finding expression in China; for us to surrender these conquered islands to any other nation is to incur the enmity of the rest, and perhaps involved civilization in a war, which might wrap the world in its devouring flame, and yet, - to permanently annex them to the Republic is to cross a greater Rubicon than that at whose brink even Caesar halted, and with consequences scarcely less momentous.Jefferson's words to James Monroe, which inspired the Monroe Doctrine, may well be recalled as applicable to the present crisis in our national life."The question," said he, "is the most momentous, which has ever been offered to my contemplation since that of independence; that made us a nation, this sets our compass and points the course which we are to steer through the ocean of time opening on us." Is the Western Hemisphere large enough for the influence and progress of the American people, or must we surrender, commercially and politically, our policy of isolation and claim an influence which shall be as limitless as the world is round?The Atlantic coast was our cradle, lusty youth found us on the banks of the Mississippi, vigorous maturity has brought us to the Pacific.What of that momentous morrow - the twentieth century?Are we, like Alexander, to stop at the margin of the sea and mourn that it forever bars our further progress, or are we, like the inspired pilot of Genoa, to launch the bark of our national destiny into an unknown sea, in search of new and untried routes to national prosperity?

Well may we, my fellow countrymen, in this great crisis of our national life, remember the beginning of the Republic and the teachings of our fathers.Such remembrance is not merely a grateful tribute to the dead, but will help us discharge our duty to the unborn.Let us, then, in the spirit of the great law giver and leader of an oppressed people.

"Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations. "As an eagle stirreth up her nest, fluttereth over her young, spreadeth abroad her wings, taketh them, beareth them on her wings. "So the Lord alone did lead him and there and was no strange God with him."

This very striking metaphor of Moses suggests a great truth in connection with our development as a nation, that it has never been permitted to remain long within the nest of any traditional policy.There is a natural conservatism in the Anglo-Saxon race, and a distrust and dread of innovation.It has ever been slow to leave the beaten paths of the fathers.Nor need this be deprecated, for it ensures a reasonable continuity of policy.Every great step forward has been due, not to the leadership of our great men, nor to any conscious and deliberate purpose of the people, but wholly to a divine guidance, which, working through the force of unforeseen circumstances, and a certain unconscious intuitive impulse of the masses, has destroyed the nest of tradition and thrust us as young eagles into the void.The great actors of the revolutionary epic had their traditions, and an ancestry in which they gloried, and yet were forced by the logic of events to disregard both.Their traditional policy was loyalty to the King, hatred of France, with whom they had contested for the possession of North America, pride in the English Empire, and disinclination towards any union between themselves.When the Revolution broke out nothing was further from their purpose than separation from England. Said John Adams:"There was not a moment during the Revolution when I would not have given everything I possessed for a restoration to the state of things before the contest began, provided we could have had a sufficient security for its continuance."Dr. Franklin, the most trusted, sagacious, and far-seeing statesman of his generation, said before the battle for a separation, or a hint that such a thing would be advantageous to America."Mr. Jay said:"During the course of my life, and until the second petition of Congress in 1775, I never had heard an American of any class, or of any description, express a wish for the independence of the Colonies."The author of the Declaration of Independence said:"It has always been, and still is, my opinion and belief that our country was prompted and impelled to independence by necessity, not by choice.I never heard a whisper, before the commencement of hostilities, of a disposition to separate from Great Britain."Washington in 1774, denounced as "malevolent falsehoods" the assertions that "There is any intention in the American colonies to set up for independent States."In 1776 he wrote:When I took command of the army I abhorred the idea of independence; now I am convinced nothing else will save us."

"Building better than they knew" - as all master builders of a nation - our fathers were led, by impulses which they could not appreciate or understand, to disregard every tradition which they held dear, to renounce allegiance to the King, separate from the great English Empire, make formal alliance with their hated enemy, France, and create a union of which each had been but too jealous.

The Constitution of the United States was not the deliberate wish of the people, but was created by their necessities; it met no one's entire approval, was only adopted after bitter debates of four months duration, and was the result of a compromise begotten by the stern and pressing necessities of the situation.Only a choice between chaos and a Constitution induced the jarring, discordant and jealous States to surrender any portion of their sovereignty, and yet this Constitution, in its present form the child of no brain and the creation of no wish, is the admiration of the world, and has been pronounced by the noblest and most scholarly statesman of our time, whose death we even now mourn, to have been the most perfect ever struck off by the brain and purpose of man at a given time.

Nor has this truth been less marked in our own time and generation.The Emancipation Proclamation clearly violated the traditional policy of our country, which recognized the existence of slavery.Jefferson'sstern denunciation of the slave trade, which he had inserted in the first draft of the great Declaration, was stricken out by Congress, and the Constitution itself distinctly recognized the existence of this baleful domestic institution.Its destruction was not due to the conscious and deliberate purpose of any statesman.Lincoln at the beginning of his administration distinctly disclaimed any purpose to interfere with it, and it was not until the blood, which had been shed from Bull Run to Antietam, cried as from the ground that again the nest of tradition was destroyed and the eagle essayed a new and nobler flight.No one recognized this more clearly than did the great war President, and in his second inaugural he plainly voiced his belief that not only the removal of slavery but the Civil War itself had come by no human wisdom, but by a divine judgment.

The same momentous fact is true today.Once again the nation feels a mysterious and puissant impulse.It has ever been the traditional policy of the Republic not to interfere in the domestic affairs of a friendly Power, and the Monroe Doctrine distinctly disclaimed any intention to interfere with existing colonial dependencies in America of European Powers, but as Lexington inflamed a continent and created a new nation, as Fort Sumter rudely shattered our dream of peace and compelled us to remove by the sword the running sore of slavery, the explosion of the Maine and the cruelties to the Cuban people have compelled us to discard our traditional and valued policy of non-interference, and directly interfere with the domestic affairs of another nation.

We need not regret the transitory influence of the past.Blind adherence to tradition is not the highest patriotism, but is a form of intellectual slavery not worthy of a free and progressive people.An assumption that the teachings of our fathers expressed the finality of political wisdom is contradicted by the uniform experience of mankind.I yield to no one in my reverential respect for the founders of this Republic.No Government has had greater men, and History can be searched in vain for any loftier lives or wiser minds than Washington and Franklin, Jefferson and Hamilton, Madison and Monroe.The eloquent judgment of the elder Chatham has received the considerate approval of mankind, when, speaking of the first Continental Congress, he said, "I must declare and vow that in all my reading and study- and I have read Thucydides and have studied and admired the master States of the world- that for solidity of reason, force of sagacity, and wisdom of conclusion, under such a complication of circumstances, no nation or body of men can stand in preference to the General Congress at Philadelphia."Nevertheless the Almighty never intended that wisdom should die either with one man, one generation, one race, one century, or one epoch.Least of any people should America doubt the "increasing purpose" of the ages and the widening of thought "with the process of the suns."

Because our fathers thought that the stage coach was adequate to their needs, shall we abandon the locomotive?The old wooden battleships, such as the "Bon Homme Richard " and the "Constitution", won imperishable laurels for the American Navy, but shall we therefore place these obsolete sailing vessels in conflict with modern steel battleships?Because the Continentals defended Bunker Hill and achieved the crowning triumph of Yorktown with flint-lock muskets, shall we discard the repeating rifle?If Franklin impressed his personality upon the world with a hand-press, shall we less avail ourselves of those throbbing engines which make possible the modern newspaper?Our fathers recognized that wise nations, as wise individuals, change their minds when occasion justifies, but fools never.Let us not ascribe to them an infallibility which they do not claim for themselves.Democracy acknowledges no living sovereign, much less those who are said to "rule us form their urns." The decadence of Spain, which has cost her the empire of the world, and now brought her to the verge of final ruin, is due to her "inordinate tenacity of old opinions, old beliefs, and hold habits," which Buckle finds to be her predominant national characteristic.He adds:"By encouraging the notion that all the truths most important to know are already known, they repress those aspirations and dull that generous confidence in the future without which nothing really great can be achieved.A people who regard the past with too wistful an eye will never bestir themselves to help the onward progress.To them antiquity is wisdom, and every improvement is a dangerous innovation." The nation which has most consistently and continuously followed the worship of ancestry is China, and as a result it is today the helpless prey of other Powers, although in numbers and resources it is potentially the most powerful on the earth.

We must not as a people permit the past to fetter the present.That way retrogression lies, and our duty as a nation is to be determined by the present, not by past conditions.We cannot even stand still.We must move onward.From civilization we derive inestimable rights, to her we owe immeasurable duties, and to shirk these is cowardice and moral death.No nation can live to itself, even if it would.The economic developments of the nineteenth century have produced a solidarity of humanity, which no racial prejudice or international hatred can destroy.Each nation is its brother's keeper, and the greater the power, the greater the responsibility.If this be so, no nation owes a great duty to civilization to be potential in the councils of the world than the United States.For it to skulk and shirk behind the selfish policy of isolation and to abdicate a destined world supremacy, would be the colossal crime of history.God has given us the power, woe be unto us if we do not use it.The stern but just law, which has governed the nations in all history, is that he alone shall have, who uses.Its ethical sanction is found in that parable of the talents, in which the Great Teacher laid down the moral law that no man or nation has an indefeasible title to property,that all is holden of God, and tenure depends upon rightful use.From Spain, as from an unprofitable and slothful servant, are about to be taken colonies which she has failed to develop in harmony with modern progress.Let our people, instead of questioning the law, remember that we too shall perish when we cease to develop the talents committed to our charge.Of every rotten tree the eternal inquiry of the Great Woodman is heard, "Why cumbereth it the ground?"

In discussing any questions, therefore, which may result from the present war with Spain, let us not give undue or conclusive value to the opinions of the past.The conditions under which we must act are essentially different from those which existed in our father's time, and the poet of democracy said nothing more worthy of remembrance by us a people than that-

"New occasions teach new duties; time makes ancient good uncouth; They must upward still, and onward, who would keep abreast of truth."

Steam and electricity have destroyed our "distant and detached position," of which Washington spoke in the immortal Farewell Address, and upon which he predicated in the infancy of the Republic a policy of isolation.Then we were the weakest Power in the world, today we are the strongest.Then we were three millions in number, scattered over three hundred thousand square miles of territory, today we are seventy-five millions of people, inhabiting a continent from ocean to ocean, fronting the Orient and the Occident, and possessed of resources which are inexhaustible.Then we were almost exclusively an agricultural country, today we are the greatest agricultural, mining, and manufacturing nation of the globe, and second only to England in commercial prestige.Then it required five weeks to visit or communicate with Europe, and the Atlantic Ocean seemed a natural barrier, today we can flash a message around the world in a few hours, and can learn of its affairs almost as they occur.The citizen of New York can today reach London with more facility than the first President could leave Mount Vernon and proceed to Philadelphia. When, therefore, Washington, at a time when the great European Powers had been thrown by the French Revolution into a state of chaos, advised the infant Republic, newest among nations and weakest in credit, numbers and resources, to avoid any interference in the affairs of the greater world beyond the seas, lest as a lamb it should be devoured by a pack of wolves, he counseled, as he always did, with a wisdom unimpeachable; but those who would forever keep the Republic in her swaddling clothes, and who for this purpose invoke the great name of Washington, should first convince us that if he were the President of the most powerful nation in the world he would advise it to yield precedence to lesser and weaker Powers.Would he not feel that this Colossus among nations should not lisp in the language of its infancy, but should say with St. Paul, "When I was a child I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child, but when I became a man I put away childish things."

Out nation is today feeling that instinct of expansion, which is the predominant characteristic of the Anglo-Saxon race.It is bred in our bone and courses with our lifeblood, and the statesmen of our day must take it into account and endeavor to wisely control it.There is with us, as with our great mother empire, a national instinct for territorial growth, "so powerful and accurate, that statesmen of every school, willing or unwilling, have found themselves carried along by a tendency which no individuality can resist or greatly modify."We could as hopefully bid the Mississippi cease its flow toward the sea, or the Missouri to remain chained within its rocky sources, as to prevent the onward movement of this great, proud, generous, and aggressive people.This was true of the day of our weakness, it is true in this, the day of our strength.

The first effort of the newly recognized Republic was to acquire territory. When at the close of the Revolution our peace commissioners met in Paris, the problem arose as to the true boundaries of the new nation.We have solemnly convenanted with France that we would not sign any treaty of peace with England unless our ally concurred.France insisted that the vast area between the rivers, which flowed into the Atlantic, and the Mississippi, was Spanish territory.Our commissioners felt that our national destiny justified a claim to the east bank of the Mississippi, and they so far "stooped to conquer" as to secretly execute without the knowledge or concurrence of France, a treaty with England, which gave us the territory to the Father of Waters.Congress at first was disposed to condemn this act of their commissioners, and disclaim the territory beyond the Alleghenies, which were felt by many to be the boundaries which Nature had set to the advance of the Republic.The most radical agreed that the Mississippi was our true boundary, and yet the commercial necessity of its free navigation caused our fathers, a few years later, to reverse this narrow conception of their national destiny, and constrained as sincere and lofty a statesman as Jefferson to sacrifice his cherished theories as to the constitutional powers of the Federal government by purchasing on his own responsibility, and without the authority of either the Constitution or of Congress, this great empire between the Mississippi and the Pacific.A great party vainly opposed the purchase of this region, and in so doing, destroyed only itself.Speaking in one of its thirty great opulent cities, at an Exposition which represents the resources of its twenty-two millions of freemen, let me quote the words of Senator White spoken on the floor of the Senate in 1803.He said:"But as to Louisiana, this new, immense, unbounded world, if it should ever be incorporated into this Union which I have no idea can be done, but by altering the Constitution, I believe it will be the greatest curse that could at present befall us.It may be productive of innumerable evils, and especially one that I even fear to look upon."And then he added, "Gentlemen on all sides, with very few exceptions agree that the settlement of this country will be highly injurious and dangerous to the United States.***We have already territory enough, and when I contemplate the evils that may arise to these states from this intended corporation of Louisiana into the Union, I would rather see it given to France, to Spain or to any other nation of the earth, upon the mere condition that no citizen of the United States should ever settle within its limits, than to see the territory, sold for $100,000,000, and we retain the sovereignty."

The opposition to the acquisition of Louisiana was repeated in the matter of the disputed territory of Oregon, which an influential Senator said was "not worth a pinch of snuff," and but for Whitman's perilous journey across the Continent, would have been forever lost to the Union; but the impulse of our people towards expansion triumphed in the matter of Louisiana and Oregon, as also in that of Texas, California and Alaska, and today our territorial possessions stretch so far into the Pacific, that the sum which casts its last rays upon the farthest Aleutian Island is already illumining the rocky coast of Maine.San Francisco, once our western limit, is now but midway between our eastern and western possessions, and the shores of Puget Sound, originally our most northern frontier, are now more than a thousand miles south of that final shore, which stretches toward the Pole and into the Arctic Ocean. I would not be understood as arguing in favor of the annexation of any of the islands, of which we have taken possession for the purposes of the war, or indeed of any policy of indiscriminate territorial acquisition.These are questions about which men of equal intelligence and patriotism may reasonably differ, and both the limitations and the proprieties of the occasion forbid their discussion.I have been protesting, however, against the tyranny of tradition, intellectual slavery, which compels obedience to past ideals, and the assumption that there should be any policy which forbids the further expansion of the republic.

Let us equally beware of that fatal error of empires and Republics, that a nation is necessarily great in proportion to its area and population.To no principle of public policy has history given a more uniform and emphatic contradiction.As Mr. Lowell has beautifully said, "The greatness of a nation is weighed in scales more delicate than the balance of trade.On the maps you can cover Athens with a pin point and Judea with a finger tip, and yet in those magnificent places impulses have been given which have not ceased to direct civilization."If mere numbers and area determined greatness, China would be the greatest nation in the world, and yet greater than all Cathay was that little capital of Attica, Athens, which has flamed as a torch of culture over the ages, and lives in memory as the "City of the violet crown."Expansion is not necessarily strength, but may involve weakness, and we should not add to our already onerous responsibilities without undoubted compensatory advantages, or unless our duty to humanity clearly requires us to take weaker nations under our fostering influence.

There is one tradition of our fathers, which we cannot too strictly respect, and whose value time cannot "wither nor custom stale."It is the spirit of justice, to which, by that instrument whose adoption we celebrate today, our country is solemnly dedicated forevermore.The richest country in the world, though it were paved with gold, were dear enough, if purchased at the price of this ideal.In achieving its high destiny the Republic must therefore respect the noble and cosmopolitan spirit in which it was formed.To appreciate it we must comprehend the meaning and purposed of the Declaration.It is commonly believed that it is noteworthy in our annals, because by that instrument, and on the day on which it was proclaimed, our country severed its relations with Great Britain.This is a mistake.The formal act of severance from Great Britain did not occur on the Fourth of July nor by the Declaration.One June 7th, 1776, Richard Henry Lee, of Virginia, at the instance of Virginia, introduced his three famous resolutions, the first of which was, "That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states, that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that the political connection between them and the state of Great Britain is, and ought to be totally absolved."They were debated with great earnestness on the 8th and 10th of June, by which time it became clear that a majority of the colonies was prepared to adopt them, but for the sake of greater unanimity, the consideration of the question was postponed until July 1st, and the committee composed of Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston, was appointed to prepare a formal declaration to the world.On the first day of July, Congress, sitting as a committee of the whole, resumed consideration of the question and it was passed by the committee.On the following day, July 2, 1776, Rodney having "come post from the Delaware Counties," and Pennsylvania having changed her vote, the House unanimously adopted the original resolution.If, therefore, the commencement of the republic is to date from the formal resolution of severance rather than from the real severance, which commenced with the first Continental Congress, then on July 2nd, 1776, the United States began their separate and independent existence.This was clearly the belief of those who participated in the proceedings, and was expressed by John Adams in his memorable letter of July 3rd, 1776, to his wife, when he said, "But the day is past.The second day of July, 1776, will be a memorable epoch in the history of America.I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival.It ought to be commemorated, as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty.***You may think me transported with enthusiasm, but I am not; I am well aware of the toil and blood and treasure that it will cost us to maintain this declaration, and support and defend these states, yet through all the gloom I can see the rays of light and glory."

What, then, was the purpose of the great Declaration, and what has given it not only undying significance for all future time, but especial value for us today? It was this:Our fathers appreciated that their act was essentially revolutionary, that it had no sanction in any code of municipal or international law, and that its only justification must be found in that higher law of the human conscience by which in the last analysis all political acts must be judged.They therefore felt that their action required formal justification, and it was for the purpose of satisfying the conscience of mankind as to the justice of an act essentially revolutionized that the Declaration of Independence was adopted on July 4th, 1776.It was not, therefore, intended for the colonists.For them a recital of their grievances was superfluous, for the wrongs done them were ineffaceably seared into their memories.Nor was the Declaration an appeal to public sentiment in England, for their "humble petition" of 1776 had been contemptuously spurned both by the King and his subservient Parliament.

Our fathers felt that further discussion with England was useless.Its purpose was, therefore, to solemnly challenge the justice of the world to the necessity of the separation.This is clearly shown by its noble preamble:"When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another,*** a decent respect to the opinion of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation."This paper, therefore, assumes - vainly as it then seemed, in an age in which might was supposed to make right - that there was a law of right and wrong, rising higher than laws, precedents, or conventions, regulated the intercourse of nations as well as individuals.It believed in moral responsibility for nations as for men, and it avowed a belief in a great human conscience which, towering above the selfish interest of nations and races, would approve the right and condemn the wrong.It assumed that this approval was more to be desired than national advantage.It established civilization as a judge between contending nations, with posterity as a court of last resort.It proclaimed the solidarity of humanity, and placed it higher than the tie of nationality; it argued-not with the ethics of a rifle or the morality of the cannon only-but with the power of the untrammeled reason, the righteousness of the separation at the bar of History, it satisfied the reason of man by adding, "In proof of this let facts be submitted to a candid world."Nay, it recognized that even above the conscience of mankind there was the "Ruler of Nations", by Whom all acts would be finally and infalliby, judged, and therefore the great Declaration concluded by solemnly "appealing to the Supreme Judge of the World for the rectitude of our intentions."

Such was the spirit, such the purpose, such the crowning glory of the noblest State paper ever drafted by the hand of man or proclaimed by any people.It proclaimed a new principle in the history of human affairs, that not by armies and navies alone, nor by the power of economic resources, but by the standards of eternal justice should a nation in the fear of God determine its action.In like spirit was the parting precept of the Father of his Country, the "counsels of an old and affectionate friend," voiced in that immortal farewell message, which was his benediction to the people whom he loved so well:-

"Observe good faith and justice towards all nations.Cultivate peace and harmony with all.Religion and morality enjoin this conduct; and can it be that good policy does not equally enjoin it?It will be worthy of a free, enlightened, and at no distant period, a great nation to give to mankind the maganimous and too novel example of a people always guided by an exalted justice and benevolence."

With this spirit we need not fear to face the future.No problem to confront us will prove too great for our solution, and no work too great for our achievement.To faintly grasp the future of this country is to bewilder and exhaust the imagination.The past is but the "happy prologue to the swelling act of an imperial theme."Today as never before we face the world as a united country.If wounds there have been, they are healed; if causes for quarrel, it has gone.East and west, from the Father of Waters, north and south of Mason and Dixon's Line, we are one today, my fellow countrymen, one, in the proud possession of the glorious past, one, in a resolute purpose to meet the duties of the hour, and one, in an abiding faith in the future of our beloved country. Never before did her flag float as a symbol of possession over so vast a dominion.Not only from the Arctic Ocean to the Gulf, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, but in those islands of the sea, where the Caribbean breaks, and in that farther archipelago, laved by the China Sea, the Star-Spangled Banner floats today in proudest triumph.Our boast is that of the mother empire, of whose teeming womb we are born that night no longer falls upon our possession, for when these joyous festivities shall have ended and they shall fade from yonder lagoon, and when the moon shall silver with its mellow glory these noble temples of art and industry, the sun will be flooding the harbor of Manila, and illumining that glorious flag, under which Dewey and his heroes defended this country's honor.For one land, one people, one flag, and one destiny, let us reverently thank the God of our fathers.May the glory of the Republic be as lasting as the day, which shines upon her flag, and her beneficent influence upon future generations as ceaseless as the majestic flow of the Mississippi to the sea!

When the early afternoon papers reached the grounds bearing the news of the destruction of Spanish Admiral Cervera's fleet and of General Shafter's ultimatum to the Spanish army in Santiago, bedlam broke loose and tremendous enthusiasm found expression in cheer after cheer.The managers of the Exposition who had labored in hopes that the war might cease and that liberal patronage might thereby be assured, now for the first time felt confident of ultimate success, and the day was one of congratulations and good will. Elaborate fireworks closed the celebration, one of the set pieces of the display representing the bombardment of Cervera's fleet, creating the wildest enthusiasm.At 11 o'clock P.M. a grand colored fire illumination of the entire Midway completed the demonstration, and thus one of the great days of the Exposition ended.

MASSACHUSETTS DAY.

July 11, 1898.

The legislature of the state of Massachusetts having provided for a formal representation at the Exposition, the state officials selected this day for their visit.At the head of the delegation was Lieut. Gov. W. Murray Crane and staff.Besides the governor, most of the state officers and numerous members of the assembly were present.The exercises were held in the Auditorium at 11 o'clock A.M.Governor Holcomb and staff and State Adjutant General Barry, Chancellor George E. McLean of the University of Nebraska, Manager Rosewater, and other Nebraskans assisted in the entertainment of the distinguished guests. Mrs. Clement Chase, chairman of the bureau of entertainment, and other members of that bureau were present.After music, Governor Hale was introduced and heartily welcomed the visitors from the Old Bay State.

Lieut. Gov. W. Murray Crane responded in a brief but appropriate address. President Gurdon W. Wattles delivered an address of welcome in which he referred to the fact that at one time the boundaries of Massachusetts extended westward to the westward to the western line of the dominion of the nation, and said that although these boundaries no longer reached to the eastern bounds of our state, yet the influence of the New England stock from which many of the residents of the west descended, the ties of consanguinity which bound the west to the east made the representatives of Massachusetts as welcome as though we were a part of the Old Bay State itself.

Hon. George E. Smith, president of the senate of Massachusetts, delivered a most polished address, after which Mrs. G.W. Johnston sang in a most pleasing manner and was warmly applauded.

Hon. John L. Bates, speaker of the house of representatives of the Massachusetts legislature was the next speaker.He said that the delegates from Massachusetts brought the hearty good will of the people of that state and congratulations on the great Exposition and on the boundless possibilities of the great country represented by that enterprise.

Chancellor George E. McLean of the Nebraska University then delivered an address, after which more music was rendered, and the meeting was adjourned to luncheon served in the Markel Cafe.At this luncheon eloquent toasts were responded to by W.H. Alexander and W.G. Whitmore, natives of Massachusetts now residing in Nebraska.

On Tuesday evening, January 12th, the Massachusetts delegation was tendered a reception by President Wattles and Mrs. Wattles at their home on Thirty-seventh street.The wide porch and grounds about their residence were decorated and illuminated for the occasion.Many of the prominent society people of Omaha met the Massachusetts visitors, and the function was pronounced one of the most elaborate and successful of any of the many private receptions given during the entire Exposition.

CHILDREN'S DAY.

July 14, 1898.

Children celebrated the dedication of the Boys' and Girls' Building.Early in the construction period of the Exposition, the school children of Nebraska and Iowa decided to raise by small donations the money for a Boys' and Girls' Building, to be erected on the Exposition Grounds.This building was located in the northeast corner of the Grand Court, and though not as large as the other buildings on this court, it was well adapted for the uses for which it was erected, the entertainment of the children.The building was a source of great interest to the thousands of school children who had contributed their dimes toward its cost and as the admission on this dedication day had been reduced to $.15 for children, great throngs of little folks were gathered early to participate in the celebration and view the sights of the Exposition.

The exercises in the building were simple, consisting of a few short speeches and some music, closing with the singing of the Star Spangled Banner, after which all formalities were laid aside and the little ones enjoyed themselves in all parts of the Exposition grounds.The day was closed with the usual concert in the evening, which was largely attended.

MILITARY DAY.

July 16, 1898.

The Third Regiment of Nebraska had been recruited by Colonel Wm. J. Bryan and were about to leave the state for service in the Cuban War.They were in camp at old Fort Omaha and had accepted the invitation of the exposition officials to attend the exposition in a body before leaving the state.Great preparations for their comfort had been made by the Woman's Bureau of Entertainment and many assistants who had volunteered to serve in distributing the refreshments to the 1500 soldiers who were expected to participate in the demonstration.At 10 o'clock A.M. the Regiment entered the exposition grounds at the north gate and were received by General Manager Clarkson with the Pawnee City Band, and marched down the West Midway over the north viaduct into the Grand Plaza and from there to the Nebraska Building, and then countermarched back to the Plaza and over the viaduct to the Grand Court.

Governor Holcomb and staff on horse back, with Colonel Bryan and his aides preceded the marching troopers, and their bright uniforms contrasting with the beautiful white of the buildings made a scene long to be remembered by those who witnessed it.Many fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters,wives and sweethearts of these volunteers were gathered on the grounds to see and perhaps embrace their loved ones for the last time.Many bands of music and waving flags lent enchantment to the scene.At 11 o'clock the troopers gathered in the Auditorium and with their friends and visitors completely filled the great building.The public was excluded until the soldiers were seated, and there was not sufficient room for all who sought admittance.

On the stage were seated Governor Holcomb of Nebraska, Governor Leedy of Kansas, Colonel William J. Bryan, General Barry, Adjutant General of Nebraska, General Manager T.S. Clarkson, President Wattles and numerous other exposition officials.After several selections by the Pawnee City Band, President Wattles introduced general Manger Clarkson, who delivered an address of welcome to the soldiers.He bade them Godspeed in the performance of their patriotic duties. He paid an eloquent tribute to the men who risked their lives for their country's honor. His address was often interrupted by cheers and at its' close the Third Regiment Band increased the enthusiasm by playing "The Battle Cry of Freedom."

Governor J.W. Leedy of Kansas then spoke briefly, after which then was more music and then Hon. G.M. Hitchcock was introduced and presented the regiment with a set of silk guidons, two for each of the three battalions.These were received by Colonel Bryan, who expressed feelingly the thanks of his regiment for this and other manifestations of good will which had been showered upon them on every hand. At the close of his address there was more music by the band, after which Governor Holcomb was introduced and delivered the formal farewell of the state to its volunteers.His address brought tears to many eyes as he assured the boys that after they had gone to the front they would be remembered and honored and their achievements would be the pride of the great commonwealth. At the close of Governor Holcomb's address, it was announced that the Woman's Bureau of Entertainment would serve dinner to the soldiers in their seats in the Auditorium. The women who had volunteered to perform this task and had secured the food for the feast were assigned as follows:

Third Regiment Band - Mrs. Charles Shiverick, assisted by Mrs. J.E. Baum, Mrs. John Wilbur, The Misses Adeline Nash, Edna Cowin, Anna Crary, Ethel Morse, Anna Shiverick, and Miss Outcalt of Lincoln.

Pawnee City Band - Committee of the Women's Relief corps, Mrs. Sarah A. Potter, chairman; Mesdames George B. Eddy, John Jeffcoat, Allen Koch, W.R. Martin, Remington, Omar Whitney, George Rhodes, McCoy, Hough, Deacon, Hull, Askwith, Sheelar, Bugh, all of Omaha corps, and Mesdames Ogg, Eastman, Ingersol, Williams, Fenner and Towl of South Omaha.

Company A - Mrs. J.M. Metcalf, assisted by Mesdames C.D. Sinclair, J.N. Cornish and J.H. Hertsche and the Misses Anna V. Metcalf and Lucy Sinclair.

Company B - Mrs. George E. Barker, Mrs. C.E. Squires, Mrs. A. H. Noyes, the Misses Amy Barker, Mary Barker, Louise Squires.

Company C - Mesdames H.T. Clarke, W.F. Allen, Frank Colpetzer, Harry Wilkins, the Misses Gertrude Clarke, Grace Allen, Mabel Taylor, Freda Ranger, Louise Tukey.

Company D - Mrs. J.E. Summers, Jr., Mrs. George Hoagland, the Misses Cora Carney, Belle Beatty, Laura Beatty, Helen Hoagland, May Meighen, Bessie Yates, Caroline Johnson.

Company E - Sanitary Aid Society, Mrs. George B. Eddy, vice president Mesdames Fred Nichols, R.C. Moore, E.V. Lewis, the Misses Flora Holt, Nessie Levitt, Moore, Helen Wyman, Flora Lewis, Jessie Brown.

Company F - Mesdames Paul Charlton, Richard Carrier, George W. Mercer, Charles W. Rainey, the Misses Nellie and Sarah Baum.

Company G - Mesdames Andrew Rosewater, T.J. Mahoney, Henry S. Jaynes, the Misses Herberta Jaynes, Edith Smith, Martha Stone, Tot Moores, and Lillie Bergh of New York City.

Company H - Committe of Women's Relief corps.

Company I - Mesdames George A. Joslyn, Charles Offutt, E.A. Nash, A.J. Love, M.A. Hall, Charles Ogden, Miss Laura Barber.

Company K - Mesdames W.A. Redick, Thomas Kilpatrick, T.M. Orr, W.N. Babcock, E.S. Dundy, D.H. Wheeler, Jr., E.H. Sprague, Alvin Saunders and Miss Dundy.

Company L - Mesdames T.J. Mackay, E.L. Lomax, John Grossman, Robert Purvis, Miss Purvis, Miss Olla Cook.

Company M - Mesdames G.W. Wattles, J.R. Buchanan, Z.T. Lindsay, G.F. Bidwell, the Misses Lindsey, Evans, Emma Creighton, Andreesen, Miss Moore of Council Bluffs, Miss Nellie Law of Henry, Ill.

MINNESOTA DEDICATION DAY.

July 20, 1898.

The Minnesota building, erected by private subscriptions and donations by the citizens of Minnesota, was unique and unlike any other building on the Exposition Grounds.It was typical of life in the pine forests of the state it represented, being constructed entirely of pine logs, hewn and morticed in an artistic and substantial manner.The building was 70 ft. long, 60 ft. wide and two stories high.There were two balconies one at each story, 20 feet wide, with railings made of poles surrounding them.All the materials used in the construction were shipped form Minnesota and illustrated products of that state.The rooms were commodious and filled with easy chairs; the walls decorated with many pictures and heads of animals of the early pioneer life of the state.

Many distinguished residents of Minnesota came on the two special trains to celebrate the dedication of Minnesota's building and to see the exposition. Governor Clough and staff, the members of the Minnesota Commission, several of the state officers and members of the legislature, were among the visitors. The dedication exercises were held at the building at 10:30 A.M., J. Newton Ninde, chairman of the Building Committee, presiding, who first introduced Governor Silas A. Holcomb, of Nebraska, who welcomed the Governor of Minnesota and other distinguished guests.John L. Gibbs, President of the Minnesota Commission, and Lieut. Gov. of Minnesota, responded in a happy manner, after which Governor Clough was introduced and formally accepted the building and in turn delivered it to the Exposition officials.President Wattles of the Exposition accepted it for the management and after his address and music by the band,Honorable W.H. Eustis of Minnesota delivered the closing address.The exercises closed with more music.

A public reception was tendered Governor Clough and his party after the exercises of the day in the parlors of the Minnesota Building.

INDIAN DAY.

August 4, 1898.

Inaugurating the Features of the Great Indian Congress.

Early in the history of the Exposition it was proposed by President Wattles that an Indian Congress of the principal tribes of North American Indians should be one of the distinctive features of the exposition.That as all of the Transmississippi territory had, but a comparatively few years past, been occupied by these Indian tribes, and that as they were fast disappearing and their modes of life and customs were gradually changing with the onward march of civilization, it would perhaps be the last time that the primitive life of these tribes could ever be successfully illustrated.As many eastern people had never seen Indians in their semi-savage state, it was argued that this Indian Congress would be a great drawing feature that would bring many eastern people to visit the Exposition.

A bill was introduced in Congress authorizing the assemblage of these Indian tribes and providing an appropriation of $40,000 to defray the expenses.Much delay was experienced in the passage of this measure and finally Manager Rosewater was prevailed upon to go to Washington and lend his efforts to those of Congressman Mercer and Senators Allen and Thurston in securing the desired legislation.When the bill was finally passed it was too late to assemble the Indians for the opening of the exposition and before the encampment was complete on the exposition grounds the first of August had passed.On the day set for the grand parade of Indian tribes which should mark the opening of the Indian Congress, there was encamped on the north tract of the exposition grounds a goodly number of the following tribes:

Chippewas, Rosebud, Lower Brule, Cheyennes, Sisertons, Flandreau, Standing Rock, Crow, Creek, Sioux, Sacs, Foxes, Assiniboines, Omahas, Winnebagos, Blackfeet, Arapahoes, Jicarilla, Apaches, Nez Perces, Comanches, Wichitas, Bannocks, Pueblos, Osages, Iroquois and Poncas.The Indians were in charge of Captain Mercer.The morning was spent in arranging their camps and in raising the flag, which was accompanied with much ceremony and wild cheering.In the afternoon the parade was formed and marched through the Midway over the North Viaduct and down the Bluff Tract to the Horticultural Building, countermarching back to the Grand Plaza.Several bands formed a part of the parade and the Indians were dressed in the fantastic manner indigenous to their respective tribes.After the parade and a short rest, the afternoon was spent in weird dances, horse racing and other Indian amusements.The day was a great success in point of attendance and from this, the opening day of the Indian Congress, until the close of the exposition, the Indians proved a great attraction.

FLOWER DAY.

Aug. 5, 1898.

For several weeks preparations had been going on for a grand Flower Parade on the Exposition Grounds.This parade was one of the decided successful features of the Exposition period.The women of the Bureau of Entertainment under the supervision and direction of Mrs. H. McCall Travis, assumed full charge of the decoration of vehicles that were to take part in the parade.The pageant formed in the afternoon at the Horticulture Building, those participating with the decorations given below:

1.Mrs. F.P. Kirkendall; drag, with cornflowers and wheat.
2.Mrs. H.T. Clark; white chrysanthemums.
3.Mrs. George A. Joslyn and Mrs. C.C. Chase; scarlet and white poppies.
4.Mrs. George Mercer; La France roses and smilax.
5.Mrs. J.M. Metcalf; shaded pink hollyhocks.
6.Mr. and Mrs. Robert Franklin Smith; pink roses with natural foliage.
7.Miss Mary Mercer; pony cart with Easter lilies and white roses.
8.Mrs. Gurdon Wattles and Mrs. George F. Bidwell; shaded pink roses.
9.Mrs. John L. Webster; drag with white horses, pink chrysanthemums.
10. Miss Louis Squires; American Beauty roses.
11. Mrs. J.N. Cornish; royal purple chrysanthemums.
12. Mrs. Thomas W. Taliaferro; white roses and white lilies.
13. Mrs. C.E. Squires; pale blue tarleton and pink and black poppies.
14. Mrs. H.H. Baldridge; tandem team.
15. Mrs. J.H. Evans and Miss Amy Barker; victoria, heliotroop and white chrysanthemums, design in Vandyke points.
16. The Misses Sharp; white roses and smilax.
17. Mrs. S.A. McWhorter; pale yellow roses.
18. Mrs. J.E. Baum; shaded yellow and black poppies.
19. Miss Elizabeth Allen; golden chrysanthemums.
20. Mrs. John N. Baldwin; pink poppies.
21. Mr. Al Patrick; the Patrick tallyho coach in the national colors in peonies.
22. Mrs. A.H. Noyes; Ak-Sar-Ben colors of red, green and yellow.
23. Mrs. Charles E. Ford; Marechal Niel roses.
24. Miss Mount and Miss Dickinson; burnt orange and amber chrysanthemums.
25. Mrs. A.J. Love and Mrs. Chas. Offutt; trap in morning glories.
26. Miss Bennett; canopy-topped carriage, various shades of violet.
27. Mrs. M.C. Peters; spider phaeton, pink roses and lavender chrysanthemums.
28. Miss Parrotte; water lilies.
29. Mrs. Downs; patriotic colors of red, white and blue.
30. Miss Shiverick; carriage upholstered in white, latticed with smilax and with borders of pink chrysanthemums.
31. Miss Andreesen; spider phaeton in white chrysanthemums.
32. Mrs. Nicholas L. Guckert; yellow and black poppies.
33. Miss Gertrude Morand; pony cart, Marechal Niel roses.
34. Mrs. Arthur Brandeis; golden butterflies, tea and Marechal Niel roses.
35. Mrs. Jack Cudahy; spider phaeton; white bride roses, ruchings of tarleton.
36. Mrs. W.R. Kelly; trap in pink tarleton, La France roses.
37. Miss Alice Parker; trap in yellow poppies, latticed over in pale green.
38. The Misses Hamilton; victoria in lavender and royal purple chrysanthemums.
39. Miss Adelaide Nash; trap in white and yellow roses.
40. Mrs. G.W. Megeath; cart in La France roses and trimmed in white satin ribbons.

The judges were Mayor Moores of Omaha, Mayor Jennings of Council Bluffs and Mayor Graham of Lincoln, who bestowed prizes upon the equipages of Mrs. J.H. Evans, Mrs. Howard Baldridge and Mr. John N. Baldwin, in the order named.

At a meeting of the executive committee the thanks of the exposition management were tendered to Mrs. T.M. Orr and her assistants for the superb and artistic spectacle their parade had afforded.In particular recognition of the work done by the women in putting on this elaborate pageant it was decided to present each of the participants with a souvenir exposition medal.

NATIONAL, STATE AND CITY DAYS.

The state buildings on the grounds having been dedicated, it was now decided to inaugurate numerous special celebrations for states, cities and national events.All of these special days proved more or less attractive and no doubt did much to swell the general attendance of the Exposition.Special promotion agents had extended the invitation of the president of the exposition to numerous of the larger Transmississippi cities to designate special days which would be set aside by the exposition management for these cities.The first celebration in acceptance of this invitation was

KANSAS CITY DAY.

August 6, 1898.

The officials and citizens of Kansas City came in goodly numbers to celebrate that day.President Wattles and Mayor Frank E. Moores welcomed the visitors as they gathered in the Auditorium at 11 o'clock A.M. for the ceremonies which had been arranged for the occasion.Mayor Moores, in his usual felicitous manner, extended to the visitors the freedom of the city, and presented Acting Mayor A.D. Burrows with huge golden keys which he explained would admit the visitors to all the pleasures of our city.Acting Mayor Burrows responded and spoke in the highest terms of their admiration for the Transmississippi and International Exposition which he declared was far beyond their most sanguine expectations.

Ex-Governor Crittenden of Missouri, responded in behalf of the state and after music by the band, president Wattles formally addressed the visitors.This concluded the speech-making, after which the distinguished visitors were escorted to the city by Mayor Moores and the city officials and tendered a banquet at the Millard Hotel.

REDMEN'S DAY.

Aug. 10, 1898.

The members of the Improved Order of Red Men with their wives, children and friends had designated this day for their special attendance.Formal exercises were held in the Auditorium, consisting of an

Invocation Rev. Campbell Fair, Dean of Trinity Cathedral
Address President Wattles of the Exposition.
Address Mayor Frank E. Moores of Omaha.
Music By Finney's Band
Response By Great Junior Sagamore, E.D. Wiley of Des Moines, Iowa.
Music By the Band
Address Grand Incohonee, Robert T. Daniels of Georgia.

This closed the formal program of the day.

UNITED STATES LIFE-SAVING SERVICE DAY.

August 11, 1898.

As a part of the United States Government exhibit, the life-saving service crew with boats and other appliances incident to the United Stated Life Saving Service was one of the decided features of the entire exposition.The illustrations of this service were begun on this day set aside for special demonstrations and these exhibitions were given daily thereafter during the remainder of the exposition.The exhibitions were under the general supervision of Mr. Sumner I. Kimball, general superintendent U.S. Life Saving Service, Washington, D.C., and were immediately in charge of Captain H.M. Knowles, Wakefield, R.I., assistant superintendent Third Life Saving District.

The participants were as follows:

Captain, Henry Cleary, Marquette, Michigan.
Surfmen.
No. 1 Henry Sinnigen,Milwaukee, Wis.
No. 2 Jacob Van Weelden Grand Haven, Mich.
No. 3 James ScottSand Beach, Mich.
No. 4 Henry Walker,Muskegon, Mich.
No. 5 John McLeod, Duluth, Minn.
No. 6 Windfield Adamson Grand Stone City, Mich.
No. 7 Frank JohnsonHolland, Mich.
No. 8 Nelson SimsEast Tawas, Mich.

The daily program was as follows:

Life Savers go on Patrol
Discover Distress Signals
Line Fired Over Wreck
Man Saved in Breeches Buoy
Man Overboard
Rescue with Lifeboat.
The Capsize
Apparently Drowned
Resuscitation
Close of Exercise.

ST. JOSEPH DAY.

August 13, 1898.

The celebration of St. Joseph Day was one of the most successful of any of the city special days.Several thousand of the inhabitants accompanied the mayor and city officials to the Exposition to celebrate their day.At 12 o'clock fully 3000 Missourians had gathered in the Auditorium and the following program was carried out:

Address of Welcome

Mayor Moores

Address

President Wattles

Response

Mayor Kirschner of St. Joseph

Music by the Band.

This concluded the formal exercises and the remainder of the day was spent in visiting the Exposition sights.

TEXAS DAY.

August 18, 1898.

The celebration of Texas Day was one of the most interesting of the many state day celebrations at the Exposition.The program consisted of:

Music

Address of Welcome

Lieut. Gov. J.E. Harris of Nebraska

Response

Gov. Culbertson of Texas

Address

President Wattles

Music

By the Band

Oration

By Governor R.B. Hubbard.

After the speaking, the official guests of the day were entertained at luncheon by the Exposition officials.

DES MOINES DAY.

August 23, 1898.

A large number of excursionists from others parts of Iowa assembled at the Auditorium for the formal exercises of Des Moines Day.The program was as follows:

Music. . . By the Band

Address of Welcome. Mayor Moores

Response. . . Mayor Macvicar of Des Moines

Address. . . President Wattles of the Exposition

Music.

Address. . . President Thomas Hatton of the Commercial Exchange of Des Moines

Address. . . Secretary Ward, of the Commercial Exchange of Des Moines.

Music.

After the exercises, the visitors were entertained at dinner at the Markel Cafe.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD AND NEBRASKA EDITORS' DAY.

August 24, 1898.

The Omaha World-Herald had requested and been granted a special day in which to celebrate the achievements of this progressive daily newspaper.The occasion of the celebration was the 13th anniversary of the founding of the Evening World, which grew to be the World-Herald.The day was the same as that set aside as Nebraska Editors' Day and the two services were therefore merged two celebrations were therefore merged.The exercises on the grounds were a luncheon served at the Markel Cafe at the expense of the editor of the World-Herald.G.M. Hitchcock, proprietor of that paper, presided.After luncheon the speech-making was started by Mr. Hitchcock, who spoke of the many pleasures the Exposition afforded his friends, and of the many trials and great effort by which this grand spectacle had been made possible.He then introduced President Wattles, who spoke briefly of the history and progress of the exposition and in closing, referred to the grand Peace Jubilee which had been planned for the month of October.He referred to the fact that Captain Jones of the 22nd Infantry was present, carrying a Spanish bullet in his leg. His reference to Captain Jones was the occasion of great cheering, which called for a short acknowledgment from the Captain.Dr. George L. Miller, founder of the Omaha World-Herald, responded to the toast "Seed Time and Harvest of Newspaperdom".He spoke in his usual felicitous manner and elicited much laughter and applause.

W.S. Day, of the Aurora Register, responded to the toast."Nebraska, She Leads Them All".He spoke in part as follows:

In some respects I am unfitted by nature to make response to the toast proposed, being of an argumentative disposition and accustomed to reach conclusions only by exhaustive and exhausting discussion.A question with only one side to it and not end at all, is a very difficult one for me to handle. When a boy I remember reflecting on the awful consequences of a supposed encounter between an irresistible force and an immovable body, but they are likely to prove mild in comparison with the result when an interminable talker comes into perihelion with an inexhaustible subject.

That Nebraska leads them all is a self-evident proposition.Who would produce statistics to demonstrate that the sun shines or the wind blows.(Especially would it resemble the carrying of coals to Newcastle to attempt to prove by figures or diagrams that the wind blows in Nebraska.)The people of this state have acquired a reputation of being a little extravagant and given to exaggeration when speaking of its advantages.I shall, therefore, weigh well my words and be ultra conservative in every statement made, preferring only the modest claim that Nebraska has the richest soil, the purest air, the best water and as manly men and womanly women as can be found on this earth.

One has but to breathe the lifeless air of the lower altitudes; note the stunted products of the red and yellow putty called farm land throughout the east and south; attempt to swallow the lukewarm solution of clay which hundreds of thousands of good people must use as a beverage, to be keenly sensible of some of the every day, yet priceless blessings in which Nebraska leads them all.No person who has sweltered through the long night and until 4 o'clock in the morning for a refreshing breath, or who has felt a touch of malaria in his system, would be willing to exchange our climate for all the big red apples of the universe.

I am of the west, western.I have lived here for more than a quarter century and have passed from boyhood to manhood in a homestead country.I can remember breaking sod day after day when the highest object in sight was the ears of my taller horse.

I have witnessed the development of our state form a barren, treeless plain to one of the most fertile and beautiful countries ever sung by poets or prosed over by historians.The labor of one generation of men has effected this transformation, and next to the welfare of my family I have no stronger wish than seeing Nebraska owned, free and clear of encumbrance, by the people who have sacrificed so much to make what it is.

Long ago in the days of "hoppers",
When real estate agents dealt in whoppers,
House of sod with roof poles limber;
Buffalo Grass and cottonwood timber
People poor - with hearts of pity;
Each incipient town a city;
Hedge rows broke, but roads across 'em
Folks that let nobody boss 'em;
That's the West as I first knew it.

The settlers of those days may have had to live largely on "bread and with it", but no heroes have greater claims on the world's history than the pioneers of Nebraska.Earnest and indomitable, hard-working and self-denying, they labored to make homes for their children, and they bore with fortitude - nay, unexampled good humor - all the misfortunes of frontier life.

One day in August, a forlorn, disheartened looking team, drawing a rickety wagon, passed through our "city", bearing a western family back east for a winter's visit to the "wife's folks."As they drove by a crowd of young fellows gathered in front of the harness shop and it became apparent from the looks and gestures of the spectators that they were poking fun at his rig. Quick as a flash the homesteader gave to his willing team the signal to stop and leveling his long forefinger at the boys, shouted earnestly:"Look here, strangers, I ain't so darned poor as you think I am.One of these horses isn't mine."

Such citizenship is one of the resources of Nebraska.The best harvest of which any land can boast is brave and worthy men and women.The best heritage we can leave our children is an ancestry that merits their emulation.These things have left their impress upon Nebraska.Springing from such stock, surrounded by such environments, who wonders that everything here is done on a large scale.That our stock fields are so extensive that we are spoken of as the "fodder land "; that we could furnish a necklace of corn cribs to encircle almost any territory desired; that our commerce, both internal and external, exceeds that of any other commonwealth of equal age, and that in the late Spanish skirmish we made a record that proves us worthy sons of the brave sires who in the days of rebellion from a population of 30,000 -possibly 7,500 families- sent 3,307 officers and men to fight for freedom.

To conclude, Nebraska is noted for her peculiarities, her possibilities and her productions.The fame of our pure air, Poland China pigs and pop-pop-popular government has gone abroad in the land.Who has not heard of our bright women, brainy men, and Bry-an.Where can you find the equal of our cattle, corn or country newspapers?Our crops are world-beaters; our Exposition beats the World's Fair; and our World-Herald can't be beat.

The day has come when we can attune our voices not only to the melody of pioneer days.

"A home, a home,
Where the deer and antelope play;
Where seldom is heard
A discouraging word
And the sky is not clouded all day".

But remembering the achievements of the years gone by, can catch the more majestic strain:

"From Atlantic to Rocky Sierras,
No people more loyal or true,
Nebraska, the gem of the prairies,
The best 'neath the red, white and blue."

G.W. Hurlbut, of the Aurora Sun, responded to the toast "A Country Yokel". W.J. Waite, of the Exeter Enterprise, responded to the toast, "The Late Unpleasantness".

W.T. Howard, of the Schuyler Sun, responded to the toast, "The Exposition as an Educator."He closed his eloquent address with the following words:"The memory of the Transmississippi Exposition will ever remain an enduring monument to western energy and civilization and of the minds who conceived and carried the project to practical results."

The program closed with the toast "The Country Press:Its Might and Its Mercy:"Responded to by Edgar Howard, of the Papillion Times.

SIOUX CITY DAY.

August 25, 1898.

The Sioux City residents came in force to celebrate their day on the Exposition Grounds. They wore badges with the following legend: "We are whooping it up for the Mondamin Carnival, Sioux City, October 3, to 8, that's what we are whooping for. "The Sioux City special was met at the north gate of the Exposition by Manager Clarkson and Mayor Moores and members of the Omaha City Council and escorted to the Auditorium, where the usual felicitations were exchanged, with the following program:

Music
Address of Welcome. . . Mayor Moores of Omaha
Response. . . . . Mayor Quick of Sioux City
Music
Address. . . . . General Manager Clarkson of the Exposition
Address. . . . . Solicitor Gill, of Sioux City

BOHEMIAN DAY.

August 27, 1898.

Bohemian Day was celebrated by a parade on the Exposition Grounds along the West Midway to Twentieth Street and thence to the Administration Arch, and thence through the Grand Court to the Auditorium.The exercises in the Auditorium were interesting and consisted of an address of welcome by Manager Rosewater of the Exposition.In his address he spoke feelingly of the changes that had taken place since he came to Omaha as a boy.He expressed great pride at the celebration of the day and declared he was never prouder in his life than to see the magnificent audience present.

Music. . . By the Bohemian Chorus
Address By Prof. B. Sinek, of the Iowa State University
Address By Mrs. Joseph Humpal-Zeman of Chicago, Editress of the Bohemian Journal.
Music. . . By the Bohemian Chorus
Address By Hon. Cenek Duras, of Wilbur, Nebraska.

One of the most interesting features of the celebration was the drills of the Bohemian Turner Societies on the Grand Plaza in the afternoon.The societies participating were those of Omaha, St. Louis and Cedar Rapids.These drills were witnessed with much interest by thousands of visitors.

CODY DAY.

August 31, 1898.

Colonel William F. Cody - Buffalo Bill - had asked that a special day be set aside in honor of his visit to the Exposition.He came at the head of his grand parade of the "Men of All Nations" and the many unique features of his great "Wild West Show".Gathered on the plaza were many distinguished Nebraskans to meet him.No less than four ex-governors besides the present governor of Nebraska were present.The exercises consisted of speech-making, after which the distingquished guests were escorted though the Indian Encampment grounds and back to the Markel Cafe, where luncheon had been provided by Colonel Cody for all the distinguished guests.Numerous toasts were given and responded to and the day was voted a great success.

KANSAS DAY.

September 1, 1898.

Attendance, 22,539.

This celebration by the citizens of Kansas was in charge of the Kansas Commission as all state day celebrations were planned by their respective commissions.The exercises were held in the Auditorium at 11 o'clock A.M., and consisted of

Music. . By the Band.
Prayer . . . By Bishop Frank R. Millspaugh, of Kansas.
Music. . . By the McPherson Quartette.
Address of Welcome. By Gov. Holcomb of Nebraska.
Response. . . By Ex-Governor Glick of Kansas.
Music. . By the Quartette.

after which an address was delivered by President Wattles, as follows:

"At the dedication of the Kansas Building on these grounds, it was my pleasure to speak briefly of the material resources, wealth and magnificent proportions and fertility of the state.I cannot allow this opportunity to pass without reviewing those historic events which for many years made Kansas the battle-ground of public opinion, and which finally culminated in the Civil War, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the development of an independent progressive civilization. During the possession of Spain and France of the vast territory which now constitutes most of the Trans-Mississippi country, very little was known of the country, then supposed to be a wilderness, only habitable by savage tribes.It is said that Coronado was the first white man to explore the state.He was in search of rich provinces, rumored to abound in magnificent cities, with untold wealth.For nearly three hundred years after his unsuccessful search, history is silent.In 1820 Major Long explored a part of the state and described its prairies as "billowy bays of grass ever rolling in shade and sunshine".He found in the western part of the state buffalo, elk and deer sufficient to feed all the savages in the United States for a century to come.But it was not until 1853 that settlers in any large numbers came to make their home in this then unorganized territory.By the Kansas and Nebraska Bill, which became a law in 1854, breaking down the Missouri Compromise of 1820, Kansas became the theatre on which was to be enacted the first scene in the great drama of the Civil War.The contest for supremacy between the slaveholders and the abolitionist began when the cavalier of the south and the Puritan of the north, with conflicting ideas in morality, religion and politics, met to contest for supremacy.For many years the enthusiasts of both sides of the great question of slavery emigrated from all parts of the north and south to this new territory and engaged in contention for principles, rather than in the work of developing the resources of the state.The contests at the poles, at public meetings, and in legislative bodies frequently culminated in scenes of blood and carnage which excited the passions of both sections represented.John Brown was a fanatic only a few degrees more enthusiastic than many others who went from the north and east to prevent the territory form declaring for slavery.The occupation of these early settlers was exciting but unprofitable. The framing of constitutions, the election of legislatures and the frequent personal contests finally culminated in the triumph of the Free State Party and the framing of a state constitution, which was ratified by the people in 1859 and finally approved by Congress in 1861, when the state was admitted to the Union.

In seven years Kansas had had seven territorial governors, had framed four state constitutions and had attracted the attention of the world to the great issue of human slavery.The remaining scenes in the drama were transferred to the halls of Congress, to the political organizations of the nation and finally to the battle fields of the civil war, and the people of Kansas, after years of agitation and excitement, settled down to the more serious business of providing homes and bread for a rapidly increasing population, but their troubles were not to end.1860 will forever be remembered as the year of drouth and famine.The records show that from June 1859 to November 1860 there was not a shower of rain at any time sufficient to wet the earth two inches in depth.Throughout the entire state and many other states of the south the blasting blight of famine and want was felt.The word went out throughout the land that men and women were starving and would suffer from cold and hunger without the aid of other states.The great heart of the nation was aroused by these appeals, and from every quarter of the country came the response in aid of suffering humanity.The limited means of transportation were taxed to their utmost to carry the gifts of the nation to the inhabitants of a suffering state.One third of the population of the state returned to eastern friends and homes,and for many years the evil effects and exaggerated reports of this great drouth retarded the growth of this rich state.

Notwithstanding this great calamity those pioneers who remained on their farms were richly rewarded by abundant crops and a period of prosperity which enabled them to repay their debt to the nation by furnishing more troops in proportion to population for the suppression of the rebellion than any other state in the union.

The conflicting elements of the early pioneers became united by the marriage of their sons and daughters.The question of slavery ceased to be an issue, and its final solution by the Emancipation Proclamation cemented all conflicting elements,leaving only the enthusiasm the originality and the independence of thought and action which at all times has characterized the inhabitants of this state.

Great men in state and national affairs, willing and able to assert and maintain original and progressive principles in philosophy, morals and politics, stand out in the history of the nation, forever placing Kansas in the front rank of reform.Kansas was one of the first states to declare for prohibition, to grant the mothers and sisters rights of property and franchise, to protest against the combinations of capital and greed of corporations.The names of Lane, Plum and Ingalls have honored the state in the halls of Congress, while Glick, Martin and Leedy are known throughout the land as men of original ideas with the courage to enforce their convictions.Mrs. Lease and Jerry Simpson are types of the original, aggressive and progressive elements which abound in this state.We may denounce their theories, but we must admit their sincerity.

With such a population, supplemented with a land of sunshine and rich soil unsurpassed in fertility by any other state in the Union, Kansas will always be found in the front rank in all progressive enterprises among the people of the west.The state is always represented at conventions for the promotion of western interests.At this Exposition which illustrates in such magnificence the wealth, progress and prosperity of the great west, Kansas takes her place with no apologies, from beets in greater quantities than can be extracted from the cane which grows in Hawaii and Cuba.Whether the energies of our people should be diverted to the conquest of foreign, uncivilized subjects, or be expended in developing and building up the untold resources of our present domain, is a question worthy of the most serious consideration.

This occasion is neither proper nor opportune for the discussion of serious subjects of policy or politics.I congratulate the people of Kansas on the magnificent opportunities this state offers to home seekers and investors.I congratulate the state on the enterprise and energy of its citizens, displayed in the beautiful building and splendid exhibit at this Exposition.I congratulate the governor of the state, the commissioners and all of its citizens here today on the success of Kansas Day, and wish for them one and all such prosperity as the fortitude of their pioneers and the enthusiasm and enterprise of their citizens deserve.

Address. . . President Thomas E. Wills,
of the Agricultural College of Kansas.
Music. . By the Band.
Address. . . C.B. Hoffman, Regent State
Agricultural College.
Address. . . Thomas Ware of Topeka.
Music.

NEBRASKA PEACH AND POTTAWATTAMIE COUNTY, IOWA, GRAPE DAY.

September 2, 1898.

This day was set aside for the free distribution of samples of Nebraska peaches and Pottawattamie County, Iowa, grapes.The peaches were distributed form the Horticultural Building and something like 1000 baskets of ripe luscious peaches were given away.The grapes were distributed from the Pottawattamie County Wigwam and several tons were carried away by the thousands of visitors that were attracted on account of this distribution.

In the evening a MASKED CARNIVAL was given on the grand court under the auspices of the bureau of entertainment. At 8:30 P.M., led by the McCook Band about 500 Omaha Society people en masque promenaned around the grand court.Confetti was used in profusion and the evening proved a most enjoyable one to all spectators.

NATIONAL EDITORIAL ASSOCIATION DAY.

September 3, 1898.

About 400 editors en route to the meeting of the National Editorial Association at Denver, stopped at the Exposition and spent the day in sightseeing.No formal exercises interfered with their pleasure-seeking on the exposition grounds.They were met at the depot by Colonel R.W. Richardson and escorted to the Press Building on the Exposition Grounds and spent the day pleasantly, leaving for Denver late in the evening.

MONTANA DEDICATION DAY.

June 29, 1898.

The location of the Montana building gave it prominence, being on the main avenue leading south from the esplanade, and near the entrance to the Bluff Tract from Sherman Avenue.The building was well arranged, and under the able supervision of Mr. W.H. Sutherlin, Exposition vice-president for Montana.The Montana building and exhibit, both of which reflected great credit on the state, were made possible by the liberal donation of Mr. Marcus Dailey, who pledged the delegation that visited Montana to promote the exposition in the winter of 1897, a donation of $15,000; the legislature afterwards appropriated a like amount, and the exhibits from that state and the building erected by the Commission were placed in charge of vice-president Sutherlin.

The exercises dedicating the building to the uses for which it had been erected, were held at 4 o'clock P.M., and while simple, were impressive.The program consisted of a short address by Vice-president Sutherlin, several musical selections, and an address by President Gurdon W. Wattles, and were concluded by a luncheon served by the Montana Commission.

MILITARY DAY.

September 7, 1898.

The return of the Second Nebraska Regiment from the tropical countries of the south gave occasion for a celebration in their honor, and the officers and men received a royal welcome on the Exposition grounds as they appeared in uniform in marching columns.The regiment arrived at the 24th street entrance a little after 10 o'clock and was met by Governor Holcomb, Adjutant General Barry and Military Secretary Ayris who carried the Nebraska colors.The Second Regiment Band preceded the soldiers and was followed by Colonel C.J. Bills and staff and the three marching battalions of the regiment in platoons.After reaching the plaza, the exercises incident to welcoming this regiment home again were held from the band stand, and consisted of the following program:

Welcome. . . By Governor Silas A. Holcomb
Address of Welcome
By Mayor Frank E. Moore
Music
Omaha Concert Band
Address. . . By Colonel C.J. Bills
Address. . . G.W. Wattles

After the exercises were concluded the company stacked arms on the plaza and a luncheon at the Markel Restaurant was served to the soldiers.The remainder of the day was spent by them in enjoying the sights of the Exposition, and in meeting their friends and relatives who had come from all points of the state to welcome them home.

LUMBERMEN'S DAY.

HOO-HOO DAY

September 9, 1898.

The members of the Nebraska Lumbermen's Association furnished entertainment for the thousands who witnessed the log-rolling contest in the afternoon at the mirror of the lagoon, for a purse of $250.Delegates were present from Kansas City, Denver, Minneapolis and numerous cities in Iowa and Nebraska.A meeting of the Association was held at the Minneapolis Building at 2 o'clock P.M. after which the log-rolling contest took place.The first prize was won by T.H. Fleming of Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

This day had also been set aside for the celebration of the societies of the Woodmen of the World.Their exercises were held in the Auditorium at 2 o'clock P.M. and consisted of the following program:

Address of Welcome
Mayor Frank E. Moores
Music. . . By Male Quartette
Address. . . C.C. Farmer, of Mt. Carroll, Illinois
Music. . Omaha Concert Band

After the exercises a competitive drill of two teams from the Alpha Camp #1 and the Columbus Camp #69 was held on the Plaza for a cash prize of $75.00 and was won by the Alpha Camp.

While the lumbermen and the Woodmen of the World were celebrating thousands of Rock Ford, Colorado, melons were distributed free at the Horticulture building, and with all these sources of special entertainment this was one of the banner days of the Exposition.

SHRINER DAY.

September 14, 1898.

Shriners from all parts of the country gathered early to celebrate this, their day at the Exposition.Early the Auditorium was filled with Nobles gathered from all parts of the country.They were entertained by speeches and other exercises as follows:

Address of Welcome By Nobel Henry Hardy
Address of Welcome By Mayor Frank E. Moores
Music. . . Omaha Concert Band
Address President G.W. Wattles
Address E.F. Allen of Kansas City
Music. . By the Band
Address John Welsey Geiger of Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Address Rev. S. Wright Butler

After the exercises the Nobels were entertained at luncheon at the Markel Cafe.

OKLAHOMA DAY.

September 16, 1898.

The celebration of Oklahoma State Day consisted of the usual entertainment at the Auditorium, where a large number of Oklahoma's citizens gathered in the early day and the following program was the order of the day:

Music. . . First Regiment Band
Address. . . President Wattles
Response. . . Governor Barnes of Oklahoma
Music. . First Regiment Band
Address. . . J.C. Robberts, of Kingfisher, Oklahoma.
Address. . . Major E. A. Woodson of Oklahoma.
Music.

On the evening of September 20th, a dinner was given at the Omaha Club by the Iowa Commission in honor, of Governor Shaw, the state officers, senators and representatives in congress from Iowa, the president and executive committee of the Exposition and the commissioners from the several states and territories participating in the Exposition and others:This dinner was exceedingly successful, both in point of the menu served and on account of the excellent toasts and music furnished.

IOWA DAY.

September 21, 1898.

The celebration of Iowa Day had been advertised throughout the state of Iowa, and special trains came from all parts of that state loaded with enthusiastic visitors. Excursion rates had been made by all the railroads in Iowa and the effect of this was early seen in the large crowds which they brought to the Exposition gates.The program celebrating this day was one of unusual interest. It was held in the Auditorium at 2:30 P.M.The Auditorium was filled to overflowing when the exercises were commenced by an organ voluntary, introducing the following program:

Introductory Address. Vice President Allan Dawson
Overture, - "The Wizard of the West", - Ladies' Band of Eldora
Invocation
Violin Solo - Lucile Franchere - Earl Byers, Accompanist
Address - His Excellency, Leslie M. Shaw, Governor of Iowa
Solo - "Delight" - Nellie Mae Brewster
Address, - Gurdon W. Wattles, President Exposition
Vocal Solo, - "Star Spangled Banner" - Mary Theresa Louthan
Oration - Hon. Robert G. Cousins
Quickstep, - "Uncle Remus", Barnard. Iowa Agricultural College Cadet Band.

Address, Governor Leslie M. Shaw.

Ladies and Gentlemen, Citizens and Friends of Iowa:

"Not many generations ago, in the place where you now sit, encircled by all that exalts and embellishes civilized life, the rank thistle nodded in the breeze, and the wild fox digged his hole unscared."So said Charles Sprague three-quarters of a century ago, and the utterance is as true when applied to the land of the Omahas as to the land of the Wampanoags.

We meet this day as citizens of Iowa, on the soil of a sister state, for no idle purpose.The people of Iowa are not idlers, but the day will have been lost to us and to our children, unless what is here said, and done, and witnessed, and enjoyed shall bring greater thoughtfulness and increased earnestness.The half century and two years since the admission of Iowa added the twenty-ninth star to the flag which has now become the protector of the world have wrought great changes.Most of the improvements of earth, most of the progress in the arts and sciences, most of the advance in civilization, have been wrought within the period of our State history.Time would not permit, if the inclination were present, to recount the achievements in the political, industrial, financial, agricultural, mechanical, scientific, educational, religious or moral world.Suffice it to say that in all of these Iowa has rendered her full share of service, and has reaped her full measure of blessing.We can well afford to leave to others the study of the past.Let it be ours manfully to face the future, now more than ever big with possibilities, and with careful glance ahead improve the present.

In all the grand exhibit of this remarkable Exposition there is not found that for which our State has greatest reason to rejoice.The product of the farm, of the orchard, of the garden, of the herd, of the dairy, of the factory, of the mine are here in great quantity and of superb quality.Truly Iowa is great in territory, great in resources, great in product, but she is greatest of all in her children.There is presented to my eye from the platform that which is infinitely more valuable than all herds and all harvests.I see scattered through this audience many of the youth of Iowa.They are from the city, from the town, from the hamlet, and from the Iowa farm.They are representatives of an aggregate of seven hundred thousand of school age, and of an equal number who have just passed from educational tuition to face the activities, the anxieties, and the achievements of manhood and womanhood.These all belong to a generation which will surely be heard from.Their fathers and mothers have been industrious, have been ambitious, have been hopeful, and have been successful.A generation thus circumstanced is always potential.Dr. Strong tells of a township in the western reserve which was settled with an energetic, liberty-loving, God-fearing, educationally-inclined people, and which in a limited period furnished many members of the State Legislature.From that community of only a few hundred inhabitants men went forth to college professorships east and west, to the supreme bench of the State, and to the United States Congress.Northhampton, Mass., has among its native and resident population over four hundred graduates form colleges and other educational institutions; it has furnished the world with one hundred and fourteen ministers, eighty-four ministers' wives, ten missionaries, twenty-five judges, one hundred and two lawyers, ninety-five physicians, seven college presidents, thirty professors, sixty-four other educators, twenty-four editors, six historians, twenty-four authors, two governors, and thirty other State officers, twenty-five members of the State General Court, as the Legislature is styled, two generals, six colonels, thirteen other army officers, thirty-eight officers of the United States, among them a Secretary of the Navy, two Foreign Ministers, a Treasurer of the United States, five Senators of the United States, eight Members of Congress and one President.If a territory six miles square, under favorable conditions can make such a record, what may we not hopefully expect from a territory containing fifty-five thousand square miles, all of it similarly peopled, and with conditions more favorable than Massachusetts ever enjoyed or Ohio ever possessed.

"Know thyself", said the Greek philosopher."Know thine opportunity" has become a companion and equally important maxim.

When you go home tonight tell the children that the world is big and constantly expanding; that this day's experience has broadened your vision; that life has become more real and hope more ardent; and that both you and the world, and especially the States expect something of them. Wake the boy in the night, break in upon his dreams with stories of hopeful possibilities; watch the fire kindle in his eye; let him dream again of greater things, of broader expanses, of higher altitudes, of nobles achievements. Neglect neigher seed time nor harvest; match the growing and maturing crops; succor and protect both flocks and herd; zealously guard the interests of the shop and the store and the office; but above all, look well to the youth of Iowa, and to all things that shall conserve the generation whose footsteps crowd the threshold of the world's activities.

PRESIDENT WATTLE'S WELCOME.

When I received the invitation from the Iowa Commission to make an address on this occasion, I at once realized my inability within the limited time at my disposal to express in a fitting manner, even my own sentiments regarding a state among whose inhabitants twenty-five years of my life had been spent, of a state in whose public schools and colleges I received my education and to whose magnificent advantages and opportunities I am indebted for whatever business success I may have attained.With apologies for apparent disloyalty to my adopted state of Nebraska, I say without fear of successful contradiction that Iowa is the best agricultural state in the Union.There is a smaller percentage of untillable land in this state than is found any other equal body of land in the world.The state has less illiteracy, more school houses and churches and a less number of criminals in proportion to population than any other state in the Union.It has a better code of laws, a more industrious, frugal and prosperous population; its wealth is more evenly distributed among its inhabitants, its climate is more healthy and its people more contented and happy than the average state of this country or in any other state or territory of like extent in any other country in the world.

These may seem extravagant statements, but they are subject to verification by facts and figures. The question may be asked, why should this be true.The answer is plain and in perfect accord with the philosophy and history of all past ages. Agriculture is the source of all wealth, it breeds contentment, virtue and happiness." From the farms comes not only the bread but the virtue of this nation." The principal avocation of the inhabitants of Iowa is farming. There are no large metropolitan cities to corrupt the morals and excite the greed of its inhabitants, there are no mines of gold and silver to attract and disappoint its people. It is true that a large area of the state is underlaid with rich deposits of coal, but beyond this its mineral wealth is confined to small districts where lead and zinc are found.The state lies within that temperate belt of latitude along which the progress, intelligence, wealth and energy of the world are most abundantly found. Neither the long hot summers of the southern climes nor the cold rigorous winters of the northern states enervates its inhabitants. The soil is rich and productive, cereals and fruits mature alike in abundance. All of the elements that produce happiness, contentment and prosperity combine and conspire to make its inhabitants intelligent, prosperous and contented.

But with all its natural advantages, a large majority of its inhabitants have earned for themselves from its rich resources the competency they now enjoy. It is truly said "There is no excellence without labor," and but for the labor, hardships and privations of the early settlers of this great commonwealth, I doubt if they or their descendants would to-day occupy the high places in the business world which they have attained.The early pioneers were all poor and but few of the later settlers had more than a few dollars with which to begin life.The privations of those who first entered the lands in the center of the state purchased of the Black Hawk Indians were sufficient to develop the energy and inspire that determined effort which always brings success.In the fifties when no railroad had penetrated the state when wheat was hauled two hundred miles by wagon and sold at forty cents per bushel,when farm produce for want of a market was worthless, when the fear of the Indian massacre and the ever present dread of sickness and want on the frontier far away from medical or neighborly aid, their trials were supreme.Surrounded with perplexities and almost over-come by obstacles which to the present generation would seem insurmountable, with no roads and no bridges, in this solitude and loneliness and amid the awful stillness which pervades a new land like this, these pioneers learned lessons of frugality, economy and self reliance which insured for them and their descendants success and prosperity, and an appreciation of the comforts and conveniences which came later with advanced civilization. Later immigrants who came into the state with such a flood during the '60's immediately after the great Rebellion suffered privations little less severe than those endured by the earlier pioneers.

As a boy whose earlier years had been spent in populous communities, I well remember the solitude of those prairies extending as far as the eye could reach with no sign of life with their billows of grass rolling like the great waves of the sea.I can picture in memory the illumination of the heavens in autumn when great prairie fires swept with terrible conflagration the broad expanse of unoccupied lands and lighted the skies with firery tongues which seemed to portend destruction of the settlements they surround.In many instances in these early days these prairie fires swept with terrible velocity through fields of ripening corn and laid waste the crops and buildings and sometimes consumed the entire possessions of the hapless settler who was exposed to their grand and destructive holocaust.I can well remember when these prairies were thought to be worthless, when the only settlements were along the wooded steams and when it was said that man could not live through the rigorous storms that blew with such velocity with nothing to break their force, across these plains in winter, and when the first man ventured out from the shelter of the woods to make his home on the open prairie he was thought to be insane.How glad the hearts of those settlers to hear the first screech of the locomotive, and the sound of the approach of the first railway train.Each additional evidence of civilization was appreciated beyond the power of the imagination of those who have never known want of the present advantages at our doors.

It was this school in these early days which reared within the state of Iowa a self reliant, industrious and frugal population, which has given caste to all subsequent settlement.These early settlers and their descendants own their homes to-day and are surrounded by many of the comforts and conveniences of life.They are happy in the comparison of their changed conditions.They have won for themselves by the individual efforts the reward which follows honest toil.I have known hundreds, yes, thousands of the present prosperous heads of families in Iowa who came to the state in poverty, and who today are free from debt and own their rich, well stocked and productive farms.Who can wonder that such a population surrounded as they are with all the conveniences of civilization should be intelligent, prosperous and happy.

Ever ready to promote the interests of their state by advertising its resources, Iowa was the first through her legislature to approve of this Exposition, and the first state in the Union to make an appropriation for a state exhibit here.She stands among the first in the beauty and convenience of their building and the variety and extent of her exhibit.It is with pride and pleasure that I welcome her citizens here today.This Exposition is the crowning achievement of the people of the west, it marks an epoch in the history of their progress, it serves notice to all the world that the west is no longer lacking in population, wealth and enterprise, and it reveals a vision of future development which will eclipse its phenomenal past.

When we consider the wonderful strides that have been made in all of the states and territories west of the Mississippi River during the short space of half a century, when we compute the wealth that has been accumulated, when we realize that 80,000 miles of railroad have been constructed, great cities built and a commerce double that of Spain and Portugal established, when we know and realize that in no other part of the world such opportunities for the investor and home seeker are offered as can be found within this territory, we can picture in our imagination its future greatness and power.When I think of the wonderful changes that have been wrought within the state of Iowa within the past thirty years, how the Red Men have been driven from their grounds to make room for the rich farms and cities which now support a population of more than 2,000,000 people, of how schools and colleges have been built, public institutions for the promotion of education, morality, Christianity and good government established, and how out of the chaos and the stillness of the wilderness such a commonwealth has grown within the memory of even the young men of this generation.I almost believe it must be the dawn of the millennium when happiness, prosperity and contentment such as the world has never known is to permeate the lives of all men.When I stand and view the magnificence and wealth of the west displayed at this Exposition, I almost feel like the rural farmer, who on entering these grounds a short time ago exclaimed, "If heaven is only as beautiful, I shall be satisfied."

To all the beauties of these grounds and the pleasures to be found in viewing the wonderful resources displayed in these buildings, I invite the visitors from Iowa to participate.This Exposition is yours as well as ours, you are equal partners in the enterprise, and from its success, now happily insured, you may learn many lessons of value for the future.It not only illustrates the wealth and progress of a great people, but it points to future possibilities undreamed of before.To the homeless millions of less favored climes it is a messenger of promise, to the weary mariner whose fortunes have been wrecked on the seas of adversity it is a harbinger of hope, it opens new fields to the investor, inspires the ambition of the genius, incites the emulation of states and stands the crowning glory in the history of the west.

ADDRESS OF ROBERT C. COUSINS, M.C. AT OMAHA.

The State of Iowa accepts with fraternal gladness the hospitable hand of greeting extended by Nebraska and our other sister States in this great empire of the pioneers and salutes with reverent patriotism the deferral government of the United States.

In the words of that original and poetic genius, "Ironquill," who has voiced so well the thought and feelings of our westland, and who has made the name of Kansas known forever in the world of letters:

States are not great
Except as man may make them.
Men are not great except they do and dare.
All merit comes from braving the unequal.
All glory comes from daring to begin.

I have asked five of the ablest and most noted Americans what they regard as the chief thing or leading feature of the Trans-Mississippi region and they have invariably answered, "Its men and women."The other day I met one of the oldest settlers of eastern Iowa - one of those original, rugged characters whose wit and wisdom has lightened the settlers' hearts and homes for many a toilsome year - one of those interesting characters who never bores you and whom one always likes to meet - a man whose head is silvered and whose countenance is kind - and I asked him what he regarded as the principal feature of our Trans-Mississippi country, and he replied: "Well, I'm no scholar, but I've been round here nigh onto sixty years and I recon 'bout the most important thing is the folks and the farms."

While you rest here a little while in this splendid auditorium before going to view the wonders and the beauties of the Exposition (and incidentally the Midway) I shall speak briefly of the folks and farms of my native state of Iowa and of this empire of the pioneers.In doing so, I have some hesitation, realizing as I do that there are doubtless those in this vast audience who were contemporaries with my grandfathers in the early settlement of Iowa away back in the thirties, and who are far better qualified to tell the tale of toil and triumph which is the glory and the honor of our birthland.In such a discussion, I feel as though I was standing on the bank of a magnificent stream in the hearing of patriarchs and pilgrims who have traveled from its source.I can look at its swift flowing current and think of the scenes by which it has swept in its lonely way form the wilds where it started; I can remember with you the roaming red man who watched with jealous eye the coming of this Anglo-Saxon stream of civilization; I can marvel with you at the vastness of the products of its soil, watered with the tears of happiness and toil; I can realize with you the ruggedness and patience of its manhood and the strength and gentleness of its womanhood, but of its landscape farther up, its tributaries and its cabins, its haunts and huts and wonders, its picturesqueness of primeval life, the story is far better told by him whose tired feet have trudged along the way, whose hands have toiled and whose hair has turned to gray.

Iowa became a separate territory, with the capitol at Burlington, in 1838, and was admitted into the Union in 1846, and has been in it ever since.It makes little difference whether it was first settled by the whites at Dubuque for mining purposes in 1788, or, for trading purposes, at Montrose, in 1799, or opposite Prairie duChien, in 1804 or 5, in Lee county at Sandusky in 1820, or on the lower rapids at what is known as Nashville, in 1829; or whether the first settlements for general purposes were made at Burlington and Davenport in 1832.The main facts is that it was well settled - not by dyspeptic tourists or by invalids who had come west out of curiosity and New Jersey, nor by climate seeking dilettante with two servants and one lung - but by the best bone and sinew of the Middle States, New England and the Old World.I do not know that there were any dukes or lords or marquises or duchesses, but there were Dutch and Irish and Scotch and Scotch-Irish and English and Americans and they had home rule right from the start - at least they had in the first school which I attended.The men and women who settled the Hawkeye State were not those who expected to go back "in the fall", or as soon as they could prove up their claims.They were stayers.They were not men to be discouraged by winter or by work.They were men who knew that nobody ever amounted to much unless he had to.Most of them began simply with the capital of honesty, good health and their inherent qualities of character.They built their cabins in the clearings and watching the smoke curl up in the great wide sky, felt just as patriotic for their humble rustic homes as e'er did princes for their castles or millionaires for mansions grand.

To build a home is a great thing.It doesn't matter so much about the dimensions."Kings have lived in cottages and pygmies dwelt in palaces," but the walls of a home always add something to inherent character.In the formation of character there are always two elements the inherent and the adventitious - that which we bring with us into the world and that which our surroundings give us.Somebody said "There is only a small portion of the earth that produces splendid people."Our pioneers got into a good place. They had left doubt sitting on a boulder in the east and packed their things and started for the west.Rivers had to be forded, trees to be felled; cabins had to be built - the rifle must be kept loaded - so much the better, there was self-reliance.Corn and coffee had to be ground, and on the same mill - so much the better, there was ingenuity.Teeth had to be filled, and there was no painless dentistry.Disease and injury must be dealt with, and the doctor fifty miles away.Life must be lightened, lonely hearts must be cheered, and the old friends and comrades far back in the states or may be away in the Fatherland, and the cheering letter tarrying with the belated stagecoach hold fast, thou sturdy denizen and gentle helpmate of the rich and wonderous empire, infinite goodness guards thee and the fertile fields are ready to reward.

Ah, pampered people of the later generations, when you imagine modern hardships, think of the courage and the trials and the ingenuity of pioneers when there were no conveniences but the forest and the axe, the wide rolling prairie and the ox team, the great blue sky, the unsolved future and the annual ague.Complain of markets in these modern times and then think of your grandmother when she was a blooming bride, listening through the toilsome days and anxious nights for the wagon bringing home the husband from a distant market with calico and jeans purchased with dressed pork sold a dollar and a half a hundred, and maybe bringing home a little money, worth far less per yard than either calico or jeans.Maybe it was all for the best, human character was being formed for the development of a great and loyal and progressive State to shine forever among the stars of the Federal Union.

Probably the purest time in the history of government and of man is when they are painfully intent upon the labor of their development and defense.Most all greatness and nearly every original idea has come out of some kind of trouble. Whoever gets to greatness or success without meeting opposition, goes in an air castle.Most of the flowers of genius have bloomed from bleeding hearts. There never was a strong and handsome face without some little line of care. And so every circumstance of those early, toilsome lives, every tedious trail, every tear, every home whose roof kept out the storm and whose walls contained their sorrows and their joys; all the gifts of a generous soil in return for careful cultivation; every irritating inconvenience which finally drove some questioned mind to ponder out improvements, all such experiences are as certain in their formation and development of character and mind as are inherent qualities that accompany the origin and mystery of life.

Somewhere I have seen an etching of a face that was called Experience, and I have never forgotten it - one never does forget a face that has ideas in it. This one was the illustrated history of a life.There was Youth with all its hope, marked here and there with all the lines of strife and care and victory which middle life had placed upon it.And there was the mystic touch of later years, like autumn's pencil work in nature, all shaded with the mellow haze of time - a kind of soft and silvery veil with which deft nature covers up her glory - a picture penciled by an artist with an understanding mind, who knew his subject had thought as he had thought, felt as he had felt, dreamed as he had dreamed - a kind of picture that one sees so very very seldom, only as often as one finds genius - the divine - and I thought there is the typical picture of a pioneer and well named "Experience."

Civil government in Iowa proceeded with its rapid settlement. The pioneer became a model citizen. He knew the necessity for the laws that were enacted. He did not feel oppressed by government.He had experienced the losses of robbery and larceny and knew something of the embarrassment and inconvenience of being scalped. There was no hysteria about trusts and combines because they had practiced combinations themselves for mutual protection.If any one would learn the true genius and exemplification and philosophy of self-government, government of and for and by the people, let him study the records of pioneer life, and institutional beginnings and the evolution of their laws.It would be worth our while on some suitable occasion when time permitted to talk over the interesting incidents attending the administration of justice in the early days of Iowa, and incidents of its territorial legislatures, the birth and growth of its Statehood and the characters of its officials.But the greatness of our State is not contained in any name.Its official history is the exponent of its industrial life and character.Its greatness is the sum total of its citizenship.In order to be just, John Jones, the average citizen, must be mentioned along with our most illustrious officials.Somebody said that the history of a nation is the history of its great men, but there is an unwritten history which that averment overlooks.The growth of a State is the progress of its average citizen.The credit of a commonwealth is the thrift of its John Jones and William Smith, and the character, prosperity and patriotism of the individual citizen is the history of Iowa.

The population of 97,000 which she had when admitted into the Union had increased to 754,699 at the close of the Civil war.Of these about 70,000, almost one-tenth of the population, were in the war - a number equal to nearly one-half the voters of the State.Who made the history of Iowa during that great struggle of our nation's life?John Jones, the average citizen, whether he carried a musket helping to put the scattered stars of State back into the constellation of the Union,or whether he toiled from early dawn to lingering twilight in the fields or in the shop.The best civilization is that which maintains the highest standard of life for its average citizen.

Since the Civil war the State of Iowa has increased in population to almost 2,225,000 of people, and most of the time had the least illiteracy of any State in the Union.Doubtless for that we are in debted to many of the older States, whose enterprising and courageous citizens constitute so large a portion of our population.With but half a century of statehood and with an area of but 55,475 square miles, the State of Iowa produces the greatest quantity of cereals of any State in the Union.As long ago as the last federal census, taken in 1890, it produced more corn, more oats, more beef, more pork than any State in the Union.Not long since I was introduced to a gentleman from New York City.he said:"Oh, from Iowa - ah - let me see, that's out - ah - you see, I'm not very well posted on the geography of the West.""Yes," I said, "it's out there just across the Mississippi river.You can leave New York about noon and get your supper in Iowa the next evening.It might be worth your while to look it up.It's the State which produces more of the things which people eat than any other State in the Union.It has more miles of railroad than your State of New York, more than Mexico, more than Brazil and more than all the New England States combined."

The value of Iowa's agricultural products and live stock in round numbers for the year 1892 was $407,000,000, to say nothing of her other great and various industries and enterprises.She produced that year 160,000,000 lbs. of th